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SFS Annual Meeting

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NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE CO2 DYNAMICS OF STREAMS FROM NDIR SENSORS

Nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzers are becoming a common method of measuring CO2 concentrations in streams and are providing high temporal resolution CO2 data. NDIR sensors can provide insight into how differences in the stream channel or riparian characteristics affect CO2 patterns on a reach scale. This was tested by placing six sensors 100m apart and rotating them through five streams over spring, summer, and fall. Preliminary data suggests that consistent characteristics along a stream channel, such as slope or groundwater influx, allows for sustained patterns of pCO2. On the other hand, transitions in and out of wetlands cause fluctuations in pCO2 patterns. Additional deployments have given further insight into potential pitfalls of using sensors such as biofouling. Large rivers or stream reaches with open canopies, as well as warmer water conditions, result in a higher susceptibility to biofouling. The proper placement of sensors and reach characterization is therefore a critical step in the efficient use of these sensors.

Brian Saccardi (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Hampshire, bek36@wildcats.unh.edu;


William H. McDowell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, bill.mcdowell@unh.edu;


Adam Wymore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, adam.wymore@unh.edu;


Wilfred Wollheim (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, wil.wollheim@unh.edu;