Wednesday, June 7, 2017
09:00 - 10:30

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09:15 - 09:30: / 301A PURDUE ENTOMOLOGICAL RESEARCH COLLECTION RESOURCES SUPPORTING FRESHWATER SCIENCE

6/07/2017  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  301A

PURDUE ENTOMOLOGICAL RESEARCH COLLECTION RESOURCES SUPPORTING FRESHWATER SCIENCE Since its establishment in 1896, the Purdue Entomological Research Collection (PERC) has become one of the largest and most important collections of aquatic insects in the world, containing the many voucher specimens from the careers of G. F. Edmunds, Jr., and W. P. McCafferty (Ephemeroptera), E. B. Montgomery (Odonata) and Frank Young (aquatic Coleoptera of Indiana). The Ephemeroptera collection contains most genera described prior to 2012, as well as several that remain to be described. PERC currently contains approximately 750,000 pinned specimens, 920,000 specimens in vials, 28,000 slides, and over 11,000 dragonflies and damselflies in archival envelopes. PERC houses over 2,500 primary and/or secondary type specimens of insects. Purdue hosts the Mayfly Central website. A recently funded National Science Foundation grant will update the existing storage systems in the collection to ensure they are preserved for future research and education. In addition, specimen images and associated data will be stored in an online database freely available to the public. This project will raise awareness of the importance of freshwater science, insects and natural history collections through various public engagement activities, aquatic ecosystem workshops, and rural community youth programs.

Luke M. Jacobus (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana Univ. Purdue Univ. Columbus, lmjacobu@iupuc.edu;


Gino Nearns ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue Univ., gnearns@purdue.edu;


Jennifer Zaspel ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue Univ., jzaspel@purdue.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 301A AN OPEN-SOURCE DIGITAL REFERENCE COLLECTION FOR AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE OF NORTH AMERICA

6/07/2017  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  301A

AN OPEN-SOURCE DIGITAL REFERENCE COLLECTION FOR AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE OF NORTH AMERICA Aquatic invertebrates are a key component of freshwater ecosystems, and understanding aquatic invertebrate taxonomy is central to freshwater science. Physical ‘reference’ collections of expertly identified voucher specimens are the “gold-standard” used to confirm identifications. However, most biologists lack access to such collections, which themselves tend to be highly regionalized and often limited in scope. The North American Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Digital Reference Collection (NAAMDRC; https://sciencebase.usgs.gov/naamdrc) was initiated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Aquatic Experimental Laboratory (AXL) at the Fort Collins Science Center to overcome these inherent qualities of physical collections. The NAAMDRC provides users with high-quality, digital photographs annotated with taxa-defining characteristics to aid in specimen identification, thus providing a National-scale alternative to less accessible regional collections. The NAAMDRC is an innovative tool that will be used to: 1) advance freshwater research tied to identification of aquatic invertebrates; 2) support resource management agencies and private sector companies in processing invertebrate samples; 3) enhance teaching of aquatic ecology in K-12 and university settings; and 4) provide high-quality, public-domain images for use in scientific presentations and publications.

David Walters (Primary Presenter/Author), US Geological Survey, waltersd@usgs.gov;


Morgan Ford ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, morganford1983@gmail.com ;


Robert Zuellig ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, rzuellig@usgs.gov ;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 301A WE CAN DO THIS OURSELVES: PREPARING STEM GRADUATE STUDENTS TO ENGAGE BROAD AUDIENCES THROUGH DIGITAL MEDIAL AND THE COMMUNICATION ARTS

6/07/2017  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  301A

WE CAN DO THIS OURSELVES: PREPARING STEM GRADUATE STUDENTS TO ENGAGE BROAD AUDIENCES THROUGH DIGITAL MEDIAL AND THE COMMUNICATION ARTS Scientists face increasing pressure to articulate the importance of their research to general audiences. This expectation is particularly important for graduate-level trainees who will contend with heightened standards of public accountability throughout their careers. Three years ago, the Center for Environmental Studies and Department of Communication Arts at VCU launched a novel program to train STEM graduate students to engage and communicate with general audiences through digital media. Objectives have (so far) been to: (1) teach STEM students basic principles of graphic design; (2) train them to consider the perceptions and expectations (i.e., ‘visual literacies’) of target audiences; and (3) provide them with requisite technical skill in digital illustration and the use of industry-standard tools (i.e., Adobe Creative Suites software). This presentation will share examples of student accomplishments, reflect on key pedagogical lessons learned, and speculate on the future of broad communication training in STEM. Now, as we plan our next steps, we would greatly value feedback from our peers.

Daniel McGarvey (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


Sarah Faris ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, sarah.faris.art@gmail.com;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 301A AN ONLINE APPROACH TO INCREASING STAKEHOLDER UNDERSTANDING OF FRESHWATER SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

6/07/2017  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  301A

AN ONLINE APPROACH TO INCREASING STAKEHOLDER UNDERSTANDING OF FRESHWATER SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT Freshwater management can be a highly local issue. In Michigan, USA, decision making for inland lake management lies largely with local governments and stakeholders. However, good decisions require local citizens to understand lake ecology, management options, and legal and social frameworks. In response, we created a new, online “Introduction to Lakes” program. This engaging 6-week course is delivered with instructional technology and design tailored for individuals with no prior experience with online learning. The course includes video lectures, activities, interactive discussion forums, quizzes, and live chat sessions with content experts. Ninety-nine people participated in the first offering (2015), and 150 participated in 2016, far exceeding our expectations. Learners included lakefront property owners, educators, lake management professionals, and local government officials. Assessment data demonstrate substantial improvement in understanding of course topics. Eighty-five percent of participants intend to apply their learning to local lake management efforts, and 97% would recommend the course to a friend or colleague. “Introduction to Lakes” is empowering communities to protect their freshwater resources, and can serve as a model for freshwater science and management communication.

Jo A. Latimore (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, latimor1@msu.edu;


Bindu Bhakta ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University Extension, bhaktabi@anr.msu.edu;


Erick Elgin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University Extension, elgineri@anr.msu.edu;


Paige Filice ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, filicepa@msu.edu;


Terry Gibb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University Extension, gibb@msu.edu;


Jane Herbert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University Extension, jherbert@msu.edu;


Gwyn Shelle ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University Extension, heyboerg@msu.edu;


Lois Wolfson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, wolfson1@msu.edu;


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