Tuesday, June 6, 2017
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 306C STREAM DRYING AND FISH METAPOPULATION DYNAMICS IN THE ICHAWAYNOCHAWAY CREEK BASIN, SOUTHWEST GA

6/06/2017  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  306C

STREAM DRYING AND FISH METAPOPULATION DYNAMICS IN THE ICHAWAYNOCHAWAY CREEK BASIN, SOUTHWEST GA Disturbances including stream drying are natural processes, and native species generally have adaptations that allow them to persist or recover. However, the point at which natural or anthropogenic disturbances exceed a community’s ability to recover is not well understood. We studied assemblage composition and metapopulation dynamics of small-bodied fish species at 19 sites in 15 streams in the Ichawaynochaway Creek basin, southwestern Georgia, to ask whether faunal composition differs between perennial streams and those that now exhibit periods of flow cessation or channel drying. Species composition was similar across sites, which shared 31 out of 41 observed species. However, species relative abundances differed dramatically, with the five most abundant species (accounting for > 80% of individuals) in intermittent sites being relatively rare at perennial sites. Fishes showed high colonization rates at the intermittent sites when streamflow declined forming isolated pools, followed by high persistence by the numerically dominant species. We also observed re-colonization following resumption of flow when channels had dried completely. Our observations provide a basis for predicting changes in stream fish assemblages given conditions of increased stream intermittency.

Jessica Davis (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, Athens, JessicaLdavis17@gmail.com;


Mary Freeman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, mcfreeman@usgs.gov;


Stephen Golladay ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Joseph W Jones Ecological Research Center, sgolla@jonesctr.org;


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09:15 - 09:30: / 306C PLANT TRAITS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT HAVE LASTING EFFECTS ON LARVAL AND POST-METAMORPHIC ANURANS

6/06/2017  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  306C

PLANT TRAITS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT HAVE LASTING EFFECTS ON LARVAL AND POST-METAMORPHIC ANURANS Changes in plant communities are seen dramatically in wetland ecosystems where plant traits (e.g., nutrients and secondary compounds) vary across plant taxa. Since many wetland species have bi-phasic life cycles, the influence of changing wetland plant communities has the potential to be transferred to adjacent ecosystems. We used aquatic mesocosms and terrestrial enclosures to assess the influence of five different plant species with varying concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and phenolics on the larval (aquatic) and post-metamorphic (terrestrial) survival, size, growth, and export biomass of wood frogs (Rana sylvatica). We found wood frog survival differed across plant treatments in the aquatic life stage, but not following metamorphosis. Tadpole and post-metamorphic size, growth and export biomass significantly varied across plant treatments. Tadpoles raised in treatments with low phenolic and high nutrient concentrations grew larger and sustained higher growth in the post-metamorphic life stage; however, variations in size, growth and biomass export did not differ following metamorphosis. Neither phenolic nor nutrient concentrations predicted tadpole survival or size. These results suggests variation in plant traits in the aquatic environment have measurable impacts on tadpole fitness, but do not have long-term impacts following metamorphosis.

Joseph Milanovich (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


Daniella DeRose ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, dderose@luc.edu;


Sarah Crites ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, scrites@luc.edu;


Andrés Muñoz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, amunoz7@luc.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 306C MIGRATION BEHAVIOR OF CHUM SALMON IN THE TOKACHI RIVER, EASTERN HOKKAIDO, JAPAN

6/06/2017  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  306C

Migration behavior of Chum Salmon in the Tokachi River, eastern Hokkaido, Japan Decreasing returns of Chum salmon over past decades has made more interested in conservation of natural spawning or wild salmon. To address this needs, seventeen adult chum salmon were caught downstream the Chiyoda weir, which was complete barrier to migration and located about 55 km upstream of the Tokachi river mouth, were tagged acoustic tags to observed the migration behavior. Nine salmon at the mouth of the river mouth and eight salmon upstream of the weir were released in October 2016. Eight tagged salmon (89 % of chum released) turned to the weir. Maximum and average migration speed salmon were 30.0 km/day and 11.5 km/day downstream area of the weir. Migration speed (average: 2.8 km/day) rapidly dropped upstream of the weir. Difference of migration speed between in the downstream and upstream area was due to their migration behavior. Although most salmon upstream of the weir are believe to be from the Men stream hatchery, two Chum salmon migrated deferent tributaries from the Men stream. Our results indicate that upstream area of the weir can have suitable habitat for natural spawning

Masanori Nunokawa (Primary Presenter/Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold region, Public Works Reseaech Institute, nunokawa-m@ceri.go.jp;


Kazuhisa Kashiwaya ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Public Works Research Institute, kashiwaya-k22aa@ceri.go.jp;


Atsushi Tanise ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Public Works Research Institute, tanise-a22aa@ceri.go.jp;


Ryuichi Shinme ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Public Works Research Institute, shimme-r22aa@ceri.go.jp;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 306C SEASONAL ECOLOGY OF MOTTLED SCULPIN (COTTUS BAIRDII) AND BROWN TROUT (SALMO TRUTTA) IN A COLDWATER MICHIGAN STREAM

6/06/2017  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  306C

SEASONAL ECOLOGY OF MOTTLED SCULPIN (COTTUS BAIRDII) AND BROWN TROUT (SALMO TRUTTA) IN A COLDWATER MICHIGAN STREAM Winter is hypothesized to be harsher than other seasons for stream fishes (reduced survival, growth, movement) in temperate regions because of adverse conditions associated with low temperatures. However, few field studies have tested this hypothesis. We compared summer and winter vital rates of mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdii) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) via capture-recapture sampling in Stegman Creek, Michigan. Over two 7-week periods (July-September 2016; January-March 2017), mottled sculpin and brown trout were individually marked and recaptured via weekly electrofishing surveys. Total length, mass, location within 100-m study reach (10-m increments), and tag identification were recorded for each fish. We found that summer movement of mottled sculpin was similar to but more variable than brown trout. Estimated apparent weekly survival of mottled sculpin was lower than brown trout in summer. Weekly recapture probability was time-dependent and consistently lower for mottled sculpin, and constant for brown trout. Upon completion of winter surveys, we will compare vital rates between seasons and determine whether trends are consistent with the hypothesis of lower survival, growth, and movement during winter in temperate regions.

Susanna LaGory (Primary Presenter/Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, lagorys@mail.gvsu.edu;


Carl Ruetz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, carl.ruetz@gvsu.edu;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 306C SPATIAL CONNECTIVITY OF ADFLUVIAL AND STREAM-RESIDENT LAHONTAN CUTTHROAT TROUT: IMPLICATIONS FOR POPULATION RESILIENCE, MANAGEMENT, AND RESTORATION

6/06/2017  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  306C

SPATIAL CONNECTIVITY OF ADFLUVIAL AND STREAM-RESIDENT LAHONTAN CUTTHROAT TROUT: IMPLICATIONS FOR POPULATION RESILIENCE, MANAGEMENT, AND RESTORATION Most adfluvial populations of Lahontan cutthroat trout (LCT) have been extirpated due, in part, to severed connections between lakes and tributaries. Consequently, there is significant interest in understanding population connections across lake and stream habitats to facilitate restoration. We studied spatial stream use of adfluvial and stream-resident LCT in the Summit Lake Basin, which has the largest viable population of adfluvial LCT, a robust population in the stream that feeds the lake, and a stream system free of migration barriers. Adfluvial spawning adults concentrated their activity in low stream reaches, but also migrated nearly to the headwaters. Throughout the stream system, we saw stream-tagged LCT migrate to the lake and found evidence of stream-residency. High flows corresponded to more small LCT migrating to the lake and more adfluvial LCT entering the stream to spawn, which led to more accessing the upper watershed. Results suggest high spatial connectivity between adfluvial and stream-resident populations that will increase in wet years, and that stream-residents may provide emigrants to the lake. Overall population resilience relies on a strong connection between lake and stream habitats.

James Simmons ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, jamessimmons@nevada.unr.edu;


Christopher Jerde ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, Global Water Center, cjerde@ucsb.edu;


William Cowan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Summit Lake Paiute Tribe, william.cowan@summitlaketribe.org;


Sudeep Chandra ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, Global Water Center, limnosudeep@me.com;


Zeb Hogan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, Global Water Center, zhogan@unr.edu;


Teresa Campbell (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Nevada Reno, tcampbs@gmail.com;


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