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SFS Annual Meeting

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COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL AND GRAZING AND NON-GRAZING MACROINVERTEBRATES

New Zealand mud snails (NZMS) (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) are an aquatic invasive gastropod across the globe, originating from the lotic and lentic systems of New Zealand and surrounding islands. NZMS have been detected in the Laurentian Great Lakes since 1991, and have recently begun to invade streams and rivers. Due to their ability of achieving extremely high densities in invaded ranges, populations can potentially monopolize periphyton resources and outcompete native macroinvertebrates. To investigate the effects of this regionally new invasive species on native macroinvertebrates, we examined benthic samples in the Au Sable River (Michigan, USA), collected over a two-year time span, at two invaded and two uninvaded sites. Preliminary results indicate NZMS are rapidly increasing in abundance at invaded sites, with current mean (+/- SD) population densities ranging from 32,069 individuals per

m2

(+/- 3,070) to 49,546 per

m2

(+/- 5,518). Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the degree to which NZMS impact a native grazing-scraping caddisfly (Helicopysche borealis), and non-grazing caddisfly families (Brachycentridae, Limnephilidae, Hydrophychidae).

Morgan Morin (Primary Presenter/Author), Oakland University, morganmmorin@gmail.com;


Jeremy Geist (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;