Posters

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1 - DIATOM COMMUNITIES OF TRAVERTINE-PRECIPITATING SPRINGS ON A GRADIENT OF ANTHROPOGENIC DISTURBANCE IN THE SANDIA MOUNTAINS, NEW MEXICO

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DIATOM COMMUNITIES OF TRAVERTINE-PRECIPITATING SPRINGS ON A GRADIENT OF ANTHROPOGENIC DISTURBANCE IN THE SANDIA MOUNTAINS, NEW MEXICO Carbonate-rich waters of travertine-precipitating springs facilitate unique physiochemical environments that support distinct diatom species assemblages adapted to the environmental stress of constant carbonate precipitation. Spring systems are further limited by the impacts of historical and ongoing anthropogenic disturbance which includes recreational activity and hydrologic modification of springs using spring boxes and wells. This study focused on impacts of water chemistry and anthropogenic disturbance on diatom assemblages found in travertine-precipitating springs. Data were collected in the fall and spring at eight spring sites, including six known to precipitate travertine, in the Sandia Mountains of central New Mexico. Water chemistry, benthic diatoms and macroinvertebrate abundances, sediment composition, percent organic matter, and categorical disturbance variables were analyzed. Hydrochemical analysis showed seven springs are dominated by Ca-HCO3 and one was mixed Ca-Mg-Cl type. Common diatom taxa include indicators of high conductivity (e.g., Diploneis parma, Pinnularia spp.), flowing water (e.g., Meridion circulare), and sediment substrates (e.g., Surirella spp., Planothidium spp.). Diatom assemblage analysis, disturbance characterization, and other biological assessments can be used to prioritize restoration of springs with unique habitats, such as travertine-precipitating springs.

Kate Mendoza (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Mexico, katlace@unm.edu;


Rebecca Bixby ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, bbixby@unm.edu;


Laura Crossey ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, lcrossey@unm.edu;


Livia Crowley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, lcrowley@fs.fed.us;


2 - EFFECTS OF LONICERA MAACKII LEAF LITTER ON ALGAL BIOMASS AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN VERNAL MESOCOSMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF LONICERA MAACKII LEAF LITTER ON ALGAL BIOMASS AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN VERNAL MESOCOSMS Lonicera maackii (Amur Honeysuckle) is an invasive plant that can influence terrestrial vegetation, aquatic macroinvertebrate communities, and nutrient availability, but effects on other aspects of aquatic ecosystems are not known. This study investigated the influence of L. maackii leaf litter on algal community structure and biomass in controlled vernal mesocosms. Leaf litter from L. maackii and two native tree species (Populus deltoides and Quercus bicolor) were collected from local riparian habitats and suspended in mesh bags within each treatment mesocosm while control mesocosms received no leaf litter. On a weekly basis, November 2016 through February 2017, measurements of basic water quality were determined using a YSI ProPlus and samples of the periphyton community, ash-free dry mass, and chlorophyll a were collected from unglazed ceramic tiles within each mesocosm. Initial analyses indicate that control vernal mesocosms had significantly higher dissolved oxygen than any of the leaf litter treatments (P<0.001). In addition, treatments with L. maackii leaves displayed significantly lower dissolved oxygen concentrations than either the control or native leaf pack treatments (P<0.001) perhaps indicating faster rates of decomposition during the winter months.

Janet Deardorff (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, j-deardorff@onu.edu;


Robert Verb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


3 - EXAMINING POTENTIAL CHANGES IN STREAM ALGAL COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS, PRE- AND POST-HEMLOCK DIE-OFF.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EXAMINING POTENTIAL CHANGES IN STREAM ALGAL COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS, PRE- AND POST-HEMLOCK DIE-OFF. Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) function as an important foundation species throughout eastern North America. However, widespread death of hemlock over the last decade has occurred in the southern Appalachians as a result of the invasion of hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). Hemlock was once abundant along streams and its death has likely caused significant changes to stream processes. Little is known about how the loss of hemlock affects stream algae. We hypothesize that diatom communities may be affected by enhanced light levels and decreasing pH following hemlock die-offs. In 2005-2006, prior to hemlock die-off, we collected baseline data on algal biomass (chlorophyll-a and AFDM) in eight stream reaches throughout the Coweeta LTER in western NC. We also analyzed diatom communities in those streams, identifying 89 species including several taxa endemic to the southern Appalachians. Densely shaded streams were characterized by low algal biomass dominated by adnate diatoms (Eunotia spp., Achnanthidium deflexum). In 2016-2017, post hemlock die-off, we are re-sampling the eight study reaches to evaluate how diatom communities have changed. We hypothesize increased algal biomass, loss of endemic taxa, and an increase in upright diatoms (Gomphonema spp., Synedra spp.).

Kelsey Solomon (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, kjsolomon89@gmail.com;


Rebecca Bixby ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, bbixby@unm.edu;


Catherine Pringle ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


4 - EXPLORING THE INFLUENCE OF BENTHIC SUBSTRATE ON BIOFILM GROWTH IN EXPERIMENTAL STREAMS AT ND-LEEF

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EXPLORING THE INFLUENCE OF BENTHIC SUBSTRATE ON BIOFILM GROWTH IN EXPERIMENTAL STREAMS AT ND-LEEF Stream biofilms colonize benthic surfaces of all types and are well studied in the context of biogeochemistry, but the interplay between substrate, hydraulics, and patterns in biofilm colonization remain understudied. We explored the interaction between substrate composition and biofilms over two summers in four 50m experimental streams with contrasting substrate composition at the Notre Dame Linked Experimental Ecosystem Facility (ND-LEEF). The four streams varied only in substrate lining each channel, representing varying size (gravel vs. cobble) and heterogeneity (alternating sizes vs. well-mixed). We used repeated sampling over time to examine biofilm accumulation at two different timescales: in 2015 we sampled 6 times over 158d of growth, and in 2016 we sampled over 32d. During both summers, we found that biofilm colonization was substrate-specific, but spatially and temporally heterogeneous. While biofilm biomass generally increased over time in all streams, even over short time scales, biofilm accumulation also included significant reach-scale patchiness. These results suggest a strong linkage between biofilm character and underlying substrate, and should be considered when exploring the impact of the physical environment on the ecology of natural streams.

Nicole Gorman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Notre Dame, ngorman@nd.edu;


Arial Shogren ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, ashogren@nd.edu;


Jennifer L. Tank ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, tank.1@nd.edu;


Elizabeth Berg ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, Elizabeth.M.Berg.43@nd.edu;


Brittany Hanrahan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, bhanrah3@nd.edu;


5 - INFLUENCE OF STONEROLLERS ON ALGAE ALONG A PHOSPHORUS GRADIENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INFLUENCE OF STONEROLLERS ON ALGAE ALONG A PHOSPHORUS GRADIENT Relationships between nutrients and algae in Ozark Highland (OH) streams can be variable due to many factors, like grazer activity. Stonerollers (Campostoma sp.) occur in high abundances in OH streams and they can negatively affect algal biomass. An electrical exclosure experiment was conducted on five OH streams along a dissolved phosphorus gradient in summer 2016. A block design was set up in each stream with a treatment excluding stonerollers using an electrical pulse and a control allowing stonerollers to graze on tiles attached to frame. Tiles were collected every seven days for four weeks in each treatment and chlorophyll a and ash free dry mass (AFDM) we measured. We hypothesized that the effect size (treatment/control) would increase along the phosphorus gradient. Days 14 and 28 show no significant difference between treatment and control. However, sites with higher phosphorus concentrations tended to have greater effect size. Stonerollers are a key fish in Ozark streams and their influence on algal biomass needs to be better understood.

Kayla Sayre (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Arkansas , kayraysay27@gmail.com;


Michelle Evans-White ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


6 - PHYTOPLANKTON ASSEMBLAGE AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF A PERTURBED TROPICAL MANMADE LAKE, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PHYTOPLANKTON ASSEMBLAGE AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF A PERTURBED TROPICAL MANMADE LAKE, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA. This study identified the phytoplankton assemblage of the Dandaru Lake (that received effluents from a zoological garden and hospital) as bioindicators of water quality. Samples of water and plankton were collected from April to September, 2015 at five stations (I – V). The mean physicochemical parameters were within the limits of USEPA except Lead, 0.02 ± 0.08 mg/ L; Manganese, 0.46 ± 1.00 mg/ L and Zinc, 0.05 ± 0.17 mg/ L. The highest mean DO (6.88 ± 1.34 mg/L) was recorded in station I with less anthropogenic activities, highest phosphate concentration (0.28 ± 0.28 mg/L) occurred in station II, the entry point of wastewater from hospital and zoological garden. The order of abundance for phytoplankton was Euglenophyceae (49.77%) > Bacillariophyceae (18.00%) > Cyanophyceae (17.39%) > Chlorophyceae (13.7%) > Xanthophyceae (1.06%) > Chrysophyceae(0.02%). The stations impacted with effluents were dominated by members of Euglenophyceae and Cyanophyceae. While station I was dominated by diatoms (57.98%). The species richness recorded was 0.32 – 4.49. The phytoplankton assemblage and comparatively low biotic diversity in Dandaru Lake could be attributed to perturbations in the water column that exerted selective effects on the biological assemblage

adedolapo ayoade (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Ibadan, kenpeadobece@gmail.com;


7 - REDUCTION OF PROPORTIONS OF FRESHWATER DIATOMS DURING THE SAVANNAH HARBOR EXPANSION PROJECT IN PORT WENTWORTH, GA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

REDUCTION OF PROPORTIONS OF FRESHWATER DIATOMS DURING THE SAVANNAH HARBOR EXPANSION PROJECT IN PORT WENTWORTH, GA Estuarine systems have naturally diverse niches and high biodiversity due to the constant change in hydrologic conditions. Anthropogenic alterations of the estuarine system are expected to cause changes in tidal height, influx of salt water, and sedimentation, along with the algal community. Baseline data before the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project began was obtained throughout 2011 by collecting mud samples along with physiochemical characteristics. Algal community indices were assessed with live to dead proportions of diatoms. Deposition of marine planktonic species and high amount of dead diatom frustules were documented. This project is evaluating the changes in algal communities as the alterations of the harbor are progressing. Samples were evaluated following standard protocols. In 2016, there was a reduction of live diatoms within the algal community of 59%, where diatoms were replaced with cyanobacteria and green coccid algae. Living algal species were classified as freshwater, marine, or brackish. Species richness in the cleaned (oxygenated and discarded organic matter) diatom community decreased by 15.3%. Due to dredging and sediment deposition, diatoms could be affected from increased turbidity, lower light availability, and higher temperature.

Alyssa Thomson (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia College & State University , alyssa.thomson@bobcats.gcsu.edu;


Kalina Manoylov ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia College and State University, kalina.manoylov@gcsu.edu;


8 - RESPONSE OF STREAM BIOFILMS TO PULSED VERSUS STEADY-STATE PHOSPHOROUS ADDITIONS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

RESPONSE OF STREAM BIOFILMS TO PULSED VERSUS STEADY-STATE PHOSPHOROUS ADDITIONS Our current understanding of how algal-dominate biofilms in streams respond to phosphorus (P) enrichment is largely based on the assumption that streams have a constant P supply. However, in reality natural streams experience large swings in P concentrations due to runoff and in-stream biotic and abiotic uptake. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a steady-state P release versus successive pulse events on algae-dominated biofilms colonizing artificial streams. One treatment (n=4) was maintained at a constant 12 µg P/L, another was subjected to weekly 8 h pulses at 252 µg P/L (n=4) and a third treatment was maintained below P detection limits (n=4). Both the steady-state and the pulse treatments received an equivalent amount of P by the end of the experiment. Preliminary pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry data indicate that algae treated with the phosphorous pulse had a greater photosynthetic capacity and ability to utilize the phosphorus.

Aaron Gordon-Weaver (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, amg43366@gmail.com;


Jennifer Tuomisto ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, jat18435@huskies.bloomu.edu;


Steven Rier ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, srier@bloomu.edu;


9 - ASSESSMENT OF BROOK TROUT PASSAGE THROUGH AMBIGUOUS CULVERT BARRIERS IN PENNSYLVANIA HEADWATER STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ASSESSMENT OF BROOK TROUT PASSAGE THROUGH AMBIGUOUS CULVERT BARRIERS IN PENNSYLVANIA HEADWATER STREAMS Habitat fragmentation driven by human activity is a common threat to aquatic organisms. Road culverts in particular can isolate fish populations and reduce genetic diversity by preventing access to upstream spawning habitat. The prioritization process for removing culverts and restoring connectivity includes an assessment of passability. Culverts often receive scores that categorize them as partial barriers, known as “gray” culverts, however detailed assessment of passability on gray culverts is lacking. To fill this research gap, we used stationary PIT-tag readers to investigate brook trout passage through three gray culverts and a reference stream lacking a culvert for 16 months in Little Bear Creek, PA. Results indicate significant differences in upstream movement rates among culvert sites. The rate of upstream passage was five times greater through the metal corrugated culvert than the reference stream. In contrast, relatively little upstream movement occurred through the two box culverts (up to 13 times less passage than the reference), indicating drastic passage differences in culverts receiving similar passability scores. Our study implies that more nuanced culvert classifications may be needed to accurately reflect fish passage.

Shawn Rummel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, srummel@tu.org;


Kathleen Lavelle ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, klavelle@tu.org;


Jonathan Niles ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, niles@susqu.edu;


David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Karli Rogers (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, karlimrogers@gmail.com;


10 - CHANNEL CATFISH SELECT FOR LARGER INVERTEBRATE PREY IN WESTERN SOUTH DAKOTA PRAIRIE STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CHANNEL CATFISH SELECT FOR LARGER INVERTEBRATE PREY IN WESTERN SOUTH DAKOTA PRAIRIE STREAMS Aquatic macroinvertebrates are important prey resources in freshwater ecosystems. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) consume invertebrates, but little is known about their prey size selectivity. Macroinvertebrates and catfish were collected from 23 river sites within the Grand, Moreau, Cheyenne, Bad, and White basins of western South Dakota. Chironomidae, Hydropsychidae, Leptohyphidae, and Simuliidae were the most common families in the 356 diets, and also the most abundant invertebrate prey items. In the environment they accounted for 32.6%, 30.4%, 3.0%, and 7.2% of available invertebrate prey, respectively. Percentages in the diet relative to total invertebrate prey were 51.5%, 11.9%, 5.9%, 21.4%, respectively. The size distribution represented by volume for individuals from these families was compared between the diets and environment among all sites. The frequency of larger prey sizes from all families was higher than expected based on proportions in the environment. This pattern was observed for Chironomidae and Hydropsychidae across all 5 river basins, but selection was more site-specific for Simuliidae and Leptohyphidae. Overall results suggest that channel catfish prey on disproportionately larger invertebrates than those available in their environment.

Erin Peterson (Primary Presenter/Author), South Dakota State University, erin.peterson@sdstate.edu;


Stephen Jones ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), South Dakota State University Department of Natural Resource Management, stephen.jones@sdstate.edu;


Nels H. Troelstrup, Jr. ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), South Dakota State University Department of Natural Resource Management, nels.troelstrup@sdstate.edu;


Katie N. Bertrand ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), South Dakota State University Department of Natural Resource Management, katie.bertrand@sdstate.edu;


Brian D.S. Graeb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), South Dakota State University Department of Natural Resource Management, brian.graeb@sdstate.edu;


11 - CONNECTING THE DOTS: A BASIC FOOD WEB OF THE LOWER OGEECHEE RIVER BASIN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CONNECTING THE DOTS: A BASIC FOOD WEB OF THE LOWER OGEECHEE RIVER BASIN The Ogeechee is a 5th order blackwater river that originates in the Piedmont and flows through Georgia’s Southeastern Coastal Plain. Although macroinvertebrate food webs have been extensively studied in the Ogeechee, few of these studies have integrated the role of fish. The goal of this study was to address this knowledge gap by including fish into food web estimates within the Ogeechee. We sampled five common fish species from June-October 2016 and developed a connectance food web to assess the dynamics of major fish feeding guilds in relation to the macroinvertebrate community present in the Ogeechee. In addition, we examined seasonal patterns in the diet of an important sport fish in the region, Redbreast Sunfish. Food web connectance, link density, and number of nodes present were 0.285, 31.87, and 112, respectively. Preliminary analyses of redbreast diets showed that stomach content composition differs significantly by season when prey items were grouped taxonomically, but not when grouped by prey habit. Our study is one of the first to construct a food web including fish in a coastal plain blackwater river.

Allison Lutz (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, al05988@georgiasouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


12 - EFFECT OF LEAF LITTER NUTRIENT AND PHENOLIC COMPOSITION ON WOOD FROG (RANA SYLVATICA) SIZE AND MORPHOLOGY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECT OF LEAF LITTER NUTRIENT AND PHENOLIC COMPOSITION ON WOOD FROG (RANA SYLVATICA) SIZE AND MORPHOLOGY Terrestrial plant communities are changing across the world. These terrestrial vegetation changes have a strong influence on aquatic ecosystems, as this anthropogenic input supplies the energy (nutrient composition) and alters toxicity (secondary compounds) for aquatic life. We conducted an outdoor mesocosm experiment using wood frog (Rana sylvatica) tadpoles to examine whether plants with varying nutrient and phenolic concentrations altered the size or morphology of tadpoles until metamorphosis. Our data showed that mesocosms with litter from plant species containing high phenolics and low nutrients resulted in smaller metamorphic individuals. Across plant treatments morphological variation was observed in the metamorphic frogs. These data can help illuminate the response of wetland taxa to changing plant communities resulting from global change.

Sarah Crites (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, scrites@luc.edu;


Thomas Sanger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, tsanger@luc.edu;


Daniella DeRose ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, dderose@luc.edu;


13 - HEAVY METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN LAKE MICHIGAN PREY FISH

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HEAVY METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN LAKE MICHIGAN PREY FISH Understanding factors that govern bioaccumulation of heavy metals in Great Lakes fish is critical for understanding ecosystem and human health implications. For example, mercury bioaccumulates in large piscivorous fish, but the trophic pathways leading to bioaccumulation remain poorly understood. We examined the tissue concentrations of heavy metals in Lake Michigan prey fish that differ in life history traits and trophic position. We obtained fish from the 2015 USGS trawl survey for six prey species common to Lake Michigan – Deepwater Sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni), Slimy Sculpin (Cottus cognatus), Bloater (Coregonus hoyi), Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), Rainbow Smelt (Osmerus mordax), and Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus). We measured stable isotope ratios (d15N and d13C), tissue metal concentration (mercury, lead, copper, nickel, zinc, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, manganese, magnesium), and individual fish attributes (total length, weight, body condition, depth of capture, capture location). Tissue metal concentrations differed between nearshore and offshore collection sites, and between benthic and pelagic species, but patterns varied among metals. For example, mercury exhibited a strong positive correlation with trophic position (d15N and d13C) but the magnitude of the effect varied among species.

Whitney Conard (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, wconard@nd.edu;


Brandon Gerig ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, bgerig@nd.edu;


Lea Lovin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, llovin@nd.edu;


Gary Lamberti ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, glambert@nd.edu;


14 - HOLD THE HYDROPHONE: ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION IN SUNFISH

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Hold the Hydrophone: Acoustic Communication in Sunfish While acoustic communication has been widely studied in many animals, this is not the case with freshwater fish. Here we report on acoustic signatures and calling patterns of two freshwater fish species, bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus) and redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus). What little work has been done on these species has only reported on calling during the breeding season. Here we report on nonbreeding calls and calling patterns. The diurnal call patterns for the bluegill and redear were recorded within isolated-species-ponds of The Cheraw Fish Hatchery in Cheraw, SC. Field recordings were done for one week in September, 2016 and one week in October, 2016. Hydrophones recorded 30 minutes of every hour for 7 days. Calls are typically short; low frequency “grunts” under 1 KHz, in bursts of single, double, triple or multiple amplitudes. Preliminary analysis indicates peak calling between noon and dusk, with a smaller peak in activity at dawn each day. Bluegill were also recorded in the lab, preliminary results indicating a pattern similar to field recordings.

Jeff Steinmetz (Primary Presenter/Author), Francis Marion University, jsteinmetz@fmarion.edu;


Michelle Gallo ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Francis Marion University, mgallo1981@g.fmarion.edu;


15 - HOME RANGES OF CAPTIVE-REARED, RECENTLY-RELEASED JUVENILE BLANDING’S TURTLES (EMYDOIDEA BLANDINGII)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HOME RANGES OF CAPTIVE-REARED, RECENTLY-RELEASED JUVENILE BLANDING’S TURTLES (EMYDOIDEA BLANDINGII) Substantial threats to reptile species biodiversity have become apparent in the last few decades. This has been partly caused by significant losses in grasslands and their associate wetland-prairie ecosystems in the Midwestern United States. One species in particular, Blanding’s Turtles (Emydoidea blandingii), occur in Midwestern prairie-wetlands and is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of species. Consequently, many wildlife managers have invested in the conservation of this species, primarily using captive-breeding programs where turtles are reared and released into natural wetlands. We used ground-based radio telemetry to radio-track 12 recently-released individuals. We calculated bi-monthly home ranges between May to November 2016 using Minimum Convex Polygons and Kernel Density Estimates at 50% and 95% CI. We found a significant difference between bi-monthly ranges across seasons, with home ranges increasing in size during summer months and decreasing during fall. Our data suggests these recently-released juveniles have a similar ecology to wild-hatched individuals across the Blanding’s turtles range. These data will provide wildlife managers with valuable insight to more effectively conserve the species and wetland ecosystems.

ANDRÉS MUÑOZ (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, andresgabrielmunoz@gmail.com;


Armand Cann ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, acann@luc.edu;


Sarah Crites ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, scrites@luc.edu;


Leigh Anne Harden ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Benedictine University, lharden@ben.edu;


16 - INFLUENCE OF INTERACTING STRESSORS ON NATIVE BROOK TROUT IN A WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA WATERSHED

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INFLUENCE OF INTERACTING STRESSORS ON NATIVE BROOK TROUT IN A WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA WATERSHED Freshwater species have declined throughout their native ranges in part due to habitat fragmentation and invasive species. Information is often lacking, however, about how interactions between these stressors affect certain aspects of native populations. Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) are a prime example of a species in decline due to human-related stressors, two of which are fragmentation from abandoned mine drainage (AMD) and competition with non-native brown trout (Salmo trutta). In an ongoing, multi-year study, we are assessing the abundance, behavior, and genetic structure of brook trout in a Pennsylvania watershed fragmented by AMD and scheduled for remediation in 2018. Results from stream surveys show brown trout are absent upstream of AMD but abundant downstream, suggesting that AMD is a chemical barrier to brown trout invasion. This watershed represents a common situation in Pennsylvania—brook trout populations are simultaneously fragmented and “protected” from brown trout invasion by AMD, but remediation could permit brown trout invasion upstream. This balance between isolation and invasion presents a significant management challenge, and our study will help biologists predict likely outcomes under different management scenarios.

Jennifer Graves (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, gravejm10@gmail.com;


David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Tom Clark ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna River Basic Commission, tclark@srbc.net;


Brianna Hutchinson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna River Basic Commission, bhutchinson@sbrc.net;


Kathleen Lavelle ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, klavelle@tu.org;


Shawn Rummel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, srummel@tu.org;


Rachel Kester ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, rkester@tu.org;


17 - INVESTIGATION OF SCALE-DEPENDENT RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR BROOK TROUT DENSITY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INVESTIGATION OF SCALE-DEPENDENT RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR BROOK TROUT DENSITY Ecological factors that determine species distributions are often scale-dependent, yet for certain high priority species research has focused on predicting population parameters primarily at local scales. We examined how the relationship between environmental factors and young-of-the-year (YOY) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) varies across four spatial scales (stream, HUC-12, HUC-10, and HUC-8). Environmental and YOY density data were collected from 644 streams by participants in Pennsylvania’s Unassessed Waters Initiative. Eight competing models consisting of different combinations of stream width, pH, alkalinity, specific conductivity, and land use (evergreen, deciduous, and agricultural cover) were compared at each spatial scale using Akaike information criterion (AIC). Surprisingly, model performance was similar across all four scales, and consistently the best model was stream width. We suspect the relatively strong performance of this model at large scales may be an artifact of stream survey priorities for individual watersheds (i.e., smaller headwaters were sampled in some watersheds than in others). While questions remain about these large scale patterns, our findings at the stream scale suggest streams more than four meters wide are less likely to hold high densities of YOY brook trout.

David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Lauren Prasko (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, l.m.prasko@iup.edu;


Aiden Simpson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, c-asimpson@pa.gov;


18 - NO DIRECT EFFECT OF FRESHWATER ‘BROWNING’ ON LARVAL FISH FORAGING

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

NO DIRECT EFFECT OF FRESHWATER ‘BROWNING’ ON LARVAL FISH FORAGING Many freshwater ecosystems are becoming browner in color due to increased inputs of terrestrially-derived organic matter. This ‘browning’ has the potential to decrease fish foraging due to a reduction in light for visual predation. We conducted laboratory feeding experiments to compare the selectivity and efficiency of larval fish preying on zooplankton across a gradient of brown water. Moreover, larvae were collected from lakes of varying transparency to determine if fish currently living in brown systems are better adapted to ‘browning’ than fish from ‘blue’ waters. Fish were placed in tanks with artificial lake water and increasing concentrations of SuperHume (absorbance at 440 nm = 1.4 – 9.6 m<-1>). An equivalent number of zooplankton was introduced to each tank, and fish were allowed to feed for 10 - 30 minutes. After which, the fish were removed and the remaining zooplankton were collected, preserved, and enumerated. Surprisingly, no significant difference in foraging selectivity or efficiency was observed across our brown water treatments, regardless of the color of the lake in which the fish were collected. Based on previous research, ‘browning’ appears to more negatively affect larval fish indirectly through food web dynamics.

Troy Clift (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, troy.clift@live.longwood.edu;


Jacob Spain ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, jacob.spain@live.longwood.edu;


Dina Leech ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, leechdm@longwood.edu;


19 - SIZE AT AGE COMPARISON OF YELLOW PERCH ACROSS A NORTH-SOUTH GRADIENT OF LAKES CONNECTED TO LAKE MICHIGAN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SIZE AT AGE COMPARISON OF YELLOW PERCH ACROSS A NORTH-SOUTH GRADIENT OF LAKES CONNECTED TO LAKE MICHIGAN Yellow perch declines in Lake Michigan have prompted research to improve understanding of life history patterns, including the extent of intraspecific variation across habitat features. To better understand how nearshore habitat variation influences growth, we used anal spine analysis to compare size at age of yellow perch collected in August 2015 from littoral zones of 10 drowned river mouth lakes (lake-like tributaries directly connected to Lake Michigan) along a north-south gradient. Our hypothesis was that yellow perch from southern lakes would have larger size at age than northern lakes due to longer growing season and higher productivity. Results showed some support for our hypothesis, as southern lakes tended to have higher size at age than northern lakes. However, a notable exception to this trend was the second northernmost lake, where size at age was 40% higher than other nearby lakes. This unexpected result may be due to relatively high productivity in this lake, which is more similar to southern lakes than to surrounding northern lakes. Our preliminary findings suggest that growth may be strongly influenced by environmental variation across nearshore habitats utilized by yellow perch.

Josh Colasante (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, j.m.colasante@iup.edu;


Greg Chorak ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University, chorakgr@gvsu.edu;


David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Carl Ruetz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, carl.ruetz@gvsu.edu;


David Clapp ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Department of Natural Resources , clappd@michigan.gov;


20 - TADPOLES FACILITATE DECOMPOSITION OF WHITE OAK LEAF LITTER

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

TADPOLES FACILITATE DECOMPOSITION OF WHITE OAK LEAF LITTER With amphibian populations rapidly declining, studying the impact anurans on freshwater ecosystem function has become a large area of interest. Specifically, their role in facilitating decomposition of allochthonous leaf litter is currently understudied. The purpose of our experiment was to determine if anuran communities were directly contributing to the decomposition of native leaf litter in freshwater ecosystems. We hypothesized communities that contained larval anurans would have a higher percent of leaf litter mass lost, compared to the communities without tadpoles. To test our experiment, we designed a randomized mesocosm experiment that took place at Loyola University Chicago. The mesocosms were used to replicate a native leaf litter treatment (Quercus alba) with six units containing 20 larval wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) and six containing simply water and leaf litter. The mass of remaining leaf litter were weighed two weeks after removal of the metamorphic wood frogs. We found leaf litter decomposition rate was measurably faster in the wood frog treatment, indicating that larval wood frogs had some influence of breakdown and/or consumption of leaf litter. Thus, amphibian declines could alter the rate at which energy becomes available to wetland ecosystems.

Daniella DeRose (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, dderose@luc.edu;


Joseph Milanovich ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


21 - USE OF MAXENT MODELING FOR SMOKY DACE (CLINOSTOMUS SP. CF. FUNDULOIDES): GROUND-TRUTHING, MODEL IMPROVEMENT, AND SAMPLING BIAS LIMITATION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Use of MaxEnt Modeling for Smoky Dace (Clinostomus sp. cf. funduloides): Ground-truthing, Model Improvement, and Sampling Bias Limitation The Smoky Dace (Clinostomus sp. cf. funduloides) is considered an undescribed species closely related to the Rosyside Dace (Clinostomus funduloides). Smoky Dace are known to inhabit low order streams of the upper Hiwassee and Little Tennessee River basins in North Carolina and Georgia, but little else is known about other habitat associations. A Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) model was developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to improve understanding of aquatic species distributions and macrohabitat use in NC. We used this MaxEnt model for Smoky Dace site targeting and evaluated model success. We detected Smoky Dace at 50 out of 139 sites sampled in late spring and early summer of 2016. Smoky Dace were predominately found in sand-dominated pools with woody debris presence. The model’s use of only macrohabitat variables could have attributed to lower detection rates than expected due to limited knowledge of site microhabitat conditions. However, the USFWS model was useful in targeting sites for detection of Smoky Dace. Improved understanding of the distribution, status, and habitat (micro and macro) associations of Smoky Dace can lead to more thorough and successful conservation strategies.

Luke Etchison (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC Wildlife Resources Commission, luke.etchison@ncwildlife.org;


Steve Fraley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC Wildlife Resources Commission, stephen.fraley@ncwildlife.org;


22 - AN ICONIC MACROINVERTEBRATE IN PERIL: IMPACTS OF INCREASING WATER TEMPERATURES ON PTERONARCYS CALIFORNICA IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AN ICONIC MACROINVERTEBRATE IN PERIL: IMPACTS OF INCREASING WATER TEMPERATURES ON PTERONARCYS CALIFORNICA IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA Salmonflies (Pteronarcys californica) are both ecologically and economically important, attracting anglers and providing a significant food pulse for aquatic and terrestrial species. Anecdotal evidence and historical datasets suggest that salmonfly populations may be declining and shifting life history patterns. We measured salmonfly abundance, biomass, and emergence along the Gallatin and Madison Rivers in southwest Montana to determine the status of salmonfly populations and initiate long-term monitoring. Initial findings suggest that in the last fifty years salmonflies are emerging earlier due to reduced snowpack and warmer Spring water temperatures. Larval counts remain consistent in the Upper Madison, but the once robust population has reached critically low to absent levels in the relatively warmer Lower Madison River. In the last twenty years, the Gallatin River population has remained within natural annual variation, but evidence indicates that the population center is moving upstream where water temperatures are cooler. Future laboratory experiments will mechanistically test the influence of water temperature and fine sediment additions on the survival and life history of this iconic species.

Heidi Anderson (Primary Presenter/Author), Montana State University, heidieliseanderson@gmail.com;


Lindsey Albertson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, lalbertson@stroudcenter.org;


23 - AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE DOWNSTREAM OF HYDROPEAKING DAMS IN THE COLORADO RIVER BASIN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE DOWNSTREAM OF HYDROPEAKING DAMS IN THE COLORADO RIVER BASIN Dams are ubiquitous structures in river systems that dramatically alter the timing and intensity of flow events, which can have negative ecological impacts. Our objective is to determine if within dam tailwater reaches, benthic aquatic invertebrate communities vary with respect to species composition, abundances, and/or traits as a result of altered flow regimes. We collected benthic invertebrate samples at standardized distances downstream (0 to 15 river miles) of six large dams (Parker, Davis, Hoover, Fontenelle, Flaming Gorge, and Navajo) in the Colorado River Basin during spring 2015. Preliminary results reveal 45 families across five phyla, with species abundances ranging from 1 to >90,000 individuals per m^2. We used multivariate analysis to compare species, trait, and flow data (e.g. prevalence of hydropeaking, high flow events) within and among tailwater reaches. With the prevalence of dams, our research is critical for determining how human water demands, necessitating various flow regimes downstream of dams, impact the biodiversity and persistence of aquatic invertebrate communities.

Erin Abernethy (Primary Presenter/Author), Oregon State University, efabernethy@gmail.com;


Ted Kennedy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, tkennedy@usgs.gov;


Jeffrey Muehlbauer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, jmuehlbauer@usgs.gov;


Richard Van Driesche ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, vandrier@science.oregonstate.edu ;


David Lytle ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, lytleda@oregonstate.edu;


24 - ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT ON MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN PENNSYLVANIA’S MARCELLUS SHALE REGION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT ON MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN PENNSYLVANIA’S MARCELLUS SHALE REGION Water withdrawal and physical habitat alternations associated with shale gas extraction pose potential threats to aquatic organisms. Unconventional gas well densities are especially high in Pennsylvania, where over 60% of the state’s streams are within the prolific Marcellus Shale Formation. This study, led by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, tests the hypothesis that stream habitat and the abundance of sensitive macroinvertebrate taxa are diminished downstream of unconventional gas wells. In spring and fall of 2013 and 2014, macroinvertebrate samples were collected from 51 sites across the Marcellus Shale region, 20 of which had unconventional gas wells upstream. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find evidence that shale gas development has widespread impacts on stream habitat or macroinvertebrate community structure. Stream embeddedness, sedimentation, and flow status were similar between sites with and without wells. Macroinvertebrate community composition, including relative abundance and taxonomic richness of pollution and sediment sensitive taxa, was similar across sites with and without gas wells. Our findings suggest that shale gas development in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale region has not substantially altered stream habitat and macroinvertebrate community structure.

Cassie Graham (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , cassiemgraham117@gmail.com;


David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Eric Chapman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, echapman@paconserve.org;


Alysha Trexler ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, atrexler@paconserve.org;


25 - PARASITES INFECTING HEXAGENIA (EPHEMEROPTERA: EPHEMERIDAE) NYMPHS FROM WESTERN LAKE ERIE, MICHIGAN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PARASITES INFECTING HEXAGENIA (EPHEMEROPTERA: EPHEMERIDAE) NYMPHS FROM WESTERN LAKE ERIE, MICHIGAN Hexagenia spp. are important biomonitoring indicators of the mesotrophic water quality. However, little research has been done on parasites infecting Hexagenia and what role parasites may play in Hexagenia population dynamics. Therefore, the aim of our study is to catalog parasites in a population of these mayflies from western Lake Erie, Michigan and to describe basic ecological information such as infection prevalence, parasite loads in mayflies, host specificity, and parasite distributions. Mayfly specimens were collected as part of ongoing biomonitoring studies and examined for parasites microscopically. Based on tentative morphological identifications, Hexagenia are infected with trematodes in the genus Crepidostomum, protists of the genera Vorticella and Epistylis, and an unidentified nematode. We present current progress on molecular and ecological work.

David Malakauskas (Primary Presenter/Author), Francis Marion University, DMalakauskas@fmarion.edu;


26 - CHIRONOMID EMERGENCE AS AN INDICATION OF TROPHIC STATE IN MINNESOTA SENTINEL LAKES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CHIRONOMID EMERGENCE AS AN INDICATION OF TROPHIC STATE IN MINNESOTA SENTINEL LAKES We assessed emergence of Chironomidae in a subset of Sentinel lakes with differing trophic states (e.g., total phosphorus = 5.6-132 micro g/l) in Minnesota. Emergence composition at genus level was determined in 2014 using two or more collections of Chironomidae surface-floating pupal exuviae per lake. In total, we documented 59 genera. Genus composition by lake varied from 16 to 35, but did not strongly coincide with lake trophic state, except for slight decreases in eutrophic-to-hypereutrophic lakes. Jaccard’s Similarity Coefficient, which quantifies community associations, ranged from 28.1% to 66.7% (Avg= 45.8%; sd = +/- 8.7%) between lakes, and average similarities declined with increasing differences in trophic state. Orthocladiinae and Tanytarsini were proportionally more abundant in lower nutrient lakes and Chironomini proportionally more abundant in eutrophic and hypereutrophic lakes, a pattern that has been observed in lakes based on dredge samples for larvae or emergence samples for adults. Our results demonstrate that collections of Chironomidae surface-floating pupal exuviae can be used to monitor community patterns across a wide range of lakes with differing trophic states.

Corrie Nyquist (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, nyqui095@umn.edu;


Leonard Ferrington, Jr. ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, ferri016@umn.edu;


Alexander Egan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, egan0059@umn.edu;


Petra Kranzfelder ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, kranz081@umn.edu;


27 - COLLECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MACROINVERTEBRATES IN AND AROUND MONTEZUMA WELL

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COLLECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MACROINVERTEBRATES IN AND AROUND MONTEZUMA WELL We conducted a Bioblitz at Montezuma Well May 20th and 21st 2016, in collaboration with the Montezuma Castle National Monument for their Centennial celebration. Montezuma Well’s unique water chemistry has made it an area of intense study in the Southwest, but only its plant and vertebrate life have been fully cataloged. This event provided an opportunity for our group to fully survey the invertebrates living in this national park. We collected and identified on-the-spot or in the laboratory, terrestrial and aquatic macroinvertebrates from the cave (N=9), meadow (N=65), irrigation ditch (N=53), outlet (N=198), Beaver Creek (N=104), and picnic area (N=15). Our collecting methods included the use of beating sheets, light traps, aspirators, nets, and hand collection. We preserved specimens in 70% or 95% ethanol and took pictures of them in the field and in the laboratory. We collected over 620 samples which have been identified to some 24 orders in 4 phyla; three Annelida, one in Platyhelminthes, 18 in Arthropoda, and two in Mollusca.

Rebecca Beresic-Perrins ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, rkb32@nau.edu;


James Boothroyd ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, jcb395@nau.edu;


Chris Wirth ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ccw227@nau.edu;


Kim Whitely ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, Kaw66@nau.edu;


Tina Greenawalt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NPS Montezuma Castle NM, Tina_greenawalt@nps.gov;


Bonnie Bain (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dixie State University, bain@dixie.edu;


Fredric Govedich ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, govedich@suu.edu;


Samuel Wells ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, samuelwells@suu.edu;


William Heyborne ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, williamheyborne@suu.edu;


Stephen Shuster ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, stephen.shuster@nau.edu;


28 - DROUGHT INDUCED DISPERSAL IN DIVING BEETLES IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DROUGHT INDUCED DISPERSAL IN DIVING BEETLES IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Drought causes many physical changes to aquatic habitats, including increasing temperatures and decreasing water levels, which can threaten aquatic invertebrate communities. Some aquatic invertebrates, such as diving beetles, can disperse via flight to relocate or discover new bodies of water. Despite observations of aquatic beetles flying during drought, little is known about what actually triggers this dispersal. We examined how decreasing water level and increasing temperature affect diving beetle dispersal, with a laboratory experiment in incubators. We collected diving beetles in San Diego County, CA, USA and used dispersal traps to measure dispersal in response to varying temperature and water levels. At the end of the three week experiment, we identified beetles to species and examined the relationship between dispersal, physical cues and specific-species dispersal tendencies. We found that both water level and temperature positively affected dispersal; however, there was no interactive effect. Our results suggest that drought will lead to higher dispersal for aquatic beetles. With drought becoming more prevalent, drought induced dispersal could have significant effects on the communities structure making understanding this phenomena vital.

Patrick Carroll (Primary Presenter/Author), University of San Diego, patrickcarroll@sandiego.edu;


Ruth Hoover ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of San Diego, ruthhoover@sandiego.edu;


Kate Boersma ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of San Diego, kateboersma@sandiego.edu;


29 - EFFECT OF DRACAENA LEAVES AS A RESOURCE FOR AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITITES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECT OF DRACAENA LEAVES AS A RESOURCE FOR AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITITES The objective of this study is to determine how plantation Dracaena leaves function as a resource for aquatic macroinvertebrates compared to common native riparian tree leaves ( Guarea glabara and Spathacanthus hoffmannii ) within cloud-forest streams (Homeier et al, 2005). Mesh bags filled with either Dracaena , G. glabara , or S. hoffmannii leaves were deployed into six streams within the Alberto Manuel Brenes Biological Reserva in Costa Rica and decomposition and macroinvertebrate colonization were measured for three months. Leaves from G. glabara decomposed most quickly, with Dracaena and S. hoffmannii following behind respectfully (F(2,122)= 33.529,p<.01). MANCOVA analyses revealed a significant difference across leaf type for diversity, F(2, 87) = 4.36,p = .016 with S. hoffmannii having significantly greater diversity than G. glabara and Dracaena . However, NMDS ordination and perMANOVA reveal no significant differences among leaf type for macroinvertebrate communities. Tropical stream macroinvertebrate communities are known to be different between natural and deforested regions (i.e. Dudgeon, 2006); however, the complexity of the problem goes beyond available allochthonous resources.

EmmaLeigh Given (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University , egiven1@kent.edu;


30 - EFFECT OF SALINITY ON HATCHING OF BRANCHINECTA LINDAHLI, PACKARD 1883.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECT OF SALINITY ON HATCHING OF BRANCHINECTA LINDAHLI, PACKARD 1883. The effect of salinity on hatching rates of Branchinecta lindahli, Packard 1883, was examined using five salt (NaCl) concentrations ranging from 0 g/L to 4 g/L (N = 18). A significant negative relationship (p=7.03x10-3, R2 = 0.522) was found between salt concentration and the number of fairy shrimp hatched. This supports other studies looking at hatching cues as a survival mechanism of fairy shrimp in ephemeral habitats. The avoidance of abortive hatching suggests that fairy shrimp do use a bet-hedging strategy that allows them to survive and persist in temporary wetlands. Salinity is most likely a hatching trigger used in that strategy.

Nayla Rhein (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, nayla.rhein@gmail.com;


Fredric Govedich ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, govedich@suu.edu;


31 - EFFECTS OF ROAD SALT APPLICATION ON STREAM INVERTEBRATE TAXONOMY AND STOICHIOMETRIC PROPERTIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF ROAD SALT APPLICATION ON STREAM INVERTEBRATE TAXONOMY AND STOICHIOMETRIC PROPERTIES Freshwater systems in temperate climates provide important resources for drinking water and recreational exploitation. However, seasonal water chemistry changes, due to deicers and rock salts have been shown to negatively affect aquatic organisms these areas. This study seeks to address the effect of increased salinity due to road salt application on aquatic macroinvertebrates and their habitats due to runoff from snowmelt in the Lake Erie Watershed in Buffalo, NY. Streams were sampled a base-flow conditions in February and March 2017, before and after large snowfall events. Stream water salinity ranged from 0.22 - 0.9 pSS over a wide geographic area. Analysis of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera and Plecoptera (EPT) taxa collected from five streams as well as overall macroinvertebrate IBI varied significantly in response to salinity and other stream water chemistry measurements. Streams with the highest levels of salinity had lower overall macroinvertebrate diversity. Macroinvertebrate nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry was also analyzed to further determine the health of these aquatic systems. Initial results suggest road salt has a significant effect on macroinvertebrate diversity and chemical composition.

Abigail LaFlair (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Daemen College, abigail.laflair@daemen.edu;


Sarah Whorley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Daemen College, swhorley@daemen.edu;


32 - ENVIRONMENTAL SEX DETERMINATION IN DAPHNIA MAGNA AND D. PULEX: ABIOTIC DETERMINANTS AND MODULATION BY THE NMDA RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST MK-801

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ENVIRONMENTAL SEX DETERMINATION IN DAPHNIA MAGNA AND D. PULEX: ABIOTIC DETERMINANTS AND MODULATION BY THE NMDA RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST MK-801 Daphnids are subject to environmental sex determination whereby environmental cues initiate the switch from asexual parthenogenetic reproduction to sexual reproduction. The introduction of males into the population marks the transition to sexual reproduction. We determined the environmental cues necessary for male production in Daphnia magna and D. pulex by examining photoperiod (long day, 16 hrs and short day, 10 hrs) and temperature (16, 18, 20 and 22C). Additionally, we investigated the role of the NMDA receptor in male production with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. Both species produced negligible or no male offspring under long day length regardless of temperature. D. pulex produced males under the short day length all temperatures, with colder temperatures significantly increasing male production. D. magna also produced males under the short day length but with colder temperatures significantly decreasing male production. Results suggest that daphnid male sex determination is triggered by a combination of photoperiodic and temperature cues that suppress the NMDA receptor. Thus, environmental contaminants interacting with the NMDA receptor, or unusual water temperatures, may alter male production with adverse consequences for population maintenance.

Allison Camp (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University, aacamp@ncsu.edu;


Maher Haeba ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, mhhaeba@ncsu.edu;


Gerald LeBlanc ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, gal@ncsu.edu;


33 - EVALUATING HOST SPECIFICITY OF TREMATODE PARASITES FOR THEIR SNAIL HOST, ELIMIA CARINIFERA (COENOGASTROPODA: PLEUROCERIDAE) IN STREAMS IN ALABAMA, USA.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EVALUATING HOST SPECIFICITY OF TREMATODE PARASITES FOR THEIR SNAIL HOST, ELIMIA CARINIFERA (COENOGASTROPODA: PLEUROCERIDAE) IN STREAMS IN ALABAMA, USA. Many snails serve as obligate intermediate hosts to trematode flatworms that infect snails for asexual larval production, often with a high degree of host specificity. Elimia carinifera, inhabits headwater streams in the Cahaba, Coosa, and Black Warrior River basins in Alabama and hosts a variety of trematodes. We determined host specificity by evaluating if worms found in E. carinifera also infected a congener, E. carinocostata, within and among the three basins. The bar coding gene, 18s rDNA, was sequenced for trematodes collected in our study. Sequences of the unknown trematodes found in E. carinifera and E. carinocostata were compared to published trematode sequences in GenBank to identify unknown worms. Six trematode families were recovered (Collyriclidae, Cyathocotylidae, Diplostomatidae, Fasciolidae, Heterophyiidae, and Opisthorchiidae) with percent sequence matches from 95 to 99 percent. Host specificity at the family level did not occur as four out of six families of trematodes were in both snail species in all basins. Further work to identify parasites to species and confirmation that snails from all populations are the same species is required to more accurately determine host specificity of trematodes infecting Elimia carinifera in Alabama streams.

Daniel Wicker (Primary Presenter/Author), Jacksonville State University, dwicker@stu.jsu.edu;


34 - IMPACTS OF DREISSENID SHELLS ON BENTHIC HABITAT AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IMPACTS OF DREISSENID SHELLS ON BENTHIC HABITAT AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN STREAMS The physical effects of dreissenid invasions are well documented in lakes, but few studies have assessed their impacts in streams. Dreissenid mussels can alter benthic habitats by aggregating on substrates, dying off, and leaving mass quantities of shells behind. We quantified dreissenid shell densities in the Rouge and Huron rivers downstream of dammed lakes, and evaluated their impact on the macroinvertebrate communities. Shell densities were highest immediately downstream of dams, sometimes covering 100% of the substrate. We found no correlation between shell densities and macroinvertebrate total abundance (p>0.05) in either river, however, community composition varied with shell density. Lower macroinvertebrate diversity was associated with high shell densities in the Rouge and Huron Rivers (p<0.05), compared to areas with low shell densities; likewise, lower relative abundances of sensitive taxa (p<0.05) were noted as shell densities increased in the Huron River. Rivers impacted by Dreissenid invasions can experience losses in habitation heterogeneity, and significant changes in macroinvertebrate community composition. Changes in the native fauna resulting from physical alterations in the benthic structure by an invasive species can have ecosystem wide implications.

Darrin Hunt (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, eb5832@wayne.edu;


Donna Kashian ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, dkashian@wayne.edu;


35 - INFLUENCES OF MILL DEBRIS ON THE BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY IN MUSKEGON LAKE, MICHIGAN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INFLUENCES OF MILL DEBRIS ON THE BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY IN MUSKEGON LAKE, MICHIGAN Muskegon Lake is a 4,150-acre drowned river mouth lake located on the eastern shoreline of Lake Michigan. Historical anthropogenic stressors, including industrial discharges and shoreline alterations, caused ecological degradation within the lake leading to its designation as an Area of Concern (AOC) in 1985. Sawmill debris (saw dust, bark, woodchips), have caused continual negative impacts on the littoral zone of Muskegon Lake, specifically to the benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Benthic communities are an integral part of an aquatic ecosystem with the integrity of the system relying on organism abundance and assemblage. Previous studies have associated the presence of mill debris with impacted benthic communities due to changes in substrate stability. To examine the impacts of mill debris on Muskegon Lake, benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected along transects at sites along the northeast shoreline at varying in depths. Preliminary analyses suggests that there was no statistically significant differences between mill debris and control sites. Our results indicate the presence of macrophytes within mill debris impacted areas may diminish the adverse effects of these materials.

Victoria Harris (Primary Presenter/Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, harrisv@mail.gvsu.edu;


Richard Rediske ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, redisker@gvsu.edu;


Brian Scull ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, scullbr@gvsu.edu;


36 - INFRADIAN CONTROL OF DAPHNIA MAGNA MOLT CYCLE AND ITS DISRUPTION BY NITRIC OXIDE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INFRADIAN CONTROL OF DAPHNIA MAGNA MOLT CYCLE AND ITS DISRUPTION BY NITRIC OXIDE Biological rhythms are used to control various processes and environmental cues are often used to regulate these molecular clocks. Environmental chemicals may disrupt internal molecular clocks, resulting in adverse consequences. We hypothesized that the timing of the crustacean molt cycle is managed by the sequential expression of several nuclear receptors and cytochrome p450 (CYP) enzymes. We propose that pulsatile nitric oxide controls the availability of one of these receptors and thus acts as a fine-tuner for timing the molt cycle and that exposure to exogenous sources of nitric oxide, e.g. nitrogen fertilizers, can disrupt this timing. Molt-synchronized adult Daphnia magna were exposed to a nitric oxide donor for 8-hours. This resulted in an elongation of the intermolt duration and a significant delay in timing of peak mRNA expression of some of the receptors and CYPs involved in ecdysis. We conclude that exposure to exogenous nitric oxide resulted in delayed peak expression of genes involved in the timing of the intermolt duration with potential adverse consequence on growth and reproductive rates of crustaceans.

Stephanie McKnight (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University, smstreet@ncsu.edu;


37 - LEARNING TO SEE, SEEING TO LEARN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

LEARNING TO SEE, SEEING TO LEARN Learning to See, Seeing to Learn is a web-based project (macroinvertebrates.org) focused on training citizen scientists to identify aquatic macroinvertebrates for water quality monitoring projects. This open educational resource will be a powerful supplement to more-traditional identification keys used by volunteers. Many volunteer biomonitoring groups lack access to physical specimens and other high-quality reference materials. Our tool features zoomable, high-resolution images for the 150 most commonly found taxa in the Eastern United States. Diagnostic characters for 50 selected taxa will have added multimedia annotations at the order, family, and genus level. These explorable images can be dynamically manipulated by the user to see and learn these important characters in context. Detailed descriptions of the diagnostic characters, life history, food preferences, ecological information, pollution tolerance values, and terminology supports will be provided to aid identification for each taxon.

Madeline S. Genco (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, mgenco@g.clemson.edu;


38 - MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN FLOW REGIME IN TROPICAL HEADWATER STREAMS OF COSTA RICA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN FLOW REGIME IN TROPICAL HEADWATER STREAMS OF COSTA RICA Predictions of global climate change suggest extreme events will increase in their intensity and frequency. In parts of Costa Rica, the likelihood of drought and higher temperatures during El Niño cycles may increase, although during La Niña events these areas will likely receive increased rainfall and flooding. To provide insights into these possible changes we are quantifying the effects of seasonal flow variation on the macroinvertebrate communities within two headwater streams, one intermittent and the other perennial, in the Puntarenas province of Costa Rica. We are sampling macroinvertebrates monthly over the course of a year using surber and grab samples. Preliminary results show that invertebrate abundance increased as the rainy season progressed, although declined at the end of the season, during the period of highest annual rainfall. Abundance was greatest in leaf litter microhabitats, where Chironomidae and the black fly Simulium spp. were dominant. Invertebrate abundance also tended to increase in pools during peak rainfall. These observations provide insights into the potential resistance and resilience of macroinvertebrate communities to extreme events in neotropical headwater streams.

Darixa Hernandez Abrams (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, darixa.hernandez@uga.edu;


Scott Connelly ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, scottcon@uga.edu;


Seth Wenger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sethwenger@fastmail.fm;


39 - MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE TO LOW HEAD DAM REMOVAL

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE TO LOW HEAD DAM REMOVAL Dams are common habitat barriers which fragment communities. Our study aimed to examine how a low-head dam removal affected macroinvertebrate community structure. We sampled Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera taxa from five habitats at the site the year before and two years after the dam was removed. Our results indicated that species richness increased from 2014-2016. Using alpha and beta diversity calculations, 2016 communities were significantly greater in evenness (alpha) and increased in similarity between habitats (beta). Taxa were sorted into functional feeding groups and our results indicated that by 2016, scrapers had decreased and predators had increased. In conclusion, habitats were more connected and able to interact with each other by 2016. The amount of species increased, validating the spatial isolation and area affects hypotheses. Functional feeding group analysis demonstrated that there was less detritus in the river and more species diversity. Our results suggest that abandoned low-head dams should be removed, to promote riverine connectivity and biodiversity.

Jane Kunberger (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alabama, jmkunberger@crimson.ua.edu;


40 - NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK: HUNTING FOR A RARE DRAGONFLY (RHIONAESCHNA MUTATA) IN THE ST. CROIX RIVER VALLEY, MN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK: HUNTING FOR A RARE DRAGONFLY (RHIONAESCHNA MUTATA) IN THE ST. CROIX RIVER VALLEY, MN The Spatterdock Darner, Rhionaeschna mutata , is a rare North American dragonfly, which is most widely distributed in the eastern USA. In 2009, a breeding population was found in two kettle ponds in the Saint Croix River Valley in eastern Minnesota. This was the first record of this species in Minnesota, establishing a substantial northwestern range expansion. The goal of our research was to characterize R. mutata breeding habitat and geographic distribution in Minnesota to inform conservation planning. We compiled information on R. mutata habitat preferences, and then selected 25 potential breeding sites, targeting heavily vegetated, fishless ponds with a sphagnum fringe and a wooded riparian zone. We conducted early summer field surveys in 2015 and 2016, using multiple methods to increase our likelihood of detection (visual adult surveys; shoreline exuviae collections; aquatic nymph sampling with dip-nets, minnow seines, and sweep frames). No R. mutata were found. R. mutata may be present in this water-rich region, but has gone undetected by our efforts, or a local extirpation may have occurred, possibly linked recent fish colonization in one of the original breeding ponds.

Emily Schilling (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg College, schillin@augsburg.edu;


Holly Kundel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg College, kundelh@augsburg.edu;


Ron Lawrenz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Warner Nature Center - Science Museum of Minnesota, lawrenz@smm.org;


41 - PATTERNS OF PLECOPTERA DISTRIBUTION IN INDIANA: USING MUSEUM DATA TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF GLACIATION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PATTERNS OF PLECOPTERA DISTRIBUTION IN INDIANA: USING MUSEUM DATA TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF GLACIATION We used over 4500 records of Plecoptera from more than 2000 unique collection sites to build a list of known species from the state of Indiana. Many of these species have not been collected for many years, likely due to human caused changes in water quality and habitat degradation. Our goal is to answer three questions: First, how does the glacial history of different regions within the state affect species richness? Second, how has the species richness of Plecoptera changed in the state over time? Third, what are the drivers of these changes? We also intend to determine conservation status for each species based on these data. Preliminary analyses show greater Plecoptera species richness in unglaciated regions of the state when compared to glaciated regions. We also found that 7 species once known from the state have not been collected since 1950, and 11 others seem to have been extirpated from specific regions of the state.

Evan Newman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois, evanan2@illinois.edu;


42 - SEASONAL VARIATION IN MACROINVERTEBRATES AFFECTED BY ACID MINE DRAINAGE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SEASONAL VARIATION IN MACROINVERTEBRATES AFFECTED BY ACID MINE DRAINAGE Many streams in Appalachia are affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) from historical coal extraction practices. The responses of the summer macroinvertebrate communities to AMD have been well-documented. However, the composition of macroinvertebrate assemblages varies between seasons, and the sensitivity of spring and fall macroinvertebrate assemblages to AMD impairment has not been as well-studied. We tested the hypothesis that AMD chemical stressors have a weaker influence on macroinvertebrate communities in spring and fall compared to summer. We used mixed model ANOVA’s to compare N=11 impaired and N=9 unimpaired sites in which riffle habitat was sampled over consecutive seasons (spring-summer or summer-fall) to test for effects of season, AMD and interactions between season and AMD. AMD reduced overall taxa richness (p=0.001) and abundance (p=0.043) as well as scraper grazer richness (p=0.003) and abundance (p=0.003). Seasonal effects on taxonomic and functional composition of the riffle community were modest, indicating high overall redundancy. Contrary to our hypothesis, the only interaction between season and impairment was on total taxonomic richness (p=0.001), which increased from spring to fall at impaired sites but not unimpaired.

Andrew Travers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, at471413@ohio.edu;


Kelly Johnson (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio University, johnsok3@ohio.edu;


43 - SEASONAL VARIATION OF LAKE LITTORAL ZONE BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN FOUR LAKES IN SOUTHEASTERN NEW YORK

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SEASONAL VARIATION OF LAKE LITTORAL ZONE BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN FOUR LAKES IN SOUTHEASTERN NEW YORK In this study, we examined four lakes in suburban Westchester County, New York from April through October 2009 and April through October 2010 to determine if species assemblages of benthic macroinvertebrates in the littoral zone demonstrated seasonal variation. Species richness, relative abundance and diversity were examined by season for each lake and between the lakes. In addition, physicochemical factors were also examined to determine if there was any significant variation among means of physicochemical factors in the lakes throughout the seasons. One of the lakes was in separate hydrological drainage, which we hypothesized would result in differences in diversity and species richness. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no significant differences in species diversity or in physicochemical variables between the lakes. We did detect seasonal patterns in species assemblages.

Tami Cloherty (Primary Presenter/Author), Penn State Abington, tmc31@psu.edu;


44 - SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN MACROINVERTEBRATE ABUNDANCE IN TRIBUTARIES AT THE HUBBARD BROOK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN MACROINVERTEBRATE ABUNDANCE IN TRIBUTARIES AT THE HUBBARD BROOK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire has an especially rich history of long-term monitoring and experimental studies of ecosystem ecology. Stream biogeochemistry and hydrology are among the topics that have been extensively investigated, but the dynamics of stream macroinvertebrate communities in the watershed have received less attention. A survey was initiated in 2013 to document the macroinvertebrate communities across the Hubbard Brook valley. Using a Surber sampler, specimens were collected two times each summer from sites in 10 tributaries that flow into Hubbard Brook. Patterns in abundance and diversity of the macroinvertebrate community are discussed with respect to sampling time (mid vs. late summer); in the context of abiotic and biotic variables including pH, canopy cover, and the presence of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis); and in comparison with earlier work in the watershed.

Kerry Yurewicz (Primary Presenter/Author), Plymouth State University, klyurewicz@plymouth.edu;


45 - SUGAR-CANE CULTIVATION AND CHIRONOMID DIVERSITY FROM NEOTROPICAL STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SUGAR-CANE CULTIVATION AND CHIRONOMID DIVERSITY FROM NEOTROPICAL STREAMS In Brazil, numerous areas of the native land cover vegetation have been removed and replaced by the sugar cane agriculture. This practice has caused deforestation, especially in the Brazilian southeast region. Currently, Brazil produces about 637 million tons of sugar cane in an area of 10 million of hectares. With the objective to contribute for designing Brazilian freshwater futures, we analyze eight streams (four located in areas with sugar-cane cultivation and four located in preserved areas) we collected the Chironomidae fauna and applied a simple method to find indicator species that would characterize groups of sites. In preserved streams, Parametriocnemus sp., Ablabesmyia (Karelia) and Endotribelos spp. had high densities. Chironomus spp. and Rheotanytarus spp. were dominant in streams located in areas of sugar-cane cultivation. The analyses of indicator species point to eight taxa in preserved streams and two taxa in the sugar-cane streams. NMDS (Non-metric Multidimensional Scale) analysis point to two groups, one gathered in the streams near the sugar-cane plantation and the other in the preserved streams. This agricultural activity seems to influence the Chironomidae community in Neotropical streams.

Juliano Corbi (Primary Presenter/Author), University of São Paulo, julianocorbi@usp.br;


46 - THE IMPACT OF WATER CHEMISTRY AND LAKE CHARACTERISTICS ON MORPHOLOGY OF DAMSELFLY LARVAE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE IMPACT OF WATER CHEMISTRY AND LAKE CHARACTERISTICS ON MORPHOLOGY OF DAMSELFLY LARVAE Authors: Ruth H. Hoover Patrick D. Carroll Adam M. Siepielski Kate S. Boersma Humans affect aquatic habitats by altering their chemistry, nutrient content, and temperature. Studies have recorded impacts of these anthropogenic changes on the physiology and behavior of aquatic organisms, but less is known about how changes in water chemistry affect morphology. We examined the effects of physical, chemical, and biological changes in the aquatic environment on gill morphology in larval damselflies (Ischnura) collected from 19 lakes throughout California. We used linear modeling to determine which of a suite of 60 environmental predictors affected gill surface area (lamellae). Specifically, we hypothesized that increasing water temperatures and hypoxic conditions would be associated with damselfly larvae with larger lamellae. We found that turbidity was positively correlated with lamellae size but that temperature and dissolved oxygen were not important predictors. Damselfly larvae with larger lamellae are easier prey for fish, so a relationship between turbidity and lamellae size could impact aquatic food webs. Urbanization can cause increased turbidity and as human populations grow it is important to look at how ongoing anthropogenic changes will affect aquatic organisms.

Ruth Hoover (Primary Presenter/Author), University of San Diego, ruthhoover@sandiego.edu;


Patrick Carroll ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of San Diego, patrickcarrol@sandiego.edu;


Kate Boersma ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of San Diego, kateboersma@sandiego.edu;


Adam Siepielski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, amsiepie@uark.edu;


47 - THE INFLUENCE OF DIDYMOSPHENIA GEMINATA ON THE RESOURCE USE BY INVERTEBRATES AND FISH IN FRESHWATER STREAMS.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE INFLUENCE OF DIDYMOSPHENIA GEMINATA ON THE RESOURCE USE BY INVERTEBRATES AND FISH IN FRESHWATER STREAMS. We used fatty acid methyl ester signatures to determine the effects of Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) mat formation on food web dynamics and basal resource use in affected rivers. Invertebrates were collected from upstream areas with high Didymo levels and downstream areas with no concentrations in three Tennessee rivers. Lipid profiles of dominant macroinvertebrate taxa (Gammarus, Baetis, Chironomidae and Simuliidae) indicated a consistent reduction in the ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6 fatty acids in upstream reaches. This change in fatty acid composition suggested a shift away from algal resources and a reduced reliance on biofilms in the presence of Didymo mats. Lipid profiles of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) showed a similar shift in fatty acid composition, most likely due to changes in composition of their food sources. However, brown trout showed an increase in DHA in the presence of Didymo, which was not seen in the invertebrates. This may reflect some level of Didymo consumption by these fish. Overall, our results indicate a dramatic shift in food web structure in the presence of Didymo mats.

Michelle Baskins (Primary Presenter/Author), Canisius College, baskinsm@my.canisius.edu;


Jonathan O'Brien ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Canisius College, obrien46@canisius.edu;


Natalie Knorp ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Tech University, neknorp42@students.tntech.edu;


Justin Murdock ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Tech University, jnmurdock@tntech.edu;


48 - DNA STABLE ISOTOPE PROBING METHODS TO EXAMINE CARBON ASSIMILATION IN STREAM BIOFILMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DNA STABLE ISOTOPE PROBING METHODS TO EXAMINE CARBON ASSIMILATION IN STREAM BIOFILMS DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) identifies microbial populations that assimilate a substrate of interest by tracking the movement of an isotopic label from a substrate into DNA. Although the technique has not been widely used in streams, DNA-SIP can be used to identify populations in stream biofilms that use different sources of carbon. We performed a DNA-SIP experiment to identify populations that assimilate mannitol and algal carbon. Stream biofilms grown on glass discs were incubated in a growth chamber in river water amended with 13C-mannitol or 13C-bicarbonate for 3 and 10 days. Biofilm DNA was extracted and separated by density using ultracentrifugation. To identify populations that assimilated our two carbon sources, we collected the heavier, isotopically-labeled DNA and sequenced the 16S rRNA gene. Sequences were analyzed using MOTHUR, operational taxonomic units identified using Megablast, and phylogenetic identities aligned against the Greengenes database. In addition to carbon assimilation, future studies can use DNA-SIP to identify populations contributing to nitrogen cycling and other stream biogeochemical processes, enhancing understanding of the link between microbial identity and ecosystem function.

Elizabeth Ogata (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, bethogata@gmail.com;


Sandra Udy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, s.k.y@aggiemail.usu.edu;


Michelle Baker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, michelle.baker@usu.edu;


Zachary Aanderud ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, zachary_aanderud@byu.edu;


49 - ENUMERATION AND GENE IDENTIFICATION OF EXTENDED-SPECTRUM-BETA-LACTAMASE-PRODUCING ENTEROBACTERIACEAE FROM IMPACTED URBAN STREAMS IN HALL COUNTY, GEORGIA, USA.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ENUMERATION AND GENE IDENTIFICATION OF EXTENDED-SPECTRUM-BETA-LACTAMASE-PRODUCING ENTEROBACTERIACEAE FROM IMPACTED URBAN STREAMS IN HALL COUNTY, GEORGIA, USA. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are a group of enzymes shown to rapidly evolve and confer resistance to a number of antibiotics, including beta lactams. Organisms that produce ESBLs pose both threats and challenges in the administration of appropriate agents to treat infections. ESBLs exhibit antibiotic resistance by destructing the antibiotics’ structure and are typically found encoded on bacterial plasmids that can easily be transferred between bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae. Water environments such as streams can help the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria which can originate from a variety of sources, including wastewater treatment plants, agricultural sources, and residential septic tank systems. An ongoing study is currently looking into the isolation and identification of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from three streams: one in a heavily industrialized area close to a water treatment facility, one with some urban impact and one with very little urban impact. We compared enumeration and bacterial composition of water and biofilm among these streams of different quality. Water and biofilm samples were obtained and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were isolated, including ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloaceae, and Shigella app.

Monica Leavell (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Georgia, meleav3383@ung.edu;


51 - SALINIZATION IMPACTS ON HISTORICALLY FRESHWATER AQUATIC COMMUNITIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SALINIZATION IMPACTS ON HISTORICALLY FRESHWATER AQUATIC COMMUNITIES The amount of carbon stored and released from freshwater wetland sediments play an important role in greenhouse gas exchange, and climate change can substantially impact wetland ecosystem structure and function. In recent years, historically freshwater wetlands have been exposed to saline conditions as a result of saltwater influx due to sea level rise. To determine how salinity influences microbial community composition, diversity, and carbon cycling functions, we used a mesocosm experiment to examine freshwater microbial response to the influx of saltwater aquatic communities and increased salinization. Previous research, using a mesocosm approach, concluded that salinity reduced zooplankton diversity structure and decreased decomposition. Further, salinity and dispersal of saline aquatic communities influenced bacterioplankton community structure, examined using barcoded amplicon sequencing of the total bacterial community. Species interactions between bacterial and zooplankton taxa were dependent on salinity, and the influence of saline aquatic communities. Our study provides the opportunity to experimentally test how historically freshwater aquatic communities will respond to salinization associated with sea level rise.

Alexandra Stucy (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), East Carolina University, stucya16@students.ecu.edu;


Michael McCoy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), East Carolina University, mccoym@ecu.edu;


Ariane Peralta ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), East Carolina University, peraltaa@ecu.edu;


52 - BOTTOM-UP IMPACT OF FRESHWATER MUSSEL DIVERSITY ON BENTHIC ALGAL COMMUNITIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

BOTTOM-UP IMPACT OF FRESHWATER MUSSEL DIVERSITY ON BENTHIC ALGAL COMMUNITIES Mussels and algae have tightly coupled interactions within freshwater ecosystems. Mussel excretion acts as a bottom-up nutrient source for algal communities. Our study examines the impacts of mussel excretion on algal community biomass and composition. We used mesocosms (n=24) to assess algal growth across varying community structure. Four treatments were used: two mussel species (Fusconaia cerina, Quadrula asperata) alone and in combination, and a control. Each treatment was replicated six times. Weekly collection of algal accrual on silicon discs tracked biomass growth over the course of the experiment. Identical samples were simultaneously collected and preserved for community composition analysis. Chlorophyll-a concentration indicates significant differences in algal biomass between the control and two-species treatments as well between Fusconaia treatments and the control. The results show mussel diversity increases algal biomass and that individual mussel species have varying degrees of influence on the algal community, likely caused by differing excretion rates and stoichiometry. These data support the assertion that species richness has positive effects on functional roles within habitats, along with providing insight on bottom-up control in freshwater habitats.

Lauren Shouse (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Alabama, lnshouse@crimson.ua.edu;


Paige Green ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama , paigegreen1014@gmail.com;


53 - COMPARING SAMPLING METHODS FOR FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN CENTRAL TEXAS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COMPARING SAMPLING METHODS FOR FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN CENTRAL TEXAS There are 15 state-threatened freshwater mussels in Texas, 6 of which are candidates of federal listing as endangered. Effective survey guidelines are vital in facilitating the collection of distribution data for mussels. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the relative effort and effectiveness of three different survey methods (timed searches, transect, and adaptive cluster method), and (2) to examine how the effectiveness varies between 6 sites with different habitat features in rivers of Central Texas. Preliminary results showed that differences between survey methods can vary considerably between sites. For example, at a bedrock dominated site in the Llano River, the density detected with the adaptive cluster method was considerable larger (0.40.2 ind/m2) compared to the transect method (0.020.02 ind/m2). In contrast, at a gravel dominated site in the San Saba River, the density found with both the adaptive cluster and transect methods were rather similar (3.30.2 ind/m2 and 2.90.4 ind/m2 respectively). In accordance with previous findings by other studies, the highest species richness and number of mussels was consistently found with timed searches.

Brittney Sanchez (Primary Presenter/Author), Texas State University, bs1468@txstate.edu;


Astrid Schwalb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas State University, schwalb@txstate.edu;


54 - LATITUDINAL VARIATION IN AMBLEMA PLICATA SIZE AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS IN NORTH AMERICA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

LATITUDINAL VARIATION IN AMBLEMA PLICATA SIZE AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS IN NORTH AMERICA Freshwater mussels are imperiled invertebrates native to North American streams that play an important role in ecosystem function. Size and growth are important characteristics for managing these organisms, plus these characteristics are related to their functional role in the stream. Mussel shell growth is the result of the organism’s metabolism, which directs its role in nutrient cycling. Amblema plicata is a widely-distributed habitat generalist that exhibits considerable variation in its growth characteristics. We are evaluating the variability of A. plicata size and growth rate across a latitudinal gradient spanning Texas to Minnesota. By thin-sectioning recently dead shells, we can use growth annuli to measure growth rates and compare these characteristics to abiotic variables related to mussel growth. We are evaluating how water temperature, river velocity, and land-use influence these growth characteristics. This study informs conservation efforts by describing the variability of growth characteristics between rivers in North America and evaluating possible mechanisms of this variability. It also has implications for the role these organisms play as nutrient capacitors within the larger ecosystem.

Traci Popejoy (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, tracipopejoy@ou.edu;


Caryn C. Vaughn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, cvaughn@ou.edu;


56 - QUANTIFICATION OF MOVEMENT BEHAVIORAL TRAITS OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS ACROSS VARYING COMMUNITY STRUCTURE: A MESOCOSM STUDY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

QUANTIFICATION OF MOVEMENT BEHAVIORAL TRAITS OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS ACROSS VARYING COMMUNITY STRUCTURE: A MESOCOSM STUDY Burrowing behavior of freshwater mussels is essential to their survival as benthic infauna in lotic systems. Few studies have aimed to quantify the influence of community structure on movement and burrowing behavior of freshwater mussels, and no studies to date have observed diel movement in freshwater mussels. Our study utilized a factorial design in mesocosms to quantify diel horizontal movement, vertical burrowing, and bioturbation across varying community structure. We used two species (Fusconaia cerina, Quadrula asperata) alone and in combination, crossed with two density treatments (15 indiv m-2, 30 indiv m-2), and replicated four times (6 treatments x 4 replicates = 24 mesocosms). Movement and burrowing was tracked every 12 hours over an 11-day period. A total of four 11-day trials were ran. In the future, we aim to expand these results to assess the influence of mussel movement traits on sediment biogeochemistry. Bioturbation has the potential to influence sediment biogeochemistry through the mixing of sediments. An understanding of mussel movement will inform future empirical studies on the influence of mussel traits, including bioturbation, on sediment biogeochemistry.

Zachary L. Nickerson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alabama, znickerson8@gmail.com;


Carla L. Atkinson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, carlalatkinson@gmail.com;


57 - THE RESPONSE OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS TO BEDLOAD TRANSPORT: EXPERIMENTAL STREAM STUDIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE RESPONSE OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS TO BEDLOAD TRANSPORT: EXPERIMENTAL STREAM STUDIES Habitat modification is believed to be one of the major causes of freshwater mussel decline. Mussel abundance and distribution is inherently linked with their habitat through sediment transport processes in moving waters (i.e. suspended sediment or bed stability). We examined bedload transport impacts on mussels through a series of four experiments at the University of Minnesota Outdoor StreamLab. The experiments included: 1. Comparing mussel movement between 3 species of mussel under quasi-equilibrium bedload conditions. 2. Comparing impact of mussel density on substrate stability 3. Comparing bed topography impact on mussel movement, and 4. Comparing burrowing under aggrading and degrading bedloads. We found that all species moved little under flooding conditions, but relocate to deeper water after a flood. At modest levels of mussel density there was little impact of mussels on substrate stability. When bottom topography is flat mussel movement is non-directional. With sloped bottoms, mussels move to deeper locations. Mussels exposed to an aggrading flood emerge from the sediment within one day. Those exposed to a degrading flood burrow into the bottom especially if the sediment is fine.

Dan Hornbach (Primary Presenter/Author), Macalester College, hornbach@macalester.edu;


Mark Hove ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, mark_hove@umn.edu;


Kelly MacGregor ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Macalester College, macgregor@macalester.edu;


Jessica Kozarek ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, jkozarek@umn.edu;


58 - EN VOGUE: EX-SITU CALIBRATION OF NEXT GENERATION CAMERA TECHNOLOGY TO ASSESS AQUATIC FOOD-WEB STRUCTURE FOR JUVENILE SALMONIDS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EN VOGUE: EX-SITU CALIBRATION OF NEXT GENERATION CAMERA TECHNOLOGY TO ASSESS AQUATIC FOOD-WEB STRUCTURE FOR JUVENILE SALMONIDS Conventional methods of measuring insect drift can become difficult with increasing water velocity due to the accumulation of organic material within nets of a certain mesh size. The processing of multiple net samples can prove to be time consuming and expensive. Together these constraints significantly limit the capacity to sample food-web structure at the necessary temporal and spatial scales within critical habitat for certain size classes of juvenile salmonid. The Scripps Plankton Camera (SPC) employs a 0.137X magnification lens, onboard Odroid – XU4 and LINUX operating system which evaluates particles down to 1mm in length and measure the major axis of the particles within the frame of view of the camera. We utilized an experimental flow-through chamber attached to a variable speed water pump then manipulated frame rate, exposure time, and processing area range to increase resolution of sample particles. We also instituted a PYTHON Image Learning Package to differentiate between insect, detritus, and turbulent bubbles with 85% efficiency. Preliminary results indicate that the development and fine tuning of high resolution photographic technology could prove to be a valuable alternative when sampling insect dispersal in various capacities of lotic environments.

Nicholas Macias (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Santa Cruz, niamacia@ucsc.edu;


59 - MACROINVERBRATE FOOD WEBS OF A METAL-CONTAMINATED RIVER: IMPORTANCE OF ALGAL BLOOMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MACROINVERBRATE FOOD WEBS OF A METAL-CONTAMINATED RIVER: IMPORTANCE OF ALGAL BLOOMS River food webs associated with algal blooms have illustrated that number of trophic levels predicts the relative importance of bottom-up and top-down influences. Significantly lower trout abundance in Reach C of the metal-contaminated Upper Clark Fork River (UCFR, 20-30 fish/km), compared to upstream reaches (200-300 fish/km) and nearby rivers (600 – 3,000 fish/km) in Montana, USA, are of concern to restoration practitioners. Metal contamination in UCFR reflect its mining history, but Reach C, without significant metal pollution but with greatest algal growth, displays lowest trout abundance. Low abundance of top predators is concordant with HSS-Fretwell prediction that an odd number of trophic levels will result in nutrient-limited algal productivity. Nitrogen limiting conditions are repeatedly observed in UCFR (<0.005 ppm N-NO3), as well as N-fixing cyanobacteria. Assessment of food webs is necessary before considering other restoration practices to recover trout abundance. Macroinvertebrate data (greatest abundances of 14.4% Chironomidae, 29.3 % Baetis, 8.74% inermis), metal analysis (Cu, As, Zn, Pb, Cd), and stable isotope composition (13C, 15N) were used in a Bayesian mixing model to discern the trophic structure in Reach C and linked to trout consumers through fish stomach content analysis.

Kim Bray (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, kimberly.bray@umontana.edu;


60 - SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIATION OF BENTHIC METABOLISM IN A LARGE REGULATED RIVER

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIATION OF BENTHIC METABOLISM IN A LARGE REGULATED RIVER Benthic metabolism was measured in a large regulated river with the goal of describing spatial differences in benthic metabolism associated with substrate (cobble vs sand), habitat type (main channel vs backwater) and flow regulation (regulated vs unregulated) during the summer months. Metabolism was estimated using benthic chambers deployed over one-week periods in two reaches of the Saint John River in New Brunswick, Canada. A two-way ANOVA comparing substrate type and month found both GPP and ER differed among months, with the greatest rates occurring in August. However, only ER differed significantly between substrate types, with cobble substrate exhibiting greater rates. ER also differed between habitat types with greater rates in the backwater channel. GPP only differed between habitat types among months, peaking in July. Assessment of flow regulation showed differences between sites and among months, with GPP greater in the regulated reach and rates highest in June (unregulated) and July (regulated). ER only differed between regulated and unregulated sites in July, with higher rates at the regulated site. This study demonstrates that there are strong spatial and temporal trends for benthic metabolism in a large river.

Craig Irwin (Primary Presenter/Author), Western University, Department of Geography, London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C2, cirwin24@uwo.ca;


Joseph Culp ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada and Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, E3B 5A3, joseph.culp@canada.ca;


Adam G. Yates ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


61 - AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES, BIODIVERSITY METRICS, AND TOLERANCE VALUES: MONITORING AGRICULTURALLY IMPACTED PONDS, A TEN YEAR STUDY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES, BIODIVERSITY METRICS, AND TOLERANCE VALUES: MONITORING AGRICULTURALLY IMPACTED PONDS, A TEN YEAR STUDY A ten-year study was conducted at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in West Tennessee using aquatic macroinvertebrates to measure differences in community structure between agriculturally impacted (accessible by cattle) and control ponds (not accessible by cattle). Four funnel traps were deployed annually in the littoral area of ten ponds (five impacted, five control) for two consecutive 48-hour periods from 2006-2015. Community assemblages were compared between pond types using several biodiversity metrics (taxa richness, Shannon diversity index, and Pielou index). We extrapolated the North Carolina Biotic Index (NCBI) of tolerance values developed for predominantly lotic taxa to the collected pond taxa. The impacted cattle ponds had a significantly higher (p=0.0023) Shannon diversity index than the control ponds. Comparing this to the NCBI, we find that cattle ponds also have higher biotic indices. The NCBI score between cattle and control ponds is approaching significance (p=0.0807). This suggests that impacted ponds have a diverse community of more tolerant taxa. Development of a biotic index using tolerance values specific for lentic macroinvertebrates may strengthen the evidence of water quality differences between the pond types.

Lauren K. Schnorr (Primary Presenter/Author), Austin Peay State University, lschnorr@my.apsu.edu;


Steven W. Hamilton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Austin Peay State University, hamiltonsw@apsu.edu;


62 - COMPARISONS OF WINTER UNDER-ICE VS. SUMMER ICE-FREE ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF FIVE SUBALPINE LAKES IN THE KLAMATH MOUNTAINS, CA USA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COMPARISONS OF WINTER UNDER-ICE VS. SUMMER ICE-FREE ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF FIVE SUBALPINE LAKES IN THE KLAMATH MOUNTAINS, CA USA Recent studies suggest a need for investigating winter, under-ice processes and their contribution to ecological dynamics in lake ecosystems. This subject is especially relevant considering how climate variability is affecting the period of ice cover on lakes. We explore the winter (under-ice) vs. summer (ice-free, stratified) ecological attributes of five subalpine lakes (z= 3 to 35 m, area= 0.5 to 20.1 ha) in the upper Klamath mountain range of Northern California. We compare primary productivity rate (using 14C method) and zooplankton and phytoplankton compositions of the winter and summer period of these lakes. Primary productivity was twenty times higher in summer compared to winter. Phytoplankton compositions varied across lakes with Chlorophyceae, Euglenophyceae, and Bacillariophyceae dominating in summer and Bacillariophyceae dominating in winter. Zooplankton composition also varied across all lakes with Daphnia, Diaptomus, and Diaphanosoma spp. dominating in summer and Diaptomus spp. dominating in winter.

Karly Feher (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Nevada Reno, kfeher@nevada.unr.edu;


Robert C. Richards ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UC Davis , bobrichards.richards@gmail.com ;


Charles R Goldman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UC Davis , goldmantahoe@yahoo.com ;


Timothy Caldwell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada - Reno, timothycaldwell@unr.edu;


Sudeep Chandra ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, Global Water Center, sudeep@unr.edu;


64 - ABUNDANCE AND ACCUMULATION OF ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER ON GREAT LAKES BEACHES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ABUNDANCE AND ACCUMULATION OF ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER ON GREAT LAKES BEACHES Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) is well documented in oceans, but studies on AL’s spatial and temporal dynamics in freshwaters are rare. This project had two components. First, we used citizen-science data to quantify AL density and seasonality on 9 beaches throughout the Great Lakes that varied by substrate type. AL data was generated by the Alliance for the Great Lake’s Adopt-a-Beach program. We categorized AL by function (i.e., smoking, fishing) and density (No. per area), and compared among seasons, beaches, and to common beach descriptors. AL density was highest on urban, sandy, unmaintained beaches in fall, suggesting visitor littering as a primary source. The second project focused on 1 beach Lake Michigan beach. We used 4 permanent transects, spaced from the water’s edge inland, where each transect had 4 habitats (e.g., vegetation, path). Biweekly AL collection was used to quantify spatial and temporal variation in AL, and annual net input. Results also suggested that beach visitors are a primary AL source and that AL accumulates with natural debris. Overall, these data will inform new AL prevention and management policies.

Anna Vincent (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, avincent1@luc.edu;


Timothy Hoellein ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


65 - CAPTURE EFFICIENCY, POPULATION DYNAMICS, AND HABITAT USE OF MUDPUPPIES (NECTURUS MACULOSUS) IN A DISTURBED URBAN LAKE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CAPTURE EFFICIENCY, POPULATION DYNAMICS, AND HABITAT USE OF MUDPUPPIES (NECTURUS MACULOSUS) IN A DISTURBED URBAN LAKE Common mudpuppy salamanders (Necturus maculosus) are broadly distributed across east-central North America, yet their seasonal behavior, population dynamics, and general physiology are poorly studied. Capture efficiency data are also lacking. Mudpuppies were once abundant throughout the Great Lakes region but were listed as threatened in the state of Illinois in 2010, possibly due to habitat loss, introduced species, overexploitation, or inadequate sampling efforts. We developed a novel trapping technique for use in open water habitats. We used this approach to study a population in a highly disturbed urban environment at Wolf Lake, Chicago. Mudpuppies captured in minnow traps were larger (mean= 24.4 +/- 1.3 cm) than those caught in hand nets (mean= 15.2 +/- 0.74 cm). Larger mudpuppies were also found farther from shore (p=0.0039) and at greater depths (p<0.0001). This is indicative of capture or habitat use biases among size classes. Our results are part of an ongoing study that began in 2015. Continuation of this research will aid in conservation efforts and management of this understudied and vulnerable species throughout the Great Lakes region.

Jared Bilak (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Illinois University, bilak@siu.edu;


Matt Whiles ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Illinois University, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


Robin Warne ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Illinois University, rwarne@siu.edu;


Philip Willink ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Shedd Aquarium , pwillink@sheddaquarium.org;


Alicia Beattie ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Chagrin River Watershed Partners, Inc., abeattie@crwp.org;


66 - DIVERSITY OF ODONATA WITHIN A MAJOR TROPICAL URBAN REGION IN THE SAN JUAN METROPOLITAN AREA, PUERTO RICO

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DIVERSITY OF ODONATA WITHIN A MAJOR TROPICAL URBAN REGION IN THE SAN JUAN METROPOLITAN AREA, PUERTO RICO Urbanization is one of the most dramatic types of alteration to natural environments. However, within urban areas, species can adapt and be successful at inhabiting urban ecosystems. We focus on the San Juan Metropolitan Area; Puerto Rico and assessed Odonata diversity. The goal of our study was to understand how the diversity of odonates varies within the urban area and whether it differs among streams according to the level of urbanization that surrounds their ecosystems. We selected 30 urban streams and classified them according to their level of urbanization. Habitat quality was assessed using the stream visual assessment protocol as modified for Puerto Rico. Odonata were surveyed by visual identification, listing the species observed in one hour, and estimating their relative abundance. Most study sites had regular habitat conditions. Species richness ranged from 10 to 3 species per site. The most heavily urbanized sites had poor habitat conditions and the lowest species richness. Our study shows that the diversity of odonates reflects the degree of impact introduced by urbanization, even when studying populations that are adapted to urban environments.

Angelique Rosa-Marin (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico at Bayamon, angelique.rosa@upr.edu;


67 - DOES URBANIZATION INFLUENCES WING SYMMETRY AND SIZE OF ENALLAGMA COECUM (ODONATA: COENAGRIONIDAE) IN PUERTO RICO?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Does urbanization influences wing symmetry and size of Enallagma coecum (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) in Puerto Rico? Urbanization alters stream conditions, creating stress environment for aquatic fauna. Here, we studied how urbanization affects Enallagma coecum, an abundant damselfly in Puerto Rico. We focused on how different levels of urbanization influence the symmetry of male E. coecum and its body size. Nine streams draining the Rio Piedras watershed were selected along a gradient of impermeable surfaces. Twelve to 15 adult males were collected at each stream for a total of 126 specimens. Individuals were preserved and photographed (full body and each wing) for subsequent analysis with the ImageJ program. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate significant differences in wing symmetry variables (interior cells, postnodal fourth row cells and postnodal to stigma veins quantity) between sampling sites. Pearson's correlation tests were made to relate wing symmetry variables and body size with percent impermeable surface area in the watershed. We found a significant correlation (R=-0.70; p<0.05) between interior wing cell symmetry and the amount of impermeable area. Our study indicates that urbanization creates stress conditions that are reflected in individual symmetry. Overall, symmetry appears to be a good indicator of urban impacts on aquatic insect populations.

Limarie Reyes ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, limarie.reyes1@upr.edu;


Alonso Ramirez ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


Yazminne Meléndez (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico, yazminne.melendez@upr.edu;


68 - HAS THE ‘URBAN STREAM SYNDROME’ BECOME A SELF-FULFILLING PROPHECY?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HAS THE ‘URBAN STREAM SYNDROME’ BECOME A SELF-FULFILLING PROPHECY? It is well documented that urbanization contributes a suite of physical, chemical, and thermal stressors to receiving waterbodies. We examined 67 chemical, physical and biological attributes of streams draining 49 randomly-selected watersheds in the metropolitan area surrounding Raleigh. Watersheds ranged in development impacts, with 0 to 99.7 % of their area in impervious surfaces. In contrast to prior studies, we found no consistent changes in habitat structure, channel dimensions or bed sediment size distributions along the urbanization gradient. We found that watershed urbanization did lead to large and consistent changes in receiving stream chemistry (with increases in NO3, bioavailable and algal-derived DOC and the trace metals Pb, Cd and Zn) and thermal regimes. These chemical and thermal changes were associated with declines in macroinvertebrate taxa richness and altered macroinvertebrate community composition, but were not associated with any consistent shifts in microbial community structure or taxa richness or with shifts in microbially-mediated biogeochemical processes (C mineralization, denitrification potential, substrate-induced respiration). Random reach selection in our region does not support the classic urban stream syndrome paradigm.

Brooke Hassett (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, brooke.hassett@duke.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


69 - MICROPLASTIC ABUNDANCE IN SMALL MAN-MADE PONDS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MICROPLASTIC ABUNDANCE IN SMALL MAN-MADE PONDS Microplastics are small particles of plastic (< 5 mm) that have been shown to have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems. The source and extent of microplastic accumulation in freshwater systems has not been completely described by current studies. Urban areas are a potentially significant source of plastic pollution because they concentrate human activity, which has been related to the type and amount of microplastics found in aquatic systems. We measure the amount of microplastic pollution in samples collected from small man-made ponds in central Virginia with contrasting hydrology to assess the degree that connections to surface water are a source of microplastic inputs. Our results Samples of microplastics from at least 3 ponds along a gradient of storm water input will be tested. At one extreme will be samples from a ground-water-fed pond that receives essentially no urban run-off, and at the other extreme samples from a storm water management pond with extensive urban run-off will be collected. The amounts of microplastics from the ponds will be compared and related to how much surface water run-off it receives.

Hannah Hatke (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, hannah.hatke@live.longwood.edu;


Kenneth Fortino ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, fortinok@longwood.edu;


70 - TESTING THE EFFICACY OF PATTERNS IN CONDUCTIVITY AS A TOOL FOR WATERSHED MANAGEMENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

TESTING THE EFFICACY OF PATTERNS IN CONDUCTIVITY AS A TOOL FOR WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Increased conductivity of streams is a common symptom of watershed urbanization and is often highly correlated with degraded water quality and impaired biotic assemblages. Stormwater runoff, sewage effluent, and sediment inputs have all been cited as sources of ions that drive conductivity. However, it is often difficult to identify these sources of pollution and distinguish them from one another. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal patterns of conductivity we continuously monitored specific conductance (SpC), stage height, and temperature from October 2016 – April 2017 in seven streams in Athens, GA, USA. Baseflow SpC was consistent in time but variable among streams, suggesting chronic sources of ions in some urban streams. In addition, our study revealed distinct patterns of high conductivity that may be diagnostic of specific stressors and events, such as evidence of “first flush” phenomena, sewer leaks and sedimentation events. Thus, the continuous monitoring of conductivity may be an effective management tool for identifying specific pollution events. Ongoing work will test the efficacy of conductivity monitoring as a tool for watershed management.

Seth Wenger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sethwenger@fastmail.fm;


Amy Rosemond ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


Phillip Bumpers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, bumpersp@gmail.com;


Emily Johnson (POC,Primary Presenter), , emj49548@uga.edu;


71 - THE IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES IN AN URBAN FORESTED WATERSHED

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES IN AN URBAN FORESTED WATERSHED Headwater streams are important because they have increased biological activity, are connected to the watershed via riparian zones, and represent most of streams within the watershed. These ecological services might be critical in urban watersheds where streams have altered hydrology, increased nutrient concentrations, and decreased biodiversity. Reedy Creek is 31.1 square kilometers watershed in Charlotte, NC whose headwaters (6.5 square kilometers) are protected in a forested urban county reserve. We have been monitoring macroinvertebrates and background water quality (dissolved oxygen, temperature, nutrients) at 10 headwater locations in different subwatersheds seasonally for 5 years as part of a pre-restoration study. EPT richness ranged from 4-19 species depending on location and season and overall the NCBI scores rated these streams as good-fair to excellent. Subwatersheds with forested land use had higher diversity than those with urban development upstream. As an urban headwater stream Reedy Creek is a critical component of the watershed that has higher diversity than other urban streams in the region. Understanding the role of these forested urban headwaters may be essential to maintaining and improving urban stream biodiversity.

Rebecca Black (Primary Presenter/Author), UNC Charlotte , rblack27@uncc.edu;


Sandra Clinton, PhD ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;


David Vinson, PhD ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, dsvinson@uncc.edu;


Sara McMillan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue University, mcmill@purdue.edu;


72 - URBAN PONDS: AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION IN DENTON, TEXAS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

URBAN PONDS: AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION IN DENTON, TEXAS The City of Denton, located in a semi-arid region of Texas, has over 200 manmade ponds within its city limits. Many of these ponds, located in densely populated areas, are engineered to control storm water runoff. There is a general lack of recognition of the value these waters contribute to regional biodiversity and as greenspaces. This study, conducted in Denton, is monitoring habitat variables and macroinvertebrate diversity in a series of ponds selected to represent a gradient of urban influences. The objective of this study is to identify the variables associated with the highest diversity. The study has determined that all the storm water ponds have high levels of diversity. The highest diversity and those with unique taxa were found in ponds with managed aquatic macrophytes and riparian vegetation. Results of this study are being used to develop a conservation plan for the city. The ponds are a benefit to the ecology of the city and provide beautiful, green spaces. If managed correctly, these systems can be incorporated into sustainable development in the future of the City of Denton.

Sabrina Moore (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, sabrinamoore2@my.unt.edu;


73 - USING AN URBAN REFERENCE TO DEFINE AQUATIC HABITAT EXPECTATIONS IN STORMWATER-AFFECTED STREAMS OF THE KANSAS CITY METRO AREA IN MISSOURI

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

USING AN URBAN REFERENCE TO DEFINE AQUATIC HABITAT EXPECTATIONS IN STORMWATER-AFFECTED STREAMS OF THE KANSAS CITY METRO AREA IN MISSOURI Urban waterways have been subject to modification and often do not meet aquatic life standards. We studied macroinvertebrate indicators across habitat-quality gradients in 10 watersheds within a stormwater management region of the Kansas City metropolitan area. Line Creek, an urban site with an unmodified riparian corridor that has consistently met aquatic life standards, was used to develop expectations for in-stream habitat characteristics. Overall habitat scores were significantly correlated with macroinvertebrate scores (r = 0.54, p = 0.04). Compared to other urban sites with similar land use and stormwater inputs, Line Creek obtained 20-30% higher habitat scores, with greatest differences observed in riparian characteristics and riffle substrate parameters. Line Creek was within 7-12% of reference and non-urban control sites for most macroinvertebrate indicators and had significantly better total species richness (p = 0.001-0.04), EPT (Ephemeroptera-Plecoptera-Trichoptera) richness (p = 0.001-0.007), and non-chironomid Diptera abundance (p = 0.011-0.026). Results indicate that regional urban streams have the capability to meet aquatic life expectations when riparian habitat corridors remain intact and the integrity of riffle substrates is maintained.

Barry Poulton (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, bpoulton@usgs.gov;


Jing Tao ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas City Water Services Dept., Jing.Tao@kcmo.org;


74 - CHARACTERIZING VARIABILITY AND DRIVERS OF WETLAND STRUCTURE AT THE GREAT DISMAL SWAMP

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CHARACTERIZING VARIABILITY AND DRIVERS OF WETLAND STRUCTURE AT THE GREAT DISMAL SWAMP Peatlands are unique wetland ecosystems, which provide valuable ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration, water storage, and biodiversity preservation. The Great Dismal Swamp (GDS) is the largest intact remnant of a greater forested peatland system that once spanned from the Chesapeake Bay to the Albemarle Sound; however, extensive logging and ditching shifted hydrologic regimes and vegetative composition across GDS. Once a mosaic of different community types, these disturbances resulted in more homogeneous vegetative composition, a dominance of red maple, and increased peat subsidence. In this work, we seek to characterize contemporary vegetative composition and peat soil properties and depths across GDS using data collected from 80 distributed survey plots. Further, we explore hydrologic controls on wetland structure by relating vegetation data to soil hydrologic indicators (e.g., bulk density, carbon/nitrogen ratios). Initial results identify major community types present but also highlight the dominance of certain species, which span inferred hydrologic regimes. Our results will inform adaptive hydrologic restoration efforts currently underway at GDS to maximize habitat diversity and carbon storage.

Raymond Ludwig (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, rfludwig@vt.edu;


Daniel McLaughlin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech University, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, mclaugd@vt.edu;


75 - DRYING RATES OF EPHEMERAL WETLANDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BREEDING AMPHIBIANS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DRYING RATES OF EPHEMERAL WETLANDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BREEDING AMPHIBIANS Ephemeral wetlands provide breeding habitat for many amphibian species, and wetland hydrology plays a crucial role in determining amphibian breeding success. We empirically evaluated recession rates (water level declines) in wetlands inhabited by the endangered Reticulated Flatwoods Salamander (Ambystoma bishopi). High recession rates are potentially problematic for flatwoods salamanders because of a long development time, including metamorphosis usually occurring from March¬–May when groundwater losses are combined with high evapotranspiration rates. To evaluate magnitude, variability, and drivers of recession rates, we monitored water levels in 33 wetlands in the Florida panhandle from 2012–2015 and examined recession rates during the flatwoods salamander reproductive period. After controlling for the effects of specific yield, standardized recession rates were, on average, 3.9 times daily potential evapotranspiration rates, suggesting that groundwater fluxes are an important driver of water level declines in these wetlands. Standardized recession rates were variable across the landscape and increased with decreasing wetland size, indicating that larger wetlands are often hydrologically more suitable for flatwoods salamanders. This work points to these and other controls on wetland recession rates and their role in regulating amphibian reproductive success.

Houston Chandler (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, houstonc@vt.edu;


Daniel McLaughlin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech University, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, mclaugd@vt.edu;


Thomas Gorman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, gormant@vt.edu;


Kevin McGuire ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, kevin.mcguire@vt.edu;


Jeffrey Feaga ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, feaga05@vt.edu;


Carola Haas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, cahaas@vt.edu;


76 - EXAMINING THE LEGACY EFFECTS OF CAPTIVE-REARING ON BLANDING’S TURTLES (EMYDOIDEA BLANDINGII)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EXAMINING THE LEGACY EFFECTS OF CAPTIVE-REARING ON BLANDING’S TURTLES (EMYDOIDEA BLANDINGII) The Blanding's Turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and is offered protection throughout much of its known range. Significant head-starting efforts have been conducted to recover populations of E. blandingii in northeastern Illinois, with over 2,500 turtles released across an 19-year period. However, the success of these programs both locally and range-wide has not been fully quantified. Our research project gauged the success of an augmentation program in northern Illinois (Blanding's Turtle Recovery Project) by assessing the legacy effects (e.g., long-term physiological health) of captive-reared, recently-released and captive-reared, formerly-released (i.e., captive reared and released prior to 2016) turtles at one wetland location. Our results indicate blood chemistry metrics and stress quickly stabalize following release of captive-reared hatchlings, and first-year survival was over 90% for released animals. Examining these efforts will provide a measure of how released turtles are acclimating to their environment, will help to gain an understanding for the consequences of rearing effects, and will provide an assessment of the health of captive-reared and released turtles.

Armand Cann (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, acann@luc.edu;


Leigh Anne Harden ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Benedictine University, lharden@ben.edu;


Joseph Milanovich ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


77 - GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLAND MONITORING PROGRAM: NOVEL RESOURCES FOR SCIENTISTS, AGENCIES, AND THE PUBLIC

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLAND MONITORING PROGRAM: NOVEL RESOURCES FOR SCIENTISTS, AGENCIES, AND THE PUBLIC Coastal wetlands are simultaneously among the most threatened and ecologically important habitats of the Laurentian Great Lakes. In 2010, the USEPA, via the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, funded the Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program (CWMP) for an initial 5-year period. In 2016, the program was renewed through 2020 to better inform future wetland protection and restoration efforts. To date, over 1000 Great Lakes wetlands have been sampled for water quality, vegetation, invertebrates, fish, amphibians, and birds using standardized protocols. Additional wetlands designated for protection or restoration are also being sampled to evaluate the effectiveness of those efforts. The extensive data gathered by this monitoring program has allowed the condition of Great Lakes coastal wetlands to be evaluated using various metrics and IBIs based on a range of biota. As an example, the CWMP has already contributed to invasive species databases designed for early detection and distributional assessment. To ensure resources and data from this program are available to any interested party, a web-based wetland map exploration tool and data portal has been erected on the CWMP webpage ( http://www.greatlakeswetlands.org).

Gary Lamberti (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Notre Dame, glambert@nd.edu;


Michael Brueseke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, mbruesek@nd.edu;


Whitney Conard ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, wconard@nd.edu;


Katherine O'Reilly ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, koreill2@nd.edu;


Valerie Brady ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, University Minnesota Duluth, vbrady@d.umn.edu;


Jan Ciborowski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, cibor@uwindsor.ca;


Matthew Cooper ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation, Northland College, mcooper@northland.edu;


Nicholas Danz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Natural Sciences, University of Wisconsin Superior, ndanz@uwsuper.edu;


Joseph Gathman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Biology Department, University of Wisconsin River Falls, joseph.gathman@uwrf.edu;


Greg Grabas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, greg.grabas@ec.gc.ca;


Robert Howe ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Wisconsin Green Bay, hower@uwgb.edu;


Lucinda Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth, ljohnson@d.umn.edu;


Ashley Moerke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Aquatic Research Laboratory, Lake Superior State University, amoerke@lssu.edu;


Gerald Niemi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, University Minnesota Duluth, gniemi@d.umn.edu;


Kevin O'Donnell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Great Lakes National Program Office, odonnell.thomas@epa.gov;


Todd Redder ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Limnotech, tredder@limno.com;


Carl Ruetz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, carl.ruetz@gvsu.edu;


Douglas Tozer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bird Studies Canada, dtozer@bsc-eoc.org;


Donald Uzarski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University, uzars1dg@cmich.edu;


Douglas Wilcox ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Environmental Science and Biology, The College at Brockport, dwilcox@brockport.edu;


78 - PRE-RESTORATION MONITORING OF A HYDROLOGIC RECONNECTION PROJECT: FATE OF LEGACY PHOSPHORUS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PRE-RESTORATION MONITORING OF A HYDROLOGIC RECONNECTION PROJECT: FATE OF LEGACY PHOSPHORUS Muskegon Lake is a drowned river mouth lake designated as a Great Lakes Area of Concern (AOC) due to a history of industrial discharges, shoreline alterations, and wetland habitat loss. Property along the AOC’s main tributary, the lower Muskegon River, is under consideration for restoration and hydrologic reconnection to the river to improve fish and wildlife habitat. Past land uses of the restoration area include celery farming, oil and gas exploration, and sulfur deposition from a coal-fired power plant. This pre-restoration monitoring study examines possible phosphorus-related outcomes when reconnecting the property to the natural river. Sediment core isotherms indicated surface (0-10 cm) and subsurface (20-30 cm) depths have equilibrium phosphorus concentrations ranging 0.1-8.4 mg P/L; however, soluble reactive phosphorus in river water was only 0.007 mg P/L, suggesting sediments may act as short-term phosphorus sources to the water column following hydrologic reconnection. Analyses of phosphorus fractionation and river water sediment rewetting experiment are forthcoming. Results will inform a restoration design minimizing phosphorus sediment loading and avoiding negative impacts in downstream Muskegon Lake, which currently meets phosphorus goals for AOC delisting.

Michael Hassett (Primary Presenter/Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, hassetmi@gvsu.edu;


Maggie Oudsema ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, oudsemam@gvsu.edu;


Nicole Hahn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, hahnni@mail.gvsu.edu];


Alan Steinman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute-Grand Valley State University, steinmaa@gvsu.edu;


79 - SALINITY INDUCED NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS RELEASE IN NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL FORESTED WETLANDS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SALINITY INDUCED NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS RELEASE IN NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL FORESTED WETLANDS Coastal wetlands act as an important biofilter between inland and marine habitats by sequestering nutrients. However, coastal wetlands are particularly vulnerable to increased salinization from sea level rise and saltwater intrusion. Increased salinization has been shown to lead to the release of stored nutrients due to salinity induced desorption of nitrogen and phosphorus. We evaluated ammonium (NH4+) and phosphate (PO43-) desorption in response to a range of salinities from freshwater to sea water (0, 3, 10, and 35 ppt Cl-) on soils from two natural, and one restored forested wetland. Soil ammonium concentrations in the restored wetland (5.6 µg cm-3 soil) are double that in the natural wetlands (1.2 and 2.3 µg cm-3 soil). Despite the large difference in NH4+ concentration, all three wetlands responded similarly to the addition of salt, with a rapid increase in NH4+ desorption up to 10 ppt Cl- concentration, then leveling off. We did not observe any clear patterns of PO43- desorption in response to salinity. This work is contributing to our understanding of how sea level rise and saltwater intrusion affect nutrient cycling in coastal wetlands.

Matthew Stillwagon (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University, mgstillw@ncsu.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


Justin Wright ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, justin.wright@duke.edu;


Marcelo Ardon ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, mlardons@ncsu.edu;


80 - EFFECTS OF A RUN OF RIVER RESERVOIR ON DOWNSTREAM WATER QUALITY WITH VARIABLE DISCHARGE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF A RUN OF RIVER RESERVOIR ON DOWNSTREAM WATER QUALITY WITH VARIABLE DISCHARGE Production of suspended algae within rivers and reservoirs is still not well understood, but could be important for nutrient processing. This study used semi-Lagrangian sampling to measure changes in algal biomass and nutrients downstream of a run-of-river reservoir on the Kalamazoo River (Michigan, USA). Longitudinal surveys showed that the upstream reservoir (Morrow Lake) transformed nitrogen and phosphorus to particulate forms by producing algae (measured as chlorophyll-a). However the algal biomass did not persist for long downstream, and the nutrients it contained were evidently regenerated. The downstream extent of algal biomass transport was dependent on discharge, with algae persisting further downstream in high flow summers than low flow summers, although at the highest discharge flushing limited algal growth in the reservoir. Concentrations of nitrate were reduced within and downstream of the reservoir, particularly during the lowest flow summers, but then returned to upstream concentrations after 30 km downstream. Ammonium did not show such predictable patterns. Understanding how run of river reservoirs affect the movement of nutrients through rivers is important to downstream water quality.

Micaleila Desotelle (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, desotell@msu.edu;


Stephen K. Hamilton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, hamilton@kbs.msu.edu;


81 - ARE MERCURY METHYLATION AND SELENATE REDUCTION INDEPENDENT PROCESSES IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ARE MERCURY METHYLATION AND SELENATE REDUCTION INDEPENDENT PROCESSES IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS? Both mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) can bioaccumulate within aquatic ecosystems and are toxic to organisms when found at high concentrations. Individually, high concentrations of either Hg or Se in water result in harmful impacts to biota, but the presence of both trace metals has been shown to have antagonistic effects; in fact, the assimilation efficiency of Hg is decreased when Se is present. Due to this relationship, many studies suggest that increased environmental concentrations and consumption of Se is a pathway to reduce Hg toxicity in organisms. Yet, despite this important link, little is understood in regard to biogeochemical factors promoting the environmental conversion of Hg and Se into more bioavailable forms and thereby leading to the concurrent uptake of Hg and Se by biota. We present a literature synthesis of the biogeochemical interaction between mercury and selenium, as well as abiotic factors that impact their bioavailability. We examine mechanisms for environmental interaction of Hg and Se and evidence for an antagonistic effect of Se on Hg toxicity.

Jacqueline Gerson (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, jacqueline.gerson@duke.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


82 - BIOFILM-SEDIMENT INTERACTIONS: MICRON-SCALE SPATIAL AND DIEL VARIATION IN OXYGEN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

BIOFILM-SEDIMENT INTERACTIONS: MICRON-SCALE SPATIAL AND DIEL VARIATION IN OXYGEN Photosynthetic biofilms in streams can influence element cycles through changes in physicochemical conditions over diel time scales. Through diffusion and advection, the products of algal metabolism may modify chemical speciation and ecosystem function in sediments. We quantified the magnitude of change in physicochemical gradients over diel periods in sediments underlying photosynthetic biofilms. Hourly micron-scale physicochemical depth profiles from the water column into sediment were collected using oxygen microelectrodes. The sediment oxic layer was shallowest (~3 mm) at nighttime just before dawn and deepest (>10 mm) between 13:00–19:00. Deepest oxic layer was concurrent with the time that sediment oxygen concentration was highest (~140% saturation). Maximum sediment oxygen concentration was stable for an additional 4 hours following maximum water column concentration. Water column oxygen concentrations indicated that the stream was slightly autotrophic (NEP = 0.28 g O2/d/m2). Increased depth in the sediment oxic layer over diel periods suggests that algal biofilms can drive sediment physicochemistry and coupled elemental cycles at fine temporal scales. Time lag in oxygen concentrations within sediments suggests that biogeochemical reactions favored under oxic conditions would be sustained at depth beyond the period of peak primary production.

Andrea Fitzgibbon (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University , afitzgib@kent.edu;


David Costello ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


83 - CAN HYDROLOGIC RESTORATION DECREASE GREENHOUSE GAS FLUXES FROM POCOSIN WETLANDS?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CAN HYDROLOGIC RESTORATION DECREASE GREENHOUSE GAS FLUXES FROM POCOSIN WETLANDS? Pocosin wetlands are efficient carbon sinks found in the southeastern US. Hydrologic restoration to pre-disturbance water levels seeks to recover carbon storage as a climate mitigation strategy. Raising water table levels can lead to reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, but may increase methane (CH4) emissions. We measured CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions before, during, and after re-wetting wetlands at the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. Pre-restoration means of CO2 and N2O fluxes were 2x higher in sites scheduled for restoration than reference sites (CO2 350±77 mg m-2 hr-1, 176±120 mg m-2 hr-1, N2O: 85±34 µg m-2 hr-1, 36±22 µg m-2 hr-1 respectively). While CH4 fluxes varied widely among sites (1.48±22.2 µg m-2 hr-1 restored, -4.48±44.2 µg m-2 hr-1 reference). Mean water table depths were lower at sites scheduled to be restored compared to reference sites (-0.63m vs. -0.37m, respectively) partially explaining the higher CO2 fluxes (F=22.8, p<0.01). We expect that decreased levels of CO2 fluxes will not be offset by increased CH4 emissions, resulting in net carbon storage in these restored pocosin wetlands.

Luise Armstrong (Primary Presenter/Author), East Carolina University, armstronglu15@students.ecu.edu;


Ariane Peralta ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), East Carolina University, peraltaa@ecu.edu;


Marcelo Ardon ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, mlardons@ncsu.edu;


84 - DISSOLVED ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CARBON IN PRE-RESTORATION URBAN FOREST STREAMS, CHARLOTTE, NC

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DISSOLVED ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CARBON IN PRE-RESTORATION URBAN FOREST STREAMS, CHARLOTTE, NC In freshwater ecosystems, dissolved organic carbon records carbon sources and respiration, whereas dissolved inorganic carbon is thought to integrate groundwater inputs, mineral reactions, and microbial respiration. Land use change may influence the sources and utilization of organic carbon and DIC production. This study aims to understand DIC and DOC occurrence in tributaries of deeply incised, pre-restoration Reedy Creek (watershed area 2.5 mi2). Land uses include agriculture, residential development, pond influence, and undeveloped forest. Since 2016, surface and ground water were sampled from these sub-watersheds and the main watershed outlet (11 sites) for DIC and DOC in addition to major ions, nutrients, and stable isotopes. The agricultural watershed had the highest DOC concentration (site average 5.2 ppm in summer-fall 2016), while DOC was fairly consistent among the other land uses. DIC concentration was highest in the small developed watersheds (site averages 1.1-1.2 mM in summer-fall 2016) and lowest in the undeveloped forest stream (average 0.5 mM in summer-fall 2016).

Taylor Kiker (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, tkiker@uncc.edu;


David Vinson, PhD ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, dsvinson@uncc.edu;


Sandra Clinton, PhD ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;


Sara McMillan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue University, mcmill@purdue.edu;


85 - HYDROLOGIC EFFECTS ON PHOSPHORUS STORAGE IN A FRESHWATER ESTUARY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HYDROLOGIC EFFECTS ON PHOSPHORUS STORAGE IN A FRESHWATER ESTUARY Excess phosphorus (P) in the Great Lakes stimulates toxic algal blooms that are harmful to the environment and human health. Research has shown that Great Lakes coastal wetlands are able to store a significant amount of P and help mitigate eutrophication. However, an individual wetland can spatially vary causing heterogeneous P storage. Our objective was to determine areas of maximum P storage in the sediments in Old Woman Creek estuary, an unaltered wetland along the coast of Lake Erie. We sampled sediment at 30 locations throughout the wetland at various depths and plant communities. Results from log-normalized data collected in June 2016 show a negative linear relationship between log water depth and log sediment total P (r2=-0.67). This suggests that P storage is higher in shallower areas. Additionally, log sediment total P shows a positive linear relationship with log total iron and log organic matter (r2=0.82 and r2=0.73, respectively) suggesting P is stored in the estuary by binding to iron oxides and in organic matter. Future analysis includes determining the variables that contribute to optimized P storage at shallower depths.

Bree Richardson (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, bricha34@kent.edu;


Lauren Kinsman-Costello ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, lkinsman@kent.edu;


Laura Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Heidelberg University, ljohnson@heidelberg.edu;


Kristin Arend ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Department of Natural Resources, kristin.arend@dnr.state.oh.us;


86 - PATTERNS AND CONTROLS ON CELLULOSE DECOMPOSITION RATES WITHIN THICK ACCUMULATIONS OF FLOCCULENT SEDIMENT IN SHALLOW FRESHWATERS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PATTERNS AND CONTROLS ON CELLULOSE DECOMPOSITION RATES WITHIN THICK ACCUMULATIONS OF FLOCCULENT SEDIMENT IN SHALLOW FRESHWATERS Thick accumulations of flocculent organic sediments (floc) are common in shallow freshwater ecosystems, but their biogeochemical and ecological importance are understudied. Investigating decomposition processes in floc is necessary to understand how these accumulations are maintained over time and how they contribute to organic carbon storage in freshwaters. We hypothesized that temperature and depth in floc are primary controls on decomposition rates; thus, rates would be higher in overlying water than in floc and would decrease with depth in the floc. To test this, we deployed vertical arrays of cotton strips in floc at 15 sites with diverse physicochemical conditions. After 21 days we retrieved the cotton strips and measured tensile strength loss as a proxy for decomposition. We also measured surface water and porewater chemistry, temperature, and dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine which factors influenced decomposition rates. Our results show that decomposition rates were on average lower in overlying water than in floc (where DO and temperature are typically lower), and suggest that the interactions between temperature, depth in floc, and dissolved phosphorus levels affect decomposition rates within floc.

Nicolas Lara (Primary Presenter/Author), Oberlin College, nlara@oberlin.edu;


Dustin Kincaid ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University, kincai32@msu.edu;


Stephen K. Hamilton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, hamilton@kbs.msu.edu;


Scott Tiegs ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


87 - PATTERNS IN DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER CHARACTER PROVIDE PERSPECTIVE ON THE INTERCONNECTION AND FUNCTION OF WATERSHED ECOSYSTEMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PATTERNS IN DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER CHARACTER PROVIDE PERSPECTIVE ON THE INTERCONNECTION AND FUNCTION OF WATERSHED ECOSYSTEMS The movement of water connects watershed ecosystems linking uplands to floodplains and headwater streams to oceans. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a critical currency for material and energy exchange among these systems, as well as an indicator of processes that transform DOM character along the way. Hence, DOM character may trace hydrologic connectivity between ecosystems, and indicate function within ecosystems. We evaluated DOM composition fluorometrically (Excitation Emission Matrices; EEMs), and modeled variation in carbon quality with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analyses. We compiled eight DOM PARAFAC models representing common watershed components, including: precipitation, glacial snowpack/ice, agricultural soils, floodplain sediments, headwaters, and higher-order rivers. Recalcitrant DOM chemical species were dominant signatures of precipitation, headwaters, floodplains, soils, and rivers, and may provide a more conservative tracer of hydrologic connections (e.g., linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems). Labile DOM were ubiquitous, varying with source environment (e.g., glaciers and geothermally-fed streams), indicating primary production or local carbon processing dynamics. Taken together, classification of DOM character regimes across watersheds will lead to a scalable perspective on how whole-watershed function emerges from the integrated behavior of composite ecosystems.

Juliana D'Andrilli (Primary Presenter/Author), Montana State University, juliana@montana.edu;


James Junker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, james.junker1@gmail.com;


Robert Payn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, Montana Institute on Ecosystems, rpayn@montana.edu;


Meryl Storb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, meryl.storb@gmail.com;


H. Maurice Valett ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, maury.valett@umontana.edu;


Marc Peipoch ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, Division Biological Sciences, marc.peipoch@mso.umt.edu;


Brent Christner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, xner@ufl.edu;


Rachel Joyce ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, rejoyce17@ufl.edu;


Rachel Kohn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, rkohn2@ufl.edu;


Eric Scholl ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, escholl86@gmail.com ;


Richard Engel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, rengel@montana.edu;


Carlos Romero ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, carlos.romero2@msu.montana.edu;


88 - SYNTHESIZING COASTAL SALTWATER INTRUSION STUDIES ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERN US - ARE ALL SALINIZATION PATHWAYS THE SAME?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SYNTHESIZING COASTAL SALTWATER INTRUSION STUDIES ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERN US - ARE ALL SALINIZATION PATHWAYS THE SAME? Freshwater ecosystems of the east coast of the United States are becoming more saline as climate change advances the progression of marine salts landward through sea level rise, strengthened storm surges, and increased drought intensity. Efforts to monitor saltwater incursion into freshwater ecosystems have demonstrated large variability in the advancing salinity front, meaning that not all systems are experiencing saltwater incursion in the same way. By comparing solute chemistry and soil solution data from sites across the southeastern United States, we aim to evaluate these differences and explain the variability in ecosystem response to salinization. We ask: what is the range of salt concentrations experienced in freshwater coastal environments? What are the rates of salinity changes over time at each site? Do relative solute contributions fluctuate across different systems, and what can be inferred about the underlying biogeochemical response to salinization? Results from this data synthesis indicate far more variability in solute chemistry and soil solution data across salinization sites than previously appreciated.

Emily Ury (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, ury.emily@gmail.com;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


Justin Wright ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, justin.wright@duke.edu;


89 - THE CONTRIBUTION OF DARK METABOLISM TO STREAM ECOSYSTEM ENERGETICS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE CONTRIBUTION OF DARK METABOLISM TO STREAM ECOSYSTEM ENERGETICS The flow of carbon and nutrients through streams is fundamentally linked to the flow of energy. Dark metabolism – the collection of anaerobic respiration and metabolic processes not mediated by light – can constitute a significant portion of the net energy flow. Traditional measurements of stream metabolism calculate rates of net ecosystem productivity based on diel O2 curves, using the assumption that photosynthesis and aerobic respiration are the only processes acting to produce or consume energy. This does not capture dark metabolism, which has been measured and found to contribute substantially to net energy flow in a variety of streams. Dark metabolism includes both autotrophic processes (e.g. nitrification) and heterotrophic processes (e.g. denitrification), with these processes constituting up to 13% and 19% of the energetic budgets respectively. In this study we present a synthesis of stream energy budgets calculated from Gibbs free energy of the processes measured in available literature.

Alice Carter (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, alicecarter05@gmail.com;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


Jim Heffernan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, james.heffernan@duke.edu;


90 - THE IMPACT OF ANTIBIOTICS ON SEDIMENT BIOGEOCHEMCIAL PROCESSES IN URBAN STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE IMPACT OF ANTIBIOTICS ON SEDIMENT BIOGEOCHEMCIAL PROCESSES IN URBAN STREAMS The presence of antibiotics in the environment have been identified as an emerging environmental contaminant problem (Buxton, 2014). These compounds have been detected in various levels in stream water and sediments downstream of wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs). Much is known surrounding bacterial resistance associated with exposure to antibiotics. However, little is known about the potential impact these antibiotics may have on microbial communities that are critical for nitrification, denitrification, methanogenesis and methane oxidation. The present study proposes to identify the most abundant antibiotics and their concentration in surface water, porewater, and sediment downstream of WWTFs and other non-point sources. The most abundant antibiotics will be studied in microcosms of stream sediment and water to assess the potential impact common antibiotics may have on nitrification, denitrification, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation. Previous studies have demonstrated that antibiotics can limit these processes, however, the concentration used were above environmental relevance. Accordingly, this study is designed to assess the impact of antibiotics on these ecosystem functions at environmentally relevant concentrations.

Austin Gray (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Carolina at Greensboro, adgray2@uncg.edu;


91 - TOTAL NITRATE REMOVAL BY FLOCCULENT ORGANIC SEDIMENTS IN SHALLOW FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

TOTAL NITRATE REMOVAL BY FLOCCULENT ORGANIC SEDIMENTS IN SHALLOW FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Anthropogenic activities have increased the availability of nitrogen (N) to the biosphere. Some proportion of this N enters aquatic ecosystems, mainly as nitrate, via runoff, groundwater, and/or atmospheric deposition. Relative to their areal coverage, a disproportionate amount of anthropogenic N is processed by these recipient ecosystems. Nitrogen cycling in small waterbodies, given their shallow nature, is strongly influenced by the sediment-water interface. In these ecosystems, thick layers of flocculent organic sediments (floc) have a tendency to accumulate. Although floc is nearly ubiquitous, little is known about its biogeochemical importance in shallow freshwater ecosystems. The objective of this study was to measure in situ nitrate removal rates by floc in a variety of shallow waters by enriching overlying water in mesocosms with nitrate and bromide and monitoring changes in concentrations over three diel cycles. Uptake rates of nitrate from overlying water increased with increasing water temperature, water depth, and sediment chlorophyll concentration, and ranged from -0.25 to -7.28 mmol m-2 h-1. These rates are similar to those measured in other shallow aquatic ecosystems.

Dustin Kincaid (Primary Presenter/Author), W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University, kincai32@msu.edu;


Stephen K. Hamilton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, hamilton@kbs.msu.edu;


92 - WATER QUALITY RAMIFICATIONS OF TEMPORARY DRAINAGE OF OREGON RESERVOIRS TO FACILITATE JUVENILE CHINOOK SALMON PASSAGE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

WATER QUALITY RAMIFICATIONS OF TEMPORARY DRAINAGE OF OREGON RESERVOIRS TO FACILITATE JUVENILE CHINOOK SALMON PASSAGE Reservoirs can support anadromous salmonids but the dams may impede fish passage downstream. The Willamette River system in Oregon (USA) has a number of such dams, including the Fall Creek Reservoir. Managers are experimenting with deep drawdowns of that reservoir to promote downstream passage of juvenile endangered Chinook Salmon, and to discourage invasive fish species that prey on or compete with the salmon. Over the past four years we have studied the downstream water quality changes during these drawdowns, which reach stream bed in the late autumn. We found modest increases in available nutrient concentrations due to drainage of near-bottom water and surficial sediment porewaters, but the increase is ephemeral and unlikely to cause eutrophication. Upon reaching stream bed there is much erosion and export of fine sediments. The oxygen demand of these sediments is not high. Sedimentation of downstream habitats is the greatest concern, but careful management of the drawdown could mitigate sediment export.

Stephen Hamilton (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, hamiltonsteve811@gmail.com;


Christina Murphy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries & Wildlife, christina.murphy@oregonstate.edu;


Sherri Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, sherrijohnson@fs.fed.us;


Ivan Arismendi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries & Wildlife, ivan.arismendi@oregonstate.edu;


93 - WITHIN-REACH VARIATION IN NITRIFICATION AND DENITRIFICATION RATES IN STREAMS OF THE UPPER PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

WITHIN-REACH VARIATION IN NITRIFICATION AND DENITRIFICATION RATES IN STREAMS OF THE UPPER PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Variation of nitrogen transformation rates among channel geomorphic units within a stream is assumed to be small, but has been seldom quantified. We asked whether nitrification and denitrification rates varied among randomly selected pools within a 200m reach from three streams in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Nitrification rates, quantified using nitrapyrin-inhibition, and denitrification rates, quantified using acetylene block, were significantly lower in the smallest (discharge = 4.5 L/s) than in the largest (2700 L/s) stream, but were similar to those in an intermediate sized stream (30 L/s). There was greater variation in rates among pools in the smallest stream (coefficient of variation (CV) = 2.0 for nitrification, 6.3 for denitrification) than within the other two streams or across all pools in the study (CV = 0.2 to 1.6). Across all streams, denitrification and nitrification were positively correlated (r = 0.69, p < 0.001), but not correlated to ammonium, phosphate, or sediment organic matter. Our findings suggest that rates of nitrogen transformations may be highly variable among channel units and therefore may not be well estimated by a single study site per reach.

Michelle Kelly (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Technological University, mckelly1@mtu.edu;


Kevin Nevorski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, kcnevors@mtu.edu;


Amy Marcarelli ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


94 - AGRICULTURAL IMPACTS ON ALGAL AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN VERNAL POOLS IN WEST-CENTRAL OHIO

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AGRICULTURAL IMPACTS ON ALGAL AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN VERNAL POOLS IN WEST-CENTRAL OHIO Limited research has been conducted on lower trophic levels in vernal pools despite their significant contributions to food web dynamics and rapid responses to changes in environmental conditions. In 2013, two vernal pools located in two different habitats (prairie and woodland) were sampled at the Ohio Northern University Tidd-Oakes Farm in Hardin County, Ohio, USA, to determine the vascular plant, algal, macroinvertebrate and amphibian community composition and their corresponding physicochemical conditions. Initial results indicated that the prairie pool was characterized by different dominant taxa and higher taxa richness for a variety of aquatic or semi-aquatic organismal groups (macrophytes, macroalgae, macroinvertebrates and amphibians) likely related to increased light availability.  Additional samples from these habitats, collected in the spring of 2017, will be used to determine if extensive drainage tile installation (summer of 2016) on the agricultural field adjacent to both of the vernal pools has influenced the makeup and the environmental state of these temporary aquatic habitats.

Olivia Keserich (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, o-keserich@onu.edu;


Kelsey Weidner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, k-weidner@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Robert Verb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


95 - ASSESSING LONG-TERM ECOLOGICAL CHANGE IN THE OGEECHEE RIVER USING AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ASSESSING LONG-TERM ECOLOGICAL CHANGE IN THE OGEECHEE RIVER USING AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES In the 1980s, an extensive collection of aquatic invertebrates from the Ogeechee River (Georgia, USA) was produced from sampling submerged woody debris. Since this collection, there has been considerable change on both a global and local scale. Currently, we are repeating the sampling to compare aquatic invertebrate communities between the past and present. Our aim is to understand: (1) whether changes in community structure and trait diversity have occurred, (2) what trends dominate in these invertebrate assemblages, and (3) what might be the source of changes. Initial re-analysis of the 1980s data shows that communities varied by season but not by sampling year. Additionally, most of the dominant taxa in the 1980s are still present, but current sampling has revealed the presence of a new taxon to appear consistently on submerged woody debris, the caddisfly genus Brachycentrus. By revisiting the original collection and making this addition to it, and preserving both in a natural history museum, our goal is to provide a basis for continued study in light of global change and anthropogenic effects on invertebrate biodiversity in Southeastern rivers.

Kelly Murray (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, kmmurray14@gmail.com;


Joseph McHugh ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, mchugh@uga.edu;


Darold Batzer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, dbatzer@uga.edu;


96 - COMPARING ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSES TO CHEMICAL STRESSORS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COMPARING ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSES TO CHEMICAL STRESSORS Ecosystem structure and function are commonly used to assess the effects of stressors at the ecosystem scale. It is understood that these endpoints have different sensitivity to stress, and the assumption is that structural measures (e.g., community composition) respond at lower stress levels than functional measures (e.g., rates of primary production). These assumptions have influenced hypotheses in stress ecology as well as monitoring and management approaches, but the extent to which structure–function sensitivity has been empirically tested is not clear. The objective of our critical review is to assess the scientific evidence on responses of ecosystem function and structure to chemical stressors. Specifically, we aim to examine 1) how frequently are functional and structural responses to stress empirically measured at the ecosystem-scale, 2) what are common metrics of ecosystem function and structure, and 3) if the sensitivity of these endpoints is related. We identified 572 publications that included mentions of ecosystem structure and function in response to stressors such as chemical pollution and landuse change. We expect to compare responses among endpoints, verify the structure–function relationship in response to stress, and identify knowledge gaps that warrant further investigation.

Raissa Mendonca (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, rmarques@kent.edu;


Mirco Bundschuh ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, mirco.bundschuh@slu.se;


Jochen Zubrod ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, zubrod@uni-landau.de;


Anna Harrison ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan, annaha@umich.edu;


David Costello ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


97 - DRYING GRADIENT INFLUENCE ON FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY ALONG A CENTRAL KENTUCKY INTERMITTENT STREAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DRYING GRADIENT INFLUENCE ON FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY ALONG A CENTRAL KENTUCKY INTERMITTENT STREAM Seasonal drying and flooding are frequent natural disturbances in Kentucky’s karst streams. The severity of these changes can vary along a single stream which challenges the aquatic organisms. To test macroinvertebrate community responses to stream drying, we studied a central Kentucky stream that had a perennially flowing section and summer drying intermittent section. As the intermittent section dries, water is reduced to isolated stagnant pools that can range from puddles (<1 m2) to large deep pools (>50 m2). In addition to macroinvertebrates, we measured other environmental characteristics (predatory fish presence, water chemistry, and hydrology). As we predicted, the perennial section had greater species diversity, with higher proportions of disturbance-sensitive groups (i.e. EPT). Within the intermittent section, larger pools were more diverse, likely due to higher dissolved oxygen or habitat complexity. Predatory fish were present in all the intermittent pools and may not be a strong influence on the macroinvertebrate communities. Understanding the community dynamics in drying streams may help us determine which aquatic macroinvertebrates may be vulnerable or resilient to more frequent or severe drying disturbances predicted with climate change.

Margaret Finn (Primary Presenter/Author), Centre College, margaret.finn@centre.edu;


Cara Barnett ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Centre College, cara.barnett@centre.edu;


Mark Galatowitsch ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Centre College, mark.galatowitsch@centre.edu;


98 - GEOLOGIC INFLUENCES ON AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND INTEGRITY IN OZARK TRIBUTARIES AT BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER AND OZARK NATIONAL SCENIC RIVERWAYS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

GEOLOGIC INFLUENCES ON AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND INTEGRITY IN OZARK TRIBUTARIES AT BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER AND OZARK NATIONAL SCENIC RIVERWAYS Watersheds are influenced by local and regional environmental factors that affect surface flows, groundwater sources, and aquatic invertebrate communities. Geologic characteristics associated with karst topography play a key role in structure and function of Ozark Plateau streams, including water chemistry, hydrology, and temperature. Invertebrate data (2005-2016) and environmental factors collected from 55 wadeable tributaries of three Ozark rivers (Buffalo River, Arkansas, and Current and Jacks Fork Rivers, Missouri) were analyzed to determine geologic influences on invertebrate community structure and integrity. Additional local/regional environmental factors were examined. Preliminary results indicate major geologic differences between basins appear to influence community structure, but do not appear to determine overall community integrity. Invertebrate community metrics varied among tributaries and between basins with similar values for all three watersheds showing little indication of disturbance. Distinct basin groupings of taxa similarity in relation to geologic differences illustrate potential influences of geology on community structure. Gradual erosion of the Ozarks, inherent in their geology, could potentially influence invertebrate community structure; therefore, long-term monitoring is important for early detection of erosion and anthropogenic influences on the invertebrate community.

Janice A. Hinsey (Primary Presenter/Author), National Park Service (NPS), Heartland Inventory & Monitoring Network (HTLN), Jan_Hinsey@nps.gov;


100 - IMPACT OF SUBSTRATE TYPE ON PERIPHYTON AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SECOND AND THIRD ORDER STREAM REACHES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IMPACT OF SUBSTRATE TYPE ON PERIPHYTON AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SECOND AND THIRD ORDER STREAM REACHES Substrate, whether artificial or natural, within stream systems provides viable habitat for a variety of benthic organisms, including macroinvertebrates and algae. There have been limited investigations into benthic community structure variation between natural and anthropogenic substrate types and how these factors may change with shifts in stream geomorphology associated with stream order. Benthic algae and macroinvertebrates were sampled from 2nd (Hog Creek, OH) and 3rd order (Ottawa River, OH) stream segments in October 2016. At each location periphyton and macroinvertebrates were collected from all visible and viable substrates within a 200-m stream segment. These sampling endeavours yielded a total of 22 substrate types from Hog Creek (20 natural, 2 anthropogenic) while the Ottawa River had 17 substrate types identified (12 natural, 5 anthropogenic). Additional multivariate analyses will be conducted to determine if the periphyton and macroinvertebrate community diversity and structure varies between substrate types and stream order.

Robert Verb (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Paige Kleindl ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, p-kleindl@onu.edu;


Stephanie Estell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University , s-estell@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


101 - MACROINVERTEBRATES ALONG A STREAM DISCHARGE AND ELEVATIONAL GRADIENT: WHO SURVIVES AND WHO THRIVES IN SMALL MOUNTAIN STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MACROINVERTEBRATES ALONG A STREAM DISCHARGE AND ELEVATIONAL GRADIENT: WHO SURVIVES AND WHO THRIVES IN SMALL MOUNTAIN STREAMS Small streams frequently go overlooked in stream ecology but can contribute to regional biodiversity of macroinvertebrates. Headwater streams fall along a gradient of stream discharge, ranging from streams with widths of several meters to small streams with widths well under a meter. The size of streams described as small varies drastically between studies, and the smallest streams unable of housing fish are often omitted. In the summer of 2016, macroinvertebrates were sampled throughout the summer season from 17 headwater streams in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, ranging in elevation from 2000 to 3000 meters. The average width of these streams ranged from over 4 meters to 40 centimeters. The pattern of taxon richness and functional trait diversity was then examined along the discharge gradient and compared between sites at higher and lower elevations. With climate change predictions forecasting less snowfall and earlier snowmelt in many mountainous areas, it is more important than ever to understand the communities of these small streams as other streams begin to decrease in size.

M Holliday Lafferty (Primary Presenter/Author), Colorado State University , mhollylafferty@gmail.com;


102 - POSITIVE INTERSPECIFIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SHRIMP AND EPHEMEROPTERA IN A TROPICAL STREAM, PUERTO RICO

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

POSITIVE INTERSPECIFIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SHRIMP AND EPHEMEROPTERA IN A TROPICAL STREAM, PUERTO RICO Facilitation is a particular type of interspecific interactions where one of the participating species benefits from the presence of the other. Facilitation often aids in maximizing resource utilization by consumers. In tropical coastal and island streams, shrimps are known to have strong interactions with other components of the community. Shrimp feeding activities reduce benthic organic matter, algal and invertebrate biomass, and changes the composition of benthic assemblages. In contrast to other groups, Leptophlebiidae mayflies increase in numbers when shrimp are present, suggesting facilitation between the two groups. The objective of this study was to assess the mechanism by which shrimp activity benefits mayfly nymphs. Field incubated tiles were placed under laboratory conditions, we created two treatments: tiles incubated with and without shrimp. After four days of incubation, we removed shrimps and placed 10 mayfly nymphs. While shrimp significantly decreased chlorophyll and organic matter on tiles, they also enhanced mayfly growth rates. Overall, our study shows that shrimp foraging activities facilitate mayfly access to food resources and potentially increase their population success in tropical streams in Puerto Rico.

Adriana Marcela Forero Céspedes (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Tolima, adrianam@ut.edu.co;


Pablo E. Gutiérrez-Fonseca ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras, gutifp@gmail.com;


Alonso Ramirez ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


103 - SEASONAL DIFFERENCES IN THE COMPOSITION OF OGEECHEE RIVER BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN RESPONSE TO TEMPORAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SEASONAL DIFFERENCES IN THE COMPOSITION OF OGEECHEE RIVER BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN RESPONSE TO TEMPORAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS The Ogeechee river is a free-flowing blackwater river rising in the Georgia piedmont before flowing into the coastal plain. Benthic macroinvertebrate communities in the river experience seasonal variation of physicochemical variables due in part to winter and spring floods. In combination with temporally driven life history traits, these factors can alter community composition over the course of the year. To examine how they influence invertebrate assemblages, quarterly benthic and physicochemical sampling was performed at six sites along the Ogeechee River within the coastal plain. Invertebrates were collected using a 20 jab method and a 200-invertebrate sub-sample was identified to genus or lowest practical taxonomic level. Resemblance based analyses of community structure suggest some degree of separation between communities by season. Discharge, temperature and pH vary seasonally and appear to be major drivers of differences in community structure. The prominence of these variables supports the role of seasonal changes in climate and hydrology in governing benthic biota in the lower portion of the river.

Julien Buchbinder (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, jb19126@georgiasouthern.edu;


104 - SEASONAL VARIATION IN BENTHIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF A TWO-STAGE DITCH

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SEASONAL VARIATION IN BENTHIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF A TWO-STAGE DITCH Two primary threats to northwestern Ohio watersheds are hydrological variation and nutrient enrichment from agricultural runoff. Two-stage ditches are one method utilized for reducing discharge and sediment loading into primary tributaries during precipitation events, but little is known about the biology of these systems. The purpose of this study was to document spatial and seasonal variation in benthic community structure of a two-stage ditch in the Blanchard River watershed (Hardin County, Ohio). During June and October 2016, 12 sites spanning the length of the two-stage ditch, as well as neighboring sites within a traditional ditch, were sampled for periphyton, macroinvertebrates and physicochemical parameters were recorded. Preliminary analyses from June revealed that sites from the traditional ditch were different than sites within the two-stage ditch. Two-stage ditch sites had lower turbidity, cooler temperatures and a macroinvertebrate community dominated by isopods, oligochaetes and physid snails. In contrast, upstream sites were dominated by lymnaeid snails and had higher macroalgal cover. These differences could be due to groundwater upwelling or changes in canopy cover, with two stage ditch sites more heavily shaded by dense herbaceous vegetation.

Leslie Riley (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Colin Light ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, c-light@onu.edu;


Connor Ney ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, c-ney@onu.edu;


Kalyn Rossiter ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, k-rossiter@onu.edu;


Ken Oswald ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, k-oswald@onu.edu;


Robert Verb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


105 - SHORT-TERM RESPONSES OF BENTHIC AND EMERGING INSECTS TO DAMSELFLY PREDATION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SHORT-TERM RESPONSES OF BENTHIC AND EMERGING INSECTS TO DAMSELFLY PREDATION Evidence from fishless communities suggests that invertebrate predators can strongly impact invertebrate abundance and community structure. However, there is little research on the impact on emergence, despite recent evidence that predation can have different effects on benthic versus emerging insects. We measured the response of benthic and emerging insects to a density gradient (0-10 individuals/m2) of the invertebrate predator, Enallagma civile, over 28 days in outdoor mesocosms. Preliminary analysis showed a negative relationship between the density of damselflies and insect emergence abundance (primarily Chironomidae). In contrast, we found no evidence of a relationship between damselfly density and benthic insect abundance. However, the slopes of these effects had broad confidence intervals, and we found no evidence that they differed in the strength of effect between emerging and benthic prey. Moreover, after week one any predator control by damselflies disappeared, likely due to other invertebrate predators (e.g. beetles and dragonflies) colonizing the pools, or to delayed emergence in pools with high densities of damselflies.

Lauren Henning (Primary Presenter/Author), University of South Dakota, lauren.henning@usd.edu;


Jeff Wesner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, Jeff.Wesner@usd.edu;


106 - TERRESTRIAL VINES ON SUBMERGED WOODY DEBRIS INFLUENCE MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

TERRESTRIAL VINES ON SUBMERGED WOODY DEBRIS INFLUENCE MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE Woody debris is an important habitat for aquatic organisms, yet the effect of vines wrapped around the logs, adding structural complexity and surface area, has not been investigated. Vines naturally grow on riparian trees while they are living. When the trees die and fall into the stream, the vines remain, becoming integrated into the aquatic habitat. This experiment investigated the effect of structural complexity, in the form of submerged woody debris with vines attached, on aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in Augusta Creek, Michigan. Vines were randomly removed from three out of the six logs studied. Sites were sampled twice before and three times after vine removal. Functional feeding groups, density estimates, and Simpson’s diversity indices were determined for collected macroinvertebrates. Preliminary results indicate that two weeks and seven weeks after vine removal, macroinvertebrate diversity was higher in logs with vines still intact, compared to logs with vines removed, yet this was not statistically significant (F=3.218, p>0.05). Both had similar values four weeks after removal. This is the first study that quantifies the effect of submerged vines on aquatic communities.

Katie Kierczynski (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, kierczy2@msu.edu;


Courtney Larson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, larso126@msu.edu;


M. Eric Benbow ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, benbow@msu.edu;


107 - THE INFLUENCE OF CLADOPHORA GLOMERATA AS A HABITAT MODIFIER IN BEDROCK DOMINATED RIFFLE HABITATS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE INFLUENCE OF CLADOPHORA GLOMERATA AS A HABITAT MODIFIER IN BEDROCK DOMINATED RIFFLE HABITATS Cladophora glomerata is a widely distributed freshwater macroalgal taxa and can provide an important habitat for macroinvertebrates. In some Ohio rivers, especially those with solid substrates, C. glomerata generates dense beds of streaming filaments. The objective of this investigation was to determine if the benthic communities found in C. glomerata beds were different and more diverse than the surrounding bedrock substrate in two different rivers (Kokosing River and Riley Creek, Ohio, USA). During the fall of 2015, C. glomerata beds and adjacent sandstone bedrock substrates were sampled in the Kokosing River for macroinvertebrates, periphyton and selected environmental parameters. During October 2016, similar samples were collected in additional C. glomerata beds and adjacent limestone bedrock substrates in Riley Creek. Preliminary results from the Kokosing River show that macroinvertebrate diversity (H’) was higher within C. glomerata beds, but periphyton diversity (H’) was not significantly different than communities on the sandstone bedrock. Shifts in community structure were more influenced by time than by substrate type, likely representing natural successional stages following a large scouring event prior to the initiation of this study.

Emily Henneman (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, e-henneman@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Robert Verb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


108 - INTEGRATING AQUATIC ECOLOGY IN SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF PALM OIL PLANTATIONS IN SOUTHEAST MEXICO

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INTEGRATING AQUATIC ECOLOGY IN SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF PALM OIL PLANTATIONS IN SOUTHEAST MEXICO Over the last several decades, land conversion to palm oil production has increased due to growing demand for palm oil as a renewable form of energy and as an additive to food and personal care products. In general, this land use change results in a degradation of the biotic composition and ecosystem processes in streams due to increasing inputs of sediments, nutrients, pesticides and herbicides, and by altering in-stream habitat and hydrology. However, to fully understand and quantify the drivers of this land use conversion and design effective conservation strategies, it is essential to incorporate the socio-political and economic factors (e.g. regulatory policies, economic incentives, and land ownership) that influence it. We develop a framework that integrates social, natural and geographical information to examine the context that has led to the expansion of palm oil plantations in Southeast Mexico and their ecological effects. We will use this framework to guide observational and experimental studies to quantify the ecological impacts of land conversion on streams, as well as to predict future expansion of plantations and the consequent changes to stream structure and function.

Keysa G. Rosas (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, keysa.rosas@gmail.com;


Krista Capps ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, kcapps@uga.edu;


109 - AN EVALUATION OF THE FIELD-BASED AQUATIC BENCHMARK FOR SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE FOR USE IN NORTHEASTERN MINNESOTA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AN EVALUATION OF THE FIELD-BASED AQUATIC BENCHMARK FOR SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE FOR USE IN NORTHEASTERN MINNESOTA We reviewed the application of the field-based aquatic benchmark for specific conductance, as originally developed for the central Appalachian Mountains, for use in northeastern Minnesota. We identified interesting issues that should be considered prior to more wide-scale application of the method. Comparing extirpation coefficients for genera common to both ecoregions showed substantially different limits for the same genera. This is an issue with the underlying premise of the conductivity benchmark that physiological limits to ion chemistry affect the distribution of benthic invertebrate taxa. Additionally, stressor-response profiles revealed different responses for common genera and highlighted the influence of low capture probability on the hazard concentration. The effects of low capture probability placed in the context of relative abundance for any one genera is not factored into the presence/absence approach used in the benchmark. This issue should be further investigated, because extirpation of a genus is largely pinned on the presence/absence of a single individual and its likelihood of being collected in a stream. We conclude that the specific conductance benchmark approach would still benefit from further investigation of these issues prior to application to other ecoregions.

Kimberly Gerlock (Primary Presenter/Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., kschott@geiconsultants.com;


110 - DISTRIBUTION OF TRACE ELEMENTS AND CS-137 IN SEDIMENTS OF A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM IMPACTED BY INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DISTRIBUTION OF TRACE ELEMENTS AND CS-137 IN SEDIMENTS OF A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM IMPACTED BY INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES A previous study revealed average concentrations of eight elements to be elevated above Ecological Screen Values (ESV) in a beaver pond on McQueen Branch (MQB), a coastal plain stream located on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site. Here, we compare this beaver pond to ponds in two less disturbed systems and assessed potential upstream MQB source areas. Concentrations of 16 trace elements and Cs-137 were analyzed in 44 composite sediment samples. Concentrations tended to be higher in the MQB sites. Within MQB, concentrations of up to 10 elements exceeded their ESV in sediments in or near sedimentation basins at the heads of two tributaries above the previously studied beaver pond. Concentrations of many elements were positively correlated to organic matter and clay content. Consequently, concentrations were lower in stream reaches that were severely scoured by excessive stormwater runoff. Concentrations tended to attenuate downstream of the headwater basins, but again accumulated in the slower waters of the beaver pond. Sedimentation basins and beaver ponds play an integral role in the storage and subsequent redistribution of contaminants in these streams.

Brooke Lindell (Primary Presenter/Author), College of Charleston/Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, lindellbe@g.cofc.edu;


J.C. Seaman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, seaman@srel.uga.edu;


J.V. McArthur ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, mcarthur@srel.uga.edu;


D.E. Fletcher ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, fletcher@srel.uga.edu;


111 - EFFECTS OF AN INDUSTRIAL BASIN OVERFLOW ON TRACE ELEMENT ACCUMULATION IN SEDIMENT AND BIOTA OF A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF AN INDUSTRIAL BASIN OVERFLOW ON TRACE ELEMENT ACCUMULATION IN SEDIMENT AND BIOTA OF A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM A sedimentation basin holding contaminated sediments overflowed for the first time following record rainfalls, potentially contaminating an adjacent stream. We evaluated 16 trace element concentrations in sediment, 7 dragonfly nymph genera, 1 crane fly larva genus, and 3 crayfish species collected downstream of the basin before and one year after the overflow event. Sediments from an upstream beaver pond were analyzed to assess potential upstream contaminant sources. Dragonfly community composition, size frequencies, and head width-weight relationships were compared between years. Organic matter, clay content, and most trace element concentrations increased between years in depositional zones. However, the organic matter-rich sediments of the upstream beaver pond contained substantially higher contaminant concentrations indicating upstream contaminant sources. Modest dragonfly community shifts were noted with a decrease of a more sensitive genus, Erpetogomphus. Relative body mass also decreased between years in Erpetogomphus. Genus- and element-specific patterns of accumulation occurred among study biota. Overall, increased concentrations between years were evident. Biota concentrations increased at lower rates than in sediment. This work illustrates the dynamic nature of stream systems and the value of watershed scale evaluations.

P.T. Stankus (Primary Presenter/Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, stankus@srel.uga.edu;


A.H. Lindell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, lindell@srel.uga.edu;


J.C. Seaman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, seaman@srel.uga.edu;


J.V. McArthur ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, mcarthur@srel.uga.edu;


D.E. Fletcher ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, fletcher@srel.uga.edu;


112 - EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY ON TRACE ELEMENT ACCUMULATION, COMMUNITY COMPOSITION, AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF DRAGONFLY NYMPHS IN COASTAL PLAIN STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY ON TRACE ELEMENT ACCUMULATION, COMMUNITY COMPOSITION, AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF DRAGONFLY NYMPHS IN COASTAL PLAIN STREAMS We compared 2 reference streams to 3 streams receiving varying amounts of stormwater runoff and industrial effluents using 7 genera of dragonfly nymphs as biomonitors of contaminants entering the aquatic food web and impacts of excessive stormwater runoff. Dragonfly nymph generic richness and diversity were diminished in the two most scoured streams as more sensitive species were missing and others were reduced in relative abundance. Life history differences between disturbed and reference streams also included some cohorts missing or poorly represented in size frequency analyses. Additionally, length-weight relationships differed between disturbed and reference streams in some genera. Variation in trace element accumulation among genera clearly exceeded variation within genera, suggesting genus to be a reasonable taxonomic level for both spatial and taxonomic comparisons. Patterns of trace element accumulation in biota tended to be element- and taxon-dependent, but patterns of elements frequently accumulating to higher concentrations in the disturbed sites were evident. Overall, dragonfly nymph community and population structures were altered in the two most scoured streams and several trace elements accumulated to higher levels in all three disturbed systems.

D.B. Pitt (Primary Presenter/Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, dbpitt@uga.edu;


A.H. Lindell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, lindell@srel.uga.edu;


J.C. Seaman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, seaman@srel.uga.edu;


P.T. Stankus ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, stankus@srel.uga.edu;


J.V. McArthur ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, mcarthur@srel.uga.edu;


D.E. Fletcher ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, fletcher@srel.uga.edu;


113 - EVALUATION OF LAS TOXICITY WITH CHIRONOMUS XANTHUS: FOCUSING IN REAL LAUNDRY WASTEWATER

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Evaluation of LAS toxicity with Chironomus xanthus: focusing in real laundry wastewater Linear Alkybenzene Sulfonate (LAS) is the most used anionic surfactant in laundries and it is present in domestic and industrial wastewaters. Although LAS is biodegradable, its long carbon chain is toxic to aquatic environment. Therefore, this study evaluated the toxicity of different standard LAS concentrations in aquatic insect larvae (Chironomus xanthus) under controlled conditions. Acute (96 hours) and chronic (192 hours) toxicity tests were performed in 250 mL of LAS dilution with 50 g of sterilized sediment with six C. xanthus larvae, in three replicates. The chosen LAS dilution were: 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, 15 mg/L, 20 mg/L, 25 mg/L, 30 mg/L, 35 mg/L and 50 mg/L. As a result, we found a LC50 of 25.90 and 18.25 mg/L of LAS in the acute and chronic test respectively. From these results, we began to evaluate the toxicity of real laundry wastewater. Preliminary assays show that there was a reduction in contamination of real laundry effluent with fluidized bed reactor treatment. In summary, we expect to confirm the reduction of toxicity for the aquatic environment with the reactor treatment.

Mayara Felipe (Primary Presenter/Author), University of São Paulo, mayarafelipe@usp.br;


Juliano Corbi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, julianocorbi@usp,br;


Maria Bernadete Varesche Silva ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, varesche@usp.br;


Thaís Macedo Carmelo ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, thazmacedo@gmail.com;


114 - IMPACTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) ON THE BEHAVIOR OF FRESHWATER SNAIL PARAFOSSARULUS STRIATULUS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IMPACTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) ON THE BEHAVIOR OF FRESHWATER SNAIL PARAFOSSARULUS STRIATULUS Fine particulate (PM2.5) is a severe problem of air pollution. Although PM2.5 effects on human health were examined, the understanding of PM2.5 influence on aquatic organisms is limited. PM2.5 through wet deposition can enter aquatic ecosystems and affect aquatic organisms. This study tested the hypothesis that PM2.5 will negatively affect the behavior of freshwater snail Parafossarulus striatulus (Benson, 1842). Along with PM2.5, a number of components (Al, Pb, and Zn) that are commonly present in PM2.5 were also tested for their effects on snail behavior. The snail behavior was scored using the Behavioral State Score (BSS), ranging from 0 (no movement) to 5 (active locomotion and fully extended body). The result shows that a high PM2.5 concentration dose (7.75mg/L) induced a significant decrease in snails’ movement behavior, and such reduced movement behavior was also observed for treatments with chemical components related to PM2.5, including aluminum and acidity (pH5.0). At a low concentration dose of PM2.5 (3.88mg/L), lead, and zinc do not significantly affect snails’ behavior. The results suggest that high PM2.5 deposition in water bodies, associated with acidification and some metals, can have an adverse effect on aquatic organisms.

Danny Hartono ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University, Danny.Hartono12@student.xjtlu.edu.cn;


Billion Lioe ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University, Billion.Lioe12@student.xjtlu.edu.cn;


Yixin Zhang (POC,Primary Presenter), Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, yixin.zhang@xjtlu.edu.cn;


Bailiang Li ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University, Bailiang.Li@xjtlu.edu.cn;


Jianzhen Yu ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, chjianyu@ust.hk;


115 - SUITABILITY OF A PUERTO RICAN CHIRONOMINI AS MODEL ORGANISM FOR FRESHWATER BIOASSAYS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SUITABILITY OF A PUERTO RICAN CHIRONOMINI AS MODEL ORGANISM FOR FRESHWATER BIOASSAYS Different freshwater organisms have been identified by the EPA as potential models for bioassays and ecotoxicological analyses. The majority of these organisms do not have a practical use as indicators outside their geographic area (e.g., continental United States). This represents a problem for locations like Puerto Rico, where few of the EPA recommended freshwater organisms are natively present. Previous efforts on the island have been centered in developing model organisms for laboratory testing, but focusing in brackish environments. Currently, we lack a native model organism for freshwater ecosystems. Here, our aim is to evaluate the suitability of a native Chironomini species as model organism for assessing the effects of contaminants on freshwater ecosystems. To achieve this, we isolated a single population under controlled laboratory conditions. The original population was obtained from egg masses collected in the field. Our study indicates that the species is easy to manage in the laboratory and has a rapid life cycle. Therefore, this chironomid has the suitable characteristics to be used as model organism for bioassays and ecotoxicological studies in freshwater environments in Puerto Rico.

Roberto Reyes-Maldonado (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, robertoomaldo@gmail.com;


Alonso Ramirez ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


116 - THE EFFECTS OF VENLAFAXINE ON FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) FEEDING BEHAVIOR AND STARTLE RESPONSE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE EFFECTS OF VENLAFAXINE ON FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) FEEDING BEHAVIOR AND STARTLE RESPONSE Venlafaxine is an antidepressant drug commonly found in stream ecosystems. It is introduced to the environment through incomplete water treatment, but many aspects of its impact on aquatic life remain unclear. We hypothesized that the pharmaceutical venlafaxine reduces feeding and startle response behaviors in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Our experiment consisted of a double blind test of four dosage levels and a control (n=7 tanks per treatment). The two lowest dose concentrations were similar to those observed in the environment. Fish were observed before and during feeding 2-3 times a week for five weeks. Behavior was assessed by recording startle response to a flashlight, and feeding by recording activity within 30 seconds of food being introduced to the tank. Results showed a 3-fold increase in proportion not feeding relative to the control and lowest dosage (Friedman’s test, p<0.001). Also, the proportion not startled roughly doubled in the two highest treatments (p<0.001). Our findings suggest that fish in streams with high concentrations of venlafaxine may exhibit changes in feeding behavior and, to a lesser extent, response to stimuli.

Morgan Eytcheson (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , chwt@iup.edu;


Sean Becker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , yyrv@iup.edu;


David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


117 - TINY TOXIN, SNAIL SURPLUS: THE CONSEQUENCES OF NANOPESTICIDE EXPOSURE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

TINY TOXIN, SNAIL SURPLUS: THE CONSEQUENCES OF NANOPESTICIDE EXPOSURE The use of nanoagrochemicals is becoming common in agriculture. However, runoff can cause these pesticides to enter aquatic environments where their impacts are not well characterized. This study looked at the effects of a copper nanoparticle pesticide on two freshwater snail species, Lymnaea and Physella in a long-term wetland mesocosm experiment. After weekly exposure for nine months at low concentrations (35 mg/week) total snail abundance was assessed and an in vitro laboratory study was conducted to see if the copper nanopesticide interfered with the reproduction process. Egg clutches were collected from the mesocosms and hatching success was examined under controlled conditions. Compared to the controls, we found that total snail abundance was 2.8 times higher (P=0.03), egg clutch weight was significantly decreased (-51%, P<0.001), while the number of embryos and hatching success did not vary. These results suggest that copper nanopesticide exposure can stimulate the reproduction process but not directly interfere with hatching success despite a strong reduction in clutch weight.

Christina Bergemann (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, cmbergemann@gmail.com;


Brittany Perrotta ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Brittany_Perrotta@baylor.edu ;


Marie Simonin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, simonin.marie@gmail.com;


Ryan S. King ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Ryan_S_King@baylor.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


118 - FLOW RECESSION AND STREAM FLOW INTERMITTENCY DOMINATE ORGANIC CARBON CHEMISTRY IN A HEADWATER MOUNTAIN STREAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

FLOW RECESSION AND STREAM FLOW INTERMITTENCY DOMINATE ORGANIC CARBON CHEMISTRY IN A HEADWATER MOUNTAIN STREAM The objective of this research is to understand how flow recession and stream flow intermittency influence the transport and transformation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We hypothesized that as flow decreases and intermittency increases, the dominant scale controlling the quantity and quality of DOC in the stream will shift from catchment scale processes (i.e. hillslope/riparian connectivity, lateral inputs) to local valley-bottom, surface water-groundwater exchange processes. In the summer of 2016, we collected monthly samples every 10 meters along a 500-meter mountainous reach in Oregon. Stream surface flow transitioned from continuous to intermittent over the summer, with 18% of the study reach dry in August. Across the three sampling events, mean DOC concentration increased from 1.09 to 2.06 mg L-1, and coefficient of variance of DOC concentration also increased. The correlation between upslope accumulation area and DOC concentration (used to assess catchment controls) weakened as flow decreased and was weakest during intermittent conditions. This study suggests that stream intermittency significantly impacts the governing spatial scale controls of DOC processing, leading to a shift from catchment scale to local scale control over DOC.

Stephen Plont (POC,Primary Presenter), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, plontste@msu.edu;


Jay Zarnetske ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Adam Ward ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University, adamward@indiana.edu;


Noah Schmadel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University, noahschm@indiana.edu;


119 - GHOST FOREST RISING: A HYPERSPECTRAL APPROACH TO ASSESSING VEGETATION HEALTH AND TREE DIE-OFF IN RESPONSE TO SALTWATER INTRUSION IN A COASTAL ENVIRONMENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

GHOST FOREST RISING: A HYPERSPECTRAL APPROACH TO ASSESSING VEGETATION HEALTH AND TREE DIE-OFF IN RESPONSE TO SALTWATER INTRUSION IN A COASTAL ENVIRONMENT Saltwater intrusion is a natural occurrence that can affect the quality of groundwater and surface water. It can also affect the health of vegetation that depends on fresh water. Our study took place on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula (APP), where we studied the effects of saltwater on vegetation with focus on loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda). We investigated the health of pine trees in this region to explore potential links between saltwater intrusion and die-off, particularly where artificial ditches and canals allow saltwater to flow deep into the interior of the peninsula. Using a spectroradiometer, we collected hyperspectral reflectance data in visible and near infrared wavebands from more than 100 canopy and leaf samples across the APP. We accompanied these measurements with measurements of tree height and circumference, distances from nearby waterways, and specific conductance measurements (as a salinity proxy) of these waters. We used reflectance spectra to calculate the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, the Red-Green Index, and site-specific indices to determine the health of particular trees. Using this information in conjunction with ancillary data, we explored the correlations between the health of vegetation and the salinity of nearby water sources.

Lizzie Lightning (Primary Presenter/Author), Northeastern State University, lightnin@nsuok.edu;


Theo Jass ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, tljass@ncsu.edu;


Alexander McGirt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UNC Charlotte, alexandermcgirt@yahoo.com;


Ryan E. Emanuel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, reemanue@ncsu.edu;


120 - HYDROLOGIC RESIDENCE TIME CONTROLS THE FATE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN AT A LAKE-GROUNDWATER INTERFACE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HYDROLOGIC RESIDENCE TIME CONTROLS THE FATE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN AT A LAKE-GROUNDWATER INTERFACE Groundwater-surface-water (GW-SW) interfaces are important regulators of biogeochemical processes. In lakes with highly permeable sediments, GW-SW exchange can control lake-level influx and removal of compounds such as nitrate, a common pollutant in lakes and groundwater. To test how hydrologic conditions at the GW-SW interface influence nitrate uptake, we conducted a series of experiments varying hydrologic residence time in down-welling lakebed sediments of a lake on Cape Cod, MA. We added isotopically-labelled 15N-nitrate to distinguish uptake from denitrification, quantifying the 15N of nitrate, nitrite, dinitrogen gas, and nitrous oxide. We additionally added acetate, a labile carbon compound, to test for carbon limitation. We found that acetate addition triggered the GW-SW interface at the lake bed to switch from net production to net removal of nitrate. Together with increased residence time from experimental decreases of down-welling, this resulted in a 20-fold increase in denitrification. We conclude that lake hydrologic conditions at the GW-SW interface control nitrate removal. Because lakebed water exchange is driven by seasonal variations in lake and groundwater stage, this provides a robust tool for temporal scaling of nitrate dynamics.

Tyler Hampton (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, thampton@msu.edu;


Jay Zarnetske ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Martin Briggs ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, Office of Groundwater, Branch of Geophysics, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, mbriggs@usgs.gov;


Kamini Singha ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA, ksingha@mines.edu;


Jud Harvey ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, National Research Program, Reston, VA, USA, jwharvey@usgs.gov;


Fred Day-Lewis ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, Office of Groundwater, Branch of Geophysics, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, daylewis@usgs.gov;


John Lane ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, Office of Groundwater, Branch of Geophysics, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, jwlane@usgs.gov;


121 - PREDICTING WARMING EFFECTS ON LITTER BREAKDOWN RATES USING FORESTED AND URBAN STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PREDICTING WARMING EFFECTS ON LITTER BREAKDOWN RATES USING FORESTED AND URBAN STREAMS Land use and climate change are predicted to increase stream water temperatures. Stream warming is predicted to accelerate processing rates of terrestrially-derived detritus which may negatively affect stream life as plant matter is critical for organism production. However, several confounding factors such as variation in shredder biomass, microbial shifts, or water quality impairment could cause carbon processing rates to deviate from predictions based on metabolic theory. To quantify the effect of water temperature on leaf breakdown rates, we incubated Acer rubrum and Rhododendron maximum leaves for six-week periods in 12 forested sites along a temperature gradient in the Southern Appalachians and 4 urban sites in the GA Piedmont. Breakdown rates in forested streams were negatively related to temperature (slope, marginally (p=0.07) significant). The two litter species, which represent labile vs. recalcitrant carbon sources, responded similarly. Our results indicate the importance of establishing empirical relationships with temperature and biological response over a range of conditions.

Garrett Frandson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, garrett.frandson19@gmail.com;


Amy Rosemond ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


Phillip Bumpers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, bumpersp@gmail.com;


122 - REDUCING REDUNDANCY AMONG FLOW METRICS IN SUPPORT OF FLOW-ECOLOGY MODELING IN THE CAPE FEAR AND PEE DEE/YADKIN RIVER BASINS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Reducing redundancy among flow metrics in support of flow-ecology modeling in the Cape Fear and Pee Dee/Yadkin river basins Flow-ecology relations are being investigated in the Cape Fear and Pee Dee/Yadkin river basins in North and South Carolina as part of the USGS’s Water Smart program. State fish and invertebrate bioassessment data are being combined with modeled (SWAT) daily flow data as a means of projecting responses (flow and biological) to climate change and evaluating possible flow criteria. Flow metrics are calculated from modeled flows using the USGS’s EflowStats R-package which calculates 198 metrics encompassing flow magnitude, duration, timing, frequency, and rate of change. Many of these metrics are highly correlated, therefore, it is necessary to reduce these flow metrics to a more manageable and less redundant set of metrics prior to modeling flow-ecology relations. A combination of literature review, correlation, principle component analysis, and local stake holder input was used to reduce the number of metrics from 189 to 30 metrics minimally redundant metrics that represent the five major components of flow. These assessments will assist in building models that help local water resource managers plan for future scenarios of water use and availability.

Jason May (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science Center, jasonmay@usgs.gov;


Jonathan Kennen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, New Jersey Water Science Center, 3450 Princeton Pike, Suite 110, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648, jgkennen@usgs.gov;


Thomas Cuffney ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, South Atlantic Water Science Center, 3916 Sunset Ridge Rd., Raleigh, NC 27607, tcuffney@usgs.gov;


123 - SPATIALLY-EXTENSIVE SAMPLING REVEALS CONSISTENT HYPORHEIC-ZONE EFFECTS ON DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER QUANTITY AND QUALITY AT THE WATERSHED SCALE.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SPATIALLY-EXTENSIVE SAMPLING REVEALS CONSISTENT HYPORHEIC-ZONE EFFECTS ON DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER QUANTITY AND QUALITY AT THE WATERSHED SCALE. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) regulates energy flow, nutrient cycling, and water quality in surface waters. As DOM passes through directional stream networks, the stream-groundwater interface, known as the hyporheic zone (HZ), exerts a strong effect on DOM quantity (i.e., concentration) and quality (e.g., aromaticity, molecular weight). Because of methodological challenges of sampling the HZ, most of our current understanding of DOM dynamics in the HZ is based on site-level studies, and it is unknown how land use and land cover influence HZ DOM processing at larger spatial scales. In this study, we performed large-scale, high-resolution HZ sampling to test how landscape patterns influenced DOM quantity and quality at 39 sites throughout a third-order watershed with diverse land patterns, encompassing first-, second-, and third-order locations. We found a strong correlation between land use and surface water DOM quantity and quality, but this relationship broke down with HZ depth. This homogenization of sub-surface DOM quantity and quality indicates common HZ functioning across spatial scales, providing a potential pathway for scaling HZ functioning determined at the site level to the watershed level.

Joseph Lee-Cullin (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, cullinjo@msu.edu;


Jay Zarnetske ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Evan Wiewiora ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, wiewiora@msu.edu;


Benjamin Abbott ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, benabbo@gmail.com;


Sydney Ruhala ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, ruhalasy@msu.edu;


Tyler Hampton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, thampton@msu.edu;


124 - THE EFFECTS OF HIGH FLOW RATES ON HEXAGENIA LIMBATA (EPHERMEROPTERA: EPHEMERIDAE) AND THEIR BURROWS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE EFFECTS OF HIGH FLOW RATES ON HEXAGENIA LIMBATA (EPHERMEROPTERA: EPHEMERIDAE) AND THEIR BURROWS Hexagenia is one of the most studied genera of Ephemeroptera, yet no study has examined the effects stream flowrates have on H. limbata. It is possible that climate change, increasing impervious surfaces in urban areas, deforestation, and other factors will affect surface water flowrates. This study is investigating the effects of higher flowrates on the burrow structure of H. limbata. In order to do so, multiple thin-spaced chambers were constructed with different flowrate regimes. The chambers allow for continuous view of the nymphs and burrows. Nymphs with head widths X.X-X.X mm were observed in sediment of no more than 1 mm, water temperature 22-27C, and under flow rates of 0, 1, and 2 m/min. Differences in the lengths, depths, and loop complexity of burrows under the different flowrates will be reported. This study also examined whether the thin-spaced chamber method altered the burrowing structures, as suggested by previous research.

Nicholas Addison (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, naddiso@g.clemson.edu;


John C. Morse ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, jmorse@clemson.edu;


125 - IMPACTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON THERMAL AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS IN COW CREEK (STILLWATER, OKLAHOMA)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IMPACTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON THERMAL AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS IN COW CREEK (STILLWATER, OKLAHOMA) Stream restoration improves riparian and instream habitats to increase biodiversity and stabilize channel morphology. Cow Creek, a third order stream located in Stillwater, OK underwent restoration in 2012, drastically decreasing riparian canopy cover. This study evaluated spatial and temporal changes between three sections of the stream: upstream unrestored, restored, and downstream unrestored. Riparian cover and water temperature data from 2015 and 2016 were analyzed for temporal changes. In 2016, stream water chemistry, canopy coverage and algal production (e.g., Chl a) were analyzed for spatial variation between sites. Preliminary analyses indicated that there were significant differences in canopy coverage (P<0.01) and water temperature (P=0.02) between 2015 and 2016. In addition, each site displayed significantly different water temperatures (P<0.01), but there were no significant shifts in water temperature between 2015 and 2016. Spatially, Site 1 (upstream unrestored) had lower Chl a concentrations which may be related to high riparian canopy coverage (76%). Canopy coverage decreased and water temperature increased downstream through the restored and unrestored stream segments.

Paige Kleindl (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, p-kleindl@onu.edu;


Christopher Crown ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Wesleyan University, ccrown@iwu.edu ;


Elaine Stebler ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oklahoma State University, elaine.stebler@okstate.edu ;


Andy Dzialowski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oklahoma State University, andy.dzialowski@okstate.edu ;


Leslie Riley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Robert Verb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Chris Zou ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oklahoma State University, chris.zou@okstate.edu ;


126 - MEASURING WATER QUALITY IMPACT OF A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM RESTORATION DURING CONSTRUCTION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Measuring Water Quality Impact of a Coastal Plain Stream Restoration during Construction Across the continental United States, more than $1 billion per year has been spent on restoring rivers and streams since 1990. Although financial investment has been considerable, there is a lack of data to determine success or failure of restorations. Only 4% of projects investigate pre-restoration conditions for comparison after restoration. Even fewer projects have monitored the impact of construction activities on water quality. In conjunction with pre-restoration and post-restoration data. Results of continuous, high-resolution water quality monitoring of the construction phase of a southeastern coastal plain stream restoration in an agricultural watershed will be presented. Nutrient dynamics for nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended solids will be discussed for baseflow conditions and storm events. Cumulative loading during the construction phase will be compared to pre-restoration conditions. The perceived impact on water quality of restoration activities will be presented.

Danielle Winter (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University , dewinter@ncsu.edu;


127 - ON SITE EVIDENCE OF GRASSES, SHRUBS AND TREES IN REDUCING FLOW VELOCITY NEAR RIVERBANKS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ON SITE EVIDENCE OF GRASSES, SHRUBS AND TREES IN REDUCING FLOW VELOCITY NEAR RIVERBANKS There is lack of sufficient understanding on the complex interaction of vegetation with river flow velocity under field condition. A field experiment was undertaken in an open earth channel by diverting a river in Southwest Ethiopia, Jimma area, 380 km from Addis Ababa. Six plant species were installed in the open channel and 3D velocities were measured within the vegetation and bare treatments by using 10 MHz Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). The results revealed that vegetation increased secondary flow significantly compared with the bare treatment. For instance, the percentage of depth averaged free stream lateral velocity (Vy) relative to free streamwise velocity (Vx) was 29.3% in the grass, 44% in the leafy tree branches and 18.9% in the bare treatment. Likewise, the percentage of average free stream vertical velocity (Vz) relative to free stream Vx was 29% in the grass, 3.5% in the tree branches, 11.55% in the shrub, 6.8% in the bare and 2.8% in the leafless-branchless stems. Flexible vegetation such as grasses, leafy tree branches and shrubs can effectively minimize riverbank erosion in-situ and siltation ex-situ compared with rigid stems and non-vegetated channels.

Ayalew Legass (Primary Presenter/Author), KU Leuven, ayalewtalema@yahoo.com;


Moise Ndekezi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Rwanda, 2. Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, mosnde433@gmail.com;


Jean Poesen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), KU Leuven, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, jean.poesen@ees.kuleuven.be;


Bart Muys ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), KU Leuven, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, bart.muys@ees.kuleuven.be;


Jan Diels ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), KU Leuven, jan.diels@ees.kuleuven.be;


128 - ANALYSIS OF INCREASING TAXA TRENDS OF LONG-TERM DATA COLLECTED IN MINING IMPACTED STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ANALYSIS OF INCREASING TAXA TRENDS OF LONG-TERM DATA COLLECTED IN MINING IMPACTED STREAMS Very few studies have been conducted using consistent long-term data of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Long-term annual monitoring of sites in Colorado and Idaho by GEI Consultants, Inc. have yielded similar increasing trends in the number of taxa collected both upstream and downstream of mining activities. A preliminary evaluation of the data from four streams, three in Idaho and one in Colorado, suggested that there was no single contributing factor for these trends and further in-depth analysis was required. In order to focus on determining the potential factors contributing to the increasing trends observed, we analyzed taxonomic name changes over the years, as well as a variety of macroinvertebrate metrics to determine if any other trends were observable.

Jennifer Shanteau (Primary Presenter/Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jshanteau@geiconsultants.com;


Jeniffer Lynch ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jlynch@geiconsultants.com;


129 - ASSESSMENT OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE PASSIVE SAMPLERS FOR SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN NON-WADEABLE STREAMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ASSESSMENT OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE PASSIVE SAMPLERS FOR SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN NON-WADEABLE STREAMS Macroinvertebrates are widely used for bioassessment, however a standardized method for sampling in non-wadeable streams has not been developed in Georgia. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness and biases of three types of passive sampling devices within the Savannah and Ogeechee Rivers of the Southeastern Coastal Plain Ecoregion. We deployed three replicates of leaf packs, snag bags, and Hester-Dendy samplers at six sites for ~30d during the fall of 2014 to assess for differences in macroinvertebrate community structure between sampling devices. In addition, we used common bioassessment metrics to evaluate for differences in scores between sampling devices. Macroinvertebrate assemblages colonizing the sampling devices differed (PERMANOVA, F14,37 =1.6078 P=0.001) however, analyses revealed that these differences were driven by varying contributions of individual groups with each sampler collecting almost identical taxa at each site. Results also showed no significant differences between common metrics. Therefore, all samplers provided an efficient means for collecting site specific macroinvertebrates, however Hester-Dendy samplers provided a standard sampling surface for the calculation of biomass.

Kelsey Laymon (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, kelsey.laymon@icloud.com;


Damon Mullis ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, damon.mullis@phinizycenter.org;


Oscar Flite ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, oscar.flite@phinizycenter.org;


Checo Colon-Gaud ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


130 - BIOMONITORING: DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT- RELATING LAND USE TO AQUATIC LIFE USE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

BIOMONITORING: DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT- RELATING LAND USE TO AQUATIC LIFE USE The Dallas/Fort Worth International (DFW) Airport is located in a densely urbanized area with one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S.A. The airport is unique in that it has the second largest land area in North America, which includes a large tract of “protected” riparian forest that is unique to the urban surroundings. Beginning in 2002 and continuing in 2005, 2008 and 2014 the DFW Airport sponsored biomonitoring surveys. The objective of these studies was to identify the major human activities, within the watershed surrounding the airport, that could potentially affect water quality. The surveys, conducted under normal flows and flows associated with supra-seasonal drought, included measurements of physicochemical parameters, habitat quality, geospatial variables, and benthic macroinvertebrate populations in the surrounding sub-watersheds. Collectively these variables, measured over several years, have allowed us to sufficiently differentiate some natural changes observed in the benthic community structure from those caused by land-use. This has enabled us to suggest improved conservation practices designed to mitigate impacts to the watershed and generate testable hypotheses for future studies.

Megann Harlow (Primary Presenter/Author), Univeristy of North Texas, megannharlow@my.unt.edu;


Bethany Hudson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Univeristy of North Texas, bethanystuck@my.unt.edu;


131 - CAN RIPARIAN HABITAT IMPACT WATER CHEMISTRY AND MACROINVERBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SMALL BLACKWATER CREEKS?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CAN RIPARIAN HABITAT IMPACT WATER CHEMISTRY AND MACROINVERBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SMALL BLACKWATER CREEKS? Streams depend on the surrounding valley for energetic subsidies and to set the stage for physicochemical conditions. Alterations to the surrounding riparian and adjacent upstream/downstream areas can ultimately result in changes to biological communities. As part of an undergraduate study in Fall 2016, we sampled the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of two creeks in southeastern Georgia, one with a relatively unaltered riparian buffer (Lotts Creek) and one with a highly impacted riparian area that has been almost entirely removed (Beautiful Eagle Creek). Our goal was to compare the sampled assemblages using a multi-metric approach (richness, composition, tolerance, etc.), along with point measurements of water chemistry parameters, in order to assess the health and ecological integrity of each creek. We predicted that Lotts Creek (> riparian buffer) would yield a more diverse macroinvertebrate assemblage, have more sensitive taxa present, and produce a higher multi-metric score (MMI) when compared to Beautiful Eagle Creek. As expected, we found differences in water chemistry (e.g., DO) and macroinvertebrate assemblages (e.g., EPT, MMI) between the creeks. However, some metrics (e.g., HBI) yielded similar scores despite these differences.

Candace Moon (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University , cm08244@georgiasouthern.edu;


Aubrie Goodson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University , ag06713@georgiasouthern.edu;


Ashley Deal ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University , ad04250@georgiasouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


132 - DEVELOPMENT OF A RICHNESS- AND TRAITS-BASED MACROINVERTEBRATE MMI USING A MULTI-STATE DATASET IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DEVELOPMENT OF A RICHNESS- AND TRAITS-BASED MACROINVERTEBRATE MMI USING A MULTI-STATE DATASET IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN Individual state assessments of stream quality are limited in their application across borders; therefore, several agencies have pushed for the development of bioassessments that transcend political jurisdictions. Thus, the goal of this study was to develop an Ohio River basin stream macroinvertebrate index (ORBMI) that transcends state boundaries and uniformly categorizes impaired and non-impaired sites, despite variation in collection methods. Data for index calibration and validation were obtained from 10 states within the basin and collected between 2003 and 2012. Impaired and non-impaired stream sites were originally determined from each state’s final index results. Fifty-two richness-based metrics comprised of richness, composition, habit, functional feeding group, and diversity measures were evaluated for inclusion in the new basin index. Eight metrics discriminated between impaired and non-impaired stream sites. Individual metric scores were calculated using a percentage of standard method and averaged to give an overall ORBMI score per site. The proportion of impaired and non-impaired sites categorized by the states and the ORBMI was not significantly different. This new ORBMI can be used as a tool to uniformly assess water quality using a hydrologically connected ecosystem across state lines.

Jamie Lau (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Kentucky University, Jamie.Lau@eku.edu;


133 - DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC OLIGOCHAETA (ANNELIDA: CLITELLATA) ON LAKE CUNIÃ, BRAZILIAN AMAZON

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC OLIGOCHAETA (ANNELIDA: CLITELLATA) ON LAKE CUNIÃ, BRAZILIAN AMAZON Oligochaeta is one of the most common and abundant taxon in continental aquatic fauna. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an inventory of aquatic oligochaetes in the Extractive Reserve of Lake Cuniã, State of Rondônia, Brazil. Collections of data were performed during the dry (August 2015) and rainy seasons (February 2016). The sediment samples were collected near the lakeside region using the kick sampling method and a kick-net sampler (mesh size of 0.25mm). This paper provides a catalog with 12 taxon from a total of 383 specimens, distributed into two families: Naididae (95%) and Opistocystidae (5%). Into naidids, the Pristininae subfamily was the most significant (85%), followed by subfamilies Naidinae (8%), Tubificinae (1%) and Rhyacondrilinae (1%). In addition, some species such as Allonais inaequalis, Aulophorus furcatus, Dero nivea, Pristina synclites, Pristina menoni and Opistocysta serrata, were recorded for the first time in the Brazilian Amazon region. Therefore, the results of this study contribute to increase knowledge on the distribution of the Oligochaeta class in Brazil, particularly in the North of the country, which is so extensive and rich in water resources, but not extensively studied.

Guilherme Gorni (Primary Presenter/Author), Araraquara University - UNIARA, grgorni@gmail.com;


Diego Gomes ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Araraquara University - UNIARA, diego.frgomes@gmail.com;


Nathalie Sanches ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Araraquara University - UNIARA, nathalie_sanches@hotmail.com;


Lucas Sahm ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Araraquara University - UNIARA, sahm.lucas@gmail.com;


Juliano Corbi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, julianocorbi@usp.br;


Vanessa Colombo-Corbi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UNIARA, vanessacolombo25@yahoo.com.br;


134 - IS STANDARD MAXENT MODEL OVER-FITTED? A TEST BASED ON SIMULATION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Is standard Maxent model over-fitted? A test based on simulation Understanding the distribution of species in relation to environment and human disturbance is critical for basic ecology and biodiversity conservation. Maxent is commonly used to model species distribution based on presence-only species data and to estimate local species richness. The default value of beta, an key parameter for controlling model complexity is set at 1. It is a general concern whether the default value may lead to model over-fitting. Recent studies have recommended using AICc to select a simpler and better model at a higher beta value. I modeled the distributions of 72 fish species in Illinois stream based on sampling data and landscape-level environmental variables, and took them as the truth, against which the predictions of the default and selected models were assessed. The sensitivity of the selected models increased, but the specificity decreased. Consequently, the overall performance measured with True Statistical Skill changed little. It is true of the similarity between the predicted and true species composition. I concluded that the default Maxent modeling is highly resistant to over-fitting, however, high beta values may be needed to minimize omission errors in modeling endangered species.

Yong Cao (Primary Presenter/Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, University of illinois, yongcao@illinois.edu;


135 - SIMULIIDAE (DIPTERA) CYTOSPECIES COLLECTED FROM BEDROCK SUBSTRATE STREAMS THROUGHOUT OHIO.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SIMULIIDAE (DIPTERA) CYTOSPECIES COLLECTED FROM BEDROCK SUBSTRATE STREAMS THROUGHOUT OHIO. Black fly larvae and pupae were collected from first and second order streams with shale bedrock substrates from northeastern Ohio, limestone bedrock substrate streams from southwestern Ohio, and shale bedrock streams from south central Ohio, all within different ecoregions. The sampling occurred from March through June over several seasons; species were identified using cytological methods. Simulium claricentrum (Diptera: Simuliidae), a new state record, was collected in far northeastern Ohio within Ashtabula and Lake Counties. Shale bedrock streams south or west of these two counties did not contain S. claricentrum. Additionally, multiple year sampling of streams containing S. claricentrum did not reveal S. innoxium, which commonly occurs in association with S. claricentrum in Pennsylvania. S. parnassum, a species not previously known to occur in Ohio was collected in a shale bedrock stream in Adams County of southcentral Ohio. Black fly diversity was highest in the northeast shale bedrock streams and the lowest in the limestone bedrock streams. This work is part of an on-going statewide comprehensive cytological survey of Simuliidae in Ohio.

Mike Mendel (Primary Presenter/Author), Cedarville University, mmendel@cedarville.edu;


Peter Adler ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, padler@clemson.edu;


Gregg Mendel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cedarville University, gwmendel@cedarville.edu;


Rhonda Mendel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EnviroScience Inc., rmendel@enviroscienceinc.com;


137 - DRAGONFLY DISTRIBUTION CHANGES MAY INDICATE CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTH DAKOTA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DRAGONFLY DISTRIBUTION CHANGES MAY INDICATE CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTH DAKOTA Climate change can be indicated by changes in aquatic organism distributions due to the alteration of water quality, changes in thermal regimes, and habitat alteration. Dragonflies are excellent indicators for aquatic habitat quality because they live in water as larvae and can fly, and therefore migrate, as adults. If conditions don’t suit them, they can move to more habitable conditions. The goal of this project is to establish a baseline distribution of dragonfly species across North Dakota in order to compare to past and future distributions. We have pulled together past data for the state, begun collecting our own adult and larval specimens, and are utilizing a set of voucher collections from bioassessment projects dating back 20 years to pull larval specimens and identify to species. Our data shows at least seven newly recorded species for the state. Whether these new records are due to a lack of previous surveys or they represent new distributions is currently unknown. In the future, we hope to correlate changes in distributions with changes in water quality and climate data.

Hayden Zander (Primary Presenter/Author), Valley City State University, hayden.j.zander@vcsu.edu;


Andre DeLorme ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Science, Valley City State University, andre.delorme@vcsu.edu;


138 - OVERWINTERING STRATEGIES OF ANAX JUNIUS IN A MINNESOTA PRAIRIE-POTHOLE ECOSYSTEM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Overwintering strategies of Anax junius in a Minnesota prairie-pothole ecosystem (the common green darner) is one of the most common and widespread species of dragonfly in the United States. Northern either overwinter as aquatic nymphs or migrate south as adults. Temperature is a leading driver of exotherm growth rate and likely plays a major role in determining which overwintering strategy an individual nymph utilizes. Therefore the timing and abundance of fall emergence and migration may be changing as climate extends the length of the northern growing season. This observational study of six different ponds within a restored prairie pothole ecosystem in central Minnesota documents the seasonal nymph population dynamics during 2017. These data, combined with adult phenological observations and experimentally created species temperature response curves will build a broad understanding of how northern are adapting to our changing climate.

Katelyn Johnston ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg College, johnstok@augsburg.edu;


Ami Thompson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, althomps@umn.edu;


Emily Schilling ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg College, schillin@augsburg.edu;


139 - IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LONGWOOD ENVIRONMENTAL OBSERVATORY (LEO)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LONGWOOD ENVIRONMENTAL OBSERVATORY (LEO) The Longwood Environmental Observatory (LEO) is a network of environmental sensors that collect data on land, water, and atmospheric processes. Data from the sensors are remotely added to a searchable database for use by students, teachers, researchers, and the public. The network is constructed using Arduino circuit boards that connect the sensors to a wireless network at each site. LEO was designed to provide tool a to communicate high resolution environmental data to professional, student, and citizen scientists. The implementation and construction of the network was completed in collaboration with undergraduate students and therefore has also provided opportunities for students to develop technical experience in computer and environmental science. The LEO web interface, which was also designed and implemented by undergraduate students, allows public access to the data collected by the network. Although the network is not fully operational yet, LEO has already shown the value of interdisciplinary projects that integrate student learning with scientific communication.

Evan Barnes (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, evan.barnes@live.longwood.edu;


Jessica Hoak ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, jessica.hoak@live.longwood.edu;


Kenneth Fortino ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, fortinok@longwood.edu;


Dina Leech ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, leechdm@longwood.edu;


Mark Fink ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , lie;


Kathy Gee ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , help;


Vanessa Gentry ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , job;


Alec Hosterman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , girl;


Chris Labosier ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), - , home;


Rachel Lombardi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), ,, view;


Robert Marmorstein ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), c , blue;


Hunter Plumley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), ,, kid;


Kristina Rogers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), ,, big;


141 - EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED BURNS ON CHIRONOMIDAE (INSECTA:DIPTERA) COMMUNITIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED BURNS ON CHIRONOMIDAE (INSECTA:DIPTERA) COMMUNITIES Fires can have detrimental impacts on macroinvertebrate communities by temporarily increasing stream temperature and/or reducing or eliminating cover within the stream riparian area. Here, we attempt to assess the impacts of fire on a subset of the macroinvertebrate community, the chironomids (Diptera: Chironomidae), by analyzing community composition before and after a prescribed burn near Blue Cloud Abbey Stream outside of Marvin, South Dakota, USA. The stream was divided into four sampling reaches: upstream of the burn area, within the burn area, and two sites downstream of the burn. Samples of surface floating Chironomidae pupal exuviae were gathered using a pan and sieve; samples were collected once before and three times after the prescribed burn for a total of thirty-two samples. A total of 380 chironimid pupal exuviae were sorted from sixteen of the samples. Exuviae were stored in 70% ethanol and brought back to the lab for sorting, slide-mounting, and identification. While slide-mounting and identification are still in progress, we anticipate that results will provide new information regarding potential impacts of small scale riparian area burns on the chironomid community.

Tessa Durnin (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern State University, tessa.durnin@wolves.northern.edu;


Alyssa Anderson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern State University, alyssa.m.anderson@northern.edu;


142 - MACROINVERTEBRATE RECOVERY RATES FROM SIMULATED STREAMBED DISTURBANCE ACROSS A GRADIENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE IMPAIRMENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MACROINVERTEBRATE RECOVERY RATES FROM SIMULATED STREAMBED DISTURBANCE ACROSS A GRADIENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE IMPAIRMENT In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) causes stressful conditions for stream biota, including elevated dissolved metal concentration and low pH. Macroinvertebrates in AMD impaired streams are strongly structured by the conditions, which result in low diversity and mostly tolerant taxa; these impaired streams may respond differently to additional stressors such as large flooding events which cause streambed disturbance. We hypothesize that impaired streams will respond differently to disturbance compared to recovered and unimpaired streams. Riffles were physically disturbed with rakes in AMD impaired streams (N=2), recovered streams (N=3), and unimpaired streams (N=2); macroinvertebrates were sampled immediately before disturbance and 5, 10, 15, and 30 days afterwards. Macroinvertebrates were identified to family and by functional feeding group. Taxonomic richness was higher in recovered and unimpaired sites before disturbance, 10 days, and 15 days after disturbance (p= 0.0522, 0.074, 0.0425, respectively). There was no significant difference 5 days or 30 days after. This indicates all sites responded similarly shortly after disturbance, but unimpaired and recovered sites returned to pre-disturbance richness, while impaired sites remained below pre-disturbance richness.

Mariah Thrush Hood (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio University, mt364608@ohio.edu;


Kelly Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, johnsok3@ohio.edu;


143 - WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM HERBIVORY INCREASES THROUGHFALL NUTRIENTS BUT NOT LITTER DECOMPOSITION RATES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM HERBIVORY INCREASES THROUGHFALL NUTRIENTS BUT NOT LITTER DECOMPOSITION RATES Western spruce budworm outbreaks should intensify in coniferous Pacific Northwest forests as climate change causes shorter winters and hotter summers. Budworm defoliation could accelerate litter decomposition rates by increasing frass input to the forest floor followed by nutrient leaching and/or by stimulating nutrient losses from the canopy via leaching. In forest plots with and without budworms, we deployed native coniferous and non-native deciduous litter bags for one year to measure decomposition rates, and we collected throughfall for nutrient analysis. Budworm sites had higher net throughfall flux of soluble reactive phosphorus and ammonium (paired t-test, p<0.01), but dissolved organic carbon flux did not differ. Despite added nutrient inputs from budworms, litter decomposition rates did not differ between high and low budworm sites, although deciduous litter decomposed faster than coniferous litter (ANOVA, p<<0.001). Limited moisture from extended summer drought in this climate could regulate decomposition rather than nutrients. These results imply limited ability of microbial immobilization to buffer budworm nutrient inputs to litter, suggesting that nutrients infiltrate into soils with possible consequences for altered nutrient cycling rates and elemental export from watersheds.

Izak Neziri (Primary Presenter/Author), Central Washington University, izakneziri@gmail.com;


Clay Arango ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Washington University, arangoc@cwu.edu;


Sally Entrekin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


Jennifer Lipton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Washington University, liptonj@cwu.edu;


Alexandra Ponette-González ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, Alexandra.Ponette@unt.edu;


144 - PHENOLOGY: PROJECTS TO EXPLORE NATURAL HISTORY AND CLIMATE CHANGE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PHENOLOGY: PROJECTS TO EXPLORE NATURAL HISTORY AND CLIMATE CHANGE Phenology refers to the changes in activity and abundance observed in organisms across the seasons. Both frogs and stream insects exhibit such patterns, which can be analyzed using data collected in the field and from databases. In addition to seasonal changes in general, the role of climate change in altering phenological patterns is also discussed.

Keith Pecor (Primary Presenter/Author), The College of New Jersey, pecor@tcnj.edu;


Kristen Batko ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Burlington County Regional School District, kbatko@nburlington.com;


145 - AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE RESPONSE TO TROUT REMOVAL IN BRIGHT ANGEL CREEK, GRAND CANYON, AZ

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE RESPONSE TO TROUT REMOVAL IN BRIGHT ANGEL CREEK, GRAND CANYON, AZ Top predators often act as keystone species, and their removal from an ecosystem can trigger trophic cascades, affecting all levels of the food web. In Bright Angel Creek, a tributary to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, the National Park Service is concluding a five-year effort to mechanically remove introduced top predators, brown trout and rainbow trout from the stream. We evaluated the effects of nonnative fish suppression on food web dynamics and macroinvertebrate resource availability to native fish species. We collected benthic, drift and emergent adult samples seasonally throughout a 3.2 km trout removal reach and compared results to a baseline study conducted prior to trout removal. We predict that invertebrate community response to trout removal will manifest as an increase in predatory insects and a decrease in collector-gatherer insects consistent with a trophic cascade. By exploring the consequences of trout removal on the food web, our results will aid managers in better understanding the ecosystem-wide effects of nonnative fish within Bright Angel Creek, and in assessing the suitability of the stream for potential native endangered species reintroduction.

Megan Daubert (Primary Presenter/Author), USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring & Research Center , mdaubert@usgs.gov;


Ted Kennedy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, tkennedy@usgs.gov;


Jeffrey Muehlbauer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, jmuehlbauer@usgs.gov;


Brian Healy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Park Service, brian_healy@nps.gov;


146 - COMPETITION AMONG RIVERINE SPORT FISH INFERRED FROM GUT CONTENT ANALYSIS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COMPETITION AMONG RIVERINE SPORT FISH INFERRED FROM GUT CONTENT ANALYSIS Rising stream temperatures associated with climate change are predicted to affect the distribution of fish species, potentially leading to novel competitive interactions. The purpose of this study was to examine dietary interactions between a warm water fish species, smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), that is likely to increasingly come into contact with cold water species such as brown trout (Salmo trutta). A secondary objective was to assess interactions between wild and stocked brown trout, as stocking also potentially affects resident cold water fish species. We predicted that diets would be similar between bass and trout and between stocked trout and wild trout. Diet items were obtained from 41 fish using gastric lavage, enumerated and categorized to the lowest taxonomic resolution possible (usually family or order), then analyzed statistically using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). Results showed little diet overlap between bass and trout, but nearly complete overlap between stocked and wild trout. We infer that smallmouth bass likely have minimal impact on food availability for brown trout in this stream, while stocked trout appear likely to directly compete with wild trout.

Eli Beal (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, vyvt@iup.edu;


David Janetski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


147 - HOW MUCH INFORMATION IS IN A FISH GUT? FINE SCALE IDENTIFICATION OF FISH GUT CONTENT ANALYSIS: A NEW METHOD EXAMINED

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HOW MUCH INFORMATION IS IN A FISH GUT? FINE SCALE IDENTIFICATION OF FISH GUT CONTENT ANALYSIS: A NEW METHOD EXAMINED Gut content analysis has been used successfully for several decades, but the level of identification of gut contents can vary. Fine-grained identification of gut contents includes fish species or invertebrate genus, while broad-grained identification creates general taxonomic groups (e.g. “insects” or “algae”). We conducted a review of the literature to examine how frequently fine-grained identification was used in gut content analysis. Additionally, we used the Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (Hybognathus amarus) as a test organism to develop a method for analyzing gut contents with fine-grained identification of both algal and invertebrate taxa. We found that the way gut content analyses were reported in the literature are somewhat inconsistent, with different methodology and different levels of identification. The case study indicated that fine-grained level of identification did provide additional information about feeding preferences and was most useful for diatom taxa. The method we developed for fine-grained identification of both taxonomic groups was easily manageable. However, combining algal and invertebrate data was relatively rare in other studies.

Ayesha Burdett (Primary Presenter/Author), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Ayesha.Burdett@state.nm.us;


Rebecca Bixby ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, bbixby@unm.edu;


Douglas Tave ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Interstate Stream Commission, Douglas.Tave@state.nm.us;


Louie Toya ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Interstate Stream Commission, Louie.Toya@state.nm.us;


Allison Hutson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Interstate Stream Commission, Allison.Hutson@state.nm.us;


148 - CYANOBACTERIA REDUCE QUAGGA MUSSEL (DREISSENA ROSTRIFORMIS BUGENSIS) REPRODUCTION AND VELIGER SURVIVAL

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CYANOBACTERIA REDUCE QUAGGA MUSSEL (DREISSENA ROSTRIFORMIS BUGENSIS) REPRODUCTION AND VELIGER SURVIVAL Quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) are highly fecund bivalves invasive to North American and Western European waters. Food availability may play a role in reproduction and development, whereas nutritious algae may stimulate dreissenid spawning and support veliger growth, while low quality food, such as bloom forming cyanobacteria, could be a hindrance. We investigated the role cyanobacteria play in regulating quagga mussel reproduction and veliger survival through a series of bioassays. Fertilization was quantified by exposing dreissenid eggs and sperm to thirteen cyanobacteria solutions and monitoring zygote formation. Veliger assays were conducted as 6-day chronic toxicity studies with exposure to five concentrations of cyanobacteria to determine the LC50. For all assays, controls of artificial lake water were used. Fertilization rates were reduced with exposure to cyanobacteria, while the LC50 for veligers was well below bloom concentrations. Results from this study demonstrate an antagonistic relationship between cyanobacteria and quagga mussel reproduction and veliger survival. This information can be used to model mussel populations, and further research could reveal a possible control method to limit dreissenid reproduction.

Anna Boegehold (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, az1079@wayne.edu;


Nicholas Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Great Lakes Science Center, njohnson@usgs.gov;


Donna Kashian ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, dkashian@wayne.edu;


149 - EFFECT OF INVASIVE ELODEA CANADENSIS ON AQUATIC INSECT COMMUNITIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECT OF INVASIVE ELODEA CANADENSIS ON AQUATIC INSECT COMMUNITIES Aquatic invasive species can have negative effects on the environment, economy, and human health, and therefore have become a global concern. The aquatic macrophyte, Elodea canadensis (Canadian Waterweed), is invasive in Alaska, particularly in coastal wetland ponds on the Copper River Delta (CRD). These ponds provide a suite of ecosystem services that could be altered by E. canadensis. The goal of this study was to assess effects of E. canadensis on aquatic insect community structure in CRD coastal wetland ecosystems. Aquatic insects were collected monthly from May to September 2016 from monotypic beds of E. canadensis and four native macrophytes. Two beds of each macrophyte species were sampled from each of four ponds. Aquatic insect abundance and species richness was higher in native macrophytes than in invasive Elodea, however, Chironomidae numerically dominated both Elodea and native macrophyte beds. This research will provide essential data on the impact of E. canadensis in coastal ponds of the CRD and has implications for fish and waterbirds that rely on aquatic insects as their primary food resource.

Jennifer Piacente (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago , jpiacente@luc.edu;


Martin B. Berg ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mberg@luc.edu;


150 - EFFECTS OF THE INVASIVE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL IN THE AU SABLE RIVER (MICHIGAN, USA)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF THE INVASIVE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL IN THE AU SABLE RIVER (MICHIGAN, USA) The New Zealand mud-snail (NZMS) Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a world-wide invader, is expanding its range throughout North American rivers. Studies conducted in the western United States have documented impacts to benthic-invertebrate and fish communities. Given the very recent discovery of NZMS in the rivers of the Great Lakes region, the potential impacts are currently unknown. Here we made use of 7 sites on the Au Sable River (Michigan, USA) that had varying NZMS densities to examine the effects of NZMS on stream-invertebrate communities and trout diet. Preliminary results show NZMS densities ranged from 0 – 9,345 individuals/m2. NZMS were constituents in the diets of the 25 trout sampled at NZMS-invaded sites; 44% of these individuals contained NZMS in their gut contents. The proportion of NZMS in total gut contents of individual trout ranged from 0-50%, with a mean proportion (+/- SD) of 7.19% (12.17). These results suggest that the NZMS invasion has influence on trout diets, with unknown consequences for the health of these fish and the ecosystems in which they live.

Jeremy Geist (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Mark Luttenton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, luttentm@gvsu.edu;


Justin Wegner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, wegnerju@mail.gvsu.edu;


Scott Tiegs ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


151 - INTER- AND INTRA-ANNUAL APPLE SNAIL (POMACEA SPP.) EGG MASS PRODUCTION IN LAKE SEMINOLE, GA, USA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INTER- AND INTRA-ANNUAL APPLE SNAIL (POMACEA SPP.) EGG MASS PRODUCTION IN LAKE SEMINOLE, GA, USA The introduction and spread of invasive Pomacea maculata across subtropical and tropical freshwaters around the world represents significant threat to ecological and biological processes. While accurate population estimates are difficult, Pomacea spp. deposit distinct calcareous egg masses above the water line that can be identified to species. In this study, we surveyed deposited egg masses across the range of available emergent surfaces to identify the distribution of a native and introduced Pomacea species in Lake Seminole, a large reservoir in southwestern Georgia. Egg mass counts were used to determine areas of high abundance for each species during peak egg mass production times from 2013-2016. Intra-annual egg mass production was surveyed monthly starting in April 2016. Areas of high P. maculata abundance were used to infer population expansion, including evidence for an invasion wave emanating from the presumed introduction location throughout Lake Seminole. Monthly surveys found egg mass production year-round, previously undocumented in North America. Ongoing production and dispersal of P. maculata in Lake Seminole may result in ecosystem level changes yet unknown, and current research aims to assess these changes.

Nicholas Marzolf (Primary Presenter/Author), J.W. Jones Ecological Research Center, nmarzolf@jonesctr.org;


Chelsea Smith ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), J.W. Jones Ecological Research Center, csmith@jonesctr.org;


Stephen Golladay ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Joseph W Jones Ecological Research Center, sgolla@jonesctr.org;


152 - ROUND GOBY INVASION AND THE IMPACT ON NATIVE STREAM FISH ASSEMBLAGES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ROUND GOBY INVASION AND THE IMPACT ON NATIVE STREAM FISH ASSEMBLAGES Nonnative species can have a variety of impacts on newly invaded areas. We tested the hypothesis that round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) invasion is associated with decreased diversity of native competitors across a spatial gradient from the site to watershed scale. Fish surveys were conducted at three sites in each of five Michigan streams over two years. Fish community diversity did not change at the site or watershed level over time. Species aggregation was observed at site and watershed levels indicating potential interaction with habitat availability. Native species likely to compete with round goby (i.e. darters) were lower in abundance (p=0.005) where goby were most abundant. Similarly, goby abundance was greater (p=0.020) at sites with lower diversity in 2015 but not 2016. This suggests some inter-annual variation in goby abundance, potentially related to boom and bust cycles along the invasion front. However, in established populations goby had diet preference for the most abundant invertebrates which may be imposing long-term competitive stress for food resources on native fishes. With further analysis, we hope to identify causal factors constraining or promoting goby invasion.

Corey Krabbenhoft (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, ckrab@wayne.edu;


Donna Kashian ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, dkashian@wayne.edu;


153 - RUSSIAN OLIVE HAS SIMILAR GROWTH AND NODULATION RESPONSES AS OTHER ACTINORHIZAL SPECIES TO SOIL N AND LIGHT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

RUSSIAN OLIVE HAS SIMILAR GROWTH AND NODULATION RESPONSES AS OTHER ACTINORHIZAL SPECIES TO SOIL N AND LIGHT The invasive exotic tree, Russian olive ( Elaeagnus angustifolia ) elevates soil N concentrations, is associated with higher exotic plant cover underneath its canopy, and has the potential to form self-replicating stands that prevent cottonwood regeneration. Additionally, it fills a previously unoccupied niche in western riparian ecosystems because it can recruit and grow in the shaded conditions found underneath cottonwood canopy. Russian olive’s tolerance to low light availability and high soil N concentration is unusual for actinorhizal species. To elucidate if Russian olive symbiosis with actinobacteria is less influenced by light availability and soil N concentrations than other actinorhizal species, we conducted a greenhouse study comparing Russian olive growth and nodulation to 3 Alnus and 2 other Elaeagnus species (all actinorhizal) across a gradient of shading and substrate N concentrations. We hypothesized that Russian olive nodulation, N fixation, and growth would be more tolerant to shading than these other species. Contrary to our expectations, Russian olive performed similarly to the other species, suggesting that differences in in the ability to fix atmospheric N in low light conditions do not explain its ability to invade areas underneath cottonwood canopies.

Graham Tuttle (Primary Presenter/Author), Colorado State University, gmtuttle@colostate.edu;


Gabrielle Katz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Metropolitan State University of Denver, gkatz@msudenver.edu;


Andrew Norton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, apnorton@colostate.edu;


154 - BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES AS BIOINDICATORS OF LAND USE IMPACTS ON THE WESTERN FINGER LAKES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES AS BIOINDICATORS OF LAND USE IMPACTS ON THE WESTERN FINGER LAKES Conesus, Hemlock, Canadice and Honeoye lakes are among the smallest Finger Lakes, but they are important for drinking water, recreation and homes along their shorelines. Farms and forests are the major land uses in their watersheds. Hemlock and Canadice lakes are both within a state forest, which provides a buffer along the shoreline, and their water quality is high, while Conesus and Honeoye lakes are unregulated with lower water quality. My M.S. thesis project explored whether relationships exist between individual watershed land use and water quality and whether having a near-shore forest buffer improves water quality, as determined by biotic indices using benthic macroinvertebrates. While significant differences were found in the overall benthic community compositions between the lakes, biotic indices indicated no significant differences in water quality between the lakes and no correlation between land use in watersheds and water quality. This suggests that partial-watershed management in Hemlock and Canadice Lakes has no effect on water quality and only whole watershed management might positively influence water quality.

Mitchell Owens (Primary Presenter/Author), College at Brockport-SUNY, owensm42@gmail.com;


155 - EFFECT OF LAKE DEPTH ON HYPOXIA IN AGRICULTURAL LAKES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECT OF LAKE DEPTH ON HYPOXIA IN AGRICULTURAL LAKES Lake depth in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Plain is heavily affected by agricultural irrigation, flood-control structures, and large-scale pumping projects. Small oxbow lakes are widespread in this region, and commonly experience hypoxia that leads to fish-kills. We examined how lake depth affects dissolved oxygen (DO) availability and lake hypoxia potential. Specifically, we measured water column and sediment primary production and respiration relationships with water depth prior to, during, and after a whole-lake drawdown to measure changes during a single drying and refilling event. Sediment net primary productivity (NPP) was predominately negative regardless of lake depth and location and ranged from -0.594 to 0.251 g O2/m2/h. Results were used to model whole-lake metabolism. Increasing depth resulted in lower whole-lake NPP due to the decreased photic zone for phytoplankton production. In the turbid conditions that are common after precipitation, greater lake depths expand the heterotrophic dark zone of the water column. This reduction in water column NPP combined with permanent DO uptake by sediments can increase whole lake hypoxia during lake refilling.

Jason Payne (Primary Presenter/Author), Tennessee Tech University, jhpayne42@students.tntech.edu;


156 - FRESHWATER SALINIZATION, IT'S NOT JUST A COASTAL PROBLEM: IMPACTS OF MOUNTAINTOP MINING ON A REGIONAL SCALE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

FRESHWATER SALINIZATION, IT'S NOT JUST A COASTAL PROBLEM: IMPACTS OF MOUNTAINTOP MINING ON A REGIONAL SCALE Since 1976, mountaintop mining valley fill operations have converted approximately 5,400 km2 of the Appalachian ecoregion to surface mines. High concentrations of alkaline mine drainage ions have been found in streams below deposits of mining waste rock, as weathering products accumulate in water flowing through these fills. These elevated ion concentrations have been implicated in observed shifts in macroinvertebrate community composition and the extirpation of sensitive aquatic taxa. Given the abundance of mining-impacted streams, salinity could also be elevated at a regional scale in receiving rivers and persist far downstream of mines. We examined the dissipation of the salinity signal from the Hobet mine, the largest surface mine in Appalachia, by measuring the conductivity of the receiving Mud River at multiple points before its confluence with the Guyandotte River. Elevated conductivity persisted 110 km downstream of mines, with all sites above the EPA’s conductivity threshold for aquatic life. These findings indicate that mountaintop mining activities produce freshwater salinization at regional scales, potentially propagating ecological impacts far downstream of the disturbance.

Laura Naslund (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University , laura.naslund@duke.edu;


Matthew Ross ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, matt.ross@duke.edu;


Alex Brooks ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University , alex.brooks@duke.edu;


Eric Moore ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University , eric.m.moore@duke.edu;


Brian McGlynn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, brian.mcglynn@duke.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


157 - IMPACT OF EXPOSURE TO URBAN DEVELOPMENT ON STONEFLY FUNCTIONAL COMPOSITION AND TAXONOMIC DIVERSITY IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IMPACT OF EXPOSURE TO URBAN DEVELOPMENT ON STONEFLY FUNCTIONAL COMPOSITION AND TAXONOMIC DIVERSITY IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS Several studies have shown that urban development can increase autochthonous energy input into waterways. First order streams provide a vital habitat for aquatic macroinvertebrates, particularly shredding detritivores, which rely on allochthonous input as their primary energy source. High biodiversity and a range of urbanization make the Southern Appalachian Mountains an ideal location to study the impacts of human development on freshwater fauna. We sampled 32 sites, all first order streams, to determine the effects of development on functional composition and taxonomic diversity of stoneflies (Family: Plecoptera). Environmental parameters were measured at each site to quantify the level of development. We chose to focus on Plecoptera because they represent a large proportion of the shredding detritivores that depend on the autochthonous input from riparian vegetation. Samples were identified to genus and analyzed using linear regression and cluster analyses to determine if any environmental variables are significantly correlated with functional or taxonomic trends.

Briana Cairco (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, kcairco@g.clemson.edu;


John C. Morse ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, jmorse@clemson.edu;


Michael Caterino ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, mcateri@clemson.edu;


Kyle Barrett ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, rbarre2@clemson.edu;


Nathan Weaver ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, nsweave@clemson.edu;


158 - LANDUSE INFLUENCES ON STREAM PROCESSES AND BIOTA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

LANDUSE INFLUENCES ON STREAM PROCESSES AND BIOTA Landuse, through runoff, can have significant influences on stream macroinvertebrate assemblages. We hypothesize that runoff is an important route for particles and dissolved chemicals from terrestrial landscapes to streams, and can modify instream processes. These modifications in agricultural landscapes compared to forests, are due to organic load changing the oxygen regime and food quality, and contaminants. All three directly affect the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Our research questions were: 1. Does runoff differ between agricultural and forest landscapes? 2. How does land-use related runoff modify the instream processes? 3. Does the macroinvertebrate assemblage respond to land-use related runoff? Runoff is a source of organic matter, phosphorus, nitrogen, carbon and contaminants in streams. Agricultural runoff in comparison to agricultural runoff results in an increase in organic load and as such in oxygen depletion, a decrease in food quality based on the C/N ratio, and an increase in contamination based on bioassay tests on growth, reproduction and emergence. All three changes will add to the observed decrease in macroinvertebrate diversity. In conclusion, buffering agricultural runoff will add to the recovery of stream ecosystems.

Paula dos Reis Oliveira (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Amsterdam, p.c.dosreisoliveira@uva.nl;


159 - QUANTIFYING HYDROLOGIC AND LAND USE CONTROLS ON THE TIMING AND MAGNITUDE OF WATERSHED NITROGEN EXPORT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Quantifying hydrologic and land use controls on the timing and magnitude of watershed nitrogen export Discharge, land use, and stormwater management have been found to be important determinants of nitrogen (N) export to receiving waters. We used long-term water quality stations from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (BES LTER) Site to assess the cumulative effect of stormwater control basins, green infrastructure, and stream restoration on nitrogen export at the watershed scale. We calculated nitrate and total nitrogen fluxes using methodology that enables accounting for watershed changes over time; weighted regressions on time, discharge, and seasonality. Here we tested the hypotheses that a) while the largest N stream fluxes occur during storm events, there is not a clear relationship between N flux and discharge and b) N export patterns are aseasonal in developed watersheds where sources are larger and retention capacity is lower. Developing a better understanding of hydrologic, seasonal, and long-term influences on nitrogen export is essential for successful adaptive watershed management.

Jon Duncan (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, jmduncan@unc.edu;


LAWRENCE BAND ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UNC CHAPEL HILL, lband@email.unc.edu;


Peter Groffman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), City University of New York, Peter.Groffman@asrc.cuny.edu ;


160 - REDUCING PHOSPHORUS LOADS IN LAKE ERIE AT SUBWATERSHED SCALE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

REDUCING PHOSPHORUS LOADS IN LAKE ERIE AT SUBWATERSHED SCALE Increased loading of phosphorus to the watersheds of Lake Erie through agricultural and urban runoff has been thought to be the main culprit for recent algal blooms. The excess availability of resources for the algae results in an overabundance of these organisms. Because of its municipality sizes and animal operations, the Portage River is important in understanding and tracking areas of high P runoff that could be contributing to algal blooms. Stable isotopes of oxygen in phosphate can be used to determine the source of P since oxygen isotopes differ depending on sources. Water samples were taken at various reaches of the Portage River. Temperature was also taken at time of sampling. Samples were processed for silver phosphate and then analyzed for ?18O. From this analysis, we will be able to determine whether the sources of P are inorganic.

Gabrielle Metzner (Primary Presenter/Author), Bowling Green State University, gmetzne@bgsu.edu;


161 - THRESHOLD ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES RELATIVE TO RESTORATION ACTIVITIES IN THE DELAWARE RIVER WATERSHED INITIATIVE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Threshold analysis of macroinvertebrate communities relative to restoration activities in the Delaware River Watershed Initiative Research is being conducted to measure the success of agricultural restoration activities as part of the Delaware River Watershed Initiative (DRWI), a large-scale, collaborative research and implementation project. Our goal is to project potential improvements in stream quality to aquatic macroinvertebrates in first- to third-order streams.  Data were analyzed using Threshold Indicator Taxa ANalysis (TITAN), an R-based package used to detect taxa distribution changes along an environmental gradient. We analyzed threshold responses of macroinvertebrates at family-, genus-, and species-level to environmental gradients comprising land use, habitat quality, and water chemistry variables. Results elucidated the need for at least genus-level identification to pinpoint the relationships between taxa and a gradient of parameters found within regions dominated by forested and agricultural land use. These analyses can be used tto define states of ecosystem recovery after restoration.

Meghan O'Donnell (Primary Presenter/Author), Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, mjo63@drexel.edu;


162 - ASSESSMENT OF NOVEL MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER ON URBAN BEACHES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ASSESSMENT OF NOVEL MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER ON URBAN BEACHES Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) accumulates in ecosystems worldwide, with negative ecological and economic effects. Management of AL is an increasing priority, but reduction or prevention strategies are rarely tested. On an urban beach in Chicago, IL, we measured the effects of newly designed ashtrays (i.e., “vote with your butt”), combined with educational and community involvement initiatives about littering, both designed to reduce beach AL. Data were collected at treatment and control beaches biweekly for 14 weeks. We collected AL around and inside installed ashtrays and along multiple transects spanning beach width. The ashtrays had no effect on cigarette AL density (No. m-2) or relative amount of cigarettes (% of total AL) in the collected zones. In addition, the engagement initiatives did not generate any differences between the treatment and control sites for the beach zone for any of the AL metrics (i.e., total AL or cigarette AL). While the two novel interventions did not reduce AL, results from this study will be used to guide the re-design, implementation, and assessment of future AL management interventions.

Veronica Lourich (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, vlourich@luc.edu;


Sarah Neville ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alliance for the Great Lakes, sneville@greatlakes.org;


Olga Lyandres ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alliance for the Great Lakes, OLyandres@greatlakes.org;


Timothy Hoellein ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


163 - EVOLUTION OF STREAM WATER QUALITY AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION ALONG AN URBAN CORRIDOR IN WINTER - BOULDER CREEK, CO

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EVOLUTION OF STREAM WATER QUALITY AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION ALONG AN URBAN CORRIDOR IN WINTER - BOULDER CREEK, CO We deployed in situ sensors in Boulder Creek at three sites: upstream of Boulder, CO in Boulder Canyon, downstream of Boulder just upstream of its wastewater treatment plant effluent (WWE), and ~8 km downstream from the WWE. For a 5-day period in December 2016, average DO and SC were 11.86 mg L-1 and 83 uS cm-1 at the upstream site, 10.82 mg L-1 and 460 uS cm-1 at the middle site, and 11.22 mg L-1 and 761 uS cm-1 at the downstream site. Metabolism models fit poorly at the upstream site due to low productivity and high reaeration rates. Modeled gross primary productivity, community respiration, net ecological production, and reaeration coefficients were 2.39 gO2m-2d-1, -9.82 gO2m-2d-1, -7.43 gO2m-2d-1 and 18.7 d-1 for the middle site and 0.89 gO2m-2d-1, -1.41 gO2m-2d-1, -0.52 gO2m-2d-1, and 5.71 d-1 for the downstream site. The rapid evolution of biogeochemistry and metabolism of the stream creates large spatial structure in the ecological functioning as well as the cycling of carbon and nutrients in this stream.

Margaret Spangler (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Colorado, margaret.spangler@colorado.edu;


Michael Gooseff ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Colorado, michael.gooseff@colorado.edu;


Edward Stets ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, tedstets@gmail.com;


Sheila Murphy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, sfmurphy@usgs.gov;


164 - LINKING WATER QUALITY AND TREE SWALLOW POPULATIONS ACROSS AN URBAN-FORESTED LANDSCAPE GRADIENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

LINKING WATER QUALITY AND TREE SWALLOW POPULATIONS ACROSS AN URBAN-FORESTED LANDSCAPE GRADIENT North American aerial insectivorous birds have experienced alarming population declines in recent decades. Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) forage in riparian areas and rely on a combination of aquatic emergent and terrestrial flying insects. We monitored tree swallow populations across an urban-forested gradient in Columbus, Ohio for three breeding seasons. At seven riparian sites, we collected data on reproductive success and body condition, as well as environmental factors and insect food availability. Preliminary analyses indicate that water-quality parameters including total phosphorus and nitrogen were important predictors of reproductive success (e.g., clutch size, number of nestlings fledged, clutch initiation date). Water turbidity and mercury concentrations were both associated with individual body condition. These results show that shifts in water quality may contribute to aerial insectivorous bird populations via effects on emergent aquatic insects, which represent an energetically-critical prey source. Further, initial evidence suggests that variability in air temperature and humidity are also related to swallow responses, implicating changing climate patterns as an additional factor potentially influencing aerial insectivorous bird populations.

Joseph Corra ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, corra.1@osu.edu;


S. Mazeika P. Sullivan (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


165 - MINIMAL EFFECTS OF FATHEAD MINNOWS ON INSECT EMERGENCE FROM OUTDOOR MESOCOSMS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MINIMAL EFFECTS OF FATHEAD MINNOWS ON INSECT EMERGENCE FROM OUTDOOR MESOCOSMS Fathead minnows are widely introduced in freshwater ecosystems throughout the world. They are omnivorous, but have been shown to reduce densities of benthic macroinvertebrates following introductions to wetlands. However, the effects of these fish on insect emergence is largely unknown. We created a gradient of fathead densities (0-5 fish per square meter) in outdoor artificial streams to measure their effects on insect emergence in late summer 2015. Based on preliminary results over the 30-day experiment, we found no consistent relationship between fathead minnow density and the abundance of emerging aquatic insects. Relationships ranged from neutral to positive, suggesting that fathead minnows did not affect, or slightly increased, emergence in our experiment. These results are surprising given the apparently strong control of benthic insects by fathead minnows from field studies. Whether the lack of relationship between fatheads and emergence in our experiment is also reflected in relationships with benthic insects, along with diet analyses, is currently being determined.

Charles Nearman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of South Dakota, c_nearman32@hotmail.com;


Lauren Henning ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, lauren.henning@usd.edu;


Brianna Henry ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, b.henry@eagle.clarion.edu;


Eric Sazama ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, ericjsazama@gmail.com;


Emily Rolfes ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Vermillion High School, archeryrocks5083@gmail.com;


Wyatt Waage ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Vermillion High School, wwaage_99@icloud.com;


Stian Olson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Vermillion High School, stianolson@gmail.com;


Jeff Wesner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, Jeff.Wesner@usd.edu;


166 - SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN INSECT EMERGENCE FROM FOUR BACKWATERS OF THE MISSOURI RIVER

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN INSECT EMERGENCE FROM FOUR BACKWATERS OF THE MISSOURI RIVER Consumer response to resource subsidies is constrained by the spatial and temporal dynamics of those subsidies, but these dynamics are not well-described. To quantify spatiotemporal variation in an aquatic-terrestrial subsidy, we measured emerging aquatic insects from four backwaters along the Missouri River from June through September of 2016. This study yielded two key findings: First, only two sites experienced distinct peaks, but in different months. Emergence in one site peaked in June and declined 78% in July through September. Emergence in the second site peaked in July, when it was 1.5 to 2.5 fold higher than any other month. The remaining sites experienced comparatively low but stable rates of emergence through all months. Second, the greatest disparity in total emergence—a 6-fold difference (208 insects/m2 versus 35 total insects/m2)—occurred between two adjacent sites separated by a beaver dam. These results demonstrate the potential for significant spatial and temporal variation to occur even amongst characteristically similar sites. Such asynchronous patterns of emergence may prolong the availability of the subsidy to consumers, thereby supporting a greater number of consumers than if emergence were synchronous.

Erika Oddy (Primary Presenter/Author), University of South Dakota, Erika.Oddy@coyotes.usd.edu;


Lisa Yager ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Park Service, lisa_yager@nps.gov ;


Jeff Wesner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, Jeff.Wesner@usd.edu;


167 - THE ROLE OF STREAM NETWORK GEOMETRY AND CLIMATE ON THE SPATIAL EXTENT OF AQUATIC-DERIVED RESOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE ROLE OF STREAM NETWORK GEOMETRY AND CLIMATE ON THE SPATIAL EXTENT OF AQUATIC-DERIVED RESOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS The effects of emergent aquatic insect subsidies are pronounced at the water’s edge, yet less is known about the extent these resources permeate into upland environments: here we assessed the relative role of stream network geometry and climate. We estimated the area at which aquatic derived resources could be detected at 25% of the value at the stream bank (i.e. “stream signature”), for ~1,600 complete stream networks across the contiguous US. We characterized the network geometry with Horton’s Laws and drainage diameter and density and compiled several hydroclimate variables, including mean annual precipitation and estimated flow. Given high in-stream productivity, we found up to 36% of the watershed could be subjected to a 25% stream signature and that the spatial extent was strongly related to stream network density. This work supplements other theoretical developments with more realistic stream networks and demonstrates the utility of a nationally consistent dataset in assessing aquatic-terrestrial resource exchange across broad spatial extents. Further, it provides a spatially explicit prediction of aquatic resource flux which can be tested empirically and improved.

Darin Kopp (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, darinkopp@gmail.com;


Daniel Allen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, dcallen@ou.edu;


168 - WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM HERBIVORY INFLUENCES STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM HERBIVORY INFLUENCES STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS Stream-riparian interactions are often mediated by leaf litter inputs. In the Pacific Northwest, herbivorous Western Spruce Budworm (WSB) outbreaks have increased in intensity and extent along riparian areas of managed Douglas-Fir forests. We predicted high rates of WSB herbivory in riparian areas would increase microbial production and food resources of macroinvertebrates through increased amounts and lability of leaf litter inputs as frass and intensified solar radiation from canopy damage. We used stable isotopic signatures of possible macroinvertebrate food sources (Frass, FBOM, CBOM, algae, and moss) to identify contribution towards growth. We also identified macroinvertebrates from quantitative samples for community structure and biomass. Preliminary data shows total frass-derived macroinvertebrate biomass was greater in low WSB stream (600 mg/m2) from more collectors compared to the high WSB stream (100 mg/m2). However, the percent of frass-derived biomass was greater in the high WSB stream (28%) than low WSB stream (9%). The results suggest WSB activity upstream may have contributed to the unexpected contribution of frass in the low WSB stream and frass appears to be an important food resource for consumers.

Deion Everhart (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Central Arkansas, deioneverhart@gmail.com;


169 - USING D18O TO TRACK PO4 ENTERING THE WESTERN BASIN OF LAKE ERIE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

USING d18O TO TRACK PO4 ENTERING THE WESTERN BASIN OF LAKE ERIE Algal blooms in the Western Basin of Lake Erie are dependent upon nutrients provided by major rivers within Northwest Ohio. To develop more accurate methods of defining which of these waterways is the largest contributor, a proof of concept study is being conducted using d18O of phosphate molecules. In the summer of 2016, 10-20L samples of water were collected at the several major branches within the Portage River, at the mouths of the Portage, Maumee, and Sandusky Rivers, and at two locations within the Western Basin. Silver phosphate was then precipitated from these water samples for d18O analysis. Initial results suggest that equilibration due to biological processing within the water column may be producing deviation from expected d18O patterns. Examining rates of equilibrium, incorporating water isotope ratios and water temperatures, and fractionation will provide more insight. Collection of water samples under high flow conditions this spring will also offer guidance as large runoff events and shorter residence time allows less equilibration and fractionation. These d18O values, collectively, will determine the validity of this novel method of tracking inorganic phosphorus.

Melanie Marshall (Primary Presenter/Author), Bowling Green State University, melaniemarshall14@gmail.com;


Gabrielle Metzner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bowling Green State University, gmetzne@bgsu.edu;


Kevin McCluney ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bowling Green State University, kmcclun@bgsu.edu;


170 - A 5-YEAR STUDY OF LEAF DECOMPOSITION IN THE OGEECHEE, A COASTAL PLAIN RIVER IN GEORGIA.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

A 5-year study of leaf decomposition in the Ogeechee, a coastal plain river in Georgia. In a changing climate, descriptive studies in a long-term context are important for understanding stream ecosystem dynamics and management. Leaf breakdown is an ecosystem process that integrates multiple components of the stream and represents a direct or indirect source of food for many organisms. The rate at which leaves decompose depends on the physical and chemical properties of the leaf, microbial and insect activity, and environmental factors (e.g., discharge, temperature, etc.). Long-term data on litter breakdown can help us quantify and elucidate the multiple complex interactions involved in this process. In this study, we present 5 years of data (2012-2016) for water oak (Quercus nigra) leaf decomposition at a single site in the Lower Ogeechee River. Our goal is to assess the effects of discharge, temperature, and macroinvertebrate assemblage in a long-term context. Preliminary results reveal that 2012, a year following an extensive drought (>1 yr), to differ in leaf decomposition rates from consequent years. Factors that potentially explain these differences include differences in abundance, diversity, and functional groups of colonizing invertebrates, as well as differences in discharge and temperature.

Jose Sanchez (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras, jas091988@gmail.com;


V. Byron Collins ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University , vc00812@georgiasouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


171 - ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER IN URBAN STREAMS: SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PLASTIC AND ITS ROLE IN LEAF LITTER BREAKDOWN

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER IN URBAN STREAMS: SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PLASTIC AND ITS ROLE IN LEAF LITTER BREAKDOWN Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) is an emerging ecological concern worldwide. Marine research implicates rivers as a major source of AL to oceans, but little is known about its distribution and effects on ecological processes within urban streams. Previous studies suggest that plastic AL in rivers (i.e. bags, wrappers) becomes trapped in debris dams and overhanging vegetation that also accumulate leaf litter and coarse particulate organic matter. In forested streams, debris dams are critical sites of leaf breakdown and habitat for stream biota. We measured spatial distribution of AL within 3 debris dams and 3 non-debris dam pairs, spaced ~2-3 km apart in 3 urban streams in Northeastern IL, USA. We then measured leaf breakdown, bacterial and macroinvertebrate communities in 3 litter bag treatments: leaves alone, plastic alone, and mixed. We expect the greatest plastic AL density occurs in debris dams, and that plastic reduces leaf breakdown by reducing oxygen levels, thereby lowering abundance of microbial decomposers and macroinvertebrate consumers. Results will show how the spatial distribution of AL drives its capacity to alter fundamental processes in urban streams.

Lisa Kim (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, lkim1@luc.edu;


Samuel Dunn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago , sdunn3@luc.edu;


Timothy Hoellein ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


172 - DECOMPOSITION OF ALLOCHTHONOUS ORGANIC MATTER IN TROPICAL STREAMS: ROLES OF MICROORGANISMS, AQUATIC INSECTS, DECAPODS, AND FISHES.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DECOMPOSITION OF ALLOCHTHONOUS ORGANIC MATTER IN TROPICAL STREAMS: ROLES OF MICROORGANISMS, AQUATIC INSECTS, DECAPODS, AND FISHES. Detritivores, as fungi and invertebrates, drive the leaf litter decomposition in most temperate forest streams, with aquatic shredder insects playing a central role comminuting leaf litter. Conversely, tropical streams show low diversity of fungi and aquatic shredder insects while macroconsumers are abundant and diverse. What is the impact of these differences on the pathways of leaf litter decomposition in tropical streams? Here, we synthesized records of leaf litter breakdown to compare the roles of microorganisms, invertebrates and fish on breakdown rates from leaf packages of alder and native species on a wide latitudinal gradient (52 °N - 48.78 °S). Despite the fact that tropical streams have higher temperatures, rates of leaf breakdown by microorganisms in temperate (0.010-0.014 KD) and tropical streams (0.062-0.026 KD) are similar. Aquatic shredder insects had low effect on leaf breakdown in tropical streams (0.022-0.052 KD). Fish and decapods contributed to increase leaf litter decomposition in a 50 to 80% in tropical streams. However their comminuting role on allochthonous matter have no been tested extensively in the tropics, neither if there is a relation between that increasing contribution and decreasing role on decomposition by aquatic insects.

Pavel García Soto (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wyoming, pgarcias@uwyo.edu;


Robert Hall ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wyoming, BHall@uwyo.edu;


173 - IS LEAF LITTER A TROPHIC OR HABITAT SUBSIDY IN SMALL MAN-MADE PONDS?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

IS LEAF LITTER A TROPHIC OR HABITAT SUBSIDY IN SMALL MAN-MADE PONDS? Leaf litter is an important subsidy to aquatic ecosystems. The breakdown of leaf litter is fundamental to nutrient cycling and is an important food resource for aquatic insects. However, it is unknown the degree to which leaves contribute to animal food webs in small ponds. Our research assessed whether the macroinvertebrate community of small man-made ponds use litter as a food source or primarily as habitat. We evaluate the role of leaf litter in an experiment that altered litter palatability while keeping structure constant. Litter bags were created that contained either leaf litter conditioned in the pond, unconditioned leaf litter from the surrounding forest floor, or inedible "leaves" made of paper towels. We incubated the litter bags in a small man-made pond in central Virginia for 4 weeks and quantified the macroinvertebrate abundance and community composition on each subsidy. Comparison of macroinvertebrate community differences among the different subsidy types allow us to assess the relative importance of leaf litter as a trophic or habitat subsidy and develop our understanding of the food webs in man-made ponds.

Naomi Williamson (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, naomi.williamson@live.longwood.edu;


Kenneth Fortino ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, fortinok@longwood.edu;


174 - LABILE AND RECALCITRANT CARBON POOLS DURING LEAF DECOMPOSITION: WHO IS USING WHAT WHEN?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

LABILE AND RECALCITRANT CARBON POOLS DURING LEAF DECOMPOSITION: WHO IS USING WHAT WHEN? Microbial communities associated with leaf litter have access to carbon pools of varying quality. Recalcitrant pools include substrate and high molecular weight dissolved carbon while low molecular weight dissolved carbon is more labile. Labile carbon availability can affect decomposition of recalcitrant carbon depending on microbial community composition and how the community allocates carbon. The objectives of this pilot study were to detect changes in recalcitrant carbon decomposition with the addition of labile carbon, to identify members of the microbial community using specific carbon pools, and to observe how nitrogen availability influences these dynamics. We inoculated senescent beech leaves with a natural microbial consortium collected from water-filled tree holes and added C13-glucose, ammonium, C13-glucose + ammonium, or deionized water. We used the isotopic signature of carbon dioxide produced to quantify the amount of recalcitrant carbon respired. We used DNA stable isotope probing and Illumina sequencing to identify taxa relying on labeled and unlabeled carbon pools. Preliminary results suggest that glucose addition suppressed respiration of substrate carbon (negative priming effect) but that the degree of suppression lessened over time.

Beth Norman (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, bcheever@msu.edu;


Edward Walker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, walker@msu.edu;


175 - ORGANIC MATTER DECOMPOSITION IN THE CHANNEL AND STREAMBED SEDIMENTS AT THE DOWNSTREAM OF HEADWATER RESRVOIRS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ORGANIC MATTER DECOMPOSITION IN THE CHANNEL AND STREAMBED SEDIMENTS AT THE DOWNSTREAM OF HEADWATER RESRVOIRS Allochthonous organic matter decomposition is a crucial process providing matters and energy to aquatic organisms in mountain streams, and this process could be affected by dam reservoirs. In this study, organic matter decomposition rates in the wetted channel and streambed sediments were studied at the downstream of headwater reservoirs using the cotton-strip assay method. The measurement was carried out 5 times in 2016 to observe the seasonal variation, and to evaluate the contribution of aquatic invertebrate, we used two different mesh sizes housing the cotton strips. The decomposition rate was slower at the downstream of reservoirs compared to the upstream reach and the nearby tributary without a reservoir in all seasons. Though water temperature was consistently warmer, the inorganic nitrogen concentration and the contribution of aquatic invertebrate were lower at the downstream of the reservoir, which contributed to the lower decomposition rate at the downstream sites. When the wetted channel and streambed sediments were compared, the decomposition rate in the streambed sediments were lower, except for winter time, suggesting that streambed sediments become important location for decomposition in winter.

Tamao Kasahara (Primary Presenter/Author), Kyusyu University, tamao.kasahara@forest.kyushu-u.ac.jp;


Yanda Li ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kyushu University, yandaroad@gmail.com;


Noboru Fujimoto ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kyushu University, fujipon@agr.kyushu-u.ac.jp;


Masaaki Chiwa ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kyushu University, masaaki.chiwa@gmail.com;


176 - PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER DYNAMICS IN EPHEMERAL TRIBUTARIES OF A CENTRAL APPALACHIAN STREAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER DYNAMICS IN EPHEMERAL TRIBUTARIES OF A CENTRAL APPALACHIAN STREAM Headwater ephemeral tributaries are external interfaces between uplands and downstream waters. Terrestrial particulate organic matter (POM) is important in fueling aquatic ecosystems, however the extent to which ephemeral tributaries are functionally connected to downstream waters through fluvial transport of POM has been little studied. Hydrology and deposition of leaf and wood, and surrogate transport (Ginkgo leaves and dowels) were measured over month-long intervals through the winter and spring seasons (6 months) in 10 ephemeral tributaries (1.3 – 5.4 ha) in eastern Kentucky. Leaf deposition and surrogate transport varied over time, reflecting the seasonality of litterfall and runoff. Leaf deposition was higher in December than February and May but did not differ from January, March, and April. Mean percent of leaf transport from the ephemeral tributaries was highest in April (3.6% per day) and lowest in February (2.5%) and May (2%). Wood deposition and transport had similar patterns. No POM measures were related to flow duration. Ephemeral tributaries are functionally connected to downstream waters through POM storage and subsequent release that is timed when POM is often limited in downstream waters.

Ken Fritz (Primary Presenter/Author), United States Environmental Protection Agency, fritz.ken@epa.gov;


Gregory Pond ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USEPA, Region 2, Office of Monitoring and Assessment, pond.greg@epa.gov;


Brent Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USEPA, johnson.brent@epa.gov;


177 - WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORMS STIMULATE COMMUNITY RESPIRATION VIA ORGANIC CARBON INPUTS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORMS STIMULATE COMMUNITY RESPIRATION VIA ORGANIC CARBON INPUTS Western spruce budworms (Choristoneura occidentalis) are a native lepidopteran that has sustained epidemic levels in the past decade across western North America. Larvae consume new, nutrient-rich conifer growth each spring, and deposit frass, damaged conifer litter, and larval and adult cadavers to the forest floor and streams. These organic inputs could stimulate stream biofilm activity. We compared how cellulose, lignin, and leachates of frass or litter affected biofilm community respiration using nutrient diffusing substrata in eight streams before and during peak budworm activity. We found that litter and frass had higher nutrient response ratios (NRR) than cellulose and lignin (p<0.01). There was no difference between cellulose and lignin, although litter had higher NRR than frass (p=0.0056). NRR did not differ before or during peak budworm activity. Budworm frass deposition peaks in early summer during baseflow whereas litterfall peaks in winter during high stream flows (p<<0.001). Therefore, budworm herbivory shifts the timing of labile organic matter inputs to flow conditions more favorable for organic matter retention and in situ secondary production rather than export downstream.

Natalie Levesque (Primary Presenter/Author), Central Washington University, levesquen@cwu.edu;


Clay Arango ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Washington University, arangoc@cwu.edu;


178 - COMPARING LEAF BREAKDOWN AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES AMONG THREE COASTAL PLAIN RIVERS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COMPARING LEAF BREAKDOWN AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES AMONG THREE COASTAL PLAIN RIVERS We compared leaf breakdown and macroinvertebrate assemblages in main-channel habitats of three Coastal Plain rivers in southeast Georgia. Over two seasons (fall 2014 and spring 2015), a total of 192 coarse-mesh packs of water oak (Quercus nigra) leaves were retrieved across six study sites (two per basin) to assess the effects of flow regime, particularly discharge, on breakdown rates and assemblage structure. Despite significant differences in discharge during the fall (p = 0.0013), each basin exhibited similar processing coefficients (avg. k = -0.013/d). Significant differences in discharge were also observed during the spring (p = 0.0015), but processing coefficients remained similar among basins (avg. k = -0.011/d). Fall assemblages were similar among basins based on abundance (p = 0.121) and biomass (p = 0.091). Spring assemblages were also similar among basins based on abundance (p = 0.056) and biomass (p = 0.071). These results suggest that discharge is not a determining factor in leaf breakdown rates and reinforce the usefulness of the ecoregion concept in delineating macroinvertebrate distributions in these systems.

V. Byron Collins (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University , vc00812@georgiasouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


179 - EFFECTS OF A CANOPY COVER DISTURBANCE ON METABOLISM AND NUTRIENT RETENTION IN A SUBTROPICAL STREAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EFFECTS OF A CANOPY COVER DISTURBANCE ON METABOLISM AND NUTRIENT RETENTION IN A SUBTROPICAL STREAM Limited information is available on the effects of natural disturbance events on ecosystem functioning in subtropical streams. We examined the effects of a strong tropical storm on metabolism and nutrient retention in a first-order stream in Brazil. The study was conducted before and right after a 130 km.h-1-wind episode resulting in 76% to 40% removal of stream canopy cover. We performed additions of NH4Cl, NaNO3 and K2HPO4 using the TASCC method to estimate uptake metrics and metabolism was assessed with the one-station method. Metabolism was predominantly heterotrophic both before and after the storm, but GPP increased after the storm (0.11 and 0.35 mgO2.L-1.day-1). Ambient uptake was higher (i.e., shorter uptake lengths) after the storm, especially for NO3- (from 59.4 to 29.3 m) and PO43- (from 61.9 to 41.4 m). Despite a great increase in the uptake velocities for NO3- (15 to 50.7 mm.min-1) and PO43- (14.3 to 24.7mm.min-1), NH4+ uptake velocity did not differ significantly (30.1 to 35 mm.min-1; p>0.05, t-test) across months. Canopy disturbance may influence nutrient uptake and metabolism differentially suggesting different factors controlling them.

Nícolas Finkler (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, nicolas.finkler@gmail.com;


Wesley Aparecido Saltarelli ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, wesley.saltarelli@gmail.com;


Adriana Miwa ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, adriana_miwa@yahoo.com.br;


Walter K. Dodds ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, wkdodds@ksu.edu;


Flavia Tromboni ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, flavia.tromboni@gmail.com;


Davi Gasparini Fernandes Cunha ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, davig@sc.usp.br;


180 - LONG-TERM OPEN WATER METABOLISM ESTIMATES ASSOCIATED WITH SEDIMENT RESTORATION IN A LOW-GRADIENT RIVER

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

LONG-TERM OPEN WATER METABOLISM ESTIMATES ASSOCIATED WITH SEDIMENT RESTORATION IN A LOW-GRADIENT RIVER Anthropogenic disturbances including mining and logging can alter benthic substrate in rivers thereby altering microbial communities and ecosystem metabolism. We examined how river metabolism varied daily, annually, and in response to a 30m reach sediment restoration of a sand-dominated section of the Salmon Trout River, Marquette, MI. Temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations were measured from May-November of 2010-2014, and sand removal occurred in June 2013. Initial modeling of open water metabolism used nighttime regression, for reaeration calculations, and diurnal oxygen saturation changes. The model demonstrated variable rates with gross primary production (GPP) ranging from 0 to 12 gO2/m2/d and ecosystem respiration (ER) ranging from -1 to -19 gO2/m2/d. The river was consistently net heterotrophic, with annual mean GPP ranging 2 to 4 gO2/m2/d and ER ranging -5 to -9 gO2/m2/d. These rates were similar to those reported in the literature for rivers not degraded by fine sediment. We are revising these estimates using Bayesian inverse modeling and exploring temporal patterns in metabolism rates relative to the sediment restoration and both daily and inter-annual variation in climate and other environmental drivers.

Kevin Nevorski (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Technological University, kcnevors@mtu.edu;


Amy Marcarelli ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


Sue Eggert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, seggert@fs.fed.us;


Casey Huckins ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, cjhuckin@mtu.edu;


181 - INSIGHTS IN GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS FROM SMALL UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS USING HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INSIGHTS IN GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS FROM SMALL UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS USING HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY Rivers are distributed indicators for surrounding landscape and groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interactions for each drainage areas. Understanding processes at the GW-SW interface, however, remain difficult to apply across systems due to complex physical and morphological dynamics and the associated biogeochemical processes. This work highlights high-resolution imagery (1-10 cm scale) from small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) flown over a short reaches (500-1000 m) of East River (CO) and Devils River (TX), supplementing more traditional methods of examining GW-SW flow interactions. In East River, spatial normalized difference vegetation indices from a multispectral camera highlight potential patterns along meanders of the sinuous system likely indicating preferential lateral flows. In Devils River, a pre-calibrated thermal camera clearly identifies GW inputs from spring flow critical to fish habitat. For both sites, visible imagery were collected for digital surface model (DSM) creation through Structure from Motion software. We present preliminary DSM analyses for river bed topography and potential identification of pool-riffle sequences. The combination of increased reliability, sensor miniaturization, and continued research hope to highlight potential sUAS-collected imagery as tool for freshwater scientists and environmental monitoring.

Henry Pai (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Nevada, Reno; Global Water Center, henryp@unr.edu;


Scott Tyler ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada, Reno, styler@unr.edu;


182 - AN ALTERNATIVE PATH TO DEVELOPING TRIBAL WETLAND PROGRAMS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AN ALTERNATIVE PATH TO DEVELOPING TRIBAL WETLAND PROGRAMS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Self-governance, tribal heritage, and cultural identity are directly dependent upon high quality water and associated Traditional resources, as guaranteed by treaty. However, geographic isolation of Tribal water resource management professionals hampers the cohesiveness of an important professional support network. For the past 7 years, a Tribal Wetland Working Group (TWIG) has facilitated collaborative, science-based decision making while encouraging peer relationships and creating opportunities that facilitate natural resource management policies and methods consistent with Tribal values. Wetland Program Plans are locally developed efforts, centered around a particular Tribal communities traditional patterns using wetlands and aquatic resources. Outcomes of these efforts have contributed to a significant increase in the number of Tribes creating Wetland Program Plans across the Region and novel combination of work between EPA and PNW Tribes. Wetland Program Plans are important, foundational Thirty eight Tribes have participated in TWIG workshops and trainings, and the number of Tribal wetland program plans has risen from 3 in 2010 to 17 in 2016. Thus, TWIG has contributed to Tribes increasingly numerous wetland programs that reflect the values of individual communities.

Scott O'Daniel (Primary Presenter/Author), Umatilla Tribes, scottodaniel@ctuir.org;


Rudy Salakory ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cowlitz Tribe, rsalakory@cowlitz.org;


Heather Bartlett ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cow Creek Tribe, heather.bartlett@cowcreek.com;


Tom Elliot ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Yakama Tribes, tnelliot@Yakama.com;


Matt Baerwalde ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Snoqualmie Tribe, Mattb@snoqualmietribe.us;


Tracie Nadeau ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EPA, Nadeau.Tracie@epamail.epa.gov;


183 - A NEW STONEFLY SPECIES (PLECOPTERA: PERLIDAE) FROM SOUTHERN USA, WITH MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR COMPARISON TO OTHER TAXA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

A NEW STONEFLY SPECIES (PLECOPTERA: PERLIDAE) FROM SOUTHERN USA, WITH MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR COMPARISON TO OTHER TAXA A new species of Perlesta Banks, temporarily named AR-1, is described from male, female, and egg stages. The absence of an earlier description is highly unexpected given AR-1's conspicuously distinct aedeagal morphology and prevalence in a widely distributed and previously sampled area. AR-1, present in at least five counties in western Arkansas, is differentiated from other cogeners by the presence of a ventral caecum and a large basal dorsal spinulae patch of the aedeagus. Comparisons to 15 cogeners and two outgroup taxa are made with morphological and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding fragment data. Stereomicroscope and scanning electron micrograph images are provided.

Eric South (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, ejsouth@illinois.edu;


R. Edward DeWalt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois, dewalt@iilinois.edu;


Mark Davis ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, davis63@illinois.edu;


184 - AN UPDATE ON THE PHYLOGENY OF GENERA OF PSYCHOMYIIDAE (TRICHOPTERA)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AN UPDATE ON THE PHYLOGENY OF GENERA OF PSYCHOMYIIDAE (TRICHOPTERA) An updated phylogeny of family Psychomyiidae is presented based on 38 morphological characters. Trees were computed using branch-and-bound search, bootstrap values were calculated using 1000 replicates, and a consensus tree was inferred. The results support the monophyletic clade Psychomyiinae of Li & Morse, consisting of Paduniella, Metalype, Psychomyia, Psychomyia lumina, P. schefterae, and P. yangae. The latter five taxa also form a monophyletic group, sister to basal Paduniella, but the relationships among those five taxa remain unresolved. Results also supported the monophyly of Lype + Eoneureclipsis and Tinodes + Trawaspsyche. The relationships of these two monophyletic groups with each other, with Psychomyiinae, and with genus Padangpsyche remain unresolved, so that a monophyletic subfamily Tinodinae is not yet corroborated.

Shuang Qiu ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Huazhong University of Science & Technology, 402547906@qq.com;


Paul Frandsen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., USA, paulbfrandsen@gmail.com;


John C. Morse (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, jmorse@clemson.edu;


185 - PROGRESS REPORT OF FEMALE GENITALIC DESCRIPTIONS FOR SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES BRACHYCENTRUS SPECIES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PROGRESS REPORT OF FEMALE GENITALIC DESCRIPTIONS FOR SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES BRACHYCENTRUS SPECIES Male genitalia have been described for all Brachycentrus adults in the southeastern United States. Female genitalia previously described for the southeastern United States include: B. incanus, B. lateralis, B. nigrosoma, and B. numerosus. New descriptions of Brachycentrus female genitalia from museum specimens in the Clemson University Arthropod Collection include: B. appalachia, B. chelates, and B. spinae; B. etwahensis, B. lunatus, and B. solomoni have yet to be described, but will be upon completion of this study. A dichotomous key of the described female genitalia of Brachycentrus is included. Diagnostic characters include the ventral and lateral shapes of the 9th and 10th abdominal terga, and shape of the lobes of the 8th abdominal sternum.

Coleson Wrege (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, cwrege@g.clemson.edu;


John C. Morse ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, jmorse@clemson.edu;


186 - COMPARING WATER QUALITY IN STREAMS WITH AND WITHOUT UNGD IN THEIR WATERSHEDS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Comparing water quality in streams with and without UNGD in their watersheds Unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) has proliferated in the Marcellus Shale region over the past decade. While instances of water contamination have been documented, the question of whether UNGD is associated with widespread impairment of stream water quality remains unanswered. We attempted to address this data gap by measuring water quality parameters (specific conductance, dissolved metal and radium) in streams in southwestern Pennsylvania, where UNGD is prevalent, and western Maryland, where no UNGD has occurred due to a statewide moratorium. The streams were located in adjacent counties and had similar climate, geology and land use other than UNGD. Pennsylvania streams had significantly higher specific conductance and concentrations of As, Ca, K, Mg, and Sr, suggesting that UNGD in the watersheds may be a source of these constituents. However, no significant correlations between watershed UNGD well density and water quality was observed, suggesting that other activities, such as UNGD waste transport and disposal, may affect water quality more than extraction wells do. Future work will focus on the effects of other UNGD-related activities, identifying pathways by which UNGD-related pollution enters streams, and gathering a more comprehensive data set.

Karen Knee (Primary Presenter/Author), American University, knee@american.edu;


187 - INVESTIGATING THE CONTROLS ON SALINIZATION OF RIVERS IMPACTED BY OIL AND GAS WASTEWATER DISPOSAL

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INVESTIGATING THE CONTROLS ON SALINIZATION OF RIVERS IMPACTED BY OIL AND GAS WASTEWATER DISPOSAL Salinization threatens our freshwater by causing a domino effect of hydrogeological processes, such as increasing concentrations of dissolved radium, sulfates, boron, fluoride, and trace metals in our water. This study investigates increasing salinity in three tributaries to a major river basin in the western USA for impacts from permitted discharges of saline oil and gas produced water. Produced waters are discharged through national pollutant discharge elimination system permits (NPDES) and, in the arid West, beneficially used for irrigation and supply water for cattle, but downstream the river is a source of drinking water to the local community causing concern for continued discharge of saline water to the freshwater supply. Water samples were collected during twelve sampling events from 2013 to 2015 at 26 sites along the tributaries both upstream and downstream of NPDES permitted discharges. Statistically significant increases were determined for sodium, sulfate, chloride, and calcium downstream from discharges. Molar ratios (e.g., Na/Cl and Ca/SO4) were utilized to determine if the spatial and temporal increases in concentrations are explained by evaporation, dissolution of minerals, or low flow rates.

Bonnie McDevitt (Primary Presenter/Author), Pennsylvania State University, bum49@psu.edu;


188 - RADIUM FATE FOLLOWING OIL AND GAS WASTEWATER DISPOSAL TO SURFACE WATERS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

RADIUM FATE FOLLOWING OIL AND GAS WASTEWATER DISPOSAL TO SURFACE WATERS Oil and gas (OG) production in Pennsylvania generates yearly billions of liters of produced water that has high levels of total dissolved solids, heavy metals, and naturally occurring radioactive material. When produced water is treated in centralized waste treatment facilities (CWT) and discharged to surface water it can impact water quality and cause elevated levels of radium activities in sediments. In 2011, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection requested wastewater treatment facilities to no longer accept unconventional OG wastewater. Our study aimed to (1) assess if the policy change in April of 2011, which led to decreased unconventional OG wastewater treated at CWT, also led to decreased radium activities in sediments and (2) characterize radium activities over a large transect (53km) both upstream and downstream of OG treatment facilities for evidence of watershed-scale impacts not observed in previous studies. We observed increased radium activity in sediments collected downstream of CWT facilities in both 2014 and 2016 and significantly (p << 0.01) higher average radium activity for 30km downstream of a CWT.

Katherine Van Sice (Primary Presenter/Author), Pennsylvania State University, kjv5@psu.edu;


Nathaniel Warner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pennsylvania State University, nrw6@psu.edu;


189 - REGULATORY HISTORY AND MANAGEMENT OF GAS WASTE IN PENNSYLVANIA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

REGULATORY HISTORY AND MANAGEMENT OF GAS WASTE IN PENNSYLVANIA The management of waste, especially wastewater, from conventional and unconventional oil and gas (O&G) extraction poses health and environmental concern in states like Pennsylvania, USA. Wastewater, typically disposed through reuse processes, injection disposal wells, and NPDES facilities permitted for discharge to surface water, contains high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS), metals, and radioactive materials. Discharge monitoring reports (DMRs) for NPDES facilities accepting O&G wastewater were collected from the DEP’s electronic discharge monitoring report system (eDMR) and from file reviews at the PA DEP Southwest regional office. Reported wastewater chemistry and volumes from DMR reports were compared to volumes reported by O&G operators in the PA DEP O&G reporting website. The DMR and O&G reporting data were used to predict annual metal loads to PA streams from NPDES facilities accepting oil and gas wastewater. Uncertainties were modeled using Monte Carlo simulations and data are presented in GIS maps illustrating historical metal loads in PA watersheds. Current disposal trends, associated regulations, and recommendations for better wastewater management and monitoring are presented in more detail.

Travis Tasker (Primary Presenter/Author), The Pennsylvania State University, tlt216@psu.edu;


John Gattermeyer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Pennsylvania State University, john.gattermeyer.3@gmail.com;


William Burgos ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Penn State, wbd3@psu.edu;


Lara Fowler ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Pennsylvania State University, lbf10@psu.edu;


190 - COMPOSITION AND FUNCTION OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES COLONIZING ORGANIC SUBSTRATES ALONG A RURAL TO URBAN GRADIENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

COMPOSITION AND FUNCTION OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES COLONIZING ORGANIC SUBSTRATES ALONG A RURAL TO URBAN GRADIENT Urbanization is increasing worldwide, and lotic ecosystems are especially susceptible to alterations collectively known as the urban stream syndrome, which include altered hydrology and increased concentrations of nutrients and contaminants. Impacts of urbanization on macroinvertebrates and fish have been documented, but implications for microbial communities are not as well understood. To address this knowledge gap we incubated organic substrates (cotton and silk strips, representing low and high nitrogen substrates, respectively) in 18 streams located along a rural to urban gradient in northeast Ohio, USA. Strips were fixed in the water column of each stream for two months and then analyzed for tensile strength (as an indicator of decomposition) and the taxonomic composition of attached microbial communities (via high-throughput amplicon sequencing). Nitrate concentrations in the streams ranged from 0.06 to 0.68 mg-N L-1. Microbial communities on cotton vs silk substrates were not significantly different in taxonomic diversity but were significantly different in taxonomic composition, suggesting that substrate nitrogen content may be a key driver of microbial community composition in these streams.

Paul Risteca (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biology, Loyola University Chicago, pristeca@luc.edu;


Andrea Fitzgibbon ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University , afitzgib@kent.edu;


David Costello ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


Scott Tiegs ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


John Kelly ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, Jkelly7@luc.edu;


191 - HUMAN INFLUENCES ON THE RIVER CONTINUUM CONCEPT: ANTHROPOGENIC NUTRIENT SOURCES AND WATERSHED DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ON BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGE AND PRODUCTIVITY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HUMAN INFLUENCES ON THE RIVER CONTINUUM CONCEPT: ANTHROPOGENIC NUTRIENT SOURCES AND WATERSHED DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ON BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGE AND PRODUCTIVITY Wastewater treatment plant effluent is detrimental to water quality and ecosystem functions. This study will evaluate the impacts of effluent on natural water systems as predicted by the River Continuum Concept. Multiple reference and impacted Southern Appalachian river systems with effluent discharges at the headwaters will be sampled from headwaters to mid-reaches for macroinvertebrates, water chemistry, and physical stream habitat parameters. Aquatic insects will be collected by NC-DEQ Qual 4 standard methods at stream sites and will be keyed out to the lowest taxonomic level. This will be used to determine and report stream biotic index, diversity indices, and trophic feeding guild percentages. Water chemistry will be measured using probes, ion chromatography, and Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectroscopy. I predict that human development in headwaters of rivers causes significant effects on the assemblage, biodiversity and productivity of a river. Specifically, I hypothesize that watersheds with water treatment plants at the headwater regions will have altered macroinvertebrate assemblage, reduced biodiversity, and increased productivity as well as increased nutrient and toxin concentrations. Preliminary data will be presented at the meeting.

Kelli Park (Primary Presenter/Author), Appalachian State University , parkka@appstate.edu;


192 - NANOMATERIALS ENHANCE ALGAL RESPONSE TO EUTROPHICATION IN A LONG-TERM FIELD MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

NANOMATERIALS ENHANCE ALGAL RESPONSE TO EUTROPHICATION IN A LONG-TERM FIELD MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT With increased adoption of engineered nanomaterials in agricultural, biomedical and commercial industries comes an increased impetus to understand their effects on downstream ecosystems. To examine the impacts of nanomaterials on wetland ecosystems, we conducted a nine-month mesocosm experiment receiving weekly low-concentration additions of Au and Cu(OH)2 ENM under oligotrophic and eutrophic conditions. Given the potential susceptibility of phytoplankton to nanomaterial toxicity, we examined in-situ chlorophyll-a concentrations weekly and characterized phytoplankton every 3 months. Chlorophyll-a concentration in eutrophic treatments increased relative to controls by 6-18 fold in Au and 4-9 fold in Cu treatments in spring and late summer. Significant negative and positive effects were found in the oligotrophic conditions, but the magnitude was more variable in comparison to eutrophic conditions. Additionally, cumulative number of algal bloom days in both nanomaterial treatments increased 0.15-0.31 fold in oligotrophic and 2.7-3.3 fold in eutrophic treatments relative to the controls. Our results show that chronic exposures to Au and Cu nanomaterials increased the occurrence of algal blooms in wetland mesocosms, especially in eutrophic conditions. These findings raise questions on the long-term potential consequences on water quality and ecosystem health.

Steve Anderson (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, sa165@duke.edu;


Marie Simonin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, simonin.marie@gmail.com;


Christina Bergemann ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, cmbergemann@gmail.com;


Ben Colman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, ben.colman@umontana.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


193 - PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF FISHES TO STRESSORS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL AND NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF FISHES TO STRESSORS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL AND NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT With population growth increasing, one challenge facing managers is to balance resource use/extraction and wildlife conservation. Data collected from streams in the Wyoming Range indicate conductivity and temperature are greater in drainages with higher levels of ONG development; however, the ecological consequences of these activities are not fully understood. Very little is known on the stress physiology of non-game fishes that dominate most freshwater assemblages. Our objective was to measure changes in physiological responses of Mottled Sculpin (MSC; Cottus bairdii) and Mountain Sucker (MTS; Catostomus platyrhynchus) to stressors associated with ONG. We measured hormonal responses across a gradient of ONG development (e.g., temperature and salts) to examine how fishes experiencing increased stress respond physiologically using metrics such as: 1) glucose, 2) cortisol, and 3) immunocompetence. Preliminary results from 2015, suggest a significantly negative correlation between average baseline cortisol and in-situ specific conductivity for MSC, but no significant relationship was observed for MTS. Understanding how fishes respond physiologically to chronic stressors associated with anthropogenic activities will help improve conservation and best management practices, and allow us to better understand species’ adaptability.

Richard Walker (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wyoming, rwalker2442@gmail.com;


Geoffery Smith ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, gdssmith57@yahoo.com ;


Annika Walters ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Wyoming Coop Fish and Wildlife Unit, annika.walters@uwyo.edu;


194 - PLANNING FOR CONSTRUCTED AND RESTORED WETLANDS AT THE WATERSHED-SCALE: A MODIFIED MODELING PROCEDURE TO EVALUATE WETLAND HYDROLOGIC EFFECTS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PLANNING FOR CONSTRUCTED AND RESTORED WETLANDS AT THE WATERSHED-SCALE: A MODIFIED MODELING PROCEDURE TO EVALUATE WETLAND HYDROLOGIC EFFECTS Wetlands are prized for a multiplicity of associated ecosystem services (e.g., peak streamflow attenuation, biogeochemical processing, and habitat provisioning). Scientists and engineers recognize that constructed and restored wetlands can be strategically managed to harness these services and thereby improve watershed-scale functions. Yet there are significant challenges to producing quantitative watershed-scale plans to guide the positioning of wetlands within the greater landscape framework. Here, we present a modification of the Soil and Water Assessment tool that improves both the spatial and hydrologic representation of non-floodplain (i.e. geographically isolated) wetlands. We describe the modified model and discuss how it may be applied to watershed management through scenario analyses and spatial optimization of wetland restoration and construction. The presented methods represent a significant opportunity to evaluate non-floodplain constructed and restored wetlands as means of improving watershed-scale functions. The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect policies of the US EPA.

Grey Evenson (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech University, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, gevenson@vt.edu;


C. Nathan Jones ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech University, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, cnjones@vt.edu;


Daniel McLaughlin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech University, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, mclaugd@vt.edu;


Heather Golden ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, golden.heather@epa.gov;


Charles Lane ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, lane.charles@epa.gov;


195 - AUTOMATED LOW-COST STREAM/RIVER FLOW MONITORING BY ELECTRONIC FLOWMETER CONNECTED TO OPEN SOURCE EMBEDDED ELECTRONICS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Automated Low-Cost Stream/River Flow Monitoring By Electronic Flowmeter Connected To Open Source Embedded Electronics The continuous monitoring of stream and river discharge is essential for water resources management and maintaining watershed ecosystems. Yet, the high cost of monitoring equipment such as ADV (Acoustic Doppler Velocity) makes streamflow monitoring absent in much of the world. Here we describe a relatively low cost flow measuring system based on a Hall sensor-equipped electronic flowmeter connected to an open source microprocessor (SODAQ Mbili). Data is recorded on a micro-SD card and also can be transmitted via a low-cost cellular modem. Low-power solar systems (< 10 W) can remotely power the system. We have deployed this system in the Wami river estuary in Tanzania as well as at MacArthur AgroEcological Center in Florida. The use of open source embedded electronics can offer realtime flow monitoring at a fraction of the cost of professional equipment. Furthermore, trained personnel can maintain and troubleshoot the system by replacing circuit components. The evolution of open source electronics aids the development of newer and cheaper systems in future, and requires basic electronics and programming training.

Roman Evarist (Primary Presenter/Author), AdaTech. Morogoro, Tanzania, romanevaristorg@gmail.com;


Amartya Saha ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Archbold Biological Station, riparianbuffer@gmail.com;


196 - DESKTOP WETLAND PROJECT: AN OPEN-SOURCE STUDY SYSTEM FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND OUTREACH

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DESKTOP WETLAND PROJECT: AN OPEN-SOURCE STUDY SYSTEM FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND OUTREACH The desktop wetland (DW) is a microcosm that was designed for research applications. However, the configurability of DWs make them an excellent tool for facilitating lessons for learners of all ages. DWs have several qualities that will be attractive to educators. They are in expensive and easy to build and they can be used to facilitate hands-on, hypothesis-driven laboratory exercises for the high school or college-level classroom. DWs also have qualities that will appeal to researchers. Their relatively small space requirement per unit of replication makes it possible to increase sample sizes. A calibrated weir monitors real-time flow and valves allow easy sampling of influent and effluent. Finally, a quality that can be appreciated by educators, researchers, and government agencies alike is the portability of DWs. We designed DWs to travel well so that they can be used in outreach applications, providing hands-on activities that pique interest and draw in open minds of all ages. My goal in presenting this tool is to collect feedback on how to improve the design, so please stop by and tell me what you think.

Simon Pearish (Primary Presenter/Author), Norwich University, spearish@norwich.edu;


197 - HYDROMET SENSING: THE NEXT GENERATION SENSOR-TO-DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USING OPEN SOURCE TECHNOLOGIES (INVITED)

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HYDROMET SENSING: THE NEXT GENERATION SENSOR-TO-DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USING OPEN SOURCE TECHNOLOGIES (Invited) In situ monitoring remains the only way of acquiring accurate, reliable, efficient, cost-effective high-frequency and long-term environmental data. Current in situ monitoring systems often overlook the critically important inclusion of a standard data management and publication system. Therefore, fully streamlining current commercially-available environmental monitoring systems adopting a data-from-sensor to storage-and-proper-annotation approach is not only long and arduous, but also pervaded with break-downs and omissions. This prompts the need to combine collection, transmission, management and delivery into a single package. This paper introduces an automated Sensor-to-Data Management System (SDMS) prototype using both open source software and hardware technologies. The system comprises a complete sensor-to-data-dissemination chain of software applications developed using the Python programming language. In addition, it contains a compact custom-made datalogger using the C.H.I.P microcomputer to support the software applications used in field data acquisition. The system, thus, is capable of handling the aspects of data collection, transmission, management and publication as well as network organization automatically. The developed system has been tested in both indoor and outdoor environments and it is effective in not only reducing field data acquisition workload, but also in laying the foundation of cost affordability.

PAUL CELICOURT (Primary Presenter/Author), SENSAQ, LLC, pcelicourt@sensaq.com;


Richard Sam ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), SENSAQ, LLC, rsam@sensaq.com;


Michael Piasecki ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The City College of New York, michael.piasecki@gmail.com;


198 - A MULTI-LOCUS PERSPECTIVE OF GLOBAL CRAYFISH PHYLOGENY

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

A MULTI-LOCUS PERSPECTIVE OF GLOBAL CRAYFISH PHYLOGENY Crayfishes are a diverse monophyletic lineage of decapod crustaceans represented by two superfamilies, Astacoidea in the Northern Hemisphere, and Parastacoidea in the Southern Hemisphere. Recent studies have estimated the split between superfamilies to have occurred between 185 and 268 million years ago. The primary objective of our study is to use a multi-locus approach to understand the phylogenetic history of crayfishes, focusing particularly on deep, and poorly supported nodes within previous phylogenetic reconstructions. We retrieved all nucleotide data from GenBank for Astacoidea and Parastacoidea. From this complete dataset, we selected 18 loci, both nuclear and mitochondrial, that included at least one representative of each of the three crayfish families. We assessed phylogenetic informativeness of each locus and filtered the data accordingly. Phylogenetic analyses were run using both a maximum likelihood and Bayesian framework. Our results stress the importance of critical assessment of gene selection and data filtration. In addition, these results provide insight into the evolutionary history of crayfishes globally, and can be used as a basis for future examination of global biogeography of these organisms.

Zachary Dillard (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Natural Science and Mathematics, West Liberty University, West Liberty, West Virginia 26074, ZWDILLARD@westliberty.edu;


Bronwyn Williams ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, bronwyn.williams@naturalsciences.org;


Zachary Loughman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Liberty University, zloughman@westliberty.edu;


199 - A SURVEY OF CRAYFISHES OF UPPER APPOMATTOX RIVER BASIN IN CENTRAL VIRGINIA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

A SURVEY OF CRAYFISHES OF UPPER APPOMATTOX RIVER BASIN IN CENTRAL VIRGINIA Crayfish are virtually everywhere in the Southeastern United States, and represent the largest biomass in most aquatic systems. Although ubiquitous, diversity, ecology and life-history, of crayfish are poorly studied, particularly for Central Virginia. We surveyed headwaters of the Appomattox River basin to document the diversity, distribution and ecology of crayfish. We documented 7 crayfish species belonging to 3 genera (Cambarus sp. C, C. bartonii, C. diogenes, C. longulus, Procambarus acutus and Fallicambarus uhleri) including an invasive species (P. clarkii). Cambarus sp. C is a widely distributed generalist that occupies all stream habitats and represents the most abundant species. Cambarus longulus is a rocky bottom specialist, and C. diogenes and F. uhleri are primary burrowers. We also discovered 4 new populations of invasive P. clarkii from Prince Edward County, which are new Virginia state records. This exemplifies the diversity of crayfish in Central Virginia and shows the need for more detailed surveys to completely understand the diversity. State authorities will be able to use this information to update their records and implement more effective conservation management practices.

David Conner (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, david.conner@live.longwood.edu;


Connor Perry ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, connor.perry@live.longwood.edu;


Sujan Henkanaththegedara ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, sujan040@gmail.com;


200 - CRAYFISH OF THE GUYANDOTTE RIVER BASIN, WEST VIRGINIA, USA.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CRAYFISH OF THE GUYANDOTTE RIVER BASIN, WEST VIRGINIA, USA. In recent years astacological studies have received an increase in focus. Efforts to better understand crayfish are largely a result of their continued decline and imperilment. As a result of these efforts, understanding and need for conservation of these animals has also progressed. In 2016 Cambarus veteranus was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. In order to aid in conservation of C. veteranus, updated information on syntopic crayfish species found within the Guyandotte River is vital; however, the last statewide survey of West Virginia Crayfish does not include updated information on C. veteranus or mention of Cambarus theepiensis, a heterospecific which was previously referred to as both Cambarus robustus and Cambarus sciotensis within the Guyandotte River. In response to this, we provide an updated list and current distribution of crayfish taxa currently found within the Guyandotte River. The current species known to occur within both the Upper and Lower Guyandotte River system include Cambarus b. cavatus, Cambarus dubius, Cambarus theepiensis, Cambarus thomai, Cambarus veteranus, Orconectes cristavarius, and Orconectes sanbornii.

David Foltz II (Primary Presenter/Author), Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. / West Liberty University, dfoltz@westliberty.edu;


Zachary Loughman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Liberty University, zloughman@westliberty.edu;


201 - DEVELOPMENT OF A CAPTIVE REARING PROTOCOL FOR TWO FEDERALLY LISTED CENTRAL APPALACHIAN CRAYFISH SPECIES: CAN IT BE DONE?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DEVELOPMENT OF A CAPTIVE REARING PROTOCOL FOR TWO FEDERALLY LISTED CENTRAL APPALACHIAN CRAYFISH SPECIES: CAN IT BE DONE? Recently the USFWS listed two crayfishes, Cambarus callainus and Cambarus veteranus as threatened and endangered respectively. As part of the listing process, recovery of both species is now of paramount importance if the obligations of the ESA are to be met. Crayfish propagation under human care has been promoted as a critical action needed for the recovery of both species. While several aquaculture techniques have been developed for lentic living Procambarus species, methodologies specific to lentic living Cambarus species do not exists. We sought to begin the process of developing a captive rearing protocol for endangered Cambarus crayfishes by investigating forage type and its impact on growth. Cambarus chasmodactylus, an ecological equivalent for both imperiled crayfishes was used as a surrogate taxa. Ovigerous females were collected from the wild, and juveniles raised individually in PVC domiciles at the National Fish Hatchery at White Sulphur Springs West Virginia and fed commercial trout chow or blood worms, with growth tracked overtime via photographic measurements. Initial results indicate survival potential was high, and growth was strongly correlated with bloodworm diet over trout chow.

Emmy Delekta (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Natural Science and Mathematics, West Liberty University, West Liberty WV, 26074, emdelekta1@westliberty.edu;


Nicole Sadecky ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Virginia Department of Natural Resources, nmsadecky@westliberty.edu;


Tyler Hern ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, White Sulphur Springs National Fish Hatchery, White Sulphur Springs, WV 24986, tyler_hern@fws.gov;


Zachary Loughman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Liberty University, zloughman@westliberty.edu;


202 - EVALUATION OF AGGRESSIVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN NATIVE AND INVASIVE CRAYFISH USING NOVEL REAL-TIME VIDEO TRACKING SYSTEM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

EVALUATION OF AGGRESSIVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN NATIVE AND INVASIVE CRAYFISH USING NOVEL REAL-TIME VIDEO TRACKING SYSTEM Eastern United States is the global hotspot for crayfish diversity with more than 440 species. Many of these native crayfish are threatened with extinction due to several reasons including invasive crayfish. Invasive crayfish cause population declines and extirpations of native crayfish. However, the mechanisms behind those population declines and extirpations of native crayfish due to invasive crayfish are poorly studied. Aggression-mediated interactions (e.g. competition for food or shelter) between native and invasive crayfish could replace native species due to high levels of aggression of invasive species. We studied aggressive interactions between native Piedmont crayfish (Cambarus sp. C) and invasive red-swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) under laboratory conditions using a novel, real-time video tracking system. The system generated aggression-related behavioral data such as direction of movement, total distance moved, velocity of the movement and movement plots for individual crayfish as it records the crayfish behavior, and the recorded behavior allowed us to rate aggression levels according to standard ethograms. This novel method may provide opportunities to collect extensive data on crayfish behavior, and future development of the software may allow us to automatically recognize specific aggressive behavior.

Eric Lewis (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, eric.lewis2@live.longwood.edu;


Jena Cruz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, jena.cruz@live.longwood.edu;


Cole Milliron ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, cole.milliron@live.longwood.edu;


Brandon Jackson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, jacksonbe3@longwood.edu;


Sujan Henkanaththegedara ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, sujan040@gmail.com;


203 - HISTORICAL AND CURRENT DISTRIBUTION OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA'S APPALACHIAN PRIMARY BURROWING CRAYFISHES: A CENTURY OF CHANGE OR STASIS?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

HISTORICAL AND CURRENT DISTRIBUTION OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA'S APPALACHIAN PRIMARY BURROWING CRAYFISHES: A CENTURY OF CHANGE OR STASIS? Astacological efforts in Pennsylvania have increased over the past decade. In particular, the distribution and conservation standing of Western Pennsylvania’s (WPA) primary burrowing crayfishes represents the greatest void in knowledge regarding the states crayfish fauna. To rectify this situation, burrowing crayfish surveys were initiated across WPA in 2014/2015 using Ortmann’s (1906) historical records as a guide. Of the 61 historic sites that were resampled, 19.6% maintained burrowing crayfish populations. Of the 57 new sites that were sampled, 71.9% supported burrowing crayfish populations. Overall burrowing crayfish were detected at 44.9% of the 118 sites sampled. Ortmann documented Cambarus dubius, Cambarus monongalensis, and Cambarus thomai in WPA. All three species were found during our surveys, with each species allied to a physiographic region, and found in the general area that Ortmann discovered them in a century prior. Urbanization had a negative effect on burrowing crayfishes over the past century, and green-spaces proved to be important islands of habitation in the presence of urbanization. Overall, our survey results indicate that all three species are currently stable in Pennsylvania.

Katie Scott (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Natural Science and Mathematics, West Liberty University, West Liberty, West Virginia 26074, rkscott@westliberty.edu;


Zachary Dillard ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Natural Science and Mathematics, West Liberty University, West Liberty, West Virginia 26074, ZWDILLARD@westliberty.edu;


Nicole Sadecky ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Virginia Department of Natural Resources, nmsadecky@westliberty.edu;


David Lieb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western Pennsylvania Conservancy and Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission, 450 Robinson Lane, Bellefonte, PA 16823, c-dlieb@pa.gov;


Zachary Loughman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Liberty University, zloughman@westliberty.edu;


204 - PREDICTING THE POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE NONNATIVE RED SWAMP CRAYFISH PROCAMBARUS CLARKII IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PREDICTING THE POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE NONNATIVE RED SWAMP CRAYFISH PROCAMBARUS CLARKII IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES The ongoing threat of introduction of nonnative species, including crayfish, to the Laurentian Great Lakes has motivated the development of predictive models to inform where nonnative populations are likely to establish. Our study is one of the first to apply regional freshwater-specific GIS layers to species occurrence data to predict ecosystem vulnerability to invasions, specifically of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii into the Great Lakes. We combined a database of crayfish species occurrences with the Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework (GLAHF) spatial database to model habitats vulnerable to invasion by P. clarkii using a machine-learning algorithm (boosted regression trees). We developed a series of taxonomically nested models of habitat suitability, ranging from one identifying all suitable crayfish habitat across the Great Lakes to one narrowly identifying potentially suitable habitat for P. clarkii based on its current, limited distribution in this system. Our models give scenarios of uncertainty for where P. clarkii might be able to establish in this important freshwater ecosystem, which can be used to inform management efforts to slow spread or detect new invasions.

Rachel Egly (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, egly2@illinois.edu;


Gust Annis ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Nature Conservancy, gannis@tnc.org;


W. Lindsay Chadderton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Nature Conservancy, lchadderton@tnc.org;


Jody A. Peters ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, peters.63@nd.edu;


Eric Larson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


205 - RANGE WIDE LAND USE IMPACTS ON THE FEDERALLY ENDANGERED CRAYFISH CAMBARUS VETERANUS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

RANGE WIDE LAND USE IMPACTS ON THE FEDERALLY ENDANGERED CRAYFISH CAMBARUS VETERANUS Cambarus veteranus was listed as federally endangered by the USFWS in April of 2016. Prior to listing, a range-wide survey was completed in West Virginia’s Upper Guyandotte River basin. Cambarus veteranus was determined to only occur in the Clear Fork/Laurel Fork and Pinnacle Creek watersheds and had experienced >80% range reduction over the previous century. Using presence/absence data from the 2015 survey, we determined local and landscape level land-use impacts on C. veteranus site occupancy by plotting collection locales on the National Land Use Cover (NLCD 2011) and generating 300m and 1000m buffers around each collection locale. Percent land use at those scales was then calculated and logistic regression models generated using previously garnered presence-absence data. Model selection results at both scales indicated a negative relationship with both agricultural and barren land and a positive relationship with forested land. Surface mining and development were determined to be important causal agents of C. veteranus decline prior to this effort. Maintenance of natural stream corridors appears to be important for the conservation of C. veteranus.

Gregory Myers (Primary Presenter/Author), West Liberty University, gamyers@westliberty.edu ;


Zachary Loughman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Liberty University, zloughman@westliberty.edu;


208 - RIVERINE RESERVES: MIGRATING PRINCIPLES OF MARINE RESERVES UPSTREAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

RIVERINE RESERVES: MIGRATING PRINCIPLES OF MARINE RESERVES UPSTREAM Riverine biodiversity and ecosystem service provisioning is under threat from many of the same problems as terrestrial and marine ecosystems. While reserve creation has been a cornerstone of conservation efforts on land and in the sea, freshwaters have been considered only as a secondary value of protected areas selected based on terrestrial value. Despite overharvest being widely regarded as one of the most acute human impacts on ecosystems, inland fisheries are rarely considered in spatial protection efforts. Here we make a first attempt to conceptually apply principles of reserve design, drawing heavily from the marine reserve literature, to riverine ecosystems. Ecological and social siting criteria, optimum reserve network topologies, and bioeconomic models have been well-developed for marine systems with the dual aims to achieve biodiversity conservation goals and to augment harvest production. Rivers produce a disproportionate amount of global inland harvest, but implementing successful riverine spatial protection will require a rethinking of traditional reserve design based on the topological and connectivity constraints of dendritic network structures, inherent polarity of flow processes, and susceptibility to degradation from external sources. Doing so, however, may provide new insights for global freshwater conservation planning.

Aaron Koning (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology, koning@wisc.edu;


209 - A ZERO-ORDER APPROACH TO ESTIMATE NUTRIENT UPTAKE LENGTH USING TRACER ADDITION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

A zero-order approach to estimate nutrient uptake length using tracer addition Nutrient uptake in streams is often quantified by uptake length (Sw). Nutrient addition experiment is a cheap way to estimate Sw compared to isotope tracers. The current approach to estimate uptake length using linear regression of log-transformed nutrient concentration (called the 1st order approach) assumes the nutrient uptake follows 1st order kinetics, which is invalid under nutrient-saturated conditions. Theoretic analysis using one dimensional solute transport model confirmed that the 1st order approach consistently overestimate the actual Sw by up to 4.6-fold. The overestimation is even greater for pulse tracer injection in which nutrient-saturated condition is inevitable due to large amount of nutrient addition. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an alternative, a zero-order approach, to estimate Sw under nutrient saturated condition as it mimics Michaelis-Menten kinetics closely when nutrient is not limiting. Our theoretic analysis confirms the zero-order approach provides much more accurate estimate of Sw than the commonly used 1st order approach. We conclude that the zero-order approach should be adapted whenever possible to estimate nutrient uptake lengths in nutrient addition experiments, especially for pulse addition experiments.

Chuanhui Gu (Primary Presenter/Author), Appalachian State University, guc@appstate.edu;


William P. Anderson, Jr. ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, andersonwp@appstate.edu;


Laura Heinen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, heinenla@appstate.edu;


210 - AQUATIC-TERRESTRIAL LINKAGES DOWNSTREAM OF GLEN CANYON DAM

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Aquatic-Terrestrial Linkages Downstream of Glen Canyon Dam From the early days of ecology, researchers have recognized the permeability of ecosystem boundaries to the movement of energy, nutrients, and organisms. Emergent insects represent one example of this exchange, maturing in the aquatic system and emerging into the terrestrial system once adults, where they become a food source for riparian predators. The concept of emergent insects as subsidies has been applied to a variety of environs. However, despite its demonstrated significance, this dynamic remains unexamined for large, altered river systems, including the Colorado River. To accomplish this, tissue samples were obtained from riparian consumers between Glen Canyon and Hoover dams and analyzed for 13C and 15N composition. Comparing consumer isotope ratios to those of aquatic insects demonstrated the trophic linkages between these groups. Isotope ratios of predators also allowed for comparisons of food chain length along the river. This is of special interest, as hydropeaking waves, a daily tide caused by dam operations, affect the structure of aquatic and terrestrial communities alike. Though this study was restricted to a stretch of the Colorado, its findings are relevant for managing rivers affected by hydropeaking worldwide.

Christina Lupoli (Primary Presenter/Author), Arizona State University, caclupoli@gmail.com;


211 - THE EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL SALT CONCENTRATIONS ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS, GROWTH, AND CARBOHYDRATE CONCENTRATIONS OF PERIPHYTON

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

THE EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL SALT CONCENTRATIONS ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS, GROWTH, AND CARBOHYDRATE CONCENTRATIONS OF PERIPHYTON Freshwater salinization is increasing from activities associated with human development. Although the rise of ions is reducing aquatic biodiversity, the effects of ion identity on freshwater organisms are largely unknown. Previous studies have quantified mostly lethal effects of elevated salt concentrations on periphyton photosynthetic and growth processes, while few have quantified sub-lethal responses. We quantified photoautotrophic and heterotrophic responses to low salt concentrations. Sodium chloride (NaCl), a common contaminant, could alter the photosynthetic capacity and biochemistry of periphyton to alter aquatic function. Periphyton was exposed to 4 NaCl concentrations for 27 days: ambient (~3 mg/L NaCl), low (16 mg/L NaCl), medium (32 mg/L NaCl), and high (64 mg/L NaCl) (n=10, N=40). We measured respiration, chlorophyll a, ash-free dry mass and glucose concentrations. Periphyton respiration was greater during light and dark incubations in the ambient compared to the high salt treatment. We did not observe altered growth, or biochemistry of periphyton, but observed possible changes in heterotrophic communities. Combined results suggest suppressed heterotrophic respiration with increasing salt concentrations. Relatively low-level salinization may alter microbial community structure and slow detrital processes in aquatic ecosystems.

Anastasia Mogilevski (Primary Presenter/Author), Gettysburg College, mogian01@gettysburg.edu;


Brooke Howard-Parker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, bbhowardparker@gmail.com;


Sally Entrekin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


212 - CHARACTERIZING CYANOBACTERIAL DYNAMICS UNDER DIFFERENT MIXING REGIMES USING MULTI-LEVEL MODELING

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

CHARACTERIZING CYANOBACTERIAL DYNAMICS UNDER DIFFERENT MIXING REGIMES USING MULTI-LEVEL MODELING Harmful algal blooms (HABs) of cyanobacteria are a growing problem for freshwater reservoirs in the United States. Issues related to these cyanobacterial blooms include aesthetic problems, hypoxia, taste and odor, and the potential release of cyanotoxins. Enhanced circulation technologies have been proposed as an on-site treatment method to suppress the formation of HABs in freshwater bodies. In this project, physical, chemical, and biological data were collected from summer 2015 to present from three Piedmont North Carolina reservoirs with different levels of artificial circulation (Jordan Lake, University Lake, and City Lake). The timing and severity of cyanobacterial blooms were determined using measurements of algal cell density, algal biovolume, and cyanobacterial dominance from phytoplankton assemblages and chlorophyll grab-samples, which were synthesized with profiles of in vivo phycocyanin and chlorophyll to produce a more comprehensive data set for predictive modeling. A multi-level (hierarchical) modeling framework was then used to account for the spatial and temporal variability of the algal dataset using meteorological conditions, physical lake characteristics, nutrients, and presence or absence of artificial mixing as candidate predictor variables. Modeling results indicate the strength and significance of various factors controlling cyanobacteria dominance.

Jeremy Smithheart (Primary Presenter/Author), NC State University, jwsmithh@ncsu.edu;


Daniel Obenour ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, drobenour@ncsu.edu;


Yue Han ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, yhan10@ncsu.edu ;


Tarek Aziz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, tnaziz@ncsu.edu;


213 - MODELING VERTICAL DIFFUSION IN A SHALLOW EUTROPHIC RESERVOIR

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Modeling vertical diffusion in a shallow eutrophic reservoir Transport phenomena are important drivers of water quality in natural waters. In lakes and reservoirs, vertical mixing through turbulent diffusion is expected to influence the relative dominance of problematic cyanobacteria to other algal taxa. Our study area is shallow embayments of Jordan Lake (North Carolina), that alternate between stratified and well-mixed conditions depending on wind and surface heat flux. In one embayment, solar-powered circulators were recently tested to determine if enhanced mixing can reduce algal blooms that are dominated by cyanobacteria in summer. To simulate vertical diffusion, a mathematical heat model with meteorological inputs is first constructed to predict time series of water-column temperature profiles. Non-linear optimization is applied to calibrate unknown parameters to within literature-specified bounds based on the fit of the model to in situ thermistor chain records. The model is evaluated using cross validation and through comparison with in situ estimates of diffusion obtained from a temperature microstructure profiler (SCAMP) and dye tests. The model is applied to simulate diffusion over a decadal period, and the impact of enhanced circulation is examined. Finally, we statistically assess potential relationships between diffusion and cyanobacteria dominance.

Yue Han (Primary Presenter/Author), NC State University, yhan10@ncsu.edu ;


Jeremy Smithheart ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, jwsmithh@ncsu.edu;


Robyn Smyth ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bard College, rsmyth@bard.edu;


Tarek Aziz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, tnaziz@ncsu.edu;


Daniel Obenour ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NC State University, drobenour@ncsu.edu;


214 - TEMPERATURE REGULATES MICROCYSTIN RELEASE FROM TOXIN-PRODUCING CYANOBACTERIA

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

TEMPERATURE REGULATES MICROCYSTIN RELEASE FROM TOXIN-PRODUCING CYANOBACTERIA To evaluate temperature regulation of microcystin release by toxin-producing cyanobacteria, we performed year-round sampling of a eutrophic lake dominated by Planktothrix agardhii. Seasonal variation in temperature was replicated in a laboratory incubation experiment designed to evaluate cause-effect relationships between temperature and toxin release. Lake temperature ranged from 3-27°C and cyanobacteria biomass increased with warming up to 18°C, but declined rapidly with further increases in temperature. Extracellular microcystin concentration was coupled with changes in water temperature and was most elevated between 20-25°C, concurrent with the decline in cyanobacteria biomass. A similar trend was observed in laboratory incubations where productivity-specific microcystin release was greater (up to 4-fold) between 20-25°C compared to release rates between 3-19°C. However, productivity-specific microcystin release declined rapidly at 30°C. The results of this study may aid in the ability to forecast elevated toxin levels in eutrophic lakes where blooms can persist year-round with varying degrees of toxin production, thereby minimizing toxin-associated health risks.

Jeremy Walls (Primary Presenter/Author), Ball State University, jtwalls@bsu.edu;


Kevin Wyatt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, khwyatt@bsu.edu;


Jason Doll ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, jcdoll@bsu.edu;


Eric Rubenstein ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, emrubenstein@bsu.edu;


Allison Rober ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, arrober@bsu.edu;


215 - ASSESSING ECOLOGICAL UPLIFT IN STREAM RESTORATION PROJECTS IN CHARLOTTE, NC

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

ASSESSING ECOLOGICAL UPLIFT IN STREAM RESTORATION PROJECTS IN CHARLOTTE, NC Stream restoration is one tool used to mitigate urban impacts on stream ecosystems. Many restoration projects modify channel geomorphology with the assumption that stream function will also improve. The Stream Functions Pyramid Framework (SFPF) is an alternative approach that seeks to design stream restoration using functional attributes instead of structural measures. The Functional Lift Quantification Tool provides a mechanism to evaluate restoration projects based on multiple processes including hydrology, hydraulics, geomorphology, physiochemical analysis, and biology. Drawn from pre and post-restoration monitoring data, a functional feet score (FFS) and uplift are calculated to assess the restoration project, given the current health of an upstream watershed. Best Management Practices (BMPs) used in urban watersheds mitigate effects of stressors in watersheds and can be used in combination with restoration. By studying the Beaverdam creek watershed, we demonstrate that the Functional Lift Quantification Tool can be used to assess an unrestored urban stream and a restored stream within the same watershed.

Ella Wickliff (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, ewicklif@uncc.edu;


Sandra Clinton, PhD ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;


216 - DOES DIEL NITRATE VARIABILITY INDICATE NITROGEN SATURATION?

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DOES DIEL NITRATE VARIABILITY INDICATE NITROGEN SATURATION? Diel nitrate patterns in streams are often attributed to metabolic uptake, with the timing and magnitude of patterns resulting from demands of primary productivity. Recent work however, indicates that this may only be the case when nitrogen is not limiting in a stream, and that the amplitude of diel nitrate signals are dampened when nitrogen limitation exists. Moreover, additional hydrologic and anthropogenic forces also have the capacity to influence diel patterns both in amplitude and in timing of peaks and valleys. Such external forcing would create nitrate patterns which closely correlate with diel discharge. We conducted a synthesis of 83 USGS monitored sites with continuous nitrate and DO data (cumulative 201 years of nitrate and 318 years of DO data) to determine the extent of diel fluctuations across rivers, as well as whether metabolism accurately predicts diel fluctuations without considering nitrogen saturation or external forcing. Using patterns of amplitude and peak timing, we additionally infer how dominant controls may shift through time in any given stream, whether seasonally or in response to distubrance.

Catherine Chamberlin (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, catherine.chamberlin@duke.edu;


Jim Heffernan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, james.heffernan@duke.edu;


218 - PARTICULATE NUTRIENTS IN THE GREAT LAKES: ANALYZING A 20-YEAR DATASET

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

PARTICULATE NUTRIENTS IN THE GREAT LAKES: ANALYZING A 20-YEAR DATASET The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) has collected water samples for particulate nutrient analysis from all of the Great Lakes since 1997. Samples are collected during GLNPO’s annual spring and summer surveys across the Great Lakes basin. This annual monitoring has resulted in a long-term dataset of particulate phosphorus, particulate nitrogen, particulate carbon, and total suspended solids. In this study, we assess temporal trends of particulate nutrients, compare trends among lakes, and determine how nutrient stoichiometry is changing over time in the Great Lakes. The results will be compared to other long-term datasets, including chlorophyll-a, to investigate changes associated with primary productivity trends across the lakes.

Kathryn Meyer (Primary Presenter/Author), ORISE Fellow, U.S EPA Great Lakes National Program Office, meyer.kathryn@epa.gov;


Glenn Warren ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program Office, warren.glenn@epa.gov;


Eric Osantowski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S EPA Great Lakes National Program Office, osantowski.eric@epa.gov;


Michael Yusim ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Contractor, Federal Occupational Health, michael.yusim@foh.hhs.gov;


219 - WHAT CAN STREAMPULSE DO FOR YOU? BUILDING THE STREAM METABOLISM PIPELINE

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

WHAT CAN STREAMPULSE DO FOR YOU? BUILDING THE STREAM METABOLISM PIPELINE Recent advances in low-cost aquatic sensor technologies make continuous monitoring of dissolved oxygen and many other ecosystem metabolic parameters easier than ever before. However, these parameters require significant effort to synthesize estimates of aquatic ecosystem productivity and respiration. The StreamPULSE project is lowering the barriers for investigators interested in measuring these fundamental metabolic rates by compiling standard sensor, field and calibration protocols, web based data processing, and a concise data pipeline to rapidly route raw data through cleaning, analysis and modeling steps. Here we acknowledge the difficulties of data consistency across multiple monitoring locations as well as making these data open, visible, and available. Ultimately, we hope the StreamPULSE platform will facilitate and build a global network of flowing water metabolic rates and regimes.

Eric Moore (Primary Presenter/Author, Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University , eric.m.moore@duke.edu;


Erin VanderJeugdt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, emv14@duke.edu;


220 - AQUATIC INSTRUMENT SYSTEM DATA CONSISTENCY ACROSS A CONTINENT: THE NEON COMMISSIONING APPROACH

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

AQUATIC INSTRUMENT SYSTEM DATA CONSISTENCY ACROSS A CONTINENT: THE NEON COMMISSIONING APPROACH The National Ecological Observatory Network’s (NEON) continental aquatic instrument system (AIS) must consistently deliver quality data over 30 years and across large spatial scales. NEON AIS consists of in-situ sensors in streams, rivers, and lakes that will monitor physical and hydrological conditions, as well as a suite of water quality parameters including temperature, DO, fDOM, pH, and nitrate. The NEON commissioning plan ensures the AIS performs at standards that meet NEON’s data requirements. As NEON finalizes construction, the AIS commissioning process assesses (i) process quality metrics in generating expected data quantities and validity, and (ii) data quality metrics based on accuracy and consistency. NEON commissioning assesses process quality by analyzing data coverage and status flags, and verifies sensor data quality by comparison to observational measurements corresponding to in-situ sensors. Here, we present surface water and groundwater stage and surface water temperature results from commissioning tests across 13 diverse sites spanning broad climatic, biogeochemical, and ecohydrologic gradients. Future NEON data delivery must follow these established commissioning standards as the AIS sensor network faces upgrades and replacements throughout the ensuing decades.

Guy Litt (Primary Presenter/Author), National Ecological Observatory Network - Battelle Ecology, glitt@battelleecology.org;


Jesse Vance ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Ecological Observatory Network, jvance@battelleecology.org;


221 - INTERACTION BETWEEN PHYSIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HETEROGENEITY DETERMINES DISCREPANCY IN STREAM METABOLISM ACROSS SPATIAL SCALES

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

INTERACTION BETWEEN PHYSIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HETEROGENEITY DETERMINES DISCREPANCY IN STREAM METABOLISM ACROSS SPATIAL SCALES Understanding the scale dependence of patterns is a central problem in ecology. We investigated the mismatch between stream metabolism at reach and habitat scales in six biomes. At the reach scale, we estimated GPP and ER by modeling the diel changes in dissolved oxygen concentration. At the habitat scale, we incubated representative substrates in recirculating chambers, and applied the same dynamic model to estimate GPP and ER. The dynamic model accounts for the temperature and light dependence of GPP and ER to allow for standardization of metabolism to the same environmental conditions. We found that the reach-to-habitat ratio of GPP and ER, standardized to the same light and temperature conditions, decreased as the variance of habitat-scale metabolism within a reach increased. By applying scale transition theory, we showed that the heterogeneity of habitat-scale metabolism within a reach, coupled with negative correlations between light and GPP per light, and between ER and temperature sensitivity, could explain the discrepancy across scales. Our results suggest that accounting for nonlinearity and spatial heterogeneity could improve our ability to translate ecological patterns across scales.

Chao Song (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, chaosong@uga.edu;


Walter K. Dodds ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, wkdodds@ksu.edu;


Janine Rüegg ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, janine.ruegg@epfl.ch;


Alba Argerich ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, alba.argerich@oregonstate.edu;


Christina Baker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, clbaker5@alaska.edu;


William Breck Bowden ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Vermont, breck.bowden@uvm.edu;


Michael Douglas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Western Australia, michael.douglas@uwa.edu.au;


Kaitlin Farrell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, kfarrel@uga.edu;


Michael B. Flinn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, michael.flinn@murraystate.edu;


Erica Garcia ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Charles Darwin University, erica.garcia@cdu.edu.au;


Keith Gido ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, kgido@ksu.edu;


Tamara Harms ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, tamara.harms@alaska.edu;


Ashley Helton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Connecticut, ashley.helton@uconn.edu;


Shufang Jia ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, shufangj@ksu.edu;


Jeremy Jones ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Univeristy of Alaska Fairbanks, jay.jones@alaska.edu;


Lauren Koenig ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, lauren.koenig@unh.edu;


John S. Kominoski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Florida International University, jkominoski@gmail.com;


William H. McDowell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, bill.mcdowell@unh.edu;


Damien McMaster ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Charles Darwin University, Damien.McMaster@cdu.edu.au;


Samuel P. Parker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Vermont, samuel.parker@uvm.edu;


Amy D. Rosemond ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


Ken Sheehan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, ken.r.sheehan@gmail.com;


Matt T. Trentman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, mtrentma@nd.edu;


Matt Whiles ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Illinois University, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


Wilfred Wollheim ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, wil.wollheim@unh.edu;


Ford Ballantyne ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, fba4@uga.edu;


222 - REDUCED WATER CLARITY IN UNITED STATES RESERVOIRS AS COMPARED TO LAKES: IMPLICATIONS FOR MEDIATING MASS TRANSPORT FROM CONTINENTS TO COASTS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

REDUCED WATER CLARITY IN UNITED STATES RESERVOIRS AS COMPARED TO LAKES: IMPLICATIONS FOR MEDIATING MASS TRANSPORT FROM CONTINENTS TO COASTS Recent work suggests that lakes and reservoirs differ in key ways that may influence sensitivity to climate change. The goal of this study is to test for differences in water clarity, a key ecological and economic characteristic of lentic environments, between lakes and reservoirs in the United States. We used the EPA National Lake Assessment datasets (2007 and 2012) to compare water clarity (e.g. Secchi depth) and related variables (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), algal biomass, and total suspended solids (TSS)) in lakes (~1,100) and reservoirs (~1,300) over time (2007 and 2012) and at varying spatial scales (national, eco-region, and geographically-paired systems). Reservoirs were less clear than lakes (photic zone half that of a typical lake) largely due to differences in TSS. Lakes had higher DOC and lower algal biomass than reservoirs in 2007, but no significant difference was found in 2012. These findings underscore the important role reservoirs play in mediating sediment transport from continents to coasts as well as their propensity to respond differently to climate change as compared with natural lakes.

Daniel Day (Primary Presenter/Author), Environmental Science Department, Dickinson College, dayd@dickinson.edu;


Kristin Strock ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environmental Science Department, Dickinson College, strockk@dickinson.edu;


Roxanne Razavi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Finger Lakes Institute, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, roxrazavi@gmail.com;


Nicole Hayes ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Biology Department, University of Regina, hayes.nicolemarie@gmail.com;


Bridget Deemer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southwest Biological Science Center, US Geological Survey, bridget.deemer@gmail.com;


223 - A NOVEL APPLICATION OF MAXENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO IDENTIFY ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC DETERMINANTS OF AMERICAN EEL DISTRIBUTION IN MID-ATLANTIC U.S. RIVERS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

A NOVEL APPLICATION OF MAXENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO IDENTIFY ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC DETERMINANTS OF AMERICAN EEL DISTRIBUTION IN MID-ATLANTIC U.S. RIVERS In freshwater systems, species’ sorting from a regional species pool to the local community occurs via a series of hierarchical filters. For fishes, three classes of filters thought to be most important are: (1) physical habitat and channel morphology (hereafter “landscape variables”), (2) hydrology, and (3) biotic interactions. Although each class of filter has been shown to be important in some systems, direct comparisons of their relative importance are rare. Using the American eel (Anguilla rostrata) as a model organism, we quantified the influences of landscape, hydrologic, and biotic variables on historical eel distributions within six Mid-Atlantic drainages. We measured the agreement (or overlap) between probability densities for observed eel “presence” sites and “background” habitat. This approach stemmed from the MaxEnt response function methodology where the response curve (predicted presences/background) is highest when minimal overlap between presence and background probability density functions is observed. Similarity of background versus presence sites between filter classes was also assessed with multidimensional scaling. Results suggest that biotic interactions, as indicated by functional traits comparisons among species, may be uniquely important to historical eel distributions.

Taylor Woods (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, woodste@vcu.edu;


Daniel McGarvey ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


224 - DRAMATIC SEASONAL SHIFTS IN PRIMARY PRODUCERS IN A MID-SIZED PIEDMONT RIVER

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

DRAMATIC SEASONAL SHIFTS IN PRIMARY PRODUCERS IN A MID-SIZED PIEDMONT RIVER Stream flow has a major influence on ecosystem structures, functions and the corresponding services provided by rivers. We are studying the effects of different flow conditions on primary productivity in a mid-sized Piedmont river by measuring biomass of primary producer pools monthly and biomass-specific productivity and respiration rates through chamber studies. Data from the 2016 field season show dramatic shifts in identity and biomass of primary producers from June to November when the Middle Oconee River experienced prolonged drought. Preliminary data suggest patterns in filamentous algal biomass and identity were due, in part, to scouring flows, and that variability in the dominant macrophyte biomass was influenced by desiccation or herbivory during the prolonged drought. These shifts in dominant producers, which have different per-unit mass productivity and respiration rates, may explain patterns in whole-stream metabolism, which change seasonally and under different hydrologic regimes. By modeling productivity in response to biomass changes and antecedent flow conditions, we aim to quantify the effects of different flow conditions, and thus different management strategies and climate scenarios, on ecosystem functions.

Caitlin Conn (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, caitlin.conn25@uga.edu;


Amy Rosemond ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


Phillip Bumpers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, bumpersp@gmail.com;


Mary Freeman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, mcfreeman@usgs.gov;


Kyle McKay ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Army Corps of Engineers, kyle.mckay@usace.army.mil;


Seth Wenger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sethwenger@fastmail.fm;


225 - TAXA RICHNESS VARIATION & NETWORKED MEASUREMENT OF IONIC STRENGTH TO MONITOR WATERWAY HEALTH

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Taxa Richness Variation & Networked Measurement of Ionic Strength to Monitor Waterway Health This study explored variation in waterway health within a small geography and whether remote monitoring systems can show real time changes from natural and human activity. Environmental monitoring can be costly, requiring expensive equipment and personnel on site. The STream Observation and Networking Equipment (STONE) is a device low cost enough to be left in the field, with the capability to upload data to a web site. Freshwater macroinvertebrate samples were collected from five sites with a seine net and identified to the family level. Chemical sampling was also performed. The STONE device is constructed from a Raspberry Pi, integrated circuits, recycled electronic components, and open source software. It measures ionic strength, which can indicate a broad range of pollution from nutrients to road salt. Calibration is accomplished with known NaCl solutions. Resistance measurements and temperature are used to calculate TDS. Data is posted real time to a web site. Of the five sites sampled, the two with the lowest nutrient pollution also had the highest taxa richness. Seven macroinvertebrate families were found only at one site in the Princeton Ridge. The STONE device showed a statistically significant difference between sites on three different streams and the controls. This study showed the link between taxa richness and nutrient pollution, and that macroinvertebrate species can vary significantly within a small area. Initial data reads from the STONE device are promising. Open source hardware, software and recycled material can be used to create a device sensitive to water health metrics, and display the data real time on a web site.

Sonja Michaluk (Primary Presenter/Author), . , sonja.michaluk@gmail.com;


226 - RAPID ASSESSMENT OF ALGAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND HARMFUL BLOOMS USING DNA BARCODING AND NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Rapid assessment of algal community composition and harmful blooms using DNA barcoding and Next Generation Sequencing Outbreaks of harmful algal blooms (HABs) dominated by toxigenic and nuisance cyanobacteria are increasingly reported across freshwater systems with adverse effects on the health and resilience of aquatic food-webs and many negative socioeconomic impacts. Timely detection and identification of bloom-forming and toxigenic algal and cyanobacterial species is essential to predict, manage, and reduce their frequency, severity, and toxicity. This is particularly challenging in large waterbodies such the Great Lakes which may exhibit a gradient in water quality and plankton composition. We applied DNA barcoding and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to develop a rapid assessment toolset for two important indicators of aquatic ecosystem health: toxigenic bloom-forming cyanobacteria and impaired planktonic biodiversity. We first developed a reference Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) database from algal and cyanobacterial isolates from the Great Lakes and other freshwater bodies around the world. We then tested NGS method with specific 16S primers to simultaneously detect cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algal chloroplasts on mock communities generated from known cyanobacterial and eukaryotic strains, and thirdly analyzed environmental samples from Lake Erie. To date, we have sequenced and uploaded to the BOLD database, a total of 146 strains of cyanobacteria and algae for 16S rDNA. By using mock community experiments we were able to validate and optimize our method and results showed accurate identification of species. As a whole, the newly developed NGS pipeline allows reproducible detection of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae in environmental samples which can be used for monitoring of Cyanobacterial and Harmful Algal Blooms.

L. Cynthia Watson (Primary Presenter/Author), Watershed Hydrology and Ecology Research Division, Water Science and Technology, Environment and Climate Change Canada, linet.watson@canada.ca;


Natalia V. Ivanova ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding, none ;


Sue B. Watson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NOAA - Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, stillnone ;


George S Bullerjahn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bowling Green State University, superlate;


227 - MAYFLY DRIFT IN RESPONSE TO ARTIFICIAL LIGHT AT NIGHT: A CASE STUDY IN SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MAYFLY DRIFT IN RESPONSE TO ARTIFICIAL LIGHT AT NIGHT: A CASE STUDY IN SCIENCE COMMUNICATION As an interdisciplinary team, we asked: How do scientists engage audiences with their research? Is there a better way? To fully examine these questions, we conducted a research experiment to investigate how the exposure to artificial light at night may alter the drift behavior of mayflies from urban (lit) and natural (dark) streams. We challenged ourselves to abandon the conventional scientific paper and develop projects that communicate these results to a larger audience. Both the science and communication presented many obstacles as we embraced our artistic nature, while adhering to the scientific method. We will present what we learned about mayfly drift and our new insight on engaging with the non-science world. We determined from our project that mastering the scientific language allows for efficient communication and advancement within the research community. However, there is a larger community that is often left out of these discussions. Bridging the gap in communication between scientists and the public is essential, particularly in regards to our environment and ecosystems.

JoAnna Hernandez (Primary Presenter/Author), . , c;


Tyler Griswold ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , no;


Stephanie Lenox ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , rar ;


Anya Romig ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , jo;


Alexandra Wert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , op;


Elizabeth Perkin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , fhui ;


228 - MACROINVERTEBRATES COMMUNITIES IN AREAS COVERED AND DEVOID OF THE FLOATING FERNS (SALVINIA SPP.) IN BOQUERÓN WILDLIFE REFUGE (BWR) AT CABO ROJO, PUERTO RICO.

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

MACROINVERTEBRATES COMMUNITIES IN AREAS COVERED AND DEVOID OF THE FLOATING FERNS (SALVINIA SPP.) IN BOQUERÓN WILDLIFE REFUGE (BWR) AT CABO ROJO, PUERTO RICO. Mangrove forests are recognized as highly productive ecosystems; nevertheless, their ecological values, biota, and food webs are complex and yet to be understood. Scientific publications and information on aquatic invertebrates in the mangroves of Puerto Rico are scarce and mostly outdated. The Boquerón Wildlife Refuge (BWR), located in Boquerón, Cabo Rojo, is the largest mangrove forest stand on the western part of the Island. Many of the mangrove channels in the BWR are invaded by thick mats of floating ferns (Salvinia spp.). An assessment of the aquatic macroinvertebrate diversity in three mangrove areas in the BWR invaded by Salvinia spp. and three areas devoid of these plants was conducted, once a month, from June to November of 2013. Three sampling methods were used; aquatic light traps, Malaise emerging traps, and D-net sweeps. Each sampling method rendered a distinctive fauna. The present work summarizes the results from Malaise traps. A total of 3,332 invertebrates were collected and identified; these belonged to 10 orders and 32 families. Mangrove areas with and without Salvinia behave as two distinct habitats. Overall, areas without Salvinia spp. had the highest abundances, mostly of Diptera. The temporal and spatial variations influenced the abundance and the presence of these groups. This study will serve as baseline for future studies and the development of specific biomonitoring and management programs for this particular type of wetland.

Dennis O. Perez Lopez (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico, dgu;


Arocho Hernandez Nahira ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, weds;


Santos Flores Carlos ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, rew ;


229 - RIPARIAN FOREST STRUCTURE AND STREAM FOOD WEBS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

RIPARIAN FOREST STRUCTURE AND STREAM FOOD WEBS Management of stream fish populations focuses on the role of physical habitat heterogeneity in regulating individual and population growth, an approach that assumes food is not limiting or unimportant. This assumption is rarely tested or evaluated despite decades of research showing the fundamental role food plays in regulating individual growth and the carrying capacity of a stream to support fish. Food limitation may be particularly important in forest streams where light and nutrients constrain primary and secondary productivity. Here we examine the linkages between riparian forest structure (e.g. dense 2nd growth stands vs. open old-growth stands), prey availability, and stream salmonid populations during summer low-flow conditions using a combination of experiments and field observations. Multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis if water temperature is conducive to positive growth, fish populations in Pacific Northwest forest streams are limited by food availability during summer low flows, which is partly determined by riparian forest structure and local habitat conditions.

Peter Kiffney (Primary Presenter/Author), Northwest Fisheries Science Center, peter.kiffney@noaa.gov;


Matthew Kaylor ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, matthew.kaylor@oregonstate.edu;


Dana Warren ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, dana.warren@oregonstate.edu;


Sean Naman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of British Columbia , mikaela.imbriani@usu.edu;


230 - STABLE ISOTOPES REVEAL INVASION-MEDIATED CHANGES IN AQUATIC SUBSIDIES PROVIDED TO RIPARIAN SONGBIRDS

6/7/2017  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom C

Stable isotopes reveal invasion-mediated changes in aquatic subsidies provided to riparian songbirds Non-native plant introductions can impact riparian ecosystem function through diverse terrestrial and aquatic pathways, resulting in cascading effects throughout food webs. Invasion-mediated vegetation changes have been shown to depress terrestrial arthropod communities and alter arthropod flux across the aquatic-terrestrial interface. We investigated the effects of a non-native woody plant, New Mexico locust (Robinia neomexicana), on insect contributions to riparian songbird diets. Using stable isotope analyses of insects and avian feces, we found the riparian songbird community consumed approximately 34% aquatic resources, highlighting the importance of aquatic resource subsidies to riparian consumers. Additionally, we found evidence that two insectivorous bird species consumed more aquatic insects in invaded sites, but these invasion-mediated diet shifts differed among years. Our detection of changes in terrestrial- and aquatic-derived prey in bird diets in response to a near-range plant invasion suggests that the introduction of invasive alien species from more geographically isolated native ranges could produce similar or stronger effects. Resource subsidies hold great potential as a means of understanding indirect consequences of invasion for riparian consumers.

Hannah Riedl (Primary Presenter/Author), , , hanriedl@rams.colostate.edu;


Lani Stinson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), , , bur;


Liba Pejchar ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), . , hidsodhf;