Monday, June 5, 2017
11:00 - 12:30

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11:00 - 11:15: / 301A DRUGS IN BUGS: A WIDE DIVERSITY OF PPCPS IN AQUATIC INSECT AND SPIDERS

6/05/2017  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  301A

DRUGS IN BUGS: A WIDE DIVERSITY OF PPCPS IN AQUATIC INSECT AND SPIDERS Pharmaceuticals are important contaminants of concern in aquatic environments and are now detected in surface waters worldwide. However, the ecological impacts of PPCPs as well as their bioaccumulation potential (via trophic transfer) are not well understood. We sampled 6 streams across an urban-rural gradient seasonally for 2 years. Using a conceptual model based on two chemical traits, water solubility and metabolic transformation rate, we were able to predict which pharmaceutical compounds had the greatest potential to bioaccumulate. To test bioaccumulation predictions we collected freshwater insects and riparian spiders and analyzed their pharmaceutical concentration. PPCPs were detected in benthic freshwater insects and in riparian spider tissue; suggesting that some PPCPs do have the potential to bioaccumulate. Further, we then quantified the standing stock of PPCPs occurring in benthic freshwater insects (PPCPs/g insect/m2) in order to calculate the flux of PPCPs to higher consumers via insect consumption. These findings raise important concerns regarding the fate of PPCPs in stream food webs and potential exposure risks to stream and riparian predators feeding on PPCP laden insects.

Erinn Richmond (Primary Presenter/Author), Monash University , erinn.richmond@monash.edu;


Emma Rosi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, rosie@caryinstitute.org;


David Walters ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, waltersd@usgs.gov;


Jerker Fick ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Umea, jerker.fick@umu.se;


Michael Grace ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Monash University , michael.grace@monash.edu;


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11:15 - 11:30: / 301A HOW DO ATRAZINE AND SELENIUM IMPACT THE LINK BETWEEN WATER AND LAND?

6/05/2017  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  301A

HOW DO ATRAZINE AND SELENIUM IMPACT THE LINK BETWEEN WATER AND LAND? Aquatic insects link aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems through their metamorphosis and subsequent transition from water to land. Chemical stressors in freshwater, such as agricultural contaminants, have the potential to disrupt insect life cycles and reduce the number of insects emerging as terrestrial adults, thereby damaging or severing this linkage. Atrazine and selenium, though frequently detected in waterways and often co-occurring, have not been studied together in controlled experiments previously. We conducted a mesocosms experiment over six weeks in the summer of 2016 to measure the responses of larval and emerging aquatic insects to treatments of atrazine, selenium, and a combination of the two. Preliminary results indicate that during peak emergence, control treatments had 40-60% higher emergence than that of the contaminant treated tanks, but there were no differences among the atrazine, selenium, and combination treatments. These differences were not apparent in samples of benthic insects. Our results indicate that atrazine and selenium, alone and in combination, have the potential to impair linkages between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems through reduction of aquatic insect emergence, and that the effects of these contaminants may differ between benthic and emerging insects.

Brianna Henry (Primary Presenter/Author), University of South Dakota, b.henry@eagle.clarion.edu;


Jeff Wesner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, Jeff.Wesner@usd.edu;


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11:30 - 11:45: / 301A HEAVY METAL AND DEVELOPMENT – EFFECTS IN CHIRONOMIDAE LARVAE TO LEAD EXPOSURE

6/05/2017  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  301A

HEAVY METAL AND DEVELOPMENT – EFFECTS IN CHIRONOMIDAE LARVAE TO LEAD EXPOSURE Human activity has affected the majority of the worlds freshwater systems, deteriorating water quality and affecting wildlife. For water quality estimations, aquatic insect larvae tolerance has long been used in environmental assessments. However, studies have shown that although insect larvae may survive in contaminated environments the metamorphosis may be hampered. Therefore, we might underestimate the environmental effect of contaminants. Knowledge about contaminants effect on metamorphosis is limited and further research is necessary to fully understand the implication of aquatic contaminants. In this laboratory study, we expose natural populations of chironomids to different concentrations of lead and measure the effects on larvae survival, hatching success and time to emergence. The study gives us information about whether metamorphosis needs to be incorporated when determining environmental quality criterias and if chironomids are potential transporters of metals from water to land. This will give us insight of potential ecological effects in both aquatic and terrestrial systems.

Johan Lidman (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of ecology and environmental science, Umeå University, johan.lidman@umu.se;


Åsa Berglund ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dep. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, asa.berglund@umu.se;


Johan Fahlman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of ecology and environmental science, Umeå University, johan.fahlman@umu.se;


Micael Jonsson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dep. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, micael.jonsson@umu.se;


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11:45 - 12:00: / 301A THE DOWNSIDE OF A SEAFRONT PROPERTY - METAL TRANSPORT FROM AQUATIC TO TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS THROUGH FOOD WEBS

6/05/2017  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  301A

THE DOWNSIDE OF A SEAFRONT PROPERTY - METAL TRANSPORT FROM AQUATIC TO TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS THROUGH FOOD WEBS Terrestrial ecosystems have traditionally been regarded as sources for contaminants whereas aquatic systems have been regarded as sinks. Lately this view have been questioned and for example emerging insects may transfer contaminants from the aquatic ecosystem back to land. In this study we focused on metal transfer from lakes to riparian insectivorous birds (Ficedula hypoleuca), via emerging insects. We compared metal concentrations in birds breeding in riparian environments with birds in more forested areas around an abandoned lead/zinc mine. Lead and zinc concentrations were 100 times higher in lakes at the mining site compared to reference lakes, and birds accumulated higher lead concentrations in contaminated sites. However, zinc (normally regulated in birds) accumulated at higher rate in nestlings from riparian zones, irrespective of contaminant load, indicating that aquatic insect may transfer zinc to terrestrial ecosystems. As such, birds may be subjected to high exposure of zinc from aquatic ecosystems, even when breeding close to lakes considered uncontaminated. Thus, the flux of metals from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems needs to be incorporated in risk assessments.

Åsa Berglund (Primary Presenter/Author), Dep. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, asa.berglund@umu.se;


Johan Lidman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of ecology and environmental science, Umeå University, johan.lidman@umu.se;


Micael Jonsson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dep. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, micael.jonsson@umu.se;


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12:00 - 12:15: / 301A MICRO- AND MACRO-DETRITIVORE SUBSIDY-STRESS RESPONSES TO RISING COMMON SALTS: ARE DETRITAL ENDPOINTS NEEDED?

6/05/2017  |   12:00 - 12:15   |  301A

MICRO- AND MACRO-DETRITIVORE SUBSIDY-STRESS RESPONSES TO RISING COMMON SALTS: ARE DETRITAL ENDPOINTS NEEDED? Ecosystem impacts of sub-lethal salt concentrations are prevalent but understudied. Despite the widespread low-level increases associated with human activities, few have studied the ecological consequences. We predict micro-and macro-detritivores to follow a subsidy-stress response because salt becomes toxic to detritivores above ca. 3-om greater than ambient, but low-levels may relax osmoregulatory stress. We measured microbial respiration and macro-detritivore stonefly growth following one-month incubations in stream water vs. three NaCl- and NaHCO3-amended stream water (3-64 mgL-1) below toxicity. Microbial respiration did not differ from stream water across the NaHCO3 gradient, but it was less than stream water at low and medium NaCl concentrations. Stoneflies grew 12% more in stream water amended with 64 mgL-1 NaCl than when grown in stream water, but growth did not differ for stoneflies grown in 64mg L-1 NaHCO3. However, in other experiments, aquatic isopods suffered mass loss at 140 mg L-1 NaCl, but NaCl had no effect on Tipula larvae. Together, results suggest salt form, concentration, and detritivore identity matters, and that small salt increases can stimulate or impact detritivore growth and performance to influence decomposition.

Sally Entrekin (POC,Primary Presenter), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


Candice Bauer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, bauer.candice@epa.gov;


Natalie Clay ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Mississippi State University, naclay@ou.edu;


Brooke Howard-Parker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, bbhowardparker@gmail.com;


Michelle Evans-White ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


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12:15 - 12:30: / 301A WHEN NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BECOME CONTAMINANTS IN FRESHWATER BROWN FOOD WEBS: A CASE FOR DETRITAL ENDPOINTS.

6/05/2017  |   12:15 - 12:30   |  301A

WHEN NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BECOME CONTAMINANTS IN FRESHWATER BROWN FOOD WEBS: A CASE FOR DETRITAL ENDPOINTS. Efforts to protect aquatic life in US freshwaters from elevated anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have historically focused on dose-response relationships between nutrient concentrations and algal metrics such as chlorophyll a. However, most freshwater streams receive significant energy subsidies as detritus from terrestrial ecosystems. Elevated nutrient concentrations can alter detrital quality as an invertebrate food resource and reduce quantity by increasing decomposition rates and altering community dynamics in microbial biofilms. Detrital carbon (C):nutrient ratios decline predictably with increasing nutrient concentrations. Decomposition often increases predictably with nutrient concentrations. These demonstrated changes in detrital quality and quantity can lead to changes in benthic macroinvertebrate growth, community structure, and secondary production. This growing body of evidence supports the inclusion of detrital endpoints into the framework for numeric nutrient criteria development in streams.

Michelle Evans-White (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


Candice Bauer ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, bauer.candice@epa.gov;


Sally Entrekin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


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