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C01 Algae 1 - SPATIAL VARIATION OF PERIPHYTON BETWEEN RESTORED AND UNRESTORED STREAM SEGMENTS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIAL VARIATION OF PERIPHYTON BETWEEN RESTORED AND UNRESTORED STREAM SEGMENTS Macochee Creek (Mad River Watershed, Ohio), is a cold water stream system that was channelized in the 1800’s for agricultural purposes, but a small section (0.8 km) underwent an extensive restoration during 2007 to restore sinuosity and improve riparian and in-stream habitat. The objective of this investigation was to examine the patterns of benthic algal assemblage within and outside of this restored stream segment. In the fall of 2017, nine sites were selected: three upstream of the restoration, three downstream of the restoration and three sites within the restored stream reach. At each site, a suite of environmental parameters were recorded and periphyton communities were collected from riffle habitats. NMDS and MRPP analyses for the periphyton community indicated that restored stream sites were not significantly (A = 0.05, p = 0.22) different from the unrestored sites. ISA did resolve three unique taxa for the upstream (Achnanthidium, p = 0.04), restored (Gomphonema, p = 0.04), and downstream (Gyrosigma, p = 0.03) segments.

Austin Morehouse (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, a-morehouse@onu.edu;


Nao Hariguchi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, n-hariguchi@onu.edu;


Alex Wood (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, a-wood.2@onu.edu;


Evan Corteville (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, e-corteville@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Ken Oswald (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, k-oswald@onu.edu;


C01 Algae 2 - THE INFLUENCE OF GLACIAL ERRATICS AS A HABITAT MODIFIER FOR PERIPHYTON IN A LOW ORDER LOTIC SYSTEM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE INFLUENCE OF GLACIAL ERRATICS AS A HABITAT MODIFIER FOR PERIPHYTON IN A LOW ORDER LOTIC SYSTEM Pleistocene glacial advances and retreats have led to the deposition of till throughout much of western Ohio. Sometimes this till is laced with large glacial boulders known as erratics. High concentrations of these geologic entities can be associated with prominent end moraines and nearby waterways. In northwest Ohio, the Ottawa River traverses along the Fort Wayne end moraine and, in areas of low anthropogenic influence, it has noticeable glacial erratics within its riffle habitats. The objective of this investigation was to determine if the benthic algal communities found in in proximity of the glacial erratics differed from the surrounding riffle habitat. During the winter of 2018, the benthos directly surrounding five glacial erratics (e.g., upstream, downstream) and adjacent riffle cobble substrates were collected and scrubbed for periphyton and assessed for visible macroalgal thalli. In addition, current velocity, turbidity and other selected environmental parameters were measured at each site. Comparisons of algal community structure, diversity and cell density and their response to calculated physical and chemical parameters around the glacial erratics will be discussed.

Crystal Scales (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, c-scales@onu.edu;


Zachary Bragg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, z-bragg@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


C01 Algae 3 - TOXICITY OF THE NOVEL ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT BENZETHONIUM CHLORIDE TO STREAM BIOFILM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TOXICITY OF THE NOVEL ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT BENZETHONIUM CHLORIDE TO STREAM BIOFILM Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are not typically removed by wastewater treatment plants, leading to contamination of freshwater systems and a variety of potential negative consequences for aquatic organisms. Among PPCPs, antimicrobials commonly used in household disinfectant products rank among the most frequently detected compounds in streams. Recently, the antimicrobial Triclosan, which can reduce growth of aquatic algae, has been phased out in favor of Benzethonium Chloride (BZT). However, the environmental impacts of BZT remain poorly understood. To assess BZT effects on aquatic algae, we measured biofilm growth on natural stone tiles in a controlled environment across three treatment levels (5, 50, and 500 ug/L) relative to a negative control. Five replicates for each treatment were sampled weekly for six weeks (ntotal = 120) and analyzed for chlorophyll a and ash-free dry mass. Preliminary findings show that the 500 ug/L treatment level had approximately 50% lower chlorophyll a than the control, while the other two treatment levels were more similar to the control. Our results suggest that biofilm growth is not substantially hindered by BZT at concentrations less than 50 ug/L.

Deven Korte (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, devenkorte@gmail.com;


David Janetski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


C01 Algae 4 - MULTI-MARKER METABARCODING ASSESSMENT OF BIODIVERSITY WITHIN STREAM BIOFILM COMMUNITIES ALONG AN ACID MINE DRAINAGE RECOVERY GRADIENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MULTI-MARKER METABARCODING ASSESSMENT OF BIODIVERSITY WITHIN STREAM BIOFILM COMMUNITIES ALONG AN ACID MINE DRAINAGE RECOVERY GRADIENT In southeastern Ohio, many stream miles have been exposed to acid mine drainage from legacy coal extraction. Reclamation of these streams has been met with varying success with some streams having achieved macroinvertebrate scores indicating good water quality while others have scores indicative of poor quality. In this study, we used four DNA markers and high through put sequencing to assess the biodiversity of the biofilm communities in three streams deemed improved not recovered and recovered and compared them with two unimpacted streams. We used two universal markers (16S and 18S), a marker specific for algae (UPA) and a marker to identify diatom diversity (rbcL). Ordination of the streams based on Bray-Curtis Index showed the unimpacted and recovered streams to be closely related, whereas the not recovered streams were more distance. Results showed a higher cyanobacterial and lower diatom abundance in the not recovered streams compared with the recovered and unimpaired streams. Analysis of the rbcL marker showed the presence of diatom taxa in the unimpaired and recovered streams that have been shown in previous research to indicate high water quality.

Morgan Vis (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio University, vis-chia@ohio.edu;


Daniel Wolf (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, dw845316@ohio.edu;


C01 Algae 5 - PATTERNS IN POLYPHOSPHATE STORAGE ACROSS A GRADIENT OF PHOSPHOROUS ENRICHMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PATTERNS IN POLYPHOSPHATE STORAGE ACROSS A GRADIENT OF PHOSPHOROUS ENRICHMENT Accurately assessing how algal-dominated biofilms in streams respond to anthropogenic phosphorous enrichment is crucial for the management and restoration of these ecosystems. Understanding phosphorous storage dynamics particularly in the form of polyphosphate can assist in creating more effective nutrient criteria. The purpose of this study was to examine polyphosphate storage dynamics across a gradient of agricultural impairment in 19 Pennsylvania streams. This study sought to determine the quantity of polyphosphate stored in response to phosphorous availability. There was a positive correlation between SRP and polyphosphate storage. The type of algal community also influenced polyphosphate storage where Cladophora-dominated algal assemblages had more polyphosphate. Results indicate that biofilms can store polyphosphate in both low and high phosphorus streams. It is possible that the presence of polyphosphate under oligotrophic conditions is indicative of a stress response to low phosphorus, while under extremely eutrophic conditions it is indicative of the use of phosphate as an energy source by polyphosphate-accumulating microorganisms.

Aaron Gordon-Weaver (Primary Presenter/Author), Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, amg43366@gmail.com;


Corey Conville (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, cjc37025@huskies.bloomu.edu;


Jennifer Tuomisto (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, jat8435@huskies.bloomu.edu;


Steven Rier (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, srier@bloomu.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 6 - COMPARATIVE ECOLOGY OF FRESHWATER FISH COMMUNITIES IN VINDHYA-SATPURA RIFT VALLEY AND HIMALAYAN FOOTHILLS IN INDIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARATIVE ECOLOGY OF FRESHWATER FISH COMMUNITIES IN VINDHYA-SATPURA RIFT VALLEY AND HIMALAYAN FOOTHILLS IN INDIA Despite their rich biodiversity, ecosystems (especially stream fish communities) in India are largely understudied. Here, we explore freshwater fish communities in very contrasting landscapes and investigate similarities in community structure and function. 20 stream sites were sampled in the states of Madhya Pradesh 'MP' (central India) and West Bengal 'WB' (Himalayan foothills in eastern India). Sampling was conducted during winter, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons between 2015 and 2017. Species accumulation curves indicate WB to be more speciose than MP. Fish diversity was highest in the pre-monsoon in both regions. Stepwise regression models reveal pH and water temperature as influential common environmental drivers. GLMMs (with season as a random factor), show no or very little effect of season on community structure. In terms of temporal dynamics, communities were found to be nested within each other, with one season acting as a source for community composition for other seasons. Our results reveal that similar environmental factors determine fish diversity and composition in these two regions, despite their geographical contrasts. This indicates towards likely occurrence of common mechanisms that drive fish community structure across diverse eco-regions.

Rubina Mondal (Primary Presenter/Author), Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, rubinamondal55@gmail.com;


Anuradha Bhat (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, anuradha.bhat@gmail.com;


18301_8310RubinaMondal.pdf

C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 7 - EFFECT OF SUSPENDED BENTONITE SEDIMENT ON FOUR SPECIES OF STREAM FISH (ETHEOSTOMA SPECTABILE, ETHEOSTOMA STIGMAEUM, NOTROPIS ATHERINOIDES, AND NOTURUS EXILIS)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECT OF SUSPENDED BENTONITE SEDIMENT ON FOUR SPECIES OF STREAM FISH (ETHEOSTOMA SPECTABILE, ETHEOSTOMA STIGMAEUM, NOTROPIS ATHERINOIDES, AND NOTURUS EXILIS) The effects of suspended sediment, a common freshwater pollutant, vary significantly between fish species, though past sediment research has tended to focus on salmonid species. An experimental set-up was modified from Sweeten (1996) to measure the growth and stress responses of four non-salmonid fish found in Ozark streams. Fish were held for 7 days in either 0 mg/L, 55 mg/L, 148 mg/L, or 430 mg/L of bentonite clay in a laboratory. Concentrations corresponded to a control, the 75th and 90th percentile sediment levels in Ozark Plateau streams, and a mean sediment concentration during high-flow events due to upstream construction. Percent weight change and cortisol levels were measured. Four trials, with 2 fish per species in each treatment level, were completed during an NSF-REU (n = 8). Both growth and stress response varied between species. Notropis atherinoides was most affected, as measured by both percent weight change and cortisol levels; Etheostoma spectabile performed better in the low concentration over the control. Next steps include replication to increase the sample size, so that a generalized linear mixed model can be used.

Andy Miller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oklahoma State University, andy.miller@okstate.edu;


Shannon Brewer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, shannon.brewer@okstate.edu;


Madison Bowe (Primary Presenter/Author), SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, mabowe@syr.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 8 - EFFECT OF HABITAT QUALITY ON ROUND GOBY (NEOGOBIUS MELANOSTOMUS) AND WHITE SUCKER (CATOSTOMUS COMMERSONII) IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECT OF HABITAT QUALITY ON ROUND GOBY (NEOGOBIUS MELANOSTOMUS) AND WHITE SUCKER (CATOSTOMUS COMMERSONII) IN STREAMS Habitat quality has implications for the health of stream biota and may differentially impact native vs. non-native species. To evaluate the impact of habitat on native and non-native fish, we compared the body condition of the native white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) and the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in relationship to habitat assessments. Habitat quality was assessed using a Rapid Habitat Assessment (RHA) over two years (2016 and 2017) in seven Michigan rivers. The RHA included an evaluation of ten physical properties including embeddedness, velocity, and pool variability. Fish health was determined using body mass to length ratios (condition factor) and liver mass to body mass ratios (liver index). Measures of fish health were then evaluated for correlation with the RHA (Pearson Correlation). No correlation was found between habitat quality and condition factor, but there was a strong negative correlation between habitat quality and liver indices of both species, potentially indicating physiological stress. Of the two species, white sucker had a stronger response to decreased habitat quality (larger relative liver mass) than round goby, suggesting the invasive species may be better equipped to deal with degraded environments.

Robert Roose (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, fz3467@wayne.edu;


Corey Krabbenhoft (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, ckrab@wayne.edu;


Donna Kashian (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, dkashian@wayne.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 9 - THE DIET OF SUNFISH FORAGING IN THE MILFOIL BEDS OF THE MENOMINEE RIVER WATERSHED, MICHIGAN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE DIET OF SUNFISH FORAGING IN THE MILFOIL BEDS OF THE MENOMINEE RIVER WATERSHED, MICHIGAN Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus and L. gibbosus) were collected from beds of mixed Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) and hybrid milfoil (M. spicatum x M. sibericum) from five reservoirs in the Menominee River watershed, MI, USA. The digestive tracts of the sunfish were preserved and contents identified. Chironomids were the dominant prey item in the diet of L. macrochirus whereas mollusks were the dominant prey item for L. gibbosus. Other major diet groups for L. macrochirus included plant material, beetles and mollusks. L. gibbosus also foraged heavily on chironomids and beetles. The milfoil beetle, Euhrychiopsis lecontei, which feeds on milfoil, was found in the digestive tracts of sunfish. However, based on the low percent of occurrence in the diet and on the low mean number of E. lecontei per sunfish, sunfish predation did not limit the milfoil weevil populations in this study. This appeared to be true even though resident populations of milfoil weevils were being augmented with milfoil weevil larvae and eggs. Terrestrial weevils from a root-feeding complex found in northern hardwood forests occurred in substantial numbers in the sunfish guts.

Mike Mendel (Primary Presenter/Author), Cedarville University, mmendel@cedarville.edu;


Jeff Niehaus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EnviroScience, Inc., JNiehaus @ EnviroScienceInc.com;


Rhonda Mendel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EnviroScience Inc., rmendel@enviroscienceinc.com;


Jamie Krejsa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EnviroScience, Inc., JKrejsa @ EnviroScienceInc.com;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 10 - SEGREGATED HABITAT USE BY JUVENILE AND ADULT TROUT IN A FLOODPLAIN SPRINGBROOK

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SEGREGATED HABITAT USE BY JUVENILE AND ADULT TROUT IN A FLOODPLAIN SPRINGBROOK Mobile consumers, like fish, utilize a range of habitats throughout their life cycles, often to satisfy dietary and energetic needs at different life stages. We examined the population distribution and demographics of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and rainbow-cutthroat hybrids (O. mykiss X clarkii bouvieri), by analyzing fish scales and generating size-at-age curves within two springbrook habitats on the Snake River floodplain, ID, USA: one experiencing periodic scour and one not scoured since 1997. We found that juvenile fish composed a greater proportion of trout occupying the scoured reach, while adults were more prevalent in the non-scoured reach. A complementary study of fish diets showed that juvenile trout were more reliant on a greater diversity of aquatic insects, whereas adult diets were dominated by fewer, and non-insect, prey. Taken together, the segregation in distribution and diets may reflect that the ability of trout to fulfill foraging needs may be linked to flow regime, as abundance and diversity of aquatic insects in these habitats are mediated by the frequency of scour.

James Paris (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stream Ecology Center, Dept. Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, parijame@isu.edu;


Colden Baxter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, baxtcold@isu.edu;


Rachel Brinkley (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, Brinrach@isu.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 11 - EFFECT OF ELEVATION IN ASSEMBLAGE FISH IN HIGH MOUNTAIN STREAMS, COLOMBIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECT OF ELEVATION IN ASSEMBLAGE FISH IN HIGH MOUNTAIN STREAMS, COLOMBIA The high mountain ecosystems have a low diversity of genus and a high endemism of the species. The streams andean in Colombia present the non-native specie like Oncorhynchus mykiss and the native species like Astroblepus. The objective of this study was to assess the diversity in Andean streams with introduced species and native species to different altitudes. The database of fish collections made by the GIZ in the Tolima department was used, this data covers 13 years (2003 to 2016). All the specimens are deposited in the Zoological Collection of the Universidad del Tolima (CZUT-IC). Three altitudinal ranges to assess diversity were established, the first (GI) between 1750-2000 m asl, the second (GII) between 2001-3000 m asl, and the third (GIII) elevations above 3000 m asl. For this the Hill numbers were used (q = 0, q = 1, q = 2), and the difference between the groups was analyzed by means of an NMDs and ANOSIM (p <0.05). Our results indicate that elevation plays an important role in fish assemblies at different heights, when the elevation increases a decrease of diversity occurs, and O. mykiis predominates in GIII.

Adriana Marcela Forero Céspedes (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Tolima, adrianam@ut.edu.co;


Francisco Antonio Villa Navarro (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Tolima, favilla@ut.edu.co;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 12 - INVASION BY A NATIVE SPECIES: CONSEQUENCES FOR POPULATION DYNAMICS AND DIET OF A NON-NATIVE SPECIES.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INVASION BY A NATIVE SPECIES: CONSEQUENCES FOR POPULATION DYNAMICS AND DIET OF A NON-NATIVE SPECIES. Invasive species have become established in some aquatic communities and these altered communities can persist through time. However, altered communities can themselves be subject to invasion by regionally native species. In a small pond with a long-established population of non-native western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), I examined the consequences of a natural invasion by the native longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis), on the population dynamics and diets of both fishes. In the two years post-invasion, mosquitofish declined as sunfish increased. Longear had a broader diet than mosquitofish; consuming crayfish, salamander larvae, mosquitofish, zooplankton, and macroinvertebrates. For prey items consumed by both fishes, cladocerans declined and chironomids increased in the diets of mosquitofish post-invasion. In contrast, the diets of longear showed no difference in cladoceran abundance between years, but chironomid abundance in the diets declined. Thus the invasion of the native longear sunfish had a negative effect on the abundance of the established non-native mosquitofish and altered their diet, suggesting that native longear have the potential to regulate populations of the non-native mosquitofish.

Jessica Rettig (Primary Presenter/Author), Denison University, rettig@denison.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 13 - ASSESSMENT OF TROPHIC INTERACTIONS AND DIETARY OVERLAP BETWEEN SMALLMOUTH BASS AND BROWN TROUT IN A PENNSYLVANIA STREAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ASSESSMENT OF TROPHIC INTERACTIONS AND DIETARY OVERLAP BETWEEN SMALLMOUTH BASS AND BROWN TROUT IN A PENNSYLVANIA STREAM Climate change is predicted to affect the distribution of fish, leading to novel species interactions and shifts in trophic position. Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), for instance, are in some areas expanding their range upstream and competing with cold water species. The purpose of our study was to determine the potential for competition between smallmouth bass and wild brown trout (Salmo trutta) using diet and stable isotope analysis. Diet items were obtained from 41 fish using gastric lavage, enumerated and categorized to the lowest taxonomic resolution possible (family or order), then analyzed using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). Fin clips were obtained from 29 brown trout and 26 smallmouth bass fish, dried and homogenized, and will be analyzed for 13C and 15N stable isotopes. Analysis of diet items shows little diet overlap between bass and trout, but nearly complete overlap between stocked and wild trout. Isotope analysis is expected to clarify ontogenetic changes in trophic role for each fish species. We anticipate our findings will be of interest of fisheries managers where brown trout and smallmouth bass may increasingly co-occur due to changing water temperature

Devin McClain (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , ttfw@iup.edu;


Eli Beal (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, vyvt@iup.edu;


David Janetski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 14 - DROUGHT EFFECTS ON ECOLOGICAL ENDPOINT CURVES IN A BIODIVERSITY HOTSPOT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DROUGHT EFFECTS ON ECOLOGICAL ENDPOINT CURVES IN A BIODIVERSITY HOTSPOT Regional geomorphic and ecological endpoint curves are valuable tools for effective stream restoration. In 2013 these tools were developed for the Piedmont of Alabama and in 2015 for the Appalachian Plateau of north Alabama, both of which are situated within the Mobile River Basin which harbors some of the richest freshwater diversity in the world. In 2016, this region was under one of the most extreme droughts in the last 10 years. How aquatic organisms respond to droughts and how natural disturbances influence restoration tools has been unclear. Our objective was to determine local community compositional shifts in response to drought and evaluate the effect of disturbance on ecological endpoint curves. In Summer 2017, fish and crayfish were collected post-drought within representative reaches of 18 Piedmont and 17 Appalachian streams ranging from 0.05–261 km2 drainage area using a Smith-Root LR-24 backpack electrofisher. Data suggest that fish assemblage structure and ecological endpoint curves were not different post-drought, although maximum catch per unit effort was lower in 2017. These preliminary findings suggest that fish were minimally influenced by drought and that regional ecological endpoint curves are robust to such disturbances.

Eric Bauer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, efb0005@tigermail.auburn.edu;


David Werneke (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, wernedc@auburn.edu;


Jon Armbruster (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, armbrjw@auburn.edu;


Brian Helms (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troy University, helmsb@troy.edu;


Corinthia Black (Primary Presenter/Author), Auburn University, coriblack@auburn.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 15 - FUNCTIONAL AND GEOGRAPHIC COMPONENTS OF RISK AND RARITY FOR STREAM FISHES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

FUNCTIONAL AND GEOGRAPHIC COMPONENTS OF RISK AND RARITY FOR STREAM FISHES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES As climate change outpaces the rate at which climate vulnerability and risk are assessed for most taxa, multispecies assessments are needed to evaluate the vulnerability of at-risk species to climate change. Geographic rarity and functional traits can dictate species’ vulnerability to altered environments, and thus may be useful to consider in such assessments. Here, we combine geographic rarity and traits-based approaches to evaluate the intrinsic risk of native freshwater fishes across the U.S. using publicly available and standardized data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). We selected N=124 species that represented the breadth of phylogeographic regions, geographic range sizes, functional and taxonomic diversity, and conservation status. We evaluated (1) geographic rarity by quantifying area-of-occupancy at multiple spatial scales, (2) species’ climate envelopes for the range of variability, seasonality, and magnitude of key climate factors that each target species may experience, and (3) functional diversity using species’ life history and ecological traits. We evaluated uncertainty in our estimates across geographic scales and metrics of intrinsic sensitivity. This research provides the foundation for an open access decision-support tool that can be used to prioritize conservation efforts for freshwater fishes.

Jennifer Smith (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, jensmith@vt.edu;


Abigail Benson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, albenson@usgs.gov ;


Jason Dunham (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, jdunham@usgs.gov;


Steffany Yamada (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, sayamada@vt.edu ;


Meryl Mims (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 16 - QUANTIFYING BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC HABITAT FEATURES TO GUIDE REPATRIATION OF SOUTHWESTERN NATIVE FISHES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

QUANTIFYING BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC HABITAT FEATURES TO GUIDE REPATRIATION OF SOUTHWESTERN NATIVE FISHES Altered flow regimes, degraded habitats, and non-native species threaten native fishes worldwide; those threats are magnified in the highly endemic fish assemblages of the arid American Southwest. Spikedace (Meda fulgida) and loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) are among the rarest of native fishes remaining in this region, occurring in only a handful of streams in the Gila River watershed. Translocations are integral to their conservation and have been conducted in several streams with varying degrees of success. Although general habitat preferences of these species are known, managers lack quantitative habitat metrics to help guide future translocation efforts. To address this knowledge gap, we surveyed streams to measure a suite of biotic and abiotic habitat variables hypothesized to limit spikedace and loach minnow populations. In both inhabited and potential repatriation streams lacking these species, we measured geomorphic, hydrological, macroinvertebrate, and stream productivity variables. We related these habitat variables to the abundance and composition of fish assemblages. A combination of physical habitat and production metrics were related to the presence of spikedace and loach minnow. These data will help prioritize new streams for spikedace and loach minnow repatriations.

Jack Torresdal (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern Arizona University, jdt292@nau.edu;


Rebecca Fritz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, rjf227@nau.edu;


Jane Marks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, jane.marks@nau.edu;


Benjamin Koch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ben.koch@nau.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 17 - ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA IN PREDICTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALASKAN FISH SPECIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA IN PREDICTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALASKAN FISH SPECIES Predicting species distributions at large regional scales is time and resource intensive. Using predictors derived from earth observations and presence/absence data based on environmental DNA (eDNA) may improve both modeling efficiency and accuracy. Traditionally, species distribution models (SDMs) are derived from data produced by catch-based methods, requiring large field crews and specialized equipment. However, the ease and modest expense of collecting eDNA should increase sample size and reduce false negatives – both of which should promote more accurate models. We compared performance of SDMs based on random forest models for arctic grayling and burbot. Models were applied to six combinations of data, differing in sample type (eDNA versus traditional) and size. Models built with catch data and eDNA performed similarly. Burbot eDNA models had AUCs from 0.58-0.78 and sensitivities between 29-54%. Models based on catch data had AUCs from 0.54-0.77 and sensitivities between 12-47%. Grayling eDNA models had AUCs from 0.61-0.77 and sensitivities between 88-97%. Models based on catch data had AUCs from 0.63-0.8 and sensitivities between 53-98%. The combination of eDNA and robust modeling should help managers predict the occurrences of species of concern at unsampled locations across regions.

James Eddings (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Watershed Sciences, National Aquatic Monitoring Center, and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan Utah 84322-5210, james.eddings@aggiemail.usu.edu;


Emily Campbell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, embug50@gmail.com;


John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


Torrey Rodgers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan Utah 84322-5210, torrey.w.rodgers@gmail.com;


Karen Mock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan Utah 84322-5210, karen.mock@usu.edu;


Charles Hawkins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Watershed Sciences, National Aquatic Monitoring Center, and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan Utah 84322-5210, chuck.hawkins@usu.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 18 - VARIABILITY OF TRACE-ELEMENT ACCUMULATION AMONG INVERTIVOROUS FISHES FROM A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM CONTAMINATED BY COAL COMBUSTION WASTE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

VARIABILITY OF TRACE-ELEMENT ACCUMULATION AMONG INVERTIVOROUS FISHES FROM A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM CONTAMINATED BY COAL COMBUSTION WASTE Invertivorous fishes are an important and diverse portion of fish communities in many stream systems. Species can differ in body form, mouth position, habitat utilization, and feeding strategy. Vertical zone typically inhabited by a species can range from remaining near the water’s surface, through being suspended in the water column, to living on or near the bottom. Even among bottom dwelling species, species may inhabit swift runs, whereas others live in depositional zones where higher levels of contaminants settle out. Feeding strategy can also influence the amount of sediment ingested. Such factors can influence contaminant exposure and subsequent accumulation resulting in significant variability among fish species. Coal combustion waste contamination exposes aquatic organisms to a broad array of metals and metalloids, consequently patterns of accumulation of multiple elements can be compared among species. We assessed accumulation of 20 elements in over 500 muscle samples distributed across 36 species of invertivorous fish collected from a coastal plain stream contaminated by coal combustion waste on the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site. Trace element accumulation differed among invertivorous fishes with differences both among and within body form and habitat use categories.

Brooke Lindell (Primary Presenter/Author), College of Charleston/Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, lindellbe@g.cofc.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 19 - FISH COMMUNITY ASSEMBLAGES IN THE OZARKS OF SOUTHERN MISSOURI

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

FISH COMMUNITY ASSEMBLAGES IN THE OZARKS OF SOUTHERN MISSOURI There are several potential mechanisms regarding fish community assembly, many of which can be related to habitat type. Basin and stream order can be important because some species are restricted to specific basin and some fish are only found in streams of certain sizes. Surrounding land use is another likely mechanism in structuring fish communities as it impacts stream habitat structure and water quality. We sought to assess the mechanisms of fish community assembly by comparing fish diversity in southwest Missouri, specifically asking 1) are fish communities structured by basin, 2) are they structured by stream order, and 3) how does land use at different spatial scales affect assemblage structure? We sampled 44 streams in the summer 2016 using a combination of seines and electroshocking. A total of 58 species were collected, including hornyhead chubs and duskystripe shiners that were found only in specific drainages, and smallmouth bass and striped shiners that were found in all three basins. Bray-Curtis distances between sites were calculated and used to determine whether the assemblages were structured by basin, stream order, land use, or a combination of these mechanisms.

Sean Maher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri State University, spmaher@missouristate.edu;


Stephanie Sickler (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri State University, sickler13@live.missouristate.edu;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 20 - SUSTAINABLE FRESHWATER RECREATIONAL FISHERY WITHOUT SUPPLEMENTAL STOCKING FARMED FISH IN JAPAN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SUSTAINABLE FRESHWATER RECREATIONAL FISHERY WITHOUT SUPPLEMENTAL STOCKING FARMED FISH IN JAPAN An important issue in the management of stream fisheries in Japan is the extent to which catch and release (C&R) regulations can be used to sustain a quality recreational fishery without the need for supplemental stocking. We examined this issue in the Itoshiro River, central Japan, where C&R regulation for salmonids was adopted in 2000, and stocking was discontinued in 2002. We compared fish populations under two treatments: sites that were C&R fishing only and sites where harvest was allowed under general fishing regulations. Fish were not stocked in the C&R sites but were stocked in the general regulation sites every year. We electrofished and estimated the fish populations across the treatments and found a significantly greater fish density in C&R sites compared to the sites with the general fishing regulation. Moreover, fish >15 cm in fork length comprised nearly 50% of the population in the C&R sites but 28% in the general regulation sites. There was no difference in angling pressure between the two treatments. These results suggest that a C&R regulation can be used to maintain a quality recreational fishery without the need to stock hatchery charr.

Yoshinori Taniguchi (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. Environmental Science & Technology, Meijo University, Japan, ytstone0727@gmail.com;


Yuya Nagasaki (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. Environmental Science & Technology, Meijo University, Japan, email 2;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 21 - EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL COVERING AND RESTORATION OF RIPARIAN GRASS ON TERRESTRIAL INVERTEBRATES SUPPLY AND AQUATIC ANIMAL COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL COVERING AND RESTORATION OF RIPARIAN GRASS ON TERRESTRIAL INVERTEBRATES SUPPLY AND AQUATIC ANIMAL COMMUNITIES Destroying riparian grass can negatively influence on aquatic communities, but few studies have experimentally shown it in a natural stream. We experimentally covered riparian grass using transparent vinyl and compared the impact on aquatic animals to the control section that had no cover. We then subsequently restored the riparian grass by removing the cover. We sampled terrestrial invertebrates input, population densities of fish, odonates, and crustaceans, and fish gut contents. The results showed that the biomass of terrestrial invertebrates supplied from the riparian grass decreased significantly in the treatment sections than in the control. Accordingly, the number of species and biomass of fish and crustaceans significantly decreased in the treatment sections by approximately 50%. Furthermore, following restoring riparian grass by removing the vinyl cover resulted in bouncing the population density of the aquatic animals back to the original condition. Covering riparian grass also affected the foraging by fish that utilized less on terrestrial invertebrates in the treatments but more on benthic invertebrates. This study suggests that destruction of riparian grass negatively influences on aquatic animals via decreased terrestrial prey for fish as well as less refuge for odonates and crustaceans.

Tsubasa Hamashima (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. Environmental Science and Technology, Meijo University, Japan, tbd@tbd.com;


Yoshinori Taniguchi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. Environmental Science & Technology, Meijo University, Japan, ytstone0727@gmail.com;


C02 Fish and Other Aquatic Vertebrates 22 - EXTREME PARENTING: OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A MEDIATOR OF THE TRADEOFF BETWEEN PARENTAL CARE AND FUTURE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN A MOUTHBROODING CICHLID FISH

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EXTREME PARENTING: OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A MEDIATOR OF THE TRADEOFF BETWEEN PARENTAL CARE AND FUTURE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN A MOUTHBROODING CICHLID FISH The investment in parental care is an energetically costly, yet fundamental aspect of the life history strategies in many species. Recently, oxidative stress has received attention as a potential mediator in the decision between caring for a current brood or investing in future reproductive success. During activities that increase metabolic activity, such as brood care, an overproduction of reactive oxygen species can occur that cannot be counteracted by antioxidants, leading to oxidative stress and tissue damage. Here we investigated the behavior of brood care on levels of oxidative stress in a mouthbrooding cichlid fish. In this species, females mate with territory defending males and hold the offspring within their buccal cavity for two weeks. In this study we used mixed-sex cichlid communities to observe how brooding and position within the brooding cycle influence levels of oxidative stress. We found that brooding females have significantly higher levels of oxidative stress than non-brooders, and significant fluctuations of oxidative stress occur throughout brood care, particularly following egg production and towards the end of the brooding cycle. Our study provides novel insights into the physiological cost of reproduction and parental investment.

Jacob Sawecki (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, sawec1j@cmich.edu;


Emily Miros (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, miros1er@cmich.edu;


Peter Dijkstra (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, dijks1p@cmich.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 23 - SUMMARY OF INSECT EMERGENCE FROM FINDLEY LAKE IN THE CONIFEROUS FOREST OF THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS, USA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SUMMARY OF INSECT EMERGENCE FROM FINDLEY LAKE IN THE CONIFEROUS FOREST OF THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS, USA Insects were collected in floating emergence traps on oligotrophic Findley Lake. The biomass that emerged in 1973 after an early thaw on 7 June was more than in 1974 after a late thaw on 31 July. Procladius and Orthocladius (Diptera: Chironomidae), Apatania zonella (Trichoptera: Apataniidae) and Suwallia pallidula (Plecoptera: Chloroperlidae) started to emerge from the sites that thawed early, even though the rest of the lake was still covered with ice. There was a large emergence of the zooplanktivore Chaoborus trivittatus (Diptera: Chaoboridae) each year which peaked only nine to thirteen days after the entire fishless lake had thawed. The detritivores Clistoronia magnifica, Limnephilus santanus and Halesochila taylori (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae) emerged from deeper water after an early thaw than after a late thaw. C. magnifica, L. santanus and Hesperophylax designatus (Limnephilidae) emerged during the summer stratification. H. taylori emerged at the start of the fall mixing. Ephemeroptera emerged from most depths during the fall mixing, except near some wet meadows. Somatochlora albicincta (Odonata: Corduliidae) emerged from the shore near the wet meadows each year. Aeshna palmata (Odonata: Aeshnidae) emerged from the entire shore in warm years.

Truman Sherk (Primary Presenter/Author), retired, tsherk@gmail.com;


Greg Rau (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), retired, ghrau@sbcglobal.net;


C03 Invertebrates 24 - COMPOSITION AND DIVERSITY OF MACROINVERTEBRATES OF A TROPICAL RESERVOIR, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPOSITION AND DIVERSITY OF MACROINVERTEBRATES OF A TROPICAL RESERVOIR, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA Benthic macroinvertebrates of Dandaru Reservoir were sampled at five stations monthly from April 2015 to March 2016 using van Veen grab (for open water biotope) and modified kick sampling method(for bankroot biotope). A total of 20 macroinvertebrates taxa comprising of 7,945 individuals were recorded in the reservoir during the period of study. Gastropods (76.4%) were the most abundant followed by insects (15.7%) and arachnids (0.89%) being the least. Melanoides tuberculata, Bellamya unicolor and Bulinus differed significantly (p< 0.05) between the sampling stations. More macroinvertebrates were encountered in the rainy season (51.6%). Mean Margalef’s Index (1.653± 2.12), Shannon diversity (0.395± 0.2,3), Evenness index (0.559±0..16) and Simpson dominance index (0.462± 0.08) were higher at station 1. The domination of the macroinvertebrate community structure of Dandaru Lake by pollution tolerant taxa and the low diversity index indicates the lake is under pollution stress. Keywords: Macrozoobenthos, Bankroot biotope, Diversity indices, Spatial variation

Adedolapo Ayoade (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Ibadan, kenpeadobece@gmail.com;


Olajumoke Nathaniel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Ibadan, nathanielolajumoke@gmail.com;


C03 Invertebrates 25 - LEGACY EFFECTS OF ABANDONED ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERING STRUCTURES ON STREAM HYDRAULICS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LEGACY EFFECTS OF ABANDONED ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERING STRUCTURES ON STREAM HYDRAULICS Habitat modifications from ecosystem engineering can have profound legacy effects on ecological processes and communities. Our research identifies a hydraulic effect stemming from net-spinning caddisfly (Hydropsychidae) retreat structures and describes the longevity of this effect over ecologically relevant timescales. We hypothesized that water velocity would be reduced immediately downstream (5mm) of caddisfly retreat structures and that this effect would diminish overtime if retreats were abandoned by their caddisfly. We measured water velocity in front of and behind retreats and then simulated abandonment by removing caddisfly larvae and measuring 8 times over a 45-day post abandonment period in an artificial stream. Water velocity was significantly lower behind retreats by as much 90%, suggesting retreats have strong effects on local hydraulics. Reductions in flow behind abandoned retreats were also maintained for 45 days suggesting a potential ecologically relevant legacy effect on near bed hydraulics. The legacy of these local changes to hydrology may provide important refugia for less flow-tolerant benthic macroinvertebrate taxa and especially to those with rapid life histories and high turnover rates. Future work will focus on defining the persistence of caddisfly structures in the field and rates of deterioration.

Zachary Maguire (Primary Presenter/Author), Montana State University, zmag1988@gmail.com;


C03 Invertebrates 26 - ESTIMATES OF NON-TANYPODINAE CHIRONOMID PRODUCTION IN THREE NEOTROPICAL HEADWATER STREAMS IN THE BRAZILIAN SAVANNA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ESTIMATES OF NON-TANYPODINAE CHIRONOMID PRODUCTION IN THREE NEOTROPICAL HEADWATER STREAMS IN THE BRAZILIAN SAVANNA Aquatic insects such as midges are important components of freshwater ecosystems. However, measuring their production is difficult due to their short development times and overlapping cohorts. We estimated production of non-Tanypodinae chironomid larvae in three headwater streams in the Brazilian savanna. Biomass was estimated from samples collected between October 2015 – September 2016, and we estimated assemblage-level growth rates (g) using two methods: a published temperature-specific model developed for temperate streams, and direct measurements of individuals placed in growth chambers in streams. For chambers, individual lengths were measured at the beginning, middle (7 days) and end (14 days) of the experiment. When growth values derived from the temperature-specific model and chambers were applied to biomass data, annual production estimates across the three streams ranged from 7.9 - 14.1, and 8.1 - 10.4 g ash-free dry mass m-² y-¹, respectively. Annual production to biomass ratios ranged from 24 - 26 with the temperature-specific model, and 16 - 28 with growth chambers estimates. No statistical difference was found between the two methods. Results suggest that the temperature-specific model developed in temperate streams may be reliably applied to some tropical streams.

José Mello (Primary Presenter/Author), University of São Paulo, josemello@sc.usp.br;


Daniel Abrahão (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, danielshs@usp.br;


Matt Whiles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Illinois University - Carbondale, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


Juliano Corbi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, julianocorbi@usp.br;


C03 Invertebrates 27 - COMPARISONS OF ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES ACROSS GOLF COURSE AND FOREST PRESERVE LENTIC ECOSYSTEMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARISONS OF ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES ACROSS GOLF COURSE AND FOREST PRESERVE LENTIC ECOSYSTEMS Golf courses are often one of the dominant green space habitats in suburban and urban landscapes. However, their role in contributing to local biodiversity is unknown. In particular, little information exists on differences of microinvertebrates, such as zooplankton, among lentic systems on golf courses and adjacent green spaces areas. Our objective was to characterize differences in abundance, diversity and species richness of zooplankton across lentic ecosystems in the Chicago Metropolitan area. We compared zooplankton communities across 55 lentic ecosystems ranging from permanent, fish-filled golf course ponds to permanent, fish-filled ponds within nature preserves to ephemeral, fishless natural wetlands between April to August 2017. We expect marked differences in zooplankton communities in lentic systems among these habitat types. For example, we hypothesize zooplankton communities (abundance, diversity and species richness) will differ across months and among habitat types. We suspect the highest abundance, diversity and richness will be seen in ephemeral wetlands in August and lowest in golf course systems in April. These data will help elucidate the degree to which golf course ponds harbor biodiversity compared to more natural adjacent systems.

Sarah Crites (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, scrites@luc.edu;


Joseph Milanoivch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


Jennifer Piacente (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago , jpiacente@luc.edu;


Joseph Milanovich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


Martin B. Berg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mberg@luc.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 28 - COMPARISON OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ACROSS GOLF COURSE AND FOREST PRESERVE LENTIC ECOSYSTEMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARISON OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ACROSS GOLF COURSE AND FOREST PRESERVE LENTIC ECOSYSTEMS Golf course ecosystems comprise large percentages of areas in suburban and urban dominated landscapes. These habitats could offer important areas for harboring biodiversity of native taxa, but biodiversity on golf course ecosystems is currently understudied. We compared macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity and species richness in 25 golf course permanent, fish-filled lentic ecosystems, 15 lentic permanent, fish-filled ponds, and 15 ephemeral wetlands located within adjacent forest preserves three times between April and August 2017. We hypothesize that abundance, diversity and species richness will differ markedly across months and among habitat types – with the highest richness, diversity and abundance found in ephemeral wetlands during June and lowest in golf course lentic systems in April. These data will provide insights on the importance of golf course lentic ecosystems to local biodiversity in suburban and urban areas.

Isabella Lentini (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, ilentini@luc.edu;


Joseph Milanoivch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


Jennifer Piacente (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago , jpiacente@luc.edu;


Joseph Milanovich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


Martin B. Berg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mberg@luc.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 29 - EFFECT OF SALINITY ON THE HATCHING OF BRANCHINECTA LINDAHLI PACKARD, 1883.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECT OF SALINITY ON THE HATCHING OF BRANCHINECTA LINDAHLI PACKARD, 1883. Utah is located in an arid desert environment, with many small isolated ephemeral or seasonal wetlands. As part of a multi-year study of a series of temporary rock pools in Three Peaks, UT, we studied the lifecycle and biology of Branchinecta lindahli Packard, 1883. These pools fill with rain or snow and then slowly evaporate until the next storm. Fairy shrimp only hatch when there is sufficient water. In this study, we looked at salinity as a hatching trigger. The effect of salinity on hatching rates of Branchinecta lindahli was examined using five salt (NaCl) concentrations ranging from 0 g/L to 4 g/L (N = 18). A significant negative relationship (p=7.03x10-3, R2 = 0.522) was found between salt concentration and the number of fairy shrimp hatched. This supports other studies looking at hatching cues as a survival mechanism of fairy shrimp in ephemeral habitats. The avoidance of abortive hatching suggests that fairy shrimp do use a bet-hedging strategy that allows them to survive and persist in temporary wetlands. Salinity is most likely a hatching trigger used in that strategy.

Nayla Rhein (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, nayla.rhein@gmail.com;


Fredric Govedich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, govedich@suu.edu;


Bonnie Bain (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dixie State University, bain@dixie.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 30 - AQUATIC INSECT EMERGENCE PRODUCTION FROM HYDROLOGICALLY ALTERED SECTIONS OF A LOW GRADIENT MIDWESTERN RIVER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

AQUATIC INSECT EMERGENCE PRODUCTION FROM HYDROLOGICALLY ALTERED SECTIONS OF A LOW GRADIENT MIDWESTERN RIVER Stream communities and the ecological processes they govern, are influenced by the physical template of lotic systems, particularly hydrology. The Cache River in southern Illinois has undergone several hydrologic alterations over the past century. In particular, construction of a ditch to the Ohio River dramatically changed hydrology and divided it into the upper Cache River (UCR) and lower Cache River (LCR). This resulted in increased water velocities and erosion in the UCR, and decreased flows and low dissolved oxygen in the LCR. To examine how hydrology influenced stream communities and associated ecosystem processes in the two sections, we sampled adult insect emergence in the UCR and LCR during summer through winter of 2017. There was no significant difference in the diversity of emerging insects between the UCR and LCR (p = 0.2). However, abundance (p < 0.0001), richness (p < 0.0001), and production (p < 0.0001) were all significantly higher in the UCR. This ongoing study will assess how hydrology in each river section ultimately affects ecological subsidies and riparian predators through changes in the availability and nutritional value of emerging adult aquatic insects.

Katie Heiden (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Illinois University, Katie.heiden@siu.edu;


Matt Whiles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Illinois University - Carbondale, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 31 - DISTRIBUTIONAL DECLINES OF TWO CRAYFISHES ENDEMIC TO THE WESTERN UNITED STATES DOCUMENTED BY COMPARING SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING TO FIELD SAMPLING

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DISTRIBUTIONAL DECLINES OF TWO CRAYFISHES ENDEMIC TO THE WESTERN UNITED STATES DOCUMENTED BY COMPARING SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING TO FIELD SAMPLING Our study evaluates the current conservation status of the pilose crayfishes Pacifastacus connectens and Pacifastacus gambelii, two data-deficient species endemic to the western United States. We first developed a species distribution model for the pilose crayfishes based on their historic occurrence records, then sampled 163 sites in the summers of 2017 and 2018 anticipated to be within the native range of these crayfishes, including 53 sites where these species were observed historically. Our species distribution model predicted 52% of sites we sampled as suitable for the pilose crayfishes based on historic occurrence records, but we found them at only 20 (12%) of the 163 total sites and 13 (24%) of 53 historic locations that we sampled. At 12 (22%) of these historic locations the invasive crayfish Faxonius virilis was present, suggesting that nonnative crayfishes have displaced these native crayfishes from some of their range. Our study provides an update to the conservation status of P. connectens and P. gambelii and characterizes critical habitats for the ongoing conservation of these crayfishes, which can be used to identify and prioritize areas where management should seek to protect existing populations.

Rachel Egly (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, egly2@illinois.edu;


Eric Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 32 - USING SECOND-GENERATION SEQUENCING TO INVESTIGATE ANTHROPOGENIC IMPACTS OF NYS RESERVOIRS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

USING SECOND-GENERATION SEQUENCING TO INVESTIGATE ANTHROPOGENIC IMPACTS OF NYS RESERVOIRS Changes in a landscape as a result of reservoir creation can alter interactions between organisms in surrounding areas. These changes can limit dispersal and gene flow around reservoirs; thereby isolating populations. This research uses an aquatic indicator species, Nigronia serricornis (Say) (Megaloptera: Corydalidae), to determine if the creation of reservoirs impacts gene flow between populations in the surrounding area. If gene flow patterns change over similar geographic distances on and off the reservoir for N. serricornis, other species may be similarly affected as well as ecosystem services provided by these aquatic communities. Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing was used on individuals from approximately equidistant populations on tributaries flowing into the Pepacton reservoir, in Downsville, New York, and those flowing directly into the Delaware River, downstream and unaffected by the reservoir. Initial data analysis revealed a possible genomic sampling bias in the relatively-new RAD sequencing technique. Upon completion, this research project will provide a better understanding of the impact of reservoir creation on aquatic species, which could better inform management and restoration practices, and propose a novel revision to RAD sequencing that should ameliorate genomic sampling bias in RAD analyses.

Emily Berezowski (Primary Presenter/Author), State University of New York College at Oneonta, bereem98@oneonta.edu;


Jeffrey Heilveil (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), SUNY College at Oneonta, heilvejs@oneonta.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 33 - THE IMPACT OF WOODY DEBRIS ON INTERMITTENT HEADWATER STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE IMPACT OF WOODY DEBRIS ON INTERMITTENT HEADWATER STREAMS This research project’s primary goal was to explore the relationships between large woody debris (LWD), biological integrity and bank stability within intermittent headwater streams in the Alleghany Plateau ecoregion. Ten streams with drainage basins ranging from 0.056 mi 2 to 0.28 mi 2 with predominantly forested land- use were selected with ranging amounts of LWD. LWD with a length greater than 0.5m and a width of .10m in the active channel was measured. LWD volume was compared to median particle size (D50), stream power index (SPI), unit stream power, gradient, and a modified bank erosion hazard index score (BEHI). LWD volume was also compared to a headwater macroinvertebrate field evaluation index score (Ohio HMFEI), and percentages of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera taxa. The LWD volumes ranged from 0 to 6 cubic meters. Contrary to the hypothesis, linear regressions, and correlations comparing LWD volume to physical and biological parameters revealed no significant correlations. This research finding suggests that naturally occurring LWD may have less impact compared to other landscape and channel variables within streams in this size stream in our ecoregion.

Gabrielle Russell (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio University, gr925615@ohio.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 34 - A BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR LAKE OF THE WOODS.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR LAKE OF THE WOODS. Lake of the Woods (LOW) is a large, international lake designated as impaired by the State of Minnesota due to excess nutrients and nuisance algal blooms. Concerns regarding eutrophication and future mining impacts prompted the need for management tools to help define areas of ecosystem impairment and monitor future changes. The goal of this study was to assess areas of potential anthropogenic impacts in LOW using a benthic macro-invertebrate reference condition approach model and identify factors correlating with these impacts. We also sought to provide baseline information prior to the initiation of increased mining activity in the basin. A Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) reference model was developed for LOW to compare the benthic community structure at a number of potentially stressed or impaired sites. The benthic community at some locations was found to be divergent from reference sites. As expected, benthic invertebrate diversity appeared to be most affected at sites that were deep, thermally stratified and high in nutrients thus making them prone to hypoxia. Benthic diversity was also negatively associated with higher concentrations of metals such as lead and arsenic.

Timothy Pascoe (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, Timothy.Pascoe@canada.ca;


Tana McDaniel (Primary Presenter/Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, Tana.McDaniel@canada.ca;


C03 Invertebrates 35 - STORM RETENTION PONDS; AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY IN A SEMI-ARID URBAN LANDSCAPE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STORM RETENTION PONDS; AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY IN A SEMI-ARID URBAN LANDSCAPE The City of Denton, located in a semi-arid region of Texas has over 200 manmade ponds within its city limits. Many of these ponds, located in densely populated areas, are engineered to control storm water runoff. There is a general lack of recognition of the value these waters contribute to regional biodiversity and as greenspaces. This study, conducted in Denton, is monitoring habitat variables and macroinvertebrate diversity in a series of ponds selected to represent a gradient of urban influences. The objective of this study is to identify the variables associated with the highest diversity. The study has determined that all the storm water ponds have high levels of diversity, but differ in taxa composition. The highest diversity and those with unique taxa were found in ponds with aquatic macrophytes. Conductivity was associated with urban influences. Results of this study are being used to develop a conservation plan for the city. The ponds are a benefit to the ecology of the city and provide beautiful, green spaces. If managed correctly, these systems can be incorporated into sustainable development in the future of the City of Denton.

Sabrina Moore (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, sabrinamoore2@my.unt.edu;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, james.kennedy@unt.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 36 - TRICHOPTERANS AS BIOMONITORS OF TRACE AND HEAVY METALS IN NORTHEASTERN OHIO URBAN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TRICHOPTERANS AS BIOMONITORS OF TRACE AND HEAVY METALS IN NORTHEASTERN OHIO URBAN STREAMS Macroinvertebrates are used as indicators of water quality and metal contamination through presence/absence bioindicator surveys. However, the absence of sensitive taxa only depicts their detriment and does not imply a cause. Likewise, the presence of tolerant taxa does not relay their level of environmental exposure to metals. Trichopterans display the most diverse feeding guilds and metal tolerance of the EPT taxa which make them ideal biomonitors for the presence of trace and heavy metals, including during storm events when other methods are not practical. Using Hester-Dendy samplers, aquatic macroinvertebrates collected from stream sites in the northeastern Ohio were identified to the lowest practical taxonomic level. Following identification, entire body digestion methods were performed on all Trichopteran individuals with body burdens for copper, zinc, lead, cadmium and iron quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Stream measurements of pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and the community-level macroinvertebrate survey paired with ICP-OES analyses (Cu, Zn, Pb, Fe, & Cd) of total suspended solids and filtered surface water were also analyzed for each site. Our preliminary results depict the presence of metals in Trichopteran tissues and their feasibility as biomonitors.

Sean Nussle (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, Snussle@kent.edu;


David Costello (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 37 - TEMPORAL VARIATION OF ECTOSYMBIONTS ON RUSTY CRAYFISH (ORCONECTES RUSTICUS) IN A HEADWATER STREAM IN WEST CENTRAL OHIO

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TEMPORAL VARIATION OF ECTOSYMBIONTS ON RUSTY CRAYFISH (ORCONECTES RUSTICUS) IN A HEADWATER STREAM IN WEST CENTRAL OHIO Ectosymbiotic organisms can have positive, negative or neutral effects on hosts. For crayfish, most ectosymbionts, such as algae and branchiobdellid worms, are thought to be commensal, but there is some evidence that the branchiobdellid-crayfish relationship can become parasitic with high worm densities. The purpose of this study was to document temporal variation in the prevalence and abundance of two prominent ectosymbionts on rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) over a three year period. During three consecutive fall seasons (2015 - 2017), one hundred crayfish were collected on each of three sampling dates from Hog Creek (Hardin County, Ohio, USA). Carapace length, sex, percent cover of a previously described epizooic chantransia stage (Thorea hispida), branchiobdellid presence and branchiobdellid abundance were recorded for each crayfish. Preliminary data from 2015 indicated that among males, branchiobdellid abundance and percent chantransia cover were positively related to size, perhaps due to greater surface area and less frequent molting. Statistical analysis of data from 2016 and 2017 are currently being employed to provide a more complete picture of the range of variation in ectosymbiont loads from year to year in Hog Creek.

Lauren Govekar (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, l-govekar@onu.edu;


Connor Ney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, c-ney@onu.edu;


Heather Lochotzki (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, h-lochotzki@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 38 - LEECHES (HIRUDINIDA) OF THE NORTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LEECHES (HIRUDINIDA) OF THE NORTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES Leeches (Hirudinida) are an important component of most freshwater lakes, ponds, and quieter flowing streams and rivers with many important species occurring in the north central United States. There are approximately one hundred described species in North America with the majority of these leeches being predators that feed on a variety of invertebrate prey including chironomids, oligochaetes, amphipods, and molluscs. Many other leech species are temporary sanguivorous (blood-feeding) ectoparasites of vertebrates including fish, turtles, amphibians, waterfowl, and mammals including humans. Leeches can be recognized by having segmented bodies (annelids) with anterior and posterior suckers. They feed by a variety of methods, including: using a proboscis, engulfing their prey, and biting, with either two or three jaws. Identification of leeches can often be difficult due to problems with properly collecting and preserving specimens and the specialized nature of keys. The goal of this presentation is to provide information on how to collect, preserve and identify freshwater leeches as well as provide updates relating to recent changes in leech classification relating to the north central United States, however, most of this will also apply to other parts of North America.

Fredric Govedich (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, govedich@suu.edu;


Bonnie Bain (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dixie State University, bain@dixie.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 39 - COMPARING THERMAL TOLERANCES OF TROPICAL AND TEMPERATE ZONE AQUATIC INSECTS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARING THERMAL TOLERANCES OF TROPICAL AND TEMPERATE ZONE AQUATIC INSECTS Organisms have optimal temperature ranges for physiological function. Climate change may push organisms beyond their optimal range, shifting community composition and potentially ecosystem function. The critical thermal maximum (CTmax)—the temperature at which an organism’s physical function is compromised—provides a relative measure of taxon sensitivity to increasing temperatures, and values have not been widely determined for tropical stream macroinvertebrates. We explored differences in thermal tolerance between tropical and temperate-zone stream insects from La Selva Biological Station (Costa Rica) and Missouri (USA). CTmax values were determined by placing individual insects in centrifuge tubes in a water bath while increasing the temperature 1°C per minute until loss of righting response. At the order level, CTmax values were significantly lower for tropical taxa than for temperate taxa. At the family level, CTmax values were significantly lower for tropical vs. temperate-zone Perlidae, but did not differ with ecoregion for Calopterygidae or Libellulidae. Related taxa had similar CTmax rankings in Missouri and La Selva, indicating that thermal tolerance is a phylogenetically conserved trait. Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera showed the highest thermal sensitivity, making them potential bioindicator taxa for changes in thermal regimes.

Rebecca Prest (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri Western State University, rprest@missouriwestern.edu;


Ben Allen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri Western State University, ballen11@missouriwestern.edu;


Carissa Ganong (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri Western State University, carissa.ganong@gmail.com;


C03 Invertebrates 40 - AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF NEOPHYLAX RICKERI CASES AND LARVAE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF NEOPHYLAX RICKERI CASES AND LARVAE Trichoptera contain a variety of case-building insects whose larvae exist in ecosystems which have different materials and water conditions that impact case development. We studied Neophylax rickeri to determine the spatial measurements of the case and larval dimensions (length, width, and average large rock size). We measured bodies and cases using an ocular micrometer or digitally on scanned images of caddisflies using ImageJ. We plotted the relationship between case length and body length and grouped them into instars. A comparison between case length and average rock length revealed that the largest cases included the largest ballast stones on the case, widest at the anterior. The linear correlation between the case widths of the middle region and the average width of the caddisfly was observed. Another way that we characterized the cases was by measuring the ballast stones (weight and shape) from cases of the same stream but different months. This exploratory study of Neophylax cases offered an investigative take on larvae and case relationships while we also conducted analytical studies of cases themselves with no associated larvae.

Jessica Garcia (Primary Presenter/Author), UC Berkeley, jgarciareyes@berkeley.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 41 - STREAM BIOASSESSMENT IN THE CLAY-PLAIN REGION OF SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO- OPTIMIZING SAMPLING AND LABORATORY ASSESSMENT METHODS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STREAM BIOASSESSMENT IN THE CLAY-PLAIN REGION OF SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO- OPTIMIZING SAMPLING AND LABORATORY ASSESSMENT METHODS Macroinvertebrate community composition can effectively indicate stream ecological condition because the taxa present vary in their tolerance to perturbations. The Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Information Network (CABIN), and Ontario Benthic Biomonitoring Network (OBBN) were both developed to assess streams with riffle-pool morphology using a D-frame dip net for field sampling and the Marchant Box for laboratory subsampling. However, these protocols have limited in their ability to effectively assess the condition of southwestern Ontario streams, which are slow-flowing, straight, and have mud or clay substrates. We evaluated sampling with a Petite Ponar grab and laboratory processing using nested sieves as alternatives. Five Clay Plain streams in southwestern Ontario were sampled by kick sampling with a 500-um mesh D-frame net, and with a petite Ponar grab. Samples were sorted using both a Marchant Box and nested sieve subsampling protocols. The D-frame net collected a wider range of taxa than Ponar grabs, and nested sieves subsampled macroinvertebrates more time-effectively and accurately for subsampling than the Marchant Box. We recommend using modified CABIN and OBBN protocols to most effectively assess the ecological condition of these Clay Plain streams.

Alyssa Frazao (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Windsor, frazao@uwindsor.ca;


Jan Ciborowski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, cibor@uwindsor.ca;


Katie Stammler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Essex Region Conservation Authority, kstammler@erca.org;


C03 Invertebrates 42 - FLOOD SCOURING AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY PROCESSES IN COSTA RICAN HEADWATER STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

FLOOD SCOURING AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY PROCESSES IN COSTA RICAN HEADWATER STREAMS Changes in climate predictions indicate that storm events are likely to become more intense but also more frequent. These disturbances are important because of their influence in shaping community structure and function. Gaining an understanding of how ecological communities respond to and recover from disturbances is therefore key. Recovery dynamic are applicable in tropical pre-montane streams as frequent rainy season floods alter abiotic conditions and biological communities. Scientists measure community reestablishment after floods by contrasting the effects of stochastic (i.e. neutral) and deterministic (i.e. niche theory) assembly processes. I tested this question with a controlled experiment in headwater streams in Costa Rica by diverting floodwaters from bifurcated channels and examining changes in benthic and leaf-litter macroinvertebrates. No differences were revealed between invertebrate communities in channels with and without floodwaters. However, perMANOVA revealed differences with time. This study fails to support the importance of flooding in structuring tropical macroinvertebrate communities and did not support deterministic assembly in high disturbance conditions. However, the significant temporal signature corresponds to the progression of the rainy season and suggests that communities change as floods progress. The Herrick Aquatic Ecology Research Grant funded this research project.

EmmaLeigh Given (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University , egiven1@kent.edu;


Savannah Justus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, sjustus1@vt.edu;


Ferenc de Szalay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, fdeszala@kent.edu;


Oscar Rocha (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, OROCHA@KENT.EDU;


C03 Invertebrates 44 - COMPARING SPECIES RICHNESS AND TAXONOMIC DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES IN RESTORED AND NATURALIZED AGRICULTURAL DITCHES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARING SPECIES RICHNESS AND TAXONOMIC DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES IN RESTORED AND NATURALIZED AGRICULTURAL DITCHES In the Midwest, agricultural ditches are designed to efficiently move excess water, nutrient and sediment away from fields to prevent flooding and enhance agricultural productivity. Conventional ditches are maintained through dredging, which reduces habitat quality and ultimately limits biodiversity and abundance of freshwater invertebrates dependent on benthic habitat. Unmaintained ditches often experience bank failure, which leads to natural floodplains and meanders, possibly resulting in improved ecological conditions. Alternatively, the two-stage ditch jumpstarts naturalization by constructing inset floodplains that promote nutrient and sediment retention during high flows. To test the effect of naturalization and floodplain restoration on biological integrity, we quantified the abundance and richness of macroinvertebrates using multiple Hess samples from contrasting sites in the Shatto Ditch Watershed (Kosciusko Co., IN) during Summer 2017. Both insect abundance and richness were significantly higher in the naturalized reach, which coincided with improved stream substrate (i.e., higher proportion of pebble and gravel) compared to the two-stage ditch. Overall, allowing streams to naturalize may be more useful for restoring biological integrity, while two-stage ditches may optimize nutrient and sediment retention.

Matt T. Trentman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, mtrentma@nd.edu;


Edward Lopez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, edward.lopez.121@nd.edu;


Jennifer L. Tank (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, tank.1@nd.edu;


Anna-Sophie Hoppe (Primary Presenter/Author), Eckerd College, ahoppe@eckerd.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 45 - NEOPHYLAX RICKERI CASE AND LARVAE MEASUREMENTS USED TO OBSERVE CASE BUILDING STRATEGIES WITHIN ONE STREAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

NEOPHYLAX RICKERI CASE AND LARVAE MEASUREMENTS USED TO OBSERVE CASE BUILDING STRATEGIES WITHIN ONE STREAM Members of Trichoptera are case-building insects whose larvae live in aquatic habitats with different available building materials as well as flow conditions that may affect case construction. We studied the cases of Neophylax rickeri using measurements of the case (length, width, average large rock size, and dimensions of the ballast stones) and the associated larvae using an ocular micrometer or digitally on scanned images of caddisflies using ImageJ. We plotted the relationship between case length and body length determined instar groups. A comparison between case length and average rock length revealed that the largest cases included the largest ballast stones on the case, widest at the anterior. The case widths of the middle region and the average width of the caddisfly were positively correlated. We also compared the size and the shape of ballast stones from cases in the same stream but in different months to determine if caddisflies altered their building strategy in response to seasonal hydrological changes in the stream.

Patina Mendez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, patina.mendez@berkeley.edu;


Jessica Garcia (Primary Presenter/Author), UC Berkeley, jgarciareyes@berkeley.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 46 - MAPPING THE CURRENT RANGE OF SPECIES IN THE GENUS MACROBRACHIUM ACROSS TEXAS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MAPPING THE CURRENT RANGE OF SPECIES IN THE GENUS MACROBRACHIUM ACROSS TEXAS Four species of genus Macrobrachium are found in the freshwaters of the coterminous United States: Macrobrachium ohione (endemic), M. carcinus, M. acanthurus, and M. olfersii. Once widespread, they have been functionally extirpated from the majority of their range. However, they are still abundant in parts of coastal Texas. Macrobrachium undergo annual migrations from the estuaries to inland waters. Gravid females migrate to the estuary to release eggs and then juveniles migrate upstream into freshwater ecosystems. Establishing baseline information on the range and migratory habits for the genus in North America is important to understand their ecological role and the consequences of their severe range retraction. We performed monthly surveys in three Texas coastal plain streams with Macrobrachium populations to track migratory movement of the fauna. To assess the species ranges, we assembled all available records from published papers and archived specimens collected by the University of Texas Biodiversity Center into a spatio-temporal database of occurrences. Archived specimens were re-identified in lab to confirm taxonomic identity. These observations were then georeferenced and appended to the National Hydrography Dataset Version 2 to develop a river network range for each species.

Alexander Solis (Primary Presenter/Author), Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi, alexander.tr.solis@gmail.com;


Christopher Patrick (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas A&M University–Corpus Ch, christopher.patrick@tamucc.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 47 - QUANTIFYING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TAILWATER MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY AND SECONDARY PRODUCTION

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

QUANTIFYING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TAILWATER MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY AND SECONDARY PRODUCTION Tailwater fisheries are frequently food limited due to both low macroinvertebrate diversity and food resources that are not readily available or optimal. Improvements to the foodbase often involve attempts to increase production of existing prey or to diversify the foodbase, or both. The latter approach assumes that a more diverse foodbase will be more temporally stable and productive, thus supporting greater fish densities or biomass. However, the relationship between diversity and secondary production has not been extensively studied for freshwater macroinvertebrates, and the few studies that exist have been limited to small, relatively un-impacted systems. We used a spatial gradient in diversity among long-term monitoring stations on the Green River below Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah to quantify relationships between macroinvertebrate diversity and secondary production. We calculated secondary production at each station on a monthly basis for one year and compared the results to metrics of diversity. We hypothesize that the predominance of high density, multivoltine taxa immediately below the dam will result in no net change in secondary production despite downstream increases in diversity. Results will refine our understanding of biological controls on tailwater fisheries management in regulated western rivers.

Matt Schroer (Primary Presenter/Author), BLM/USU National Aquatic Monitoring Center, Department of Watershed Sciences, Utah State University, mattschroer@gmail.com;


Scott Miller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), BLM/USU National Aquatic Monitoring Center, Department of Watershed Sciences, Utah State University, scott.miller@usu.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 48 - TOLERANCE TO PH DECLINES OF MACROINVERTEBRATES FROM SEASONALLY ACIDIFIED TROPICAL STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TOLERANCE TO PH DECLINES OF MACROINVERTEBRATES FROM SEASONALLY ACIDIFIED TROPICAL STREAMS Acidification frequently has negative impacts on aquatic macroinvertebrates, and drought-driven acidification events of increasing frequency and severity are expected due to climate change. These events may expose even well-adapted macroinvertebrate taxa to acidification regimes beyond their tolerance levels. In lowland Costa Rica, poorly-buffered tropical streams may exhibit extremely low pH levels (<4.5) during seasonal acidification events. We conducted laboratory mesocosm experiments at La Selva Biological Station to determine the thresholds of acidification effects on growth and survival of leptophlebiid mayflies (Traverella holzenthali) and paleomonid shrimp (Macrobrachium olfersi) from a poorly-buffered stream and larval chironomids (Chironomidae) from a poorly-buffered (pH 4.3-6.9) vs. a naturally well-buffered (pH 5.1-6.9) stream. Chironomids were unaffected by pH regimes above 3.5, indicating tolerance to pH levels in the poorly-buffered stream during natural seasonal acidification. Mayflies and shrimp showed decreased tolerance to the lowest pH levels (3.6-4.0) recorded after a previous extreme dry season, suggesting that increasingly severe extreme acidification events might negatively affect their survival. Our findings are not only relevant to lowland Neotropical streams, but also signal the need for further research in lotic ecosystems worldwide where drought-driven pH declines are probable in the future.

Carissa Ganong (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri Western State University, carissa.ganong@gmail.com;


Minor Hidalgo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Organization for Tropical Studies, minor.hidalgo@tropicalstudies.org;


Catherine Pringle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 49 - THE IMPACT OF A JULY 2017 FLOOD EVENT ON BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN TRIBUTARIES AT THE HUBBARD BROOK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE IMPACT OF A JULY 2017 FLOOD EVENT ON BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN TRIBUTARIES AT THE HUBBARD BROOK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST In July 2017, a major storm impacted the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), with heavy precipitation resulting in high runoff, streamflow, and erosion. Preliminary peak stage height data from HBEF suggest that the observed flows during this event may fall within the top ten highest values on record at some locations. Sections of six tributaries that had just been sampled for benthic macroinvertebrates in the week before this storm event were resampled between 3-4 days afterward. Overall macroinvertebrate densities collected in these samples decreased by half from the pre- to post-storm period. Changes in community composition between the pre- and post-storm samples are discussed, as well as patterns in the abundance and diversity of macroinvertebrates in the same sample areas by early August 2017.

Kerry Yurewicz (Primary Presenter/Author), Plymouth State University, klyurewicz@plymouth.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 50 - VARIABILITY IN REPLICATE BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE SAMPLES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

VARIABILITY IN REPLICATE BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE SAMPLES Benthic macroinvertebrates are the most widespread tool for assessing the biological quality of freshwater and have been used for decades in environmental assessment. Although benthic macroinvertebrates have been used for a long time, the study of variability between replicate samples has not been assessed. Matched-paired replicate Hess samples were collected within a specific habitat and time of year from the San Miguel River in Colorado, Red River in New Mexico, and multiple stream locations in West Virginia. Replicate samples were analyzed for the overall effects of sampling variation for a range of commonly used metrics.

Kimberly Gerlock (Primary Presenter/Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., kgerlock@geiconsultants.com;


Jamie Carmon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants Inc, jcarmon@geiconsultants.com;


Craig Wolf (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., cwolf@geiconsultants.com;


Jeniffer Lynch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jlynch@geiconsultants.com;


C03 Invertebrates 51 - LOCAL EFFECTS OF WOOD-ADDITION ON STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATES IN GUNN CREEK, OREGON, USA.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LOCAL EFFECTS OF WOOD-ADDITION ON STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATES IN GUNN CREEK, OREGON, USA. Historically, much of the natural woody debris in streams has been removed due to forestry and management activities in the pacific Northwest of North America. Modern restoration plans include the addition of woody debris back into the streams. The objective of this project to evaluate the potential effects of recent wood additions on macroinvertebrate communities in Gunn Creek. We collected samples three replicated surber samples in four riffles above and four riffles below the woody debris woody addition. We conducted a similar procedure at Palmer Creek, our reference site, where there has not been an addition of woody debris. We will sort and identify specimens up to family taxonomic level. We expect to see most significant changes in aquatic invertebrate’s communities (densities and species composition) in close proximity to the wood addition. This effect will decrease in both downstream and upstream directions. We will also explore potential effects on species richness. And the consequences for higher trophic levels.

TeLa Branstetter (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University , branstet@oregonstate.edu;


William Gerth (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, william.gerth@oregonstate.edu;


Ivan Arismendi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries & Wildlife, ivan.arismendi@oregonstate.edu;


C03 Invertebrates 52 - ANNUAL THERMAL PARTITIONING IN CHIRONOMID EMERGENCE FROM AN URBAN TROUT STREAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ANNUAL THERMAL PARTITIONING IN CHIRONOMID EMERGENCE FROM AN URBAN TROUT STREAM Chironomids display thermal partitioning on an annual basis with different taxa emerging under specific temperature regimes in streams. Research on chironomid emergence indicates that similarities in emerging taxa decrease over time as the amount of time between emergences increases. In Southeastern Minnesota, cold-adapted taxa predominantly emerge during the winter, and warm-adapted taxa typically emerge during spring and summer. Thus, the composition of emerging taxa changes over the course of a year. This study assesses the similarities and rate of change in emerging chironomid taxa across study months in an urban trout stream. The trout stream, located in South Central Minnesota, was assessed from July 2006 to June 2007. Similarities and rates of change in emerging chironomid taxa were quantified using Jaccard’s Similarity Index. On average, 48.1% of emerging taxa were shared between adjacent months. In contrast, an average of 23.1% of taxa were shared between months that were half a year apart. Months with the most contrasting air temperatures (e.g. July and January) had the largest rate of change between comparisons (100% different). Our results indicate that the taxonomic composition of emerging chironomids differs more as time between emergences increases.

Corrie Nyquist (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, nyqui095@umn.edu;


Leonard Ferrington, Jr. (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, ferri016@umn.edu;


C04 Microbial Ecology 53 - DISCOVERING THE MUSSEL BED MICROBIOME

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DISCOVERING THE MUSSEL BED MICROBIOME Heterotrophic microbes play critical roles in nutrient cycling, changing biologically unavailable nutrients into accessible forms which supports autotrophic production. The interactions between assemblages of microbes (microbiome), multicellular organisms that host them, and the environment are understudied, especially in freshwater systems. Freshwater mussels (Unionoida) link water column and sediment microbiomes through filter feeding and aerobic and anaerobic sediments by burrowing, and thus are a good study system to investigate microbiome-host-environment interactions. Freshwater mussels play important roles in nutrient cycling by biodepositing feces and pseudofeces (mucus encapsulated rejected food particles) that are rich in N, and recent works shows they also promote the proliferation of anammox cycling bacteria in the sediment. To investigate linkages between mussels and microbiome composition, in summer of 2017 we collected mussel fecal samples and sediment samples from plots in the Kiamichi River that were part of a larger experiment. We have sequenced the v4 region of the 16s RNA gene for analysis. We predict there will be an increase in sediment microbial species specializing in nitrogen removal within the mussel bed and that sediment microbiomes will most closely resemble the fecal microbiome of the closest mussel species.

Edward Higgins (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, higginse@ou.edu;


Thomas Parr (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, Thomas.parr@ou.edu;


Caryn Vaughn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, cvaughn@ou.edu;


C05 Unionid Ecology 54 - PYGANODON GRANDIS DOMINATES MUSSEL ASSEMBLAGES IN NORTHERN PRAIRIE POTHOLE LAKES AND RESERVOIRS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PYGANODON GRANDIS DOMINATES MUSSEL ASSEMBLAGES IN NORTHERN PRAIRIE POTHOLE LAKES AND RESERVOIRS Native freshwater mussels (Family: Unionidae) have been described as the most imperiled group of freshwater animals on Earth. However, few studies have documented mussel occurrence and distribution from northern prairie lakes and reservoirs. We conducted the first survey of South Dakota prairie lakes and reservoirs to evaluate species occurrence and relative abundance. Two person-hour timed searches were conducted in 116 randomly selected lakes and reservoirs stratified by major river basin. Seven species of Unionidae and one species each of Dreissenidae and Corbiculidae were recorded from our survey. Pyganodon grandis comprised 80% (1,770 shells) of total species abundance across all sites and occurred within 38% of surveyed lakes. There were a large number of live P. grandis in reservoirs (45%) compared to natural lakes (27%). Frequency of P. grandis among major river basins ranged from 0-58%. P. grandis was both more common and size distribution larger from reservoirs versus natural lakes. Survey results suggest that northern prairie basins currently support only a few species of Unionidae, with assemblages dominated by the generalist P. grandis. Current efforts focus on P. grandis age and growth variation as a function of lake trophic status.

Katherine M. Wollman (Primary Presenter/Author), South Dakota State University, katherine.wollman@jacks.sdstate.edu;


Nels H. Troelstrup, Jr. (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), South Dakota State University Department of Natural Resource Management, nels.troelstrup@sdstate.edu;


C05 Unionid Ecology 55 - DETERMINING THRESHOLD ELEMENTAL RATIOS (C:P) OF THE ALABAMA RAINBOW MUSSEL (VILLOSA NEBULOSA) USING GROWTH OBSERVATIONS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DETERMINING THRESHOLD ELEMENTAL RATIOS (C:P) OF THE ALABAMA RAINBOW MUSSEL (VILLOSA NEBULOSA) USING GROWTH OBSERVATIONS The C:N or C:P at which consumer growth limitation switches from one element to the other is the threshold elemental ratio (TER), and is the dietary elemental mixture at which organisms achieve optimal growth. Though bionenergetics models are available to determine TERs mathematically, growth observations have been shown experimentally to be a more accurate method. TERs have been studied extensively in cladocerans and modelled in many aquatic taxa, but freshwater mussels have been largely excluded from this area of research. Mussels (Family Unionidae) are an integral component of aquatic ecosystems and, because they are among the most globally imperiled taxa, it is imperative that we understand factors influencing their survival and persistence. The primary objective of this study is to use an observational growth experiment to determine the threshold C:P ratio for the Alabama Rainbow mussel, Villosa nebulosa. For six months we will feed one year old individuals a diet of algae cultured at four P levels across a gradient to determine the C:P ratio of algae that produces optimal growth in the mussels. The TERC:P will be the treatment with the highest growth rate during the experimental period.

Monica M. Winebarger (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alabama, mmwinebarger@crimson.ua.edu;


C05 Unionid Ecology 56 - STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF THE FOOD WEB ECOLOGY OF ENDEMIC FRESHWATER MUSSELS (UNIONIDAE) IN CENTRAL TEXAS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF THE FOOD WEB ECOLOGY OF ENDEMIC FRESHWATER MUSSELS (UNIONIDAE) IN CENTRAL TEXAS Unionid mussel populations are declining as a result of various anthropogenic stressors. The increased awareness of their ecological function and their imperiled status has driven greater concern for mussel conservation. Although it is widely assumed that mussels are filter-feeders, much remains unknown regarding their food and feeding relationships. Understanding their feeding ecology is necessary to further understand their role in ecosystem processes, the causes of their decline and to aid in propagation and relocation programs. In this study, we use stable isotope analysis (13C, 15N) to assess multiple food resource categories including fine particulate organic matter associated with benthic sediments (FPOM), suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM), aquatic plants, and coarse detrital organic matter (CPOM). We collected seasonal tissue samples from three endemic Texas species (Cyclonais petrina, Cyclonais houstonensis and Lampsilis bracteata), and potential food source samples from the site of mussel collections across four basins. Mussel 13C and 15N values suggested that all three mussel species were feeding similarly. The majority of the carbon assimilated appeared to be derived from detrital CPOM, while SPOM and FPOM played relatively minor roles in the contribution to dietary carbon.

Kaelyn Fogelman (Primary Presenter/Author), Auburn University , kjf0021@auburn.edu;


C05 Unionid Ecology 57 - EFFECTS OF THERMAL STRESS AND HYPOXIA ON METABOLIC PATTERNS OF TWO CANDIDATE MUSSEL SPECIES FROM CENTRAL TEXAS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF THERMAL STRESS AND HYPOXIA ON METABOLIC PATTERNS OF TWO CANDIDATE MUSSEL SPECIES FROM CENTRAL TEXAS Rising temperatures and altered flow regimes in river systems may negatively impact aquatic organisms inhabiting them. Rare mussel species may be at particular risk from thermal stress and hypoxia due to limited range and mobility. We used closed respirometry to test the effects of thermal stress and hypoxia on two candidate species from Central Texas Cyclonaias houstonensis and Cyclonaias petrina, and whether these effects differed between subpopulations. Temperatures ranged from 15 to 36°C. Our main objectives were to determine how metabolic demand, and the ability to meet this metabolic demand, changed as temperatures rose and dissolved oxygen decreased from normoxic to anoxic conditions. Metabolic rates increased linearly with temperature for both species at each location, with C. houstonensis from the Colorado River exhibiting the highest rate of increase. However, neither the ability to regulate, nor the DO threshold below which mussels switched from aerobic to anaerobic respiration changed significantly with temperature. These results suggest that a main effect of rising temperatures is to increase the risk of food limitation, particularly for the C. houstonensis subpopulation in the Colorado River. Sensitivity to hypoxic conditions remained relatively constant with increasing temperatures.

Austin Haney (Primary Presenter/Author), Auburn University, arh0093@auburn.edu;


Brian Helms (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troy University, helmsb@troy.edu;


James Stoeckel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, jimstoeckel@auburn.edu;


C05 Unionid Ecology 58 - USING PONDS AND RESERVOIRS AS “GROW OUT” FACILITIES FOR FRESHWATER MUSSEL (UNIONIDAE) RESTORATION IN THE DELAWARE RIVER WATERSHED

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

USING PONDS AND RESERVOIRS AS “GROW OUT” FACILITIES FOR FRESHWATER MUSSEL (UNIONIDAE) RESTORATION IN THE DELAWARE RIVER WATERSHED Freshwater mussels play an important role in maintaining healthy freshwater ecosystems and can be used as reliable indicators to evaluate water quality, habitat diversity and bottom stability in streams and rivers throughout the US. As filter feeders, mussels significantly reduce seston in the water thereby influencing water quality. Researchers from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, and the Philadelphia Water Department have been involved in freshwater mussel restoration efforts throughout southeastern Pennsylvania and Delaware, including propagating mussels at The Mussel Hatchery in Philadelphia. One of the greatest challenges to the success of many propagation programs is the need for adequate “grow out’” sites, where juvenile mussels can be relocated and held until they reach a size whereby they can be transplanted into local streams. We present preliminary data on the survivorship and growth of transplanted adult Elliptio complanata and Utterbackiana implicata and juvenile Utterbackiana implicata in several different lentic environments, a description of different types of installations used for overwintering mussels, and the merits and challenges of using ponds and reservoirs as grow out facilities.

Roger Thomas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Patrick Center for Environmental Research, rlt47@drexel.edu;


Kathryn Longwill (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Patrick Center for Environmental Research, kab543@drexel.edu;


Danielle Kreeger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Partnership for the Delaware Estuary; The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Patrick Center for Environmental Research, dkreeger@delawareestuary.org;


Kurt Cheng (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, kcheng@delawareestuary.org;


Lance Butler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Philadelphia Water Department, Lance.Butler@phila.gov ;


Christopher Vito (Primary Presenter/Author), The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, Patrick Center for Environmental Research, cev34@drexel.edu;


C06 Large River Ecology 59 - A COMPARISON OF THREE COMMON BENTHIC SAMPLING METHODS AND THEIR EFFICACY FOR COMMUNITY ANALYSES IN AN IMPOUNDED RIVER SYSTEM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A COMPARISON OF THREE COMMON BENTHIC SAMPLING METHODS AND THEIR EFFICACY FOR COMMUNITY ANALYSES IN AN IMPOUNDED RIVER SYSTEM In the summers of 2007-2010, the Spokane Tribe of Indians collected benthic macroinvertebrates (BMIs) from the Upper Columbia River using three techniques: benthic sled, drift, and artificial substrates. An analysis of the samples collected by these methods revealed significant discrepancies in the types of organisms caught. Benthic sled and drift methods collected mainly planktonic taxa, primarily small crustaceans.This varies significantly from the community structure of the artificial substrate samples (p<0.001), which contained primarily Cnidarian polyps (Hydra sp.), and Chironomids. Collectively, these two taxa made up an average of 93.6% of the individuals in artificial substrates in 2007, and 63.7% in 2010. Though artificial substrate samples were less diverse than samples collected by other methods (p<0.001), the samples contained more benthic oriented taxa. These data suggest that, of the methods presented, artificial substrates are most applicable to the study area, as they provided a more accurate representation of BMI assemblages with little or no overlap with the zooplankton community.

Sarah Hindle (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Washington University, shindle@eagles.ewu.edu;


Ryan Reihart (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Dayton, Reihartr1@gmail.com;


Camille McNeely (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Washington University , camillemcn@gmail.com;


Andy Miller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Spokane Tribe of Indians , amiller@spokanetribe.com;


C06 Large River Ecology 60 - RANGIA CUNEATA IN THE LOWER NECHES RIVER, REVISITED: THE EFFECT OF A PERMANENT SALTWATER BARRIER ON A BRACKISH INDICATOR SPECIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RANGIA CUNEATA IN THE LOWER NECHES RIVER, REVISITED: THE EFFECT OF A PERMANENT SALTWATER BARRIER ON A BRACKISH INDICATOR SPECIES The estuarine clam, Rangia cuneata, invaded the upper reaches of the lower Neches River as it was dredged in the early to mid-1900s. Adult clams are tolerant of a wide range of disturbances, but require a salinity pulse to spawn. The construction of the Lower Neches River salt water barrier in 2003 eliminated salinity pulses in a portion of the river. We surveyed the Neches River above and below the barrier in 2016 and compared our results to rangia data collected in the 1950's, 1980's and 1990's, when rangia beds dominated the lower river, with few other bivalves present. The lack of salt-water pulses lead to drastic decreases in clam abundance above the barrier. The few individuals present were large and old, likely settling during pre-barrier spawning events. We developed a salinity-flow model broken-stick regression model and estimated when salinity conditions would facilitate spawning, which corresponded with cohort ages in rangia beds below the barrier. The loss of rangia above the barrier has allowed other freshwater unionid species to become established in areas that they may not have inhabited for over 100 years.

Matthew Pyne (Primary Presenter/Author), Lamar University, mattpyne@hotmail.com;


Ana Christensen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lamar University, christenab@lamar.edu;


C07 Lentic Ecology 61 - CYANOBACTERIAL BLOOMS IN OLIGOTROPHIC LAKE SUNAPEE, NH, AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR LAKE PHOSPHORUS CYCLES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CYANOBACTERIAL BLOOMS IN OLIGOTROPHIC LAKE SUNAPEE, NH, AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR LAKE PHOSPHORUS CYCLES Cyanobacterial blooms are on the rise worldwide, including in economically important, low nutrient, clear-water (LNCW) lakes where they have not historically been reported. Because cyanobacteria can transport sediment phosphorus (P) into the water column during recruitment from benthic resting stages, we hypothesized that cyanobacterial blooms are key sources of P to LCNW lakes during the summer stratified season. We tested this hypothesis in oligotrophic Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire, by comparing P loading by the large colonial cyanobacterium Gloeotrichia echinulata to external P loading via 11 tributaries during summers 2005-2017. Depending on assumptions, our estimates of potential P loading via Gloeotrichia recruitment range from <0.1 to ~3 kg P/summer. Although this represents a small fraction of the estimated annual P loading via streamflow (~800-2100 kg), cyanobacteria-mediated P loading occurs during late summer when external loading is much lower (~1-3 kg for each of the 5 smaller inflows vs. 6-25 kg for the larger ones). Given that cyanobacteria-derived P can fuel growth of other phytoplankton and decrease resilience to external perturbations, scientists and lake managers should consider the potential impacts of internal recycling by cyanobacteria on P cycles in oligotrophic lakes.

Kathryn Cottingham (Primary Presenter/Author), Dartmouth College, kathryn.l.cottingham@dartmouth.edu;


Nicole Ward (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, nkward@vt.edu;


Bethel Steele (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, steeleb@caryinstitute.org;


Holly Ewing (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bates College, hewing@bates.edu;


Kathleen Weathers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, weathersk@caryinstitute.org;


Cayelan Carey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, cayelan@vt.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 62 - STRESS RESPONSE OF A COMMON FISH TO CHANGING URBAN STREAM TEMPERATURES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STRESS RESPONSE OF A COMMON FISH TO CHANGING URBAN STREAM TEMPERATURES Urban streams often have higher average and more variable temperatures than forested streams. However, the effects of anthropogenically influenced water temperatures on fish condition are not well understood. We propose to quantify the impacts of urbanized stream temperatures on the physiological stress response of Creek Chubs. We will use growth rates and blood-glucose levels to measure stress responses in a 6-week laboratory experiment. The treatment group will be subjected to a diurnal temperature profile that simulates urban stream temperatures of Columbus, Ohio and the control group will be subjected to a constant 21 °C, the optimal growth temperature for Creek Chubs. Results from a preliminary trial (with the control group held at a constant 14°C) suggested that increased temperature variability was related to increased growth rates, but blood-glucose levels showed no significant changes. We anticipate that subjecting fish to a temperature regime that mimics an urban stream during summer, rather than spring, will likely prompt decreased growth rates and elevated blood-glucose levels. Relationships between urban temperature profiles and Creek Chub would indicate that less thermally tolerant species may be at high risk from shifting temperature regimes in urban streams.

Levon Bajakian (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, bajakian.1@osu.edu;


Daniel Symonds (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, desymond3@gmail.com;


S. Mazeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 63 - THE ABUNDANCE AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF LAKES AND PONDS IN CENTRAL VIRGINIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE ABUNDANCE AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF LAKES AND PONDS IN CENTRAL VIRGINIA Historically large lakes have received the majority of research effort and because of this we know more about the ecology and function of large lakes than we do about smaller systems. More recently, the potential for small lakes and ponds to have significant impacts on watershed processes is being realized and this has led to more research on the ecological function of small ponds and lakes. In order to effectively scale up individual pond studies to larger geographic areas, there needs to be an accurate description of the abundance and size distribution of ponds and lakes within watersheds. We are using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the abundance and size distribution of lotic water bodies in the Appomattox River watershed in central Virgina. Preliminary results, show that the average density of lakes is 76 km-2 and that there are more lakes in the 0.00 to 0.01 km2 size category than all other size categories combined. These results show that small ponds are the numerically dominant lentic habitat in central Virgina and likely to be an important component of watershed function in this region.

Jonathan Milisci (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University, jonathan.milisci@live.longwood.edu;


Kenneth Fortino (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, fortinok@longwood.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 64 - NUTRIENT FLUX AND URBANIZATION IN LOW GRADIENT BAYOU SYSTEMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

NUTRIENT FLUX AND URBANIZATION IN LOW GRADIENT BAYOU SYSTEMS Urbanization encroaching into low gradient bayou systems currently has unpredictable effects. Bayous often do not have measurable flow, even drying periodically during the year. Therefore, in-stream processes rather than watershed landcover features may exert greater influence on bayou nutrient concentrations than land-use alone. This is due to a lack of connectivity between landscape and stream channels. The White Oak Bayou has experienced an 8% increase in urbanization in the last 7 years, and phosphorus and nitrogen levels tend to be elevated within bayou wetlands. Although residential and commercial landcover predicted some variation in nutrient concentrations, much variation is unexplained. Season is an important variable for predicting flux due to connectivity being lost or established from intermittency. Therefore, we predicted urban area would better estimate seasonal nutrient flux within catchments. Nutrient flux is predicted to increase linearly across a gradient of watershed urbanization. Catchments with average discharge of 0.2 m3/s, elevated total nitrogen (0.7-1.1 mg/L), and total phosphorus (0.1-0.35 mg/L) would have the highest flux. We will present landcover and nutrient flux models to enhance the understanding of bayou responses to rapid urbanization.

Danielle Braund (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Central Arkansas, dbraund1@cub.uca.edu;


Stephanie Stoughton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas, stoughton54@gmail.com;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 65 - PREDATOR - PREY INTERACTIONS OF WATER MITES FROM THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ARE REVEALED BY NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING, CLASSIC TAXONOMY, AND DNA BARCODING

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PREDATOR - PREY INTERACTIONS OF WATER MITES FROM THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ARE REVEALED BY NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING, CLASSIC TAXONOMY, AND DNA BARCODING Water mites are aquatic arachnids and are found in most bodies of water except Antarctica. Considered carnivorous, water mites feed by liquefying their prey and then ingesting the digested material into their mid gut. Despite their abundance and obvious important ecological roles, hypotheses concerning diet have been based mainly on laboratory feeding experiments and not on the gut contents of water mites freshly collected from nature. In this study, we collected water mites from the field and immediately preserved them in ethanol. Extracted DNA was then analyzed using next generation sequencing of cytochrome oxidase I (COI) DNA barcodes to study the molecular composition of the gut contents. Here we describe water mite prey biodiversity (chironomids; also other organisms, especially oligochaetes, reported in another abstract). Identification of chironomids was further enhanced in the present study with new taxonomic studies and COI barcodes (Sanger sequencing) of adult chironomids. This work represents the first use, to our knowledge, of next generation sequencing to understand water mite diet composition.

Adrian Vasquez (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, avasquez@wayne.edu;


Patrick Hudson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, phudson@usgs.gov ;


Katherine Gurdziel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, gurdziel@wayne.edu;


Divya Yerramsetty (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, yerrams1@msu.edu ;


Jeffrey Ram (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, jeffram@wayne.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 66 - EFFECT OF ROAD SALT APPLICATION ON SEASONAL WATER CHEMISTRY IN SOUTH-CENTRAL INDIANA STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECT OF ROAD SALT APPLICATION ON SEASONAL WATER CHEMISTRY IN SOUTH-CENTRAL INDIANA STREAMS To prevent the harmful impacts to aquatic and riparian life that could occur as the result of road salt application, more research is needed in regions where urbanization is occurring and road density is high. We monitored 4 different streams in south-central Indiana located in watersheds that vary in degree of urbanization. Grab samples were collected and analyzed for major anions and cations, and electrical conductivity was measured in-situ at each stream regularly during the non-winter season and at least weekly during the winter season. During the winter season, if precipitation occurred (in the form of rain or snow), samples were collected before, during, and after the event. Initial results show that conductivity, which can be directly correlated to chloride concentrations, increased during winter precipitation events. For example, specific conductivity at a heavily urbanized site the evening before a winter storm event was 1581 µS/cm @25C, and it increased to 3324 µS/cm during the event. In contrast, a less urbanized stream had a specific conductivity of 855 µS/cm @25C the evening before precipitation occurred and it increased to 1022 µS/cm during the event.

Anna M. Starks (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University Bloomington, starksam@iu.edu;


Todd V. Royer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University Bloomington, troyer@indiana.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 67 - THE EFFECTS OF BEAVER DAMS ON CONDUCTIVITY IN URBAN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE EFFECTS OF BEAVER DAMS ON CONDUCTIVITY IN URBAN STREAMS High conductivity is common in urban streams, whether due to human wastewater, road salting, or general non-point source pollution, and is easily measured by municipalities as a proxy for more expensive water quality parameters. Beaver populations are rebounding throughout the US and seem well adapted to living in urban streams. Beaver-created ponds and wetlands provide ideal sites for microbial processes that could remove many of the ions contributing to conductivity in urban streams. We deployed pairs of conductivity loggers in two urban stream-wetland systems in Atlanta, GA, USA to explore the potential for beaver activity to improve water quality at these sites. Conductivity consistently decreased as the stream flowed through the beaver pond. This change was particularly pronounced following storms: storms led to a decrease in conductivity throughout the system, and the increase in conductivity following storm flow was significantly greater upstream of the beaver dam than downstream. These patterns demonstrate the potential for beaver activity to help restore water quality in urban streams and suggest that urban watershed managers should consider allowing beavers to remain or even fostering their colonization of impacted streams.

Logan Williams (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, lwilli16@ggc.edu ;


Elizabeth Sudduth (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, esudduth@ggc.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 68 - URBAN STREAMS IN PUERTO RICO: EFFECT OF CHANNELIZATION ON HABITAT CONDITION AND DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

URBAN STREAMS IN PUERTO RICO: EFFECT OF CHANNELIZATION ON HABITAT CONDITION AND DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATES Channelization is a common form of stream degradation in urban areas that negatively affects ecosystem function and diversity. In Puerto Rico, stream channelization is a common occurrence in urban areas, often in response to flooding. However, we know little about their impact. The objective of our study was to assess habitat condition in channelized sections and how that condition translates into impacts on the diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates. We characterized three channel types in the Río Piedras Watershed, San Juan, Puerto Rico: 1) complete concrete channelization, 2) intermediate channelization, mostly channelized section that became degraded and have heterogeneous benthic substrate; and 3) reference channels without channelization. At each site we assessed stream condition using the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP-PR), Family Biotic (FBI-PR) and BMWP-PR. The three channel types were significantly different among themselves and formed a gradient of degradation. Channelized sites were classified as impaired and had the lowest biodiversity. In contrast, natural channels were in good conditions and supported high diversity. Overall, channelization negatively affects stream ecosystems eliminating habitats, reducing riparian zones, and supporting reduced biodiversity. However, deterioration of channelized section recover their diversity.

Natalia Rodriguez-Ortiz (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras Campus, lalapr7@gmail.com;


Alonso Ramirez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


C08 Urban Ecology 69 - COMPARISONS OF STOICHIOMETRY IN THE MOSQUITO AEDES ALBOPICTUS ACROSS URBAN-RURAL GRADIENTS IN SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARISONS OF STOICHIOMETRY IN THE MOSQUITO AEDES ALBOPICTUS ACROSS URBAN-RURAL GRADIENTS IN SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is an invasive mosquito species that is of medical importance due to its aggressive biting behavior and ability to vector viruses such as dengue and Zika. Aedes albopictus breeds in natural and artificial freshwater habitats such as tires and cemetery vases. Since May 2017, The University of Southern Mississippi and The Mississippi State Department of Health have collaborated to determine distributions of container mosquito species by collecting and identifying larvae from locations across an urban-rural gradient in five Southern Mississippi counties every two weeks. Aedes albopictus from these locations were reared to adult to analyze carbon and nitrogen stoichiometry. Our data show no differences in C, N, and C:N across population densities (p>0.05) or across counties (p>0.05), but N did vary across time (p<0.05) whereas C and C:N did not (p>0.05). These results show that there are no stoichiometric differences across urban and rural environments or across counties, but that stoichiometry could vary across time with analysis of future months. As mosquito performance and disease transmission are affected by mosquito stoichiometry, these results may contribute to a broader understanding of mosquito-borne disease in nature.

Catherine Dean (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Southern Mississippi , catherine.dean@usm.edu;


Nicole Mackey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, nicole.s.mackey@usm.edu;


Wendy Varnado (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Mississippi State Department of Health , wendy.varnado@msdh.ms.gov;


Donald Yee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, donald.yee@usm.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 70 - SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL HETEROGENEITY IN ORGANIC CARBON WITHIN A SEMI-ARID URBAN STREAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL HETEROGENEITY IN ORGANIC CARBON WITHIN A SEMI-ARID URBAN STREAM Modification of landscapes due to urbanization has led to extensive changes in the amount, sources, and transport of carbon to streams. Changes to vegetation alter the quantity and quality of organic C inputs while changes to land cover and hydrologic networks affect the transport of C to streams. However, the effects of urbanization on C dynamics in streams are inconsistent across studies, and there is likely substantial variation in C inputs and transport even within single urban watersheds. To address this variation, we collected synoptic water samples every 200 m along an urban stream in Pocatello, ID to identify spatial patterns of dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations and relate these to land use, land cover, and stormwater infrastructure within a single watershed. These spatial samples were combined with high frequency measurement of fluorescence dissolved organic matter (fDOM) at two locations within the stream network to understand temporal variation in C transport at event to seasonal time scales. Initial results suggest significant heterogeneity in organic carbon concentrations over both space and time that are related to urban land cover characteristics.

Sophie Hill (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, hillsoph@isu.edu;


C08 Urban Ecology 71 - URBAN PONDS: AN EXCELLENT RESOURCE FOR DRAGONFLY DIVERSITY.AND CONSERVATION.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

URBAN PONDS: AN EXCELLENT RESOURCE FOR DRAGONFLY DIVERSITY.AND CONSERVATION. The City of Denton is rapidly expanding its urban footprint in north central Texas. As infrastructure is developed, stormwater retention ponds are often built as mitigation measures. These ponds, valued as green spaces, are often overlooked as sources of biodiversity and ecosystem services. In March 2017, a study of the aquatic insect’s diversity found within a series of six ponds located along an urbanization gradient began. The objective of this study, a subset of a larger project, was to identify catchment, habitat and environmental characteristics and estimate their net influence on the diversity of the dragonflies (Odonata). To date, nearly 40 species of dragonflies (Anisoptera) and damselflies (Zygoptera) have been identified. While the number of species found in each pond is similar, the composition differs. Body size and wing asymmetry also varies in some species common across the ponds. Changes to odonate population characteristics are related to the quality of the pond’s catchment area and diversity of the aquatic and terrestrial vegetation. Study results are being used to develop an integrated catchment management plan to maximize the aquatic diversity of the ponds.

Gillian Graham (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, GillianGraham@my.unt.edu;


Sabrina Moore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, sabrinamoore2@my.unt.edu;


Karina Barbosa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, KarinaBarbosa@my.unt.edu;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, kennedy@unt.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 72 - TRIOPS INTERACTIONS: DRIVERS AND FEEDBACKS IN PLAYA LAKE COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TRIOPS INTERACTIONS: DRIVERS AND FEEDBACKS IN PLAYA LAKE COMMUNITIES Triops (tadpole shrimp: Crustacea: Notostraca) play an important role in shaping ephemeral pond community structures, which is illustrated by their predatory behavior and their habitat-shaping bioturbation behavior. The physiologies and population dynamics of Triops vary greatly through the course of each hydroperiod and may be influenced by competitive and environmental pressures within the ephemeral pond community. In our study, we examined what drives Triops diet shifts, how Triops shape the invertebrate community, and how the invertebrate community feeds back to impact Triops populations. We used laboratory microcosms to sample invertebrate communities emerging from soil collected from several dry playa lakes. The size, fecundity, and body condition of Triops were measured at the end of the two-week hydroperiod. Our results indicate that Triops size and egg production have the potential to increase with higher temperatures and longer daylengths. Triops were smaller when Triops densities and fairy shrimp densities were higher. These results suggest that Triops growth and egg production is controlled by an interaction between intraspecific competition, interspecific competition with fairy shrimp, and environmental conditions.

Mitchell Van Dyke (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, vandykemw15@uww.edu;


Brian O'Neill (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, oneillb@uww.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 74 - EVALUATING MECHANISTIC COMPONENTS OF INVERTEBRATE PRODUCTIVITY TO ASSESS POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WETLANDS OF THE ARCTIC COASTAL PLAIN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EVALUATING MECHANISTIC COMPONENTS OF INVERTEBRATE PRODUCTIVITY TO ASSESS POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WETLANDS OF THE ARCTIC COASTAL PLAIN On the Arctic Coastal Plain, wetlands – including deep troughs, shallow polygons, and larger coalescent ponds – provide important invertebrate forage for fish and bird species. Unlike wetlands at more southern latitudes, however, there is little ecological information about Arctic wetland invertebrates, and factors that regulate their abundance are poorly understood. Yet this type of knowledge is needed to accurately predict how wetland-dependent fish and wildlife will respond to changing environmental conditions across the Arctic. To address questions related to invertebrate ecology and climate-mediated changes in productivity of Arctic wetlands, we collected data from 33 wetlands in northern Alaska and specifically tested for linkages between water chemistry, autotroph abundance, temperature, and abundance of key nektonic taxa. Our results show that abundances of these invertebrates vary considerably within and across wetlands, and that accurate assessments of abundance require careful consideration of this variability. Although factors that influence invertebrate abundance are variable among taxa, groups that represent key food items for consumers (Diptera, Branchiopoda) became less abundant as pond temperatures increased, suggesting that direct effects of ongoing climate change on Arctic wetland invertebrates may have consequences for consumers that prey upon them.

Kirsty Gurney (Primary Presenter/Author), Environment & Climate Change Canada, kirsty.gurney@canada.ca;


Mark Wipfli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, mwipfli@alaska.edu;


Joshua Koch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, jkoch@usgs.gov;


Joel Schmutz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, jschmutz@usgs.gov;


Joshua Schmidt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. National Park Service, joshua_schmidt@nps.gov;


C09 Wetland Ecology 75 - MIGRATORY HABITS OF MACROINVERTEBRATES IN EPHEMERAL PLAYAS IN COLORADO

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MIGRATORY HABITS OF MACROINVERTEBRATES IN EPHEMERAL PLAYAS IN COLORADO Playas are small ephemeral bodies of water found in the Southern Great Plains of the US. They usually exhibit a vegetated ring around the perimeter and a clear patch in the middle. Throughout their hydroperiod, the water dries up causing it to shrink in size. The questions this project poses are: 1) is there an aquatic invertebrate community difference between the edge and the middle areas and 2) do organisms whom reside in the edge areas move inward as the playa dries up? Samples were taken from several playas throughout the hydroperiod. Samples were taken at the edge of the playa as well as in the middle at each location on each day. Macroinvertebrates were then identified to genus (if possible). While total number of invertebrates did not vary significantly across vegetated edge and the clear middle habitat, there were significant community differences. There were higher abundances of collector-gathering macroinvertebrates. Regarding community composition through the hydroperiod, there is a clear fluctuation in the communities. With some, the abundances increasing, while others go down. With most, it is not consistent throughout all of the playa sites.

Marisa Vargas (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, vargasmi01@uww.edu;


Brian O'Neill (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, oneillb@uww.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 76 - THE EFFECTS OF FLOODING ON THE GROWTH OF BALD CYPRESS IN FRESHWATER RESTORED WETLANDS.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE EFFECTS OF FLOODING ON THE GROWTH OF BALD CYPRESS IN FRESHWATER RESTORED WETLANDS. Understanding the changes happening in forested coastal wetlands is critical to planning successful wetland restoration projects. Bald cypresses (Taxodium distichum) are commonly planted in restored wetlands in this region because they are native to eastern NC, play a major role in the ecology of wetlands, and are commercially viable to propagate. The question remains whether this species will be resilient to the effects of increased flooding due to sea level rise. This study examined the effects of water level on the growth of bald cypress trees. We compared the diameter at breast height (DBH) of 258 bald cypress trees in 2017 to measurements collected in 2012 in a restored wetland. Sampling plots were grouped in three classes: “low” (<10 cm), “intermediate” (10-30 cm) and “high” (>30cm), according to their water depth. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences in tree growth between water level classes. Using linear regression, water levels did however have a negative effect on the DBH of bald cypress trees in the studied region. This suggests that an increase in water levels have a detrimental effect on the growth of bald cypress trees.

Eleazer Reyna Ocampo (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University, erocampo@ncsu.edu;


Matthew Stillwagon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, mgstillw@ncsu.edu;


Marcelo Ardon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, mlardons@ncsu.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 77 - MILLPONDS AND MALARIA IN THE NEW WORLD - A CLOSER LOOK AT BENJAMIN RUSH'S CLAIMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MILLPONDS AND MALARIA IN THE NEW WORLD - A CLOSER LOOK AT BENJAMIN RUSH'S CLAIMS Malaria has been historically a disease of both tropical and temperate climes. In 1785 New England physician, Benjamin Rush wrote a short essay on the causes of the disease in the American colonies. The essay, “An inquiry into the causes of the increase of bilious and intermitting fevers in Pennsylvania”, presents an ecological argument for mitigating the spread of a disease that wasn’t clearly understood at the time. Rush believed the disease arose from “mill-ponds”. Most of his contemporaries, however, following the traditions of the Old World, where intermittent fevers were associated with brackish water, ignored his important observation. Because mosquitoes were not known to vector the disease until the end of the 19th Century, the ecological differences between the Old and New World species went unnoticed, along with Rush’s insights. Our focus is the demographic ecology of malaria in the American Colonies. Through literature review including the identification of counties with high levels of mill ponds, maps of malaria by county, and anecdotal documented cases, we are constructing a clearer image of the association between malaria and mill ponds and Rush's claims.

Agueda Rodriguez (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, aguedamrodriguez47@gmail.com;


Spencer Wells (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College of William and Mary, sswells@email.wm.edu;


Samuel Wells (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, samuelwells@suu.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 78 - THE EFFECTS OF BEAVER ACTIVITY ON AMMONIUM AND NITRATE IN URBAN STREAM WATERS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE EFFECTS OF BEAVER ACTIVITY ON AMMONIUM AND NITRATE IN URBAN STREAM WATERS The purpose of this research is to study the effects of beaver activity on water quality an urban stream-wetland system in Atlanta, Ga, USA that was impacted by development activity. This is conducted by gathering water samples from different areas throughout the stream and wetland and analyzing the nitrate and ammonium levels over 2 years. Nitrate was determined using a new spectrophotometric method, and the results were compared to samples analyzed on an ion chromatograph. In general, there was no clear evidence of consistent nutrient removal due to the beaver activity in the system, but the changes in nutrient concentrations suggest evidence of nitrification occurring in the stream and of denitrification occurring in the wetland. Continued beaver activity in the system could be expected to increase movement of streamwater through the wetland, enhancing denitrification. However, the high flashiness of this urban stream tends to damage beaver dams or remove them entirely with every storm event, likely limiting the effectiveness of these urban beavers in nutrient removal.

Tiandra Manns (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, tmanns1@ggc.edu;


Elizabeth Sudduth (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, esudduth@ggc.edu;


Thomas Gluick (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, tgluick@ggc.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 79 - DRAGONFLY AND DAMSELFLY (ODONATA) BIODIVERSITY IN INTERDUNAL WETLANDS AT SAUGATUCK HARBOR NATURAL AREA, MICHIGAN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DRAGONFLY AND DAMSELFLY (ODONATA) BIODIVERSITY IN INTERDUNAL WETLANDS AT SAUGATUCK HARBOR NATURAL AREA, MICHIGAN Great Lakes coastal sand dunes feature rare wetland habitats called interdunal wetlands. These fishless wetlands likely support rare and potentially unique plant and animal communities. Odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) are conspicuous predators within fishless wetlands and the adjacent terrestrial habitat. Our objective was to describe the diversity of Odonata within the interdunal wetland complex at Saugatuck Harbor Natural Area (SHNA). We asked: 1) does the odonate assemblage change over time, 2) what is the adult flight phenology of species within SHNA, and 3) what environmental factors contribute to larval assemblage composition among ponds? We collected larval and adult odonates from four wetlands once a month from May through September 2017. In total 53 species were identified representing 31.5% of the recorded number of odonate species in the state of Michigan. Assemblages changed over the collection period due to species emergence timing. Flight seasons ranged from one day to the duration of the collection period. Larval odonate assemblages were structured along a salinity gradient. This research is the first of its kind to document diversity of the odonate assemblage within an interdunal wetland complex in the Great Lakes region.

Devon Volz (Primary Presenter/Author), Western Michigan University, devonvolz@gmail.com;


Tiffany Schriever (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western Michigan University, tiffany.schriever@wmich.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 80 - VARIATIONS IN BAT ACTIVITY LINKED WITH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM FACTORS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

VARIATIONS IN BAT ACTIVITY LINKED WITH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM FACTORS Bat activity is driven by number of biotic and abiotic components such as climate, cover, and food availability. Understanding the influence of these factors allows for greater predictability of bat responses to development and climate change. This work shows results of a month long observation (Sept-Oct 2017) of variations in bat activity, predatory arthropod abundance, local climate, and other factors in riparian ecosystems of an agricultural region of Northwest Ohio. No correlation was found between warmer temperatures and the number of recordings. In addition, there was no apparent indirect relationship between spider abundance and bat activity. However, a positive relationship between bat activity and availability of cover was noted, as recording locations lacking in tree cover yielded almost no calls. Another correlation was found with time of day, as recording intervals falling after 8:00pm caught significantly more bat calls than intervals falling before 8:00pm. Hence, sunset likely plays a role in bat stimulation, and suggests when researchers should carry out recording sessions. We also discuss relationships with rates of insect emergence and stream geomorphology and the potential for bat foraging on emergent insects to influence agricultural pests.

John Woloschuk (Primary Presenter/Author), Bowling Green State University, jrw101@francis.edu;


Kevin McCluney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bowling Green State University, kmcclun@bgsu.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 81 - DROUGHT, FLOODING, AND FIRE: WETLAND RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE PREDICTED SCENARIOS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DROUGHT, FLOODING, AND FIRE: WETLAND RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE PREDICTED SCENARIOS Wetlands are one of the world's largest known carbon sinks, while comprising only 2-6% of the Earth's surface. Carbon in wetlands is stored through decomposition of organic matter and absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. As climates continue to change and some regions are expected to experience increased periods of drought, wetlands are predicted to become carbon sources through release of CH4 and less CO2 uptake. We examined water quality, primary production, decomposition rates, soil moisture, and soil organic matter in a series of experimental ponds manipulated to simulate flooding and drought. Preliminary data suggests that water quality (e.g., dissolved oxygen), primary production (e.g., chlorophyll a and periphyton biomass) and organic matter decomposition rates are significantly reduced as wetlands recede following a short period of flooding, compared to being constantly flooded. Ongoing studies include the addition of controlled burns prior to flooding and drought manipulations to assess for changes in CO2 and CH4 fluxes and carbon sequestration rates. Our goal is to develop a framework to better understand the response of southeastern coastal plain wetlands to predicted climate change scenarios.

Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


Angela Shaffer (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, as17251@georgiasouthern.edu;


C09 Wetland Ecology 263 - TRADEOFFS AMONG ECOSTSTEM SERVICES AFTER PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS REMOVAL IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TRADEOFFS AMONG ECOSTSTEM SERVICES AFTER PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS REMOVAL IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS In many Great Lakes wetlands, invasive Phragmites australis (common reed) has displaced native communities and significant effort is devoted to its management. In this study, we investigated the tradeoff between floristic quality and nutrient retention in coastal wetlands five years after herbicide treatment was applied to remove Phragmites. We compared plant productivity, nutrient uptake, and floristic quality index (FQI) values in seven restored and four Phragmites-dominated sites along the western side of Lake Erie. The average aboveground biomass at Phragmites sites was four times greater than at restored sites (1903.0 grams and 415.5 grams m-2, respectively), indicating significantly greater nutrient uptake. The average floristic quality index was significantly greater for restored sites (7.1) than for Phragmites sites (2.4), indicating that restored sites support the re-establishment of native flora. These outcomes highlight trade-offs in of ecosystem services associated with invasive species management.

Amanda Kandies (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, akandies@emich.edu;


Kristi Judd (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, kjudd2@emich.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 82 - LINKING WATER DEPTH TO DENITRIFICATION IN SHALLOW AGRICULTURAL LAKES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LINKING WATER DEPTH TO DENITRIFICATION IN SHALLOW AGRICULTURAL LAKES Many shallow oxbow lakes in northwest Mississippi are hypereutrophic due to nitrogen (N) loading from agricultural fertilizer application. However, high turbidity often limits the depth of photosynthesis to the upper water column and lake edges and reduces overall photosynthesis rates. High water temperature from shallower depth, along with low oxygen, and high nitrogen conditions create increased potential for nitrogen removal through denitrification. The objective of this study is to determine spatial and temporal variations of denitrification rates in the sediment and water column of Roundaway Lake, Mississippi, focusing on the relationship between water depth, temperature, and N removal. Denitrification and nutrient retention rates were measured in lake water and sediment cores collected across a depth gradient during three occasions in spring 2017 using a flow-through core system in the laboratory. In fall 2017, sediment denitrification rates were measured across a 20°C temperature gradient for five days. Initial results suggest that shallower lakes have higher N removal rates. As these lakes are frequently manipulated for agricultural irrigation and experience substantial depth fluctuations independent of seasonal rainfall, there is potential to manage lake depth to optimize nitrogen removal through denitrification.

Jordan Evans (Primary Presenter/Author), Tennessee Technological University, jlevans44@students.tntech.edu;


Justin Murdock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Tech University, jnmurdock@tntech.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 83 - DYNAMIC HETEROGENEITY OF GREENHOUSE GASES IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DYNAMIC HETEROGENEITY OF GREENHOUSE GASES IN STREAMS Freshwaters are sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. However, the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of GHG fluxes, and how they relate to land use, remains a major source of uncertainty in regional and global carbon budgets. To understand interactions between land use and GHG dynamics, we measured CH4 and CO2 in Stroubles Creek, a second-order stream in Virginia, which flows through three land use transitions (urban, agriculture, forest). Weekly sampling at a single site (6/26/2017-8/29/2017) was supplemented with three synoptic samplings along 11.6km of Stroubles and one campaign throughout the watershed. All sites were supersaturated with respect to atmospheric CH4 and CO2: in-stream concentrations ranged from 8-739ppm CH4 and 929-4741ppm CO2. Sites draining more modified landscapes had higher concentrations of CH4 (11-46x) and CO2 (1.4-3.9x) than forested reaches. CH4 and CO2 were positively correlated with open/low-intensity urban land use (r2= 0.60 and 0.70, respectively). Forested Stroubles reaches had lower GHG concentrations than other forested streams sampled within the watershed. A more critical look at mechanisms controlling the heterogeneity of stream CO2 and CH4 is key to understanding the magnitude and variability of freshwater contributions to GHG budgets.

Morgan Gallagher (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, mtg3@vt.edu;


Erin Hotchkiss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ehotchkiss@vt.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 84 - EXPLORING HOW CARBON SOURCE AND REACTIVITY AFFECT THE FATE OF NITRATE AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EXPLORING HOW CARBON SOURCE AND REACTIVITY AFFECT THE FATE OF NITRATE AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE The sediment-water interface (SWI) is an important regulator of biogeochemical processes in streams. Carbon and nitrogen inputs from various terrestrial and aquatic sources influence the function of this interface, however it is not known how carbon source composition and reactivity influence the export of denitrification products. We tested how porewater from the SWI of Augusta Creek, MI was processed when amended with four carbon types, a conservative bromide tracer, and a 15N-nitrate isotopic tracer in a series of SWI push-pull experiments. Leachates from the leaves of Elm and Tamarack trees, as well as from flocculated organic matter, and a solution of sodium acetate, were added in four sequential experiments. We hypothesized that uptake rates and denitrification products would scale with increasing carbon source reactivity. One set of triplicate porewater push-pull samplers was used to look at the degradation of dissolved organic carbon and nitrate concentrations at high temporal resolution (~10 min), while a second set of triplicates was sampled separately for dissolved di-nitrogen and nitrous oxide gasses. This study will contribute to our understanding of how seasonal or land-use dependent carbon dynamics could affect the function of SWIs.

Tyler Hampton (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, thampton@msu.edu;


Jay Zarnetske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Joseph Lee-Cullin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, cullinjo@msu.edu;


Rachel Geiger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College of the Environment, Western Washington University, WA, USA, geigerr@wwu.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 85 - LINKING ENERGY FLOW AND NUTRIENT CYCLING IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LINKING ENERGY FLOW AND NUTRIENT CYCLING IN STREAMS Carbon and nutrients are the energetic currency of ecosystems, and their respective cycles drive metabolic and biogeochemical processes in streams. While stoichiometric limitations can have significant effects on coupled element transformations, carbon and nutrient cycles are often studied in isolation from each other. To what extent are dynamics of carbon and other element cycles in streams linked? Using ecosystem metabolism and nitrogen cycling data collected for the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment (LINX-II), we compared spiraling metrics for both organic carbon (OC) and nitrate (NO3-) in headwater streams across a variety of land uses and biomes. Mineralization velocities of OC (vf-OC) and NO3- uptake velocities (vf-NO3) were of similar magnitude (6.1*10-6 to 4.5*10-3 m/min and 2.5*10-5 to 1.8*10-2 m/min, respectively). vf-OC and vf-NO3- were weakly positively correlated across all sites (r=0.23, p=0.06). The strongest relationships between OC turnover and NO3- uptake were in streams that were more metabolically balanced (steppe sites, r=0.81, p=0.03, GPP/ER=0.81; tallgrass sites, r=0.72, p=0.03, GPP/ER=0.91; urban streams, r=0.45, p=0.03, GPP/ER=0.54). This study highlights the promise of investigating coupled carbon-nitrogen cycles, and how the balance between productivity and respiration may be a universal driver of coupled carbon-nutrient behavior.

Stephen Plont (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, plontste@vt.edu;


Brynn ODonnell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, brynno@vt.edu;


Morgan Gallagher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, mtg3@vt.edu;


Erin Hotchkiss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ehotchkiss@vt.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 86 - LONG-TERM TRENDS IN WATER CHEMISTRY IN GEOTHERMALLY-MODIFIED GROUNDWATER INFLUENCED LOWLAND TROPICAL STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LONG-TERM TRENDS IN WATER CHEMISTRY IN GEOTHERMALLY-MODIFIED GROUNDWATER INFLUENCED LOWLAND TROPICAL STREAMS Long-term datasets are useful to understand responses to climate cycles and human stressors on freshwaters. We have collected a ~20-year dataset of stream physical and chemical parameters (temperature, pH, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), nitrate (NO3-)) from the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. At La Selva, low elevation streams exhibit higher solute concentrations due to inputs of geothermally modified groundwater (GMW). Here, we use time series methods to assess long-term stream data in relation to climate phenomena across the groundwater-elevation gradient. Low solute and high solute streams exhibited increases in NO3- (tauH = 0.22, tauL = 0.06). Concurrent increases in NO3- and decreases in SRP (tauH = -0.07, tauL = -0.08) across all sites have resulted in increases in [NO3]-:[SRP] (tauH = 0.27, tauH = 0.03). Decreases in SRP in all streams raises interesting questions about SRP cycling in low solute streams, where P is limiting, and high solute streams where P is abundant due to GMW. Continued changes in nutrient and physical conditions reveal potential ecosystem level consequences in response to GMW driven by climate cycles.

Nick Marzolf (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University, nmarzol@ncsu.edu;


Marcelo Ardon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, mlardons@ncsu.edu;


Alonso Ramirez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


Catherine Pringle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 87 - BIOAVAILABLE PHOSPHORUS IN PULP AND PAPER MILL EFFLUENTS: FINDINGS FROM ALGAL GROWTH ASSAYS FOR IMPROVED WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT TARGETS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BIOAVAILABLE PHOSPHORUS IN PULP AND PAPER MILL EFFLUENTS: FINDINGS FROM ALGAL GROWTH ASSAYS FOR IMPROVED WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT TARGETS Weak quantitative relationships between phosphorus and algae growth can confound the development of sound water quality management tools (e.g. TMDLs). This may be because some phosphorus in runoff, wastewaters, and the system itself may be unavailable to algae, or become available only after extended time in the environment. We quantified and characterized phosphorus bioavailability in paper mill effluents (n=4) using an algal assay in which effluent or controls were inoculated with phosphorus-starved algae and placed under ideal conditions until growth ceased. Algae were removed, and solutions reinoculated with phosphorus-starved algae and allowed to grow. This process repeated until growth ceased completely, with the residual phosphorus representing the non-bioavailable fraction. The difference between the solution’s initial phosphorus concentration and this non-available phosphorus represented the bioavailable phosphorus. Uptake of available effluent phosphorus took >40 days and 4-6 cycles of addition/removal of phosphorus-starved algae, with 8-16% of effluent phosphorus unavailable for algal growth. Further analyses suggest that non-bioavailable phosphorus may be colloidal, and associated with non/slowly-available humic metal-phosphorus complexes. These findings have important implications for the development of effective nutrient-response linkages, and more robust water quality management targets.

Camille Flinders (Primary Presenter/Author), NCASI, cflinders@ncasi.org;


Jim Palumbo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), ncasi, jpalumbo@ncasi.org;


C10 Biogeochemistry 88 - WETLAND INFLUENCES ON A CONTAMINATED RIVER: DYNAMICS OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSING DOMAINS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

WETLAND INFLUENCES ON A CONTAMINATED RIVER: DYNAMICS OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSING DOMAINS Discrete components of aquatic ecosystems can be thought of as nutrient processing domains (PDs) that, depending on net biogeochemical and hydrologic properties, may act as either nutrient donors, conveyors, transformers, or removers. Interaction of various processing domains within a lotic continuum ultimately determines loads to receiving waters by dictating net nutrient export form and abundance. This approach was applied to a tributary stream to assess its influence on nutrient budgets of a larger river as reflected in spatiotemporal patterns of nutrient loading rates. We analyzed dissolved nutrient concentrations in a river along a longitudinal gradient, sampling each river-km and tributary confluence to identify zones of net nutrient input. In autumn, a donor tributary increased background river N concentration from 0.003 to 0.042 µg NO3-N L-1. The following spring, N concentrations above and below the tributary confluence showed a similar pattern, with ammonium as the primary N-form, increasing from 0.023 to 0.099 µg NH4-N L-1. We hypothesize this nitrogen subsidy is derived from a large wetland complex that dominates the contributing tributary, acting as a seasonally-driven biological hotspot of N production with spatiotemporal variability accounting for discrete nutrient processing domains.

Marc Peipoch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, mpeipoch@stroudcenter.org;


H. Maurice Valett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, maury.valett@umontana.edu;


Patrick Hurley (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, patrick1.hurley@umontana.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 89 - LOW BIOREACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON FROM STREAM FLOCCULENT ORGANIC MATTER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LOW BIOREACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON FROM STREAM FLOCCULENT ORGANIC MATTER Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) controls energy transfer, biogeochemical cycling, and water quality in surface and subsurface waters. Flocculent organic matter (floc) that accumulates in stream environments is a potentially important source of organic carbon to aquatic ecosystems. The role of floc in stream biogeochemistry is presently unknown, but its ubiquitous presence in streams indicates it may be important. To test the relative bioreactivity of floc, we ran a series of laboratory batch reactor and field-based push-pull experiments. The batch reactor experiments isolated potential locations of floc decomposition (e.g. stream water, sediment) as compared to a control medium of ultrapure water. Also, nutrient (N and P) additions were made in parallel batch reactor experiments to test the effect of nutrient priming on floc reactivity. The push-pull experiments were conducted in a lowland Michigan stream to assess the degradation of floc leachate injected into sediments. Overall, the floc DOC showed little degradation over time across all experiments, revealing its low relative bioreactivity qualities under multiple controlled and field conditions. This suggests that floc accumulation and ubiquity in shallow aquatic environments may be a function of its low bioreactivity.

Rachel Geiger (Primary Presenter/Author), Western Washington University, omstijsn@gmail.com;


Jay Zarnetske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Joseph Lee-Cullin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, cullinjo@msu.edu;


Tyler Hampton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, thampton@msu.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 90 - INVERTEBRATE ACTIVITIES IN WETLAND SEDIMENTS INFLUENCE OXYGEN AND NUTRIENT DYNAMICS AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INVERTEBRATE ACTIVITIES IN WETLAND SEDIMENTS INFLUENCE OXYGEN AND NUTRIENT DYNAMICS AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE Invertebrates living in aquatic sediments alter nutrient cycling by shaping oxygen penetration into sediments, influencing geochemical and microbial processes. Through the creation of burrows, bioturbating invertebrates rework sediment, which introduces oxygenated water to otherwise anoxic sediment. Invertebrate bioturbation can have critically important effects on sediment-surface water nutrient (i.e. nitrogen and phosphorus) exchange, but until recently these effects have been underappreciated. Nutrient release from benthic sediments into surface waters, or alternately nutrient immobilization, may influence rates of internal loading and eutrophication. To assess how bioturbators influence nutrient exchange from wetland sediments to surface waters, I experimentally tested the effects of two functionally different bioturbators (Ephemera mayfly larvae and Lumbriculus worms) in urban wetland and Lake Erie coastal wetland sediments. I analyzed surface water nutrients and measured sediment oxygen penetration using microelectrode sensors. Results show a stronger increase in sediment oxygen penetration into normally anoxic regions by Ephemera than Lumbriculus. With increasing densities of both bioturbators, I observed decreasing phosphorus and increasing nitrate surface water concentrations. Changes in surface water concentrations suggest that bioturbators simultaneously enhance sediment phosphorus sequestration while releasing nitrogen, consistent with expectations of oxidation processes.

Taylor Michael (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, tmichae9@kent.edu;


Andrea Fitzgibbon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University , afitzgib@kent.edu;


David Costello (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


Lauren Kinsman-Costello (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, lkinsman@kent.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 91 - RESPONSES OF SILICA STOICHIOMETRY TO HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETATION CHANGES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RESPONSES OF SILICA STOICHIOMETRY TO HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETATION CHANGES Silica (Si) is an essential nutrient in aquatic ecosystems, yet the understanding of Si transport and cycling is lacking compared to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The stoichiometry of these nutrients is critical for the dynamics of algal communities, including the formation of harmful algal blooms (HABs) by cyanobacteria. Understanding how N:P:Si stoichiometry responds to agricultural conservation (winter cover crops) and hydrology (storm versus baseflow conditions) is a first step in predicting the occurrence of HABs. We collected water samples from tile drains and stream sites in two agricultural watersheds in northern Indiana, including locations with and without cover crops. We combined these analyses with data from similar agricultural streams in central Indiana and east-central Illinois. We found that molar ratios deviate highly from the Redfield ratio for both N:Si and P:Si, and N:Si ratios were consistently enriched in N relative to Si. In contrast, P:Si ratios vary above and below the Redfield ratio for a relatively narrow range of discharge values. These results suggest that N:P:Si stoichiometry can vary significantly over short time periods as hydrological conditions change, and that conservation practices could impact N:P:Si ratios in unexpected ways.

Lienne Sethna (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University, lsethna@iu.edu;


Todd V. Royer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University Bloomington, troyer@indiana.edu;


Matt T. Trentman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, mtrentma@nd.edu;


Shannon Speir (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, sspeir@nd.edu;


Jennifer L. Tank (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, tank.1@nd.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 92 - STREAMPULSE: LARGE-SCALE COLLABORATIVE MONITORING OF STREAMS' VITAL RHYTHMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STREAMPULSE: LARGE-SCALE COLLABORATIVE MONITORING OF STREAMS' VITAL RHYTHMS Due to recent advancements in model design and sensor technology, long-term monitoring of stream metabolism is more practical and affordable than ever before. Still, general understanding of what drives variation in metabolism across time and space has been hampered by a lack of consistency in methodologies for collecting and modeling stream data. The StreamPULSE project provides a central, web-based platform for the submission, storage, retrieval, and analysis of data acquired from streams and rivers worldwide. It also promotes an adaptable set of standard procedures for data collection and analysis, and for the interpretation of model outputs. Here we show developments to the platform over the last year, including tools for visual quality control, outlier detection, and gap filling. Upcoming features include versatile anomaly detection via decision trees and elastic, on-demand cloud modeling.

Michael Vlah (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, vlahm13@gmail.com;


Matthew Cohen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, mjc@ufl.edu;


Nancy Grimm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, nbgrimm@asu.edu;


Robert Hall (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Flathead Biological Station, University of Montana, bob.hall@flbs.umt.edu;


Jim Heffernan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, james.heffernan@duke.edu;


Ashley Helton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Connecticut, ashley.helton@uconn.edu;


William H. McDowell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, bill.mcdowell@unh.edu;


Brian McGlynn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, brian.mcglynn@duke.edu;


Jordan Read (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, jread@usgs.gov;


Emily Stanley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin - Madison, ehstanley@wisc.edu;


Emily Bernhardt (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, emily.bernhardt@duke.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 93 - BURPING WETLANDS: QUANTIFYING GREENHOUSE GAS EBULLITION RATES ACROSS A RANGE OF SEDIMENT ORGANIC MATTER CONTENT, WATER TEMPERATURE, AND LAND USE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BURPING WETLANDS: QUANTIFYING GREENHOUSE GAS EBULLITION RATES ACROSS A RANGE OF SEDIMENT ORGANIC MATTER CONTENT, WATER TEMPERATURE, AND LAND USE Aquatic ecosystems are a source of greenhouse gases (GHG) to the atmosphere. One pathway of this GHG release is ebullition, or bubbling, from aquatic sediments. The contribution of ebullition is often underestimated in global GHG budgets, as it is rarely included in emission measurements. The ebullition pathway can account for up to 67% of methane emissions from water bodies. We aim to determine the factors that influence ebullition of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide, including sediment organic matter content, water temperature, and land use. We included study sites that are in urban, cropland, pasture, and forested areas. We found that the relationship between gas volumes and water temperature was positive, and was negative between sediment organic matter and gas volumes. With increasing climate-induced water temperatures, we predict that ebullition rates will increase. Understanding the factors influencing GHG emissions from aquatic ecosystems will give us a broader understanding of the significance of their contribution to global GHG budgets in a changing climate.

Jannice Newson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Missouri, jannicenewson@gmail.com;


C10 Biogeochemistry 94 - WINTER DENITRIFICATION POTENTIAL IN RESPONSE TO NITROGEN ADDITIONS TO THE KANSAS RIVER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

WINTER DENITRIFICATION POTENTIAL IN RESPONSE TO NITROGEN ADDITIONS TO THE KANSAS RIVER Nitrogen (N) cycling processes, specifically denitrification, are most commonly studied in small streams during summer. Therefore, we know relatively little about winter denitrification rates in large rivers. From November 2017 to April 2018, high nitrate water was released into the Kansas River from a decommissioned fertilizer plant. When nitrate enters the waterway, it undergoes the stepwise process of denitrification, where nitrate reduces to N2 and is released to the atmosphere as a gas. Denitrification enzyme assays (DEAs) were used to measure the denitrification potential of the river water and sediment, spanning sampling sites from one mile upstream of the release point to 40 km downstream. We asked: How does denitrification in large rivers respond to wintertime N additions? Preliminary data from December 2017 indicated that denitrification rates increased downstream from the discharge point with the rates ranging from undetectable levels to 0.142 µg N2O-N/h downstream. The DEA data collected over the course of the winter will help us better understand how a large river processes large amounts of nitrate additions.

Cay Thompson (Primary Presenter/Author), Haskell Indian Nations University, caynoel16@gmail.com;


Emma Overstreet (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, evover@live.com;


Michelle Kelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, michellekelly@ku.edu;


Amy Burgin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, aburgin2@unl.edu;


Terrance Loecke (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, loecke.terry@ku.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 95 - TO MODEL OR TO MEASURE: THE CHALLENGES OF CONSTRAINING GAS EVASION ESTIMATES FOR ACCURATE ESTIMATION OF WHOLE-STREAM METABOLISM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TO MODEL OR TO MEASURE: THE CHALLENGES OF CONSTRAINING GAS EVASION ESTIMATES FOR ACCURATE ESTIMATION OF WHOLE-STREAM METABOLISM Whole ecosystem productivity and respiration can be modeled in streams using diel changes in dissolved O2 concentration. Stream metabolism models rely on accurate measurement or modeling of a gas exchange rate coefficient (K d-1) to allocate changes in dissolved O2 concentration to physical reaeration or ecosystem respiration. Empirical measurements of K are time consuming and require many repetitions to construct a rating curve over a range of stream discharge (Q). Various modeling approaches to estimate K have different degrees of prediction accuracy, which may be improved upon by including empirical estimates of K to constrain model estimates. The accuracy or the strength of the K vs Q relationship can drive the outcome of the modeled ecosystem metabolism. High slope and low productivity streams produce modeled metabolism estimates with lower confidence due to the increased role of gas exchange in temporal changes in dissolved O2 concentration. The comparison between modeling and empirical measurements of K across several types of stream ecosystems indicate that constraining the K-Q relationship is an important step in estimating ecosystem metabolism.

Alice Carter (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, alicecarter05@gmail.com;


Amber Ulseth (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, amber.ulseth@epfl.ch;


Lauren Koenig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Connecticut, Lauren.Koenig@uconn.edu;


Jim Heffernan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, james.heffernan@duke.edu;


Emily Bernhardt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 96 - SEASONAL TRENDS IN ROAD SALT RUNOFF IN SEMI-URBAN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SEASONAL TRENDS IN ROAD SALT RUNOFF IN SEMI-URBAN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS In areas that receive snow, road salts are applied to impervious surfaces to clear the snow and ice. The increasing salinity of urban aquatic ecosystems is a potential hazard to aquatic life, and while many studies have investigated the behavior of road salts in streams and lakes, little has been done to examine wetlands. We investigate the type and quantity of salts found in two semi-urban constructed wetlands on Kent State University’s campus in northeast Ohio. Combining high resolution conductivity data with less frequent surface water samples that determine the concentrations of road salt components (chloride, acetate, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium) results in a robust data set that describes the response of urban wetlands to the application of road salt. Preliminary results indicate that indices of salt are extremely variable (specific conductivity ranges 689-22300 ?s/cm; chloride ranges 74-423 mg/L), and are elevated in the winter months. Insights into salt trends in wetlands, and their potential hazards to aquatic life, can be used to help managers of constructed wetlands make more informed decisions about which salts could minimize negative environmental impacts while still maintaining safe roadways.

Riley Weatherholt (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, rweather@kent.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 97 - TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF STREAM ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM WITHIN A DRIFTLESS AREA STREAM, WISCONSIN, USA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF STREAM ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM WITHIN A DRIFTLESS AREA STREAM, WISCONSIN, USA The unglaciated, carbonate-sandstone landscape of the Driftless Area (Wisconsin, USA) is drained by many low-order streams that serve important socio-ecological functions and that are heavily impacted by human activity. Stream metabolism has yet to be quantified in the Driftless Area, but knowledge of it would aid in assessing stream health and condition in the region. In this study, I estimated stream metabolism of a headwater stream, Spring Coulee Creek, using a single-station, Bayesian statistical model of open-channel diel changes in oxygen, water temperature, and irradiance. Preliminary results indicate gross primary production (GPP) during the fall was 12.4 gO2 m-2 day-1, while during the same period ecosystem respiration (ER) was 16.4 gO2 m-2 day-1. During the winter the system was less productive with GPP at 5.9 gO2 m-2 day-1 and ER of 12.4 gO2 m-2 day-1. Spring and summer data are still being analyzed, but the ecosystem is expected to be very productive, potentially resulting in a seasonally autotrophic system. These results are helpful for understanding the impacts of seasonality and land use on stream metabolism, as well as for monitoring the impacts of climate change.

Phoenix Rogers (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Alabama, parogers@crimson.ua.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 98 - A TEN YEAR RECORD OF NITRATE RETENTION IN A WISCONSIN STREAM: TEMPORAL VARIATION AT MULTIPLE SCALES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A TEN YEAR RECORD OF NITRATE RETENTION IN A WISCONSIN STREAM: TEMPORAL VARIATION AT MULTIPLE SCALES Nitrate retention is an important ecosystem service provided by streams. We measured nitrate retention in a groundwater-fed stream, Emmons Creek, in Central Wisconsin during 2007-2016. We used a two station mass-balance approach based on weekly to biweekly sampling for nitrate in surface water. Groundwater nitrate input was assessed by biweekly to seasonal sampling from a piezometer network. We used time series modelling to generate nitrate concentration time series data that were sensitive to surface water discharge and season. Nitrate concentrations in surface water, but not in groundwater, exhibited strong seasonality. Nitrate retention tended to be highest in spring and autumn, moderate in summer and very low in winter. Groundwater discharge was a strong predictor of nitrate retention within seasons. Our results are consistent with the results of previous research that has demonstrated the importance of shallow groundwater for nitrogen transformation in ecosystems.

Robert Stelzer (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, stelzer@uwosh.edu;


Thomas Parr (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, Thomas.parr@ou.edu;


C10 Biogeochemistry 99 - QUANTIFYING DENITRIFICATION IN ARIZONA STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

QUANTIFYING DENITRIFICATION IN ARIZONA STREAMS Elevated nitrate (NO3-) concentration in streams and rivers has contributed to environmental problems such as downstream eutrophication and loss of biodiversity. Sycamore Creek in Arizona is nitrogen limited, but previous studies have demonstrated high potential for denitrification, a microbial process in which biologically active NO3- is reduced to relatively inert dinitrogen (N2) gas. Oak Creek is similarly nitrogen limited, but NO3- concentration in reaches surrounded by agriculture can be double that of other reaches. We employed a denitrification enzyme assay to compare potential denitrification rate between differing land uses in Oak Creek, and measured whole system N2 flux using a membrane inlet mass spectrometer to compare seasonal differences in actual denitrification rates at Sycamore and Oak Creeks. We anticipated that NO3- would be an important limiting factor for denitrifiers; consequentially, agricultural land use reaches within Oak Creek would have the highest potential denitrification rate. We expected actual denitrification rate to be higher in the winter dormant season than in the summer growing season, due to a lapse in competition between microbes and plants. Results will aid in understanding nitrogen cycling in other nitrogen-limited streams.

Monica Palta (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pace University, mpalta@asu.edu;


Nancy Grimm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, nbgrimm@asu.edu;


Corey Caulkins (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, ccaulkin@asu.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 100 - SPATIAL VARIATION IN PERIPHYTON AND MACROINVERTEBRATE VERNAL POOL COMMUNITIES AT THE TIDD-OAKES FARM (HARDIN COUNTY, OHIO)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIAL VARIATION IN PERIPHYTON AND MACROINVERTEBRATE VERNAL POOL COMMUNITIES AT THE TIDD-OAKES FARM (HARDIN COUNTY, OHIO) Vernal pools are ephemeral, fishless, freshwater habitats that appear in early spring. Despite their well-documented importance as breeding habitats for amphibians and selected macroinvertebrates, much less is known about factors that drive variation in macroinvertebrate community structure within and across vernal pools. Understanding drivers of alpha diversity (within a pool) and beta diversity (species composition turnover between pools) has important implications for conservation and restoration of these habitats. The pilot study conducted in 2013 suggested that pool morphology and dominant riparian vegetation could both influence macroinvertebrate communities in vernal pools. The main purpose of the current study was to establish a baseline data set of macroinvertebrate community structure and diversity within and across five vernal pools differing in pool morphology and dominant riparian vegetation types at the Ohio Northern University Tidd-Oakes Farm (Hardin County, Ohio, USA). March 2017, each pool was divided into four quadrats. Each quadrat, macroinvertebrates were collected with dip nets, dominant riparian vegetation was recorded and physicochemical parameters were measured. Preliminary analysis during 2017 suggested that pool morphology and proximity to permanent ponds was more influential on macroinvertebrate communities than dominant riparian vegetation type.

Olivia Keserich (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, o-keserich@onu.edu;


Kelsey Weidner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, k-weidner@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 101 - FISH AND INVERTEBRATE SIZE-SPECTRA IN EASTERN U.S. STREAMS: SEARCHING FOR A LATITUDINAL GRADIENT IN LOTIC SIZE STRUCTURE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

FISH AND INVERTEBRATE SIZE-SPECTRA IN EASTERN U.S. STREAMS: SEARCHING FOR A LATITUDINAL GRADIENT IN LOTIC SIZE STRUCTURE Scaling relationships between body mass and abundance, or ‘size-spectra’, have been reported in diverse aquatic ecosystems, though few efforts have been made to detect or explain regional scale patterns in size-spectra parameters. Such regional patterns are plausible given that production and diversity, which underlie the distribution of biomass among species, often exhibit regional gradients. We therefore hypothesized that the slopes and intercepts of size-spectra models may exhibit latitudinal trends, mirroring latitudinal production and diversity gradients. To test this hypothesis, we collected quantitative estimates of fish (3-pass depletion sampling) and benthic invertebrate (10 replicate Hess samples) abundance in four eastern U.S. streams, distributed along a latitudinal gradient from ~39°N (Front Royal, VA) to ~33°N (Moundville, AL). Fish and invertebrate data are now being combined with linear regression to build multi-trophic level size-spectra models for each of the four sites. Analysis of covariance will then be used to determine whether the size-spectra slopes and intercepts change in a consistent, directional way with latitude.

Serena Moncion (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Virginia, sam7dz@virginia.edu;


Daijona Revell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, revelldt@mymail.vcu.edu;


Raquel Wetzell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, wetzellrm@mymail.vcu.edu;


Felisha Walls (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, wallsfn@vcu.edu;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 102 - THE EFFECTS OF SEASONALITY AND TWO-STAGE DITCH MORPHOLOGY ON BENTHIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE WITHIN THE BLANCHARD RIVER WATERSHED

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE EFFECTS OF SEASONALITY AND TWO-STAGE DITCH MORPHOLOGY ON BENTHIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE WITHIN THE BLANCHARD RIVER WATERSHED Two primary threats to northwest Ohio watersheds are hydrologic variation and nutrient enrichment. Some farms within the Blanchard river watershed are testing experimental approaches to reduce nutrient enrichment. At Kurt’s Farm (Hardin County, Ohio), a two-stage ditch was installed with intact floodplain benches to slow current velocity and retain excess sediments, especially during flooding events. While previous studies have documented that ditches can also serve as habitat for other organisms and can make substantial contributions to diversity within watersheds, the effect of ditch morphology on benthic communities is not well known and, in at least one study, appears to not be important. Multivariate analysis revealed two groups which were defined as two-stage ditch sites and upstream sites that were closely related to traditional, open ditches. The results generated from June 2016 samples showed that the two-stage ditch sites were characterized by low turbidity, low water temperature and a detritivore-dominant community, while the open ditch sites were characterized by higher turbidity, higher water temperature, higher dissolved oxygen, and were dominated by macroalgae and herbivorous Lymnaeid snails. Additional data from three subsequent sampling periods will be included to examine seasonality.

Colin Light (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, c-light@onu.edu;


Connor Ney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, c-ney@onu.edu;


Lauren Govekar (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-govekar@onu.edu;


Chad Carroll (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hancock Soil & Water Conservation District, c-carroll@onu.edu;


Janet Deardorff (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University , j-deardorff@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 103 - PRECIPITATION RESTRICTS FISH AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PRECIPITATION RESTRICTS FISH AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES Mean annual precipitation is expected to change in regions across the globe throughout the next century. In the American Southwest, conditions are expected to become more arid. Using a space-for-time approach, we predict fish composition shifts in responses to altered precipitation regimes based on existing patterns in streams spanning sub-humid to semi-arid climates along the Texas Coastal Prairie. In the Fall of 2016, we conducted surveys of 5 USGS gauged, wadeable streams spanning the central precipitation gradient; we measured stream metabolism, nutrients, water chemistry, habitat characteristics, benthic invertebrates, and fish community composition data. These sites plus 8 additional gauged streams were re-surveyed in Spring of 2017. The data were analyzed for existing correlations between environmental factors and the biodiversity and composition of fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Precipitation-mediated effects, flow regime, evapotranspiration, and land-usage were significantly correlated with fish and macroinvertebrate community structure. The compositional changes of fish and invertebrate communities along the gradient occur non-linearly, suggesting a climate threshold for these communities. The results indicate that small future changes in precipitation regime in this region may result in abrupt conversion to new community states.

Fernando Carvallo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, fcarvallo@islander.tamucc.edu ;


Christopher Patrick (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas A&M University–Corpus Ch, christopher.patrick@tamucc.edu;


Sean Kinard (Primary Presenter/Author), Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, s2kinard@gmail.com;


C11 Community Ecology 104 - EFFECTS OF INVASIVE PLANTS ON RIPARIAN INSECT COMMUNITIES AND PREY SUBSIDIES TO STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF INVASIVE PLANTS ON RIPARIAN INSECT COMMUNITIES AND PREY SUBSIDIES TO STREAMS Invasive plants can affect higher trophic levels by reducing habitat and food resource availability for native fauna. In riparian systems, vegetation serves as habitat for terrestrial insects, as well as influencing inputs of allochthonous material to streams. Little is known about how invasive riparian plants may affect cross-ecosystem subsidies of terrestrial arthropods. This study used two paired stream reaches (invaded and native) in Sonoma County, California, to test how invasive plants influenced riparian insect communities (using pan traps) and terrestrial insect subsidies to streams (using floating pan traps). Insect abundance was higher in invaded sites than in native sites; one of the invaded sites had lower rarefied richness than the two native sites. Terrestrial insect subsidies were generally higher in invaded sites than in native sites, although subsidies varied throughout the summer. This study helps further our understanding of how invasive plants affect both terrestrial insect communities and the availability of allochthonous prey in streams, with implications for the restoration of riparian zones and conservation of aquatic insectivores, such as salmonids.

Elias Lopez (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University, Stanislaus, elopez59@csustan.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 105 - IDENTIFICATION OF TAXONOMIC AND FUNCTIONAL ICHTHYOFAUNAL ZONES WITHIN THE JAMES RIVER BASIN, VIRGINIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

IDENTIFICATION OF TAXONOMIC AND FUNCTIONAL ICHTHYOFAUNAL ZONES WITHIN THE JAMES RIVER BASIN, VIRGINIA Environmental gradients structure ichthyofaunal communities longitudinally along river networks via the selective filtering of species’ traits. In many instances, these environmental influences have created distinct zones of co-occurring fish species. Zonation studies have most often been conducted with taxonomic data (species x site matrices), but the increasing availability of functional trait data creates an opportunity to build more rigorous understanding of species’ co-occurrence patterns. Notably, zonation studies that use taxonomic data may not reveal the same patterns as studies based on trait data. In this study, we tested for distinct ichthyofaunal zonation in James River Basin, VA using a combination of historical (1950-1990) and contemporary fish occurrence records (2003-2016) that were aggregated within 12-digit hydrologic units (HU). Zonation tests were performed separately for taxonomic data and functional trait data, using a combination of non-metric multidimensional scaling, k-means cluster analysis, and Monte Carlo permutations (significance testing). We detected three distinct taxonomic zones and three functional trait zones within the James River Basin, with permutation tests confirming that both classifications were significantly non-random. A Mantel test also indicated that the spatial positions of taxonomic and functional trait zones were not significantly different.

Joseph Noel (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, noeljl2@vcu.edu;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 106 - ANALYSIS OF AQUATIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE NEAR A LOWHEAD DAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ANALYSIS OF AQUATIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE NEAR A LOWHEAD DAM Eight lowhead dams have been historically installed along the Ottawa River to maintain higher water levels during dry periods of the year. The Jackson Street dam on the Ottawa River (Lima, Ohio) was sampled in late August from 2014-2017. This lowhead dam is a candidate for removal and one of the baffles has already been extracted from the the dam. The primary objective of this investigation was to survey the aquatic life above and below the dam to create a baseline dataset of the community structure prior to dam removal. Two riffle habitats were sampled downstream of the dam and one riffle was sampled upstream. At each site, the physical and chemical parameters were measured; periphyton, and macroinvertebrates were collected. Preliminary MANOVA and MRPP analyses indicated there is limited spatial significance between sites (upstream vs. downstream) sampled in a given year. However, there were significant (p<0.001) temporal variations between community structure found in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Future multivariate analyses will be utilized to incorporate the 2017 data to determine if this temporal variation continues and, if so, what significant environmental factors may be involved.

Robert Verb (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Rody Seballos (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-seballos@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 107 - MONTHLY DIFFERENCES IN DIEL PATTERNS OF CRUSTACEAN AND DIPTERAN ZOOPLANKTON EXPORT FROM A POLYMICTIC RESERVOIR

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MONTHLY DIFFERENCES IN DIEL PATTERNS OF CRUSTACEAN AND DIPTERAN ZOOPLANKTON EXPORT FROM A POLYMICTIC RESERVOIR Past studies have demonstrated diel patterns of zooplankton export from lentic to lotic habitats, suggesting that under the right limnological and hydrological conditions, diel vertical migration of zooplankton may influence the composition of zooplankton exported to streams. Polymictic reservoirs are poorly stratified, regularly mix to depth, and are often very productive systems by virtue of relaxed nutrient limitation relative to dimictic reservoirs. In the study presented here, we investigate diel patterns of zooplankton export from a polymictic reservoir in New Jersey during three consecutive summer months. The composition of the exported zooplankton community varied significantly from month to month. Diel patterns were detected in zooplankton exports during one time period, but not during others. These results suggest that the occurrence of diel patterns in zooplankton export may be related to stratification regime and/or water residency time in the upstream lentic system.

Michael Grove (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, Grove@rowan.edu;


Courtney Richmond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, Richmond@rowan.edu;


Nathan Ruhl (Primary Presenter/Author), Rowan University, Ruhl@rowan.edu;


Guy Leland (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, lelandg2@students.rowan.edu;


Desiree' Haban (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, Haband2@students.rowan.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 108 - SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATION IN ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND EXPORT FROM A POLYMICTIC RESERVOIR

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATION IN ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND EXPORT FROM A POLYMICTIC RESERVOIR Shallow polymictic reservoirs experience frequent disruptive mixing from both wind and hydrological events that may interrupt or otherwise alter the normal seasonal patterns of bloom-bust in the plankton. In the study presented here, we monitored epilimnetic zooplankton diversity in a polymictic reservoir on a weekly basis near Zmax and at the base of the reservoir outfall over the course of the summer and fall of 2017. We also monitored these two sites over the course of a 24 hour period on three different days over the summer. Preliminary results indicate that the reservoir and outfall communities follow similar successional trajectories over the course of the summer, but diel variation in community composition was dissimilar between the lake and outfall sites at all three time periods. Differences between the lake and outfall community composition did not vary significantly between months, but there was a significant diel effect across all three sampling periods combined. Across all three time periods combined, zooplankton community composition was more similar at night than during twilight hours.

Caitlyn Czajkowski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, czajkowsc2@rowan.students.edu;


O'Neil Chase (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, chaset31@students.rowan.edu;


Michael Grove (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, Grove@rowan.edu;


Courtney Richmond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, Richmond@rowan.edu;


Nathan Ruhl (Primary Presenter/Author), Rowan University, Ruhl@rowan.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 109 - ANALYSIS OF TRAIT-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIPS ALONG A FOREST-URBAN GRADIENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ANALYSIS OF TRAIT-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIPS ALONG A FOREST-URBAN GRADIENT Functional traits, or phenotypic traits that influence an organism’s performance in a particular environment, can be used to understand and predict how environmental changes can restructure local communities. Trait-based community analysis links traits with environmental variables to identify ecological mechanisms underlying community response to stressors. While the effect of urban stressors on the composition and diversity of macroinvertebrate species is well documented, relatively few studies have assessed how macroinvertebrate traits respond to urban stressors. We employed RLQ and 4th corner methods to analyze functional trait characteristics of macroinvertebrate assemblages surveyed as part of a multi-faceted research effort investigating physical, chemical, biological, and thermal characteristics of streams on a forested-urban gradient throughout the Piedmont region of North Carolina. To perform these analyses, we identified 6 traits of 50 insect taxa found across 20 sites (10 forested, 10 urban). Initial results indicate a significant relationship between traits and environment (global RLQ, P < 0.05), and that catchment-level environmental variables (including soil erodibility and proportion forested) are significantly related to trait syndromes.

Christy Violin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA, USA, cviolin@sju.edu;


Brooke Hassett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, brooke.hassett@duke.edu;


Elizabeth Sudduth (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, esudduth@ggc.edu;


Kayleigh Somers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, kayleigh.somers@gmail.com;


Dean Urban (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, deanu@duke.edu;


Emily Bernhardt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, emily.bernhardt@duke.edu;


Sarah Lee (Primary Presenter/Author), DePauw University, sarahlee@depauw.edu;


C11 Community Ecology 110 - STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FROM AN URBANIZED WATERSHED: A MULTI-YEAR STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FROM AN URBANIZED WATERSHED: A MULTI-YEAR STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT Urbanization has led to the deterioration of aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, cumulative impacts from industrial effluents, combined sewer overflows and habitat destruction have significantly impacted its central watershed, the Mill Creek Watershed. Efforts are underway to improve stream quality; however, baseline data are still needed to understand current conditions and assess future improvements. The main objective of this study was to evaluate habitat quality and macroinvertebrate community structure and function throughout the Mill Creek Watershed overtime. Nine stream sites were surveyed over 4 years (2014-2018). To assess habitat, the Ohio Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index was conducted at each site. To assess macroinvertebrates, quantitative and qualitative samples were collected from riffles and all macrohabitats, respectively. Preliminary results indicate that habitat and macroinvertebrate communities were variable across the watershed, with evidence of degradation still present at some locations. Habitat quality generally improved from downstream to upstream with little variation overtime. Structural and functional macroinvertebrate metrics indicate high spatial and low temporal variability, both within and among stream sites. This study will provide necessary data for future monitoring, management and restoration efforts within the Mill Creek Watershed.

Sophie Racey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University, sracey@iu.edu;


Mollie McIntosh (Primary Presenter/Author), Xavier University, mcintoshm2@xavier.edu;


C12 Conservation Ecology 111 - POPULATION DEMOGRAPHY OF LEPTOXIS AMPLA (COENOGASTROPODA: PLEUROCERIDAE), A THREATENED SPECIES IN THE CAHABA RIVER BASIN, ALABAMA, USA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

POPULATION DEMOGRAPHY OF LEPTOXIS AMPLA (COENOGASTROPODA: PLEUROCERIDAE), A THREATENED SPECIES IN THE CAHABA RIVER BASIN, ALABAMA, USA The Cahaba River has the highest level of extant pleurocerid diversity in the Mobile River Basin. With 74% of the entire North American freshwater gastropod fauna considered imperiled, the importance of conservation research on these taxa cannot be understated. Leptoxis ampla, commonly known as the Round Rocksnail, is an endemic pleurocerid that is listed as federally threatened and patchily distributed in the Cahaba River Basin. Little is known about these populations of L. ampla, and knowledge of effective population abundance, size structure, and production is critical to understanding the viability of individual populations. We targeted four populations of L. ampla from known localities in the Cahaba River and its tributaries and sampled for species abundance and developed secondary reproduction models for each population using AFDM to develop length-mass regressions models. Results indicate populations in tributaries are more stable, reproducing more frequently and maintaining greater population abundance year-round. Cahaba River populations suffer from habitat degradation, suggesting conservation efforts prioritize main stem populations.

Lori Tolley-Jordan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Jacksonville State University, ljordan@jsu.edu;


Brian Helms (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troy University, helmsb@troy.edu;


Daniel Wicker (Primary Presenter/Author), Jacksonville State University, dwicker@stu.jsu.edu;


C12 Conservation Ecology 112 - PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF NATIVE UNIONID MUSSELS TO ZEBRA MUSSEL INVASION

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF NATIVE UNIONID MUSSELS TO ZEBRA MUSSEL INVASION One of the fastest growing threats to North America’s native freshwater mussel is the invasion of Eurasian Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Since the introduction and rapid spreading of invasive Dreissenid mussels throughout North America, native Unionid species have experienced dramatic declines—with many reports of local extirpation, but some situations of possible coexistence. Despite well-documented declines in native mussel populations to Dreissenid invasion, the mechanisms through which Unionids are locally extirpated is not well understood. Zebra mussel populations began exploding in the Mendota Lake (Dane Co., WI) in 2016, they have since quickly colonized the three lakes downstream. We collected individuals from two common Unionid species (Lampsilis siliquoidea and Pyganodon grandis) across a Zebra mussel infestation gradient. Hemolymph samples were extracted for metabolomic analysis, soft tissues were dried, weighed, and assessed for glycogen content. Preliminary glycogen analysis suggests that body condition might be worsening for Unionids in the earliest invaded lake, but the powerful new tool of metabolomics may provide a more detailed look into how Unionids respond to Zebra mussel invasions and explore the main drivers of their expected collapse.

Emily Stanley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin - Madison, ehstanley@wisc.edu;


Vincent Butitta (Primary Presenter/Author), Center for Limnology, vincent.butitta@wisc.edu;


C13 Ecotoxicology 114 - EFFECTS OF SUBLETHAL NAPHTHENIC ACID EXPOSURE ON THE METABOLOME OF HEXAGENIA SPP.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF SUBLETHAL NAPHTHENIC ACID EXPOSURE ON THE METABOLOME OF HEXAGENIA SPP. Naphthenic acids (NAs) and their associated naphthenate salts are present in oil sands process waters (OSPW) in concentrations of up to 120 mg/L. Discharge of OSPW to the environment is currently prohibited. However, potential for future discharge does exist as OSPW volumes continue to increase with no definitive plan for disposal or remediation. Thus, knowledge regarding the potential environmental effects of NA exposure is needed. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of NA exposure on the growth, survival, and metabolome of Hexagenia spp. using a controlled microcosm experiment. Hexagenia spp. were exposed for 21 days to a gradient of NA concentrations (0-0.1mg/L) in 2-L microcosms. No differences in growth or survival were detected among NA concentrations. Preliminary results of metabolomic analyses on whole organism tissue revealed an altered metabolome at the highest NA concentrations. Changes in the metabolome may be indicative of alteration of biological processes resulting from biochemical responses to stress. Observed changes in the metabolome will be used to inform decision-making processes regarding the future of OSPW disposal and remediation.

Sarah McKenzie (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Western Ontario, smcken4@uwo.ca;


Robert B. Brua (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 3H5, bob.brua@canada.ca;


Adam G. Yates (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


C13 Ecotoxicology 115 - BIOACCUMULATION DYNAMICS AND TRANSFER OF URANIUM ACROSS METAMORPHOSIS IN MAYFLY NEOCLOEON TRIANGULIFER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BIOACCUMULATION DYNAMICS AND TRANSFER OF URANIUM ACROSS METAMORPHOSIS IN MAYFLY NEOCLOEON TRIANGULIFER The moratorium on uranium (U) mining in federal lands of the Grand Canyon Region motivates study of the impacts that mining may have on water and wildlife resources. The Colorado River watershed contains tributaries that receive U inputs naturally from the land that they drain, making an understanding of the effects of U on aquatic biota crucial to understanding the risk of increased U introduction through mining. Among the aquatic biota, insects play a key role in linking aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about the mechanisms governing U bioaccumulation by insect larvae or the transfer of U to terrestrial ecosystems via metamorphosis. We conduct experiments to parameterize U uptake and elimination rate constants in a model aquatic insect, the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer. Results showed that mayflies efficiently accumulate U from the aqueous phase, but marginally from diet. Nearly 90% of the accumulated U was eliminated within 24 hours. Assessment of U content in mayflies exposed across development further revealed that >90% of U accumulated by larvae is lost by adulthood. These results indicate a relatively low risk of U transfer from mayflies to insect consumers on land.

Brianna Henry (Primary Presenter/Author), University of South Dakota, b.henry@eagle.clarion.edu;


Marie-Noele Croteau (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, mcroteau@usgs.gov;


David Walters (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, waltersd@usgs.gov;


Daniel J Cain (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, djcain@usgs.gov;


Janet Miller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, jmiller@usgs.gov;


Jeff Wesner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of South Dakota, Jeff.Wesner@usd.edu;


C13 Ecotoxicology 116 - RISK OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION TO THE HEALTH OF FISH IN THE SOUTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RISK OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION TO THE HEALTH OF FISH IN THE SOUTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES Methyl mercury (MeHg) is a toxic heavy metal that contaminates all aquatic systems and can pose a risk to the health of fish. In this study, we examined how Hg deposition, fish trophic position and fish length affected MeHg risk to fish in 14 ecoregions of 6 states of the south central U.S. We used the National Descriptive Model for Mercury in Fish to estimate average MeHg concentrations of five size categories of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), a low trophic position invertivore, and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), a high trophic position piscivore, at 728 sampling sites. We determined the percentage of sites where estimated MeHg concentrations in fish exceeded risk thresholds associated with potential 1) biochemical effects, 2) reproductive and behavioral effects and 3) growth effects. The percentage of sites where fish MeHg concentrations exceeded at least one risk threshold increased with Hg deposition in ecoregions, fish trophic position and fish length. Large-sized largemouth bass in ecoregions with high Hg deposition were at the greatest risk. Our results indicate that MeHg contamination in the south-central U.S. could negatively impact largemouth bass and perhaps other large, piscivorous fish species.

Ray Drenner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas Christian University, r.drenner@tcu.edu;


Matthew Chumchal (Primary Presenter/Author), Texas Christian University, m.m.chumchal@tcu.edu;


Madeline Hannappel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas Christian University, m.p.hannappel@tcu.edu;


Spencer Weinstein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas Christian University, s.weinstein@tcu.edu;


Chris Gerstle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas Christian University, c.gerstle@tcu.edu;


C13 Ecotoxicology 117 - : SORPTION OF BENZOBICYCLON IN SOILS OF RICE GROWING REGIONS OF ARKANSAS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

: SORPTION OF BENZOBICYCLON IN SOILS OF RICE GROWING REGIONS OF ARKANSAS Arkansas is the United States’ leading rice producer, accounting for over 50% of the rice produced in 2014. Over 40 counties in Arkansas cumulatively grow approximately 1.2 million acres of rice a year. Common weeds in rice production systems develop resistance to currently available herbicides over time. Reduced yields due to the new resistance of weeds prompted the U.S. release of benzobicyclon, a rice herbicide that has been used for decades in Asia. Benzobicyclon isn’t yet available to consumers in Arkansas and is under review by the EPA. Little is known about the fate and transport of benzobicyclon in Arkansas agricultural systems. This study used equilibration experiments to examine benzobicyclon and benzobicyclon hydrolysate (BH) sorption in soils with varying properties used to grow rice in Arkansas. The broad question addressed over the course of this experiment is, “Will the recommended use of benzobicyclon be uniform across the agricultural lands of Arkansas or will the recommendation vary according to soil properties?” Specifically, research determined how soil properties influence the sorption characteristics of benzobicyclon hydrolysate (BH), the active metabolite.

Jessica Clarke (Primary Presenter/Author), Fort Valley State University, ms.clarke5000@gmail.com;


C13 Ecotoxicology 118 - TOXICITY OF OIL SANDS PROCESS WATER COMPONENT, SODIUM NAPHTHENATE, TO MAYFLY HEXAGENIA LIMBATA.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TOXICITY OF OIL SANDS PROCESS WATER COMPONENT, SODIUM NAPHTHENATE, TO MAYFLY HEXAGENIA LIMBATA. The Athabasca oil sands in Alberta, Canada represents one of the largest crude oil deposits in the world. Extraction of oil sands creates large amounts of waste, which is currently stored in on site tailings ponds. Due to limited storage space, there may be a need for release of tailings to surrounding environments. Tailings ponds represent an environmental management challenge, as the aqueous portion of tailings contain contaminants that are toxic to aquatic communities. Naphthenic acids are the principle toxic components of tailings and are of particular concern due to their high solubility and persistence in aquatic environments. Naphthenic acids are known to be toxic to fish, but less is known about the effects on aquatic invertebrates. The following study examines 48-h acute toxicity tests of sodium naphthenate on mayfly nymphs, (Hexagenia limbata) and calculates an LC50 for this substance that will be useful for setting environmental guidelines. The results of this study will also provide information to help develop a management plan for oil sands tailings ponds, which will conserve unique ecosystems downstream of development in the region.

Julia Howland (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Brunswick, p5wap@unb.ca;


C13 Ecotoxicology 119 - WATERCRESS SECONDARY METABOLITE TOXICITY TO DIATOM COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

WATERCRESS SECONDARY METABOLITE TOXICITY TO DIATOM COMMUNITIES Watercress (Nasturtium officinale) is a non-native perennial herb that can form dense populations in springs and spring brooks. Upon tissue damage, watercress releases the chemical phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). This chemical acts as an herbivory deterrent to snails, amphipods, and other macroinvertebrates. The effects that PEITC has on attached algae are unknown. Field collected diatoms were exposed to known concentrations of PEITC in a 48-hour toxicity test to examine toxic effects. Preliminary results indicate that as the concentration of PEITC increased, the percentage of healthy, intact chloroplasts decreased, resulting in a higher number of dead diatoms.

Kambridge Stephens (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, kambridge.brown@gmail.com;


Elizabeth Bergey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, lbergey@ou.edu;


C13 Ecotoxicology 120 - INITIAL SURVEY OF MICROPLASTICS IN THE WATER AND SEDIMENT OF THE KINNICKINNIC RIVER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INITIAL SURVEY OF MICROPLASTICS IN THE WATER AND SEDIMENT OF THE KINNICKINNIC RIVER Plastic debris is an environmentally persistent and complex contaminant that has permeated the aquatic environment. Microplastics are plastic debris less than 5mm in size. Their small size increases the potential for plastic particles to enter food webs which is particularly concerning because plastics contain chemical additives that can sorb toxic contaminants from the surrounding water and sediment such as PCBs, pesticides, and heavy metals. Thus, microplastics are a potential pathway for contaminants to enter food webs, and not only harm aquatic life, but also humans who are dependent on freshwater ecosystems for drinking water and food resources. In this study, microplastic presence was analyzed in the waters and sediments of the Kinnickinnic River in western Wisconsin. Microplastics were present in all water and sediment samples. Discrepancies between the amount and sizes of particles in reduced volume and bulk water samples indicate that the use of sampling devices with large pore sizes dramatically underestimates the presence of microplastics in the environment. The prevalence and distribution of microplastics is widespread throughout the portion of the river that was studied. Microfibers originating from synthetic clothing and textiles represent the greatest proportion of particles.

Claire Simmerman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - River Falls, claire.simmerman@my.uwrf.edu;


C14 Hydroecology 121 - SPATIO-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS IN PHYSICO-CHEMISTRY OF A HIGH ELEVATION STREAM-LAKE NETWORK

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIO-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS IN PHYSICO-CHEMISTRY OF A HIGH ELEVATION STREAM-LAKE NETWORK The high elevation Macun Lakes system (2600 m a.s.l.), Swiss National Park, has been monitored for physico-chemistry since 2000. Monitoring consisted of annually-collected water samples at 10 sites in the network, high frequency sampling over the field season (May til October) in 2002 and 2017, and hourly records using an Exosonde (8 sensors) from July 2016 to December 2017 (excluding March-June) at the network outlet lake. The Macun Lakes comprises two basins, one mostly groundwater/precipitation-fed and the other mostly rock-glacier fed. Basin differences existed and each basin exhibited differences in long-term trends. Long-term trends in both basins were seen for pH, nitrogen and organic carbon. The 2002/2017 data showed seasonal patterns reflected differences in inter-annual climate regimes. Here, 2017 was a wet, more productive year compared to 2002. The Exosonde data were transmitted daily by satellite and offered real-time data to Park visitors. Exosonde data were important for assessing seasonality (including winter data) and diel patterns for specific parameters such as temperature, chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen and pH. The long-term collection strategy provided important information regarding changes in water physico-chemistry in relation to local landscape attributes and climate patterns.

Chris Robinson (Primary Presenter/Author), Eawag, robinson@eawag.ch;


Helena Vogler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eawag, vogler@eawag.ch;


Christian Ebi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, EAWAG, Urban Water Management dpt., christian.ebi@eawag.ch ;


Simon Dicht (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eawag, Eawag;


Tobias Ebner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Swiss National Park, ebner@snp.ch;


C14 Hydroecology 124 - PREDICTING DAILY DISCHARGE OF NON-PERENNIAL STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PREDICTING DAILY DISCHARGE OF NON-PERENNIAL STREAMS Long-term flow records are needed to produce hydrologic classifications in support of ecological assessments. However, in our study area (the arid southwestern US), temporal and spatial data gaps limit analyses of flow regimes. We therefore conducted a pilot project to determine if empirical models could be used to both fill-in missing values from existing gauge records and predict long-term flow dynamics for ungauged streams. We used long-term flow data from 43 basins located throughout the southwestern US to test if random forest models could accurately predict daily discharge (Qd) for individual streams. 50% of observations were used for validation. We modeled each basin's Qd as a function of daily flows observed at the other 42 basins. Model performance (as R2) ranged between 4 and 99%. 29 basins had R2 > 90%, and 12 other basins had R2 > 56%. Two southern Arizona basins had R2 < 13%. Both basins had low mean Qd and extreme desert climates. We are exploring if model performance in these low mean Qd regions can be improved by adding basin-specific climate variables as predictors.

Angela Merritt (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Watershed Sciences, National Aquatic Monitoring Center, and Ecology Center, angela.merritt@aggiemail.usu.edu;


Charles Hawkins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Watershed Sciences, National Aquatic Monitoring Center, and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan Utah 84322-5210, chuck.hawkins@usu.edu;


C16 Restoration Ecology 125 - A COMPARISON OF HISTORICAL AND CURRENT MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN THE GRAND CALUMET RIVER AREA OF CONCERN, INDIANA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A COMPARISON OF HISTORICAL AND CURRENT MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN THE GRAND CALUMET RIVER AREA OF CONCERN, INDIANA More than 150 years of industrial and chemical manufacturing, channelization and urbanization have resulted in extensive degradation of the Grand Calumet River (GCR) basin, a small (175 km2) watershed in northwest Indiana flowing into southern Lake Michigan and the Illinois River Basin. The GCR basin has been designated as a Great Lakes Area of Concern (AOC) requiring a Remedial Action Plan to improve 12 current beneficial use impairments (BUIs). The Indiana Department of Environmental Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Indiana Department of Natural Resources conducted intensive biomonitoring surveys in 2013 and 2015 collecting fish and macroinvertebrate communities, fish and sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity data, in-situ water chemistry and habitat information at numerous locations in the GCR AOC. Comparison of current macroinvertebrate communities in the GCR with results from nearly 50 previous years of sampling indicate that recent sediment removal and capping remediation projects have generally been effective in improving the diversity of macroinvertebrates in the GCR AOC. However, while macroinvertebrate communities in sections of the GCR AOC have improved, overall they have not met requirements for the removal of BUIs relating to the degradation of benthos.

Paul D. McMurray Jr. (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana Department of Environmental Management, paul.mcmurray79@gmail.com;


Dr. Daniel W. Sparks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serivce, daniel_sparks@fws.gov;


James R. Stahl (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana Department of Environmental Management, jstahl@idem.in.gov;


Anne L. Kominowski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana Department of Environmental Management, aremek@idem.in.gov;


Dr. James R. Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana Department of Environmental Management, ewefishfarm@gmail.com;


C16 Restoration Ecology 126 - RESTORATION MONITORING OF HABITAT, HERPTILES, AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATES, AND FISH IN KRISPIN DRAIN ON HARSENS ISLAND, ST. CLAIR RIVER DELTA, MICHIGAN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RESTORATION MONITORING OF HABITAT, HERPTILES, AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATES, AND FISH IN KRISPIN DRAIN ON HARSENS ISLAND, ST. CLAIR RIVER DELTA, MICHIGAN Krispin Drain is located within the St. Clair River Area of Concern and was identified in 1985 by the U.S. and Canadian governments as impaired due to shoreline alterations and significant loss of wetlands. The St. Clair River Bi-National Public Advisory Council developed a Stage I Remedial Action Plan in 1992, baseline assessments were completed in 2013, and in 2015, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality completed Guidance for Delisting Michigan’s Areas of Concern. Consequently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency completed habitat restoration of Krispin Drain in 2015, which included reshaping the drain, removal of the invasive Phragmites spp., and installation of coarse substrate within the drain. Habitat, herptiles, and macroinvertebrates were assessed during pre- and post- restoration conditions in 2013 and 2017, respectively, and a fish community evaluation was added in 2017. Overall, improvement was observed in the quality of habitat and herptile and macroinvertebrate communities post-restoration. The fish assemblage consisted of 35 species including a state listed endangered shiner. Assessments suggest that restoration efforts have had a positive effect on the biological communities of Krispin Drain. Another round of monitoring in 2018 will hopefully further validate these results.

Conrad Zack (Primary Presenter/Author), EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC, czack@eaest.com;


Marty Sneen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC, msneen@eaest.com;


Larry Bushing (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC, lbushing@eaest.com;


KristieRae Ellis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC, krellis@eaest.com;


C16 Restoration Ecology 127 - INFLUENCE OF STREAM CHANNELIZATION AND RESTORED SINUOSITY ON COLD WATER LOTIC FISH ASSEMBLAGES.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INFLUENCE OF STREAM CHANNELIZATION AND RESTORED SINUOSITY ON COLD WATER LOTIC FISH ASSEMBLAGES. Cold water habitats are rare in the state of Ohio, but important, because they contain unique fish communities. Macochee Creek (Mad River Watershed, Ohio), was channelized in the 1800’s for agricultural purposes, but a small section (0.8 km) underwent an extensive restoration during 2007 to restore sinuosity and improve riparian and in-stream habitat. The objective of this investigation was to examine the patterns of fish assemblage within and outside of this restored stream segment. In the fall of 2017, 3 sites were selected: one upstream of the restoration, one downstream of the restoration and one site within the restored stream reach. Electrofishing surveys revealed the most abundant species to be Semotilus atromaculatus (creek chub), Lethenteron appendix (American brook lamprey), and Catostomus commersonii (white suckers). Initial results for fishes indicate that the downstream segment had higher Shannon diversity and species richness when compared to the restored and upstream segment.

Alexander Wood (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, a-wood.2@onu.edue;


Nao Hariguchi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, n-hariguchi@onu.edu;


Evan Corteville (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, e-corteville@onu.edu;


Austin Morehouse (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, a-morehouse@onu.edu;


Ken Oswald (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, k-oswald@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


C16 Restoration Ecology 128 - RESPONSE OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE TO RESTORATION EFFORTS ON MACOCHEE CREEK, OHIO, USA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RESPONSE OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE TO RESTORATION EFFORTS ON MACOCHEE CREEK, OHIO, USA The Mad River represents one of the few cold water habitats present in the state of Ohio. One of the Mad River’s primary tributaries, Macochee Creek, was channelized in the 1800’s for agricultural purposes, but a small section (0.8 km) underwent an extensive restoration during 2007 to restore sinuosity and improve riparian and in-stream habitat. The purpose of this study was to assess the macroinvertebrate community ten years after restoration. In the fall of 2017, nine sites were selected: three upstream of the restoration, three downstream of the restoration and three sites within the restored stream reach. At each site, selected environmental parameters were surveyed and macroinvertebrates were collected from riffle habitats using a Surber sampler. Preliminary results from a subset of macroinvertebrate samples indicate that the restored section had higher Shannon diversity, higher % EPT and higher family richness at the restored sites when compared to the unrestored sites.

Nao Hariguchi (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, n-hariguchi@onu.edu;


Alexander Wood (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, a-wood.2@onu.edue;


Evan Corteville (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, e-corteville@onu.edu;


Austin Morehouse (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, a-morehouse@onu.edu;


Ken Oswald (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, Department of Biological & Allied Health Sciences, k-oswald@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


C16 Restoration Ecology 129 - LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF IN-STREAM RESTORATION ON MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SANDY BOTTOM STREAMS AT FORT BENNING MILITARY INSTALLATION, GA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF IN-STREAM RESTORATION ON MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SANDY BOTTOM STREAMS AT FORT BENNING MILITARY INSTALLATION, GA Habitat augmentation is a common in-stream restoration method; however, little research has examined long-term (>10y) effects of such restorations. In Coastal Plains streams of the southeastern US, increased sediment deposition can reduce coarse woody debris (CWD) abundance and overall benthic habitat. In 2003, CWD was experimentally added to 4 streams at Fort Benning Military Installation and macroinvertebrate assemblages and several habitat variables were compared to 3 unrestored streams. Effects 3y post-restoration were seasonal and variable among streams but generally indicative of increased ecological integrity. In 2017, we seasonally sampled (summer, fall, winter) macroinvertebrates and associated habitat in the 7 streams to determine the long-term effects of restoration on stream condition. Preliminary analysis of benthic organic matter (BOM) reveal similar seasonal patterns across streams as found 3y post restoration, however standing stocks were higher in 2017 as compared to initial evaluations. Community analysis is ongoing and will be presented; however, preliminary analysis of BOM in the streams showed considerably higher levels than 3y post-restoration. The increase in BOM could indicate increases in macroinvertebrate densities suggesting long-term beneficial effects of in-stream restoration.

Daniel Isenberg (Primary Presenter/Author), Troy University, djisenberg94@gmail.com;


Samuel Bickley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, slb0035@auburn.edu;


Jack Feminella (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, feminjw@auburn.edu;


Natalie Griffiths (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, griffithsna@ornl.gov;


Brian Helms (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troy University, helmsb@troy.edu;


C16 Restoration Ecology 130 - DEFINING SOCIAL AND ECOLOGICAL MEASURES OF STREAM RESTORATION SUCCESS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DEFINING SOCIAL AND ECOLOGICAL MEASURES OF STREAM RESTORATION SUCCESS Substantial time and financial resources are spent on stream restoration projects across the United States with little information about the ecological response of the stream or the cost-benefit ratio for the community as the stream site recovers. Stream restoration projects encourage participation by a diverse group of stakeholders during all phases, from design to funding to implementation. Yet, because of the associated diversity of participant goals for restoration design and implementation, defining success can be challenging. Therefore, we are evaluating how definitions of success vary across stakeholders for six stream restoration projects in two watersheds through in-person interviews and determining how those definitions vary across stakeholder roles (e.g., agency, landowner) and values. These results will ultimately be paired with an ecological assessment of the stream function at those sites. Initial results demonstrate that diverse social and economic factors contribute to stakeholder assessments of restoration success and point to the need to understand the human dimensions of restoration. Our results demonstrate the importance of consistencies between permit conditions and finished projects along with funding for suitable post-assessments of restoration projects for inclusive success.

Alyssa Millard (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, millaly2@isu.edu;


C16 Restoration Ecology 131 - ECOLOGICAL RECOVERY FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE IN PASSIVE REMEDIATION PONDS IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ECOLOGICAL RECOVERY FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE IN PASSIVE REMEDIATION PONDS IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA Acid mine drainage is a pervasive problem in the United States, with 14,763 miles of contaminated streams across the country and 9,396 miles in the Appalachian region. Passive treatment of mine drainage typically involves forcing water through a series of ponds to neutralize pH and capture heavy metal precipitates, but monitoring of biological recovery seldom occurs. To assess recovery attained by passive treatment systems, we measured macrophyte density and diversity, as well as macroinvertebrate community composition at two ponds in the Tanoma treatment system, located in western Pennsylvania. Results showed a correlation between macroinvertebrate composition and pond location, with 55% more sensitive taxa present near the outlet pond. Vegetation density was 3.4 times higher in the outlet pond than in the pond closer to the raw mine discharge. Our findings show that water quality improvements from passive treatment systems permit substantial ecological recovery from the harmful impacts of abandoned mine discharge. Treatment systems with engineered ponds and water level controls may be effective for use in other regions where heavy metal remediation and biological restoration are desired.

Jessica Slappo (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, qfnw@iup.edu;


Kelsey Twining (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, K.M.Twining@iup.edu;


David Janetski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Michael Tyree (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, mtyree@iup.edu;


Gregory Mount (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, gregory.mount@iup.edu;


C16 Restoration Ecology 132 - INFLUENCE OF POORLY FUNCTIONING CULVERTS ON STREAM HABITAT AND INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INFLUENCE OF POORLY FUNCTIONING CULVERTS ON STREAM HABITAT AND INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES Goals of most culvert restoration projects are focused on aquatic organism passage (AOP) rather than ecological impacts within watersheds. Stream simulation design (SSD) is a geomorphic and ecologically-based restoration approach that mimics natural channel structure, while bankfull/backwater design (BBD) allows culverts to fill on their own. As part of a culvert restoration project, we examined habitat qualities (current velocity, water depth, silt depth, organic matter standing crops, and substrate type) and invertebrate communities above and below four poorly functioning culverts in the Nicolet National Forest, WI set to be restored using SSD or BBD. Pre-restoration analyses revealed slower current velocities, higher water and silt depths, higher total and fine organic matter standing crops, and lower proportions of hard substrate types upstream of the culvert compared to downstream reaches at all sites. Poor habitat quality above the culvert resulted in lower tax richness, abundance, and biomass of sensitive invertebrate taxa at sites above the culverts. Pre-restoration data demonstrated negative ecological consequences in addition to AOP concerns associated with substandard culverts. Future work will document effectiveness of culvert replacement using BBD/SSD on habitat quality and aquatic communities.

Sue Eggert (Primary Presenter/Author), USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, seggert@fs.fed.us;


C16 Restoration Ecology 134 - EVALUATING SHORT-TERM TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY AND NUTRIENT RETENTION IN RECONNECTED LAKE ERIE COASTAL WETLANDS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EVALUATING SHORT-TERM TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY AND NUTRIENT RETENTION IN RECONNECTED LAKE ERIE COASTAL WETLANDS Historically, coastal wetlands along the western Lake Erie basin supported many ecosystem functions including nutrient retention and biodiversity support. Remaining coastal wetlands are diked, severing hydrologic connection and limiting ecosystem functions. Growing concern over increased frequency and intensity of harmful algal blooms has prompted hydrologic reconnection of coastal wetlands to Lake Erie. Reconnecting wetlands is predicted to improve habitat and water quality in the long-term, but there may be short-term trade-offs to biodiversity. In 6 reconnected and 6 diked coastal wetlands, we compared total nitrogen and total phosphorus as direct indicators of nutrient retention and wetland plant and phytoplankton biomass as indirect indicators. Additionally, we compared macroinvertebrate diversity between wetlands to examine whether there were changes in biodiversity following reconnections. Total phosphorus and total nitrogen were higher in diked than reconnected wetlands in 2016, but the same as in reconnected wetlands in 2017. However, plant and phytoplankton biomass were higher in diked wetlands. Both taxonomic and functional macroinvertebrate diversity were similar in reconnected and diked wetlands. Together, these preliminary findings suggest there may not be trade-offs in reconnected wetlands in the short-term.

Elizabeth Berg (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, berg.229@osu.edu;


C17 Bioassessment 135 - QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL IN A NATIONAL BIOMONITORING NETWORK IN CANADA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL IN A NATIONAL BIOMONITORING NETWORK IN CANADA The Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) is a networked approach to biomonitoring for the assessment of freshwater ecosystems across Canada and has been in operation at some scale since 1999. CABIN provides standardized protocols and online tools to promote data sharing. To ensure consistency among the variety of contract taxonomists used by partners, a National Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QAQC) laboratory was established in 2008 to maintain reference collections, verify voucher specimens, and provide 3rd party audits on contractor sorting efficiency and identification errors. The CABIN protocol also recommends the use of SFS certified taxonomists as a first step in the QAQC process. This level of quality assurance was recently applied to all aspects of CABIN in an annual quality assurance plan where quality gates within the program were identified to support program improvement and data verification and validation. In the 2 years since inception, quality reports have identified data verification and validation shortcomings and program improvements which will be implemented in subsequent years. The QAQC guidance will be made available to other network partners for application in their own CABIN projects.

Adam Martens (Primary Presenter/Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, adam.martens@canada.ca;


Martin Jean (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, Martin.Jean@canada.ca;


C17 Bioassessment 136 - COUPLED EFFECT OF CHANNELIZATION AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES ON THE FISH COMMUNITY IN A PERENNIAL, LIMESTONE STREAM OVER A DECADE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COUPLED EFFECT OF CHANNELIZATION AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES ON THE FISH COMMUNITY IN A PERENNIAL, LIMESTONE STREAM OVER A DECADE The Kentucky Index of Biotic Integrity (KIBI) is a modification of Karr's IBI and was used to assess the long-term health of Little Six Mile, a low order (wadeable) perennial stream in Central Kentucky.The stream displays the features of a channelized limestone stream with low sinuosity, waterfalls, bedrock, low density of riffles, bank erosion, and former agriculture in the flood plain. Data span 2007-2017 with an increase in sampling frequency after 2011. Fish, habitat, and water quality data were sampled in late summer. Overall, the KIBI scores decreased from a peak in 2012. When drought conditions did not exist, KIBI scores were fair to excellent and during an extreme drought, the stream scored as good. The absence of simple lithophilic spawning species, intolerant species richness, and percent insectivores (excluding tolerant species) decreased the KIBI. The results indicate a coupled effect of channelization and precipitation extremes on the fish communities in a limestone stream and are not likely to improve without restoration of riffle habitat and upstream connectivity.

Rhiannon Cecil (Primary Presenter/Author), Kentucky State University, rhiannon.cecil@kysu.edu;


Tamara Sluss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kentucky State University, tamara.sluss@kysu.edu;


Stephanie Brandt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kentucky Fish and Wldlife, stephanie.brandt@ky.gov;


Matthew Thomas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kentucky Fish and Wldlife, matthew.thomas@ky.gov;


C17 Bioassessment 137 - NEW TAXA RECORDS FOR SAMPLES FROM PUERTO RICO

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

NEW TAXA RECORDS FOR SAMPLES FROM PUERTO RICO Recent sampling events conducted by NEON at two sites in southeastern Puerto Rico have yielded taxa that either have not been recorded or not yet been described. These new records include taxa from Coleoptera, Diptera, Hydrachnidia, Gastropoda, Lepidoptera, and Ephemeroptera. There is a lack of recent literature pertaining to distribution, taxonomic keys, and overall population studies in Puerto Rico for many of these groups. We take a preliminary look at these specimens, corresponding literature from nearby geographical locations, and discuss in-depth a possible new genus of water mite in the family Hygrobatidae.

Jennifer Shanteau (Primary Presenter/Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jshanteau@geiconsultants.com;


Kimberly Gerlock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., kgerlock@geiconsultants.com;


Uttam Rai (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., ukrai@geiconsultants.com;


Jeniffer Lynch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jlynch@geiconsultants.com;


C17 Bioassessment 138 - ZOOBENTHIC ASSEMBLAGE CONDITION INDEX FOR LAKE ERIE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ZOOBENTHIC ASSEMBLAGE CONDITION INDEX FOR LAKE ERIE We derived and calibrated a Lake Erie multivariate zoobenthic index by sampling across the full range of an environmental stress gradient, ordinating response variables against the gradient and identifying the changing range of variability (quantiles) in the response variables. A composite stressor gradient was created by combining consensus-derived Great Lakes Environmental Assessment and Mapping (GLEAM) stress layers likely to influence zoobenthos. We then examined variation in zoobenthic composition in samples collected in 2004, 2010 and 2015/16 through L. Erie Comprehensive Collaborative Studies (ECCS; 125-294 stratified-randomly selected stations). Sites situated in the lowest stress quintile were designated “Reference” locations. Cluster analysis of these sites identified 3 biological groups, spatially distinguishable according to basin, depth and substrate type. Habitat-specific benthic composite indices were derived by relating changing community composition to stress gradient scores. Hexagenia mayflies, gammarid amphipods, and oligochaete species/chironomid genera characterized reference sites of shallow-soft (western basin), shallow-hard, and deep-soft habitat locations respectively. Stress thresholds were identified by piecewise regression. Post hoc classification accuracy varied by habitat type, ranging from 40-70%.

Jan Ciborowski (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, cibor@uwindsor.ca;


David Barton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Waterloo, drbarton@uwaterloo.ca;


Valerie Brady (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, University Minnesota Duluth, vbrady@d.umn.edu;


Meijun Cai (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota Duluth, Natural Resources Research Institute, mcai@d.umn.edu;


Katya Kovalenko (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, Univ. Minnesota Duluth, philarctus@gmail.com;


Kenneth Krieger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Heidelberg University, kkrieger@heidelberg.edu;


Sigrid Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan, sdpsmith@umich.edu;


Jabed Tomal (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Toronto Scarborough, jtomal@utsc.utoronto.ca;


David Allan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan, dallan@umich.edu;


Lucinda Johnson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth, ljohnson@d.umn.edu;


C18 Biodiversity 139 - LINKING STREAM HABITAT QUALITY, SPECIES DIVERSITY AND SPECIES TRAITS TO BETTER INFORM RESTORATION PRACTICES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LINKING STREAM HABITAT QUALITY, SPECIES DIVERSITY AND SPECIES TRAITS TO BETTER INFORM RESTORATION PRACTICES We investigated the relationship between stream habitat quality and benthic macroinvertebrate community diversity and function by evaluating 30 streams in the Piedmont, North Carolina spanning a gradient of good to poor habitat quality. We used the Mecklenburg Stream Habitat Assessment Protocol (MHAP) to assess stream habitat quality and diversity. We sampled the benthic macroinvertebrate community in these streams using the North Carolina Standard Bioassessment Sampling Method (NCDWR). In the 10 streams with Good MHAP scores, benthic macroinvertebrates were collected from 8 microhabitats, including riffles, root wads, and sandy areas to correlate species and species ecological traits with each microhabitat. We found that EPT Taxa Richness is generally 10 or more when the MHAP score is greater than 110 (Partially Supporting Use Category). Riffles are the most diverse microhabitat in terms of species and functional diversity. Leaf packs, root wads, and wood debris were microhabitats that also supported a diversity of species and functional traits. By correlating species traits with specific microhabitats, we can better evaluate how to better design stream restoration projects as one component in restoring stream function and in stimulating benthic macroinvertebrate community recovery.

Anthony Roux (Primary Presenter/Author), Mecklenburg County Storm Water Services, Water Quality Program, Charlotte, NC; William States Lee College of Engineering, University of North Carolina Charlotte, Tony.Roux@MecklenburgCountync.gov;


Sandra Clinton, PhD (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;


C18 Biodiversity 140 - DETECTING THE IMPACT OF PARASITISM AND EGG BANK RECRUITMENT ON HOST GENETIC DIVERSITY IN A DAPHNIA-PARASITE SYSTEM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DETECTING THE IMPACT OF PARASITISM AND EGG BANK RECRUITMENT ON HOST GENETIC DIVERSITY IN A DAPHNIA-PARASITE SYSTEM Daphnia dentifera is a dominant species in lakes, playing a significant role in nutrient cycling and serving as a resource for aquatic predators. Studies indicate diseases can strongly select on host populations, leading to changes in host genetic variation. Studying the impact of virulent fungal parasite Metschnikowia bicuspidata on D.dentifera helps us understand how hosts maintain genetic variation in the face of strong selection. In this system, the reproductive cycle of hosts consists of alternating asexual and sexual phases; the latter results in diapausing eggs that are incorporated into lake sediments. We collected mothers bearing diapausing eggs from two lakes in the fall; one lake had experienced an epidemic and one had not. We also collected individuals hatched from both egg banks the following spring. We are quantifying changes to host diversity in the two lake populations by microsatellite genotyping. We will compare the genetic variation of sexually recombinant daughters to that of the spring hatchling population to detect how recruitment from the egg bank impacts the diversity of D. dentifera. This study will show how sexual reproduction and the egg bank effect maintain diversity in ecologically important host species.

Katherine McLean (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan , kdmclean@umich.edu;


Camden Gowler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Univesity of Michigan, cgowler@umich.edu ;


Spencer Hall (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University, sprhall@indiana.edu;


Meghan Duffy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan , duffymeg@umich.edu;


Haniyeh Zamani (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Michigan , hzamani@umich.edu;


C18 Biodiversity 141 - MULTIPLE DISPERSAL PATHWAYS SHAPE DIVERSITY PATTERNS IN ARID RIVER NETWORKS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MULTIPLE DISPERSAL PATHWAYS SHAPE DIVERSITY PATTERNS IN ARID RIVER NETWORKS River networks have a hierarchical dendritic structure in which branching headwater segments converge to form higher order mainstem segments. The shape and structure of river networks results in variation in connectivity between network locations and is closely linked to the dispersal of aquatic organisms. In arid systems, ephemeral and intermittent segments have seasonal dry periods, reducing network connectivity. However, this reduction to connectivity may have less of an impact on flight and strong dispersing species that may be more structured by an overland dispersal network. This study examined long-term archived data for sites sampled for aquatic arthropods in arid catchments in Southern California, USA to explore diversity patterns of taxa exhibiting a wide range of dispersal abilities. This study hypothesized that species with overland dispersal traits would be more similar along Euclidean distance, while river network restricted species would be more similar over in-stream measured distances.

Ryan Conway (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Riverside, rconw002@ucr.edu;


Kurt Anderson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Riverside, kurt.anderson@ucr.edu;


C18 Biodiversity 142 - SCALING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FRESHWATER INSECT DIVERSITY AND THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SCALING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FRESHWATER INSECT DIVERSITY AND THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT Climate change and human land use are leading threats to freshwater biodiversity. Terrestrial primary productivity may modify the effects of climate and land use on freshwater biodiversity, because primary productivity often correlates positively with biodiversity, and stream organisms are partly reliant on terrestrial primary production for organic matter. Relationships between climate, the terrestrial environment, and freshwater biodiversity likely differ across spatial scales and may vary among different forms of freshwater biodiversity– taxonomic and functional. These scaling relationships have yet to be quantified at continental extents. We are addressing these knowledge gaps by building a database of species occurrence records and functional traits for freshwater insects across the continental United States. We are characterizing relationships of remotely sensed climate, land use, and terrestrial primary productivity with stream insect taxonomic and functional diversity at three spatial scales, using watersheds of the US Geological Survey hydrological unit codes ranging in area from 103 to 43,512 km2. This study will advance conservation planning by identifying regions of high freshwater insect diversity, land use impacts, and the scales at which remotely sensed measures of climate and the terrestrial environment are effective for predicting freshwater biodiversity.

Laura Twardochleb (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, twardoch@msu.edu;


Quentin Read (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, qdr@msu.edu;


Phoebe Zarnetske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, plz@anr.msu.edu;


Ethan Hiltner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, hiltnere@msu.edu;


Kyla Dahlin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, kdahlin@msu.edu;


Kendra Cheruvelil (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, ksc@msu.edu;


Patricia Soranno (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, soranno@msu.edu;


Aaron Kamoske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, kamoskea@msu.edu;


C20 Climate Change 143 - CLIMATE CHANGE AND MOUNTAINTOP REMOVAL MINING: A MAXENT ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL DUAL THREAT TO WEST VIRGINIA FISHES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CLIMATE CHANGE AND MOUNTAINTOP REMOVAL MINING: A MAXENT ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL DUAL THREAT TO WEST VIRGINIA FISHES Accounts of species’ range shifts in response to climate change, primarily as latitudinal shifts towards the poles or upslope shifts to higher elevations, are rapidly accumulating. These range shifts are often attributed to species ‘tracking’ their thermal niches as temperatures in their native ranges increase. Our objective is to assess the effects climate change-driven shifts in water temperature may have on West Virginia’s freshwater fishes, focusing explicitly on increased exposure to mountaintop removal (MTR) surface coal mining. Mid-century shifts in habitat suitability for nine non-game West Virginia fishes were projected via Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) species distribution modeling using a combination of contemporary climate conditions and the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 future climate scenarios. Results from RCP 8.5 scenarios predict habitat suitability will generally increase in high elevation streams that lie within a 10 km radius buffer of MTR sites, thereby increasing the risk of exposure to MTR effects for many freshwater fishes. Methods and results presented here can be used to inform management and conservation decisions for aquatic species threatened by MTR and other large-scale disturbances.

Lindsey Flanary (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Commonwealth University , flanarylr@vcu.edu;


C20 Climate Change 144 - TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON STREAM ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONING ACROSS SEASONS: INSIGHTS FROM A TEMPERATE THERMAL SPRING IN THE VOSGES MOUNTAINS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON STREAM ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONING ACROSS SEASONS: INSIGHTS FROM A TEMPERATE THERMAL SPRING IN THE VOSGES MOUNTAINS During the last decades, the effects of temperature on stream ecosystem functioning have received considerable attention. However, because several biotic or abiotic (e.g. latitudinal, seasonal) factors often co-vary with natural temperature gradients, disentangling the effect of temperature from the influence of confounding factors in field studies remains a challenge. To overcome this limitation, we used a non-volcanic thermal spring that flows out at 21°C all year round and progressively cools downstream, resulting in a moderate negative temperature gradient. We studied microbial decomposition of alder leaf-litter and benthic biofilm production for 28 days, in spring and winter, at 4 sites along this gradient. Results showed contrasting patterns between leaf-litter decomposition and primary production. Surprisingly, increasing temperature hampered decomposition in spring, whereas winter decomposition rates were invariably low along the temperature gradient. Conversely, primary production increased with temperature at both seasons, although this concentration was lower in winter. These results suggest some discrepancies in the temperature-dependence of these two fundamental ecosystem processes. Temperature rise could thus lead to shifts in the balance between carbon fixation and mineralization in stream ecosystems with strong consequences on carbon cycles at the global scale.

Alice Gossiaux (Primary Presenter/Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, alice.gossiaux@univ-lorraine.fr;


Pascal Poupin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, pascal.poupin@univ-lorraine.fr;


Jérémy Jabiol (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, jeremy.jabiol@univ-lorraine.fr;


Eric Chauvet (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, CNRS, France, eric.chauvet@univ-tlse3.fr;


François Guérold (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, francois.guerold@univ-lorraine.fr;


C20 Climate Change 145 - DETERMINING THE SYNCHRONY OF CO2 FLUX IN DIFFERENT PONDS NEAR BARROW, ALASKA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DETERMINING THE SYNCHRONY OF CO2 FLUX IN DIFFERENT PONDS NEAR BARROW, ALASKA The tundra houses more than one-third of the world's soil carbon and tundra ponds may contribute a substantial amount of carbon to the landscape carbon budget, despite making up a relatively small component of the landscape. The study's purpose was to examine variation in diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) flux in tundra ponds near Barrow, Alaska. CO2 concentrations were logged for 48 hours at 8 ponds surveyed over 2 weeks in summer 2018. Average CO2 concentrations within any pond ranged from 311 to 4310 µatm, with an overall average of 1541, indicating that ponds were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Correlations were done to see the degree of synchrony among ponds. Most ponds followed similar diurnal trends in CO2 (r>0.55, p<0.05). Variability among ponds could be explained by temporal variability in precipitation and solar radiation, as well as the chemical and physical properties of the ponds. Further research on the ponds is needed in order to determine what controls the CO2 flux in a period of changing climate.

Vanessa Lougheed (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Texas at El Paso, vlougheed@utep.edu;


Luis Del Val (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Texas at El Paso, ladelval@miners.utep.edu;


C20 Climate Change 146 - COMPARISONS OF THE VARIABILITY OF DIURNAL CO2 FLUX IN DIFFERENT AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS IN BARROW, ALASKA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARISONS OF THE VARIABILITY OF DIURNAL CO2 FLUX IN DIFFERENT AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS IN BARROW, ALASKA Heat concentration at the Earth’s poles, coupled with carbon rich permafrost in the Arctic, leaves the possibility of release of CO2 or CH4 due to increased photorespiration. The aim of this study was to examine the variations in diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) flux of three tundra water bodies: a pond, river and a lake. Located in Barrow, Alaska, sites were monitored continuously using Campbell loggers and Vaisala CO2 sensors for an eight to twelve-day period during peak growing season. The pond, river, and lake had average CO2 concentrations of 1333, 1358, and 512 µatm, respectively; all sites were sources of CO2, with concentrations greater than atmospheric CO2 (388 µatm). The largest CO2 release was from the pond (4190 µatm), corresponding to relatively high downward total solar irradiance values of 617 W/m2. Solar radiation, paired with temperature, explained much of the variability in CO2 within all three water bodies. Accurately recording PAR and temperature at multiple sites with CO2 flux monitoring at each site could give better insight as to the exact effects of solar irradiance on CO2 release in the Arctic.

Fabian Uribarri (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Texas at El Paso, fauribarri@miners.utep.edu;


C20 Climate Change 147 - DRIVERS OF CO2 FLUX FROM OPEN WATER AND VEGETATED MARGINS OF AN ARCTIC TUNDRA POND

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DRIVERS OF CO2 FLUX FROM OPEN WATER AND VEGETATED MARGINS OF AN ARCTIC TUNDRA POND The Arctic tundra has traditionally been viewed as a net carbon sink; however, the gradual rise in temperature may be causing carbon dioxide (CO2) release from permafrost at a faster rate. For this study, CO2 concentrations in the water were monitored continuously over a 14-day period during the summer of 2017 from a single Arctic tundra pond near Utqia?vik, AK using a CO2 data logger. Climate data was collected from the nearest weather station. The goal was to see how CO2 flux differs among open water and the vegetated margins, and the role of climate on these fluxes. Average aquatic CO2 concentrations were highest from the vegetated margins (2729 µatm) than the open water sites (1328 µatm), with both acting as a source of atmospheric CO2. Highest CO2 concentrations at both sites were observed during a period of exceptionally warm weather, with a maximum temperature of 20.4 degrees C and a solar irradiance peak of 618 W/m2. The associated implications with high levels of CO2 flux that come with warmer temperatures and from the currently expanding vegetation margins can affect the balance of carbon flux at the landscape level.

Vanessa Lougheed (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Texas at El Paso, vlougheed@utep.edu;


Rocio Ronquillo (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Texas at El Paso , rcronquillo@miners.utep.edu;


C20 Climate Change 148 - SUPRASEASONAL DROUGHT DRIVES TURNOVER OF STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SUPRASEASONAL DROUGHT DRIVES TURNOVER OF STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES Climatic extremes are becoming more intense across much of the globe, potentially transforming biodiversity and functioning within affected ecosystems. In freshwater environments, hydrological extremes, such as drought, can regulate beta diversity, acting as a powerful environmental filter to dictate the complement of species and functional traits found at local and landscape scales. New methods enabling beta diversity and its functional equivalent to be partitioned into turnover and nestedness-resultant components may offer novel insights into parallel drought impacts on ecosystem structure and function. We used a series of artificial channels (perennial headwater stream analogues) to simulate a gradient of drought intensity, along which we modelled taxonomic and functional turnover and nestedness of macroinvertebrate communities. Drought intensification produced significant environmental distance decay trends (i.e. communities became increasingly taxonomically and functionally dissimilar the more differentially disturbed by drought they were). Taxonomic and functional distance decay slopes were not significantly different, implying that communities were functionally vulnerable to drying. The increased frequency and intensity of droughts predicted under most climate change scenarios could thus profoundly modify not only the structure of running water invertebrate communities, but also the ecosystem functions they underpin.

Tom Matthews (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, t.j.matthews@bham.ac.uk;


Kieran Khamis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, k.khamis@bham.ac.uk;


Zining Wang (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, zxw305@bham.ac.uk;


Alexander Milner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, a.m.milner@bham.ac.uk;


Matthew O'Callaghan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, mattgdns@yahoo.co.uk;


Mark Ledger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, m.e.ledger@bham.ac.uk;


Thomas Aspin (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Birmingham, ta9287@my.bristol.ac.uk;


C20 Climate Change 149 - RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF YOUNG OF THE YEAR BROOK TROUT AND INTERANNUAL CLIMATE VARIATION IN PENNSYLVANIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF YOUNG OF THE YEAR BROOK TROUT AND INTERANNUAL CLIMATE VARIATION IN PENNSYLVANIA Climate fluctuations can have widespread effects on reproductive success, potentially altering the demographics and viability of animal populations. In streams, extreme summer temperatures coupled with substrate scouring during rain events can reduce survival of young-of-the year (YOY) fish, but these mechanisms have seldom been examined over multiple years across state management regions. We aimed to identify inter-annual regulators of fish populations by testing for relationships between the relative abundance of YOY brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and climatic conditions. Brook trout data were collected from over 600 streams across Pennsylvania by participants in Pennsylvania’s Unassessed Waters Initiative Data from 2010-2017, and seasonal climate data were obtained from regional airports. Relative abundance of YOY brook trout varied dramatically (17-66%), and preliminary analysis shows strong negative relationships with winter and spring precipitation and no relationship with temperature. One possible explanation for our findings is that extreme rain events during egg incubation in the substrate reduces recruitment of YOY fish. If this is the case, we predict negative impacts on fish populations in regions with more extreme winter and spring rain events due to climate change.

Lauren Prasko (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, laurenprasko@gmail.com;


David Janetski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.edu;


Aiden Simpson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, c-asimpson@pa.gov;


C22 Distrubance 150 - THE INFLUENCE OF WATER TEMPERATURE ON ECOSYSTEM METABOLIC RESPONSE TO FLOODS IN MIDWESTERN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE INFLUENCE OF WATER TEMPERATURE ON ECOSYSTEM METABOLIC RESPONSE TO FLOODS IN MIDWESTERN STREAMS Ecosystem metabolism is a fundamental biological process that contributes to whether an ecosystem is a net carbon source or sink. By reducing light availability and removing biofilms, floods often reduce respiration in streams, though these effects may vary throughout the year as seasons change. In order to examine the effect that seasonality has on stream ecosystem metabolic flood response, we analyzed USGS and StreamPulse data from 2 streams in southern Wisconsin and modeled ecosystem metabolism over three years. While ecosystem metabolism in one stream decreased during flood events throughout the year as predicted in the scientific literature, ecosystem metabolism in the other stream responded differently between summer and winter floods. Summer floods (those with water temperatures higher than the 3-year average) caused ecosystem metabolism to increase significantly during the flood event and winter floods had no such effect. Though a small study, this result shows that floods may not have solely negative effects on ecosystem metabolism. As in other ecosystems, disturbance events play a complicated role in stream ecosystem processes and so warrant more focused research.

Sam Blackburn (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - Madison, srblackburn@wisc.edu;


Emily Stanley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin - Madison, ehstanley@wisc.edu;


C22 Disturbance 151 - COMMUNITY RECOVERY FROM SIMULATED STREAMBED DISTURBANCE ACROSS A GRADIENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE IMPAIRMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMMUNITY RECOVERY FROM SIMULATED STREAMBED DISTURBANCE ACROSS A GRADIENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE IMPAIRMENT Acid mine drainage (AMD) creates stressful conditions for stream organisms, including low pH and elevated dissolved metal concentrations. These conditions strongly influence stream communities, leading to low diversity and mostly tolerant taxa in AMD impaired streams. We hypothesized that impaired streams recover faster from streambed disturbance than recovered and unimpaired streams. Riffles were physically disturbed with rakes in AMD impaired streams (N=2), recovered streams (N=3), and unimpaired streams (N=2). Macroinvertebrates and periphyton were collected immediately before disturbance and 5, 10, 15, and 30 days afterwards in both undisturbed and experimentally disturbed areas. Macroinvertebrates were identified to family; chlorophyll a was quantified from scrubbed rocks. We used generalized mixed effects models to examine how AMD impairment and streambed disturbance affected the recovery rates of macroinvertebrate abundance and richness and chlorophyll a. Recovery in impaired sites was different than recovered and unimpaired sites for abundance (p<0.001 and = 0.002, respectively), richness (p>0.001 for both). Recovery of periphyton in impaired sites was significantly different than unimpaired sites (p<0.001), but not recovered sites (p=0.082). These findings suggest that recovered sites differ in recovery rate due to taxonomic characteristics, especially in the periphyton community.

Mariah Thrush Hood (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio University, mt364608@ohio.edu;


Kelly Johnson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, johnsok3@ohio.edu;


Meg Beattie (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, mb734014@ohio.edu ;


C22 Disturbance 152 - INTRASPECIFIC PREDATION AMONG WATER STRIDERS (VELIIDAE, HEMIPTERA) AS STRONG AS INTERSPECIFIC PREDATION BY RIPARIAN SPIDER (WENDILGARDA CLARA)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INTRASPECIFIC PREDATION AMONG WATER STRIDERS (VELIIDAE, HEMIPTERA) AS STRONG AS INTERSPECIFIC PREDATION BY RIPARIAN SPIDER (WENDILGARDA CLARA) Intraspecific predation among water striders (Veliidae, Hemiptera) as strong as interspecific predation by a riparian spider (Wendilgarda clara) ABSTRACT Intraspecific and interspecific predation, are important processes that determine species interactions. Wendilgarda clara is a theridiosomatid spider abundant in tropical streams that attach their silk lines to the water surface to snare floating insects. They rely on structural features of the riparian zone for web building. To test how substrate complexity will affect the capture rate of Veliidae by W. clara we conducted an experiment by creating eight mesocosms of varying substrate complexity. We measured the mortality rates and number of web attachment points between mesocosm treatments. There were no significant differences between treatment groups, for both Veliidae mortality rate and web attachment points. We propose that these results may show evidence of W. clara behavioral plasticity and adaptation to frequently changing ecosystems. Intraspecific predation rates among Veliidae may be more significant than interspecific predation by W. clara. This study offers evidence that top-down control of Veliidae by W. clara along headwater streams in Puerto Rico may be relatively low.

Mariely Vega (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras Campus, Mariely.vega2@upr.edu;


C22 Disturbance 153 - LACK OF POST-HURRICANE IMPACTS ON ALGAL BIOFILMS IN TWO TROPICAL HEADWATER STREAMS IN PUERTO RICO

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LACK OF POST-HURRICANE IMPACTS ON ALGAL BIOFILMS IN TWO TROPICAL HEADWATER STREAMS IN PUERTO RICO In tropical streams, large-scale disturbances such as hurricanes can increase light availability through defoliation, influencing the response of algal primary producers. After Puerto Rico was struck by two successive Category 4 hurricanes (Irma and Maria) in September 2017, we examined the response of algae to canopy defoliation in two headwater streams draining the El Yunque National Forest. We predicted increases in algal standing crop in response to greater light availability. Building on our 15-year dataset of algal standing crop at the reach scale, we quantitatively sampled algae along a 100 m reach of each stream. Contrary to our initial prediction, algal standing crop did not increase post-hurricane, as was observed in 1989 in response to large-scale defoliation by Hurricane Hugo. We attribute the lack of increase in chlorophyll a to repeated high discharge events (increased “flashiness” with storm events) following Hurricanes Irma and Maria. In contrast, Hurricane Hugo was followed by drought and the lack of scouring events resulted in visibly high algal standing crop. Our study highlights the importance of the interacting effects of disturbance events such as hurricanes with droughts and high discharge events.

Amber Faulkner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, afalkner687@gmail.com;


Pablo Gutierrez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, ;


Pedro J Torres (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, torresp@denison.edu;


Alonso Ramirez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


Catherine Pringle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


Kelsey Morton (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, kmorton@uga.edu;


C22 Disturbance 154 - LONG-TERM TRENDS IN VARIABILITY OF PRIMARY PRODUCER COMMUNITIES IN A DYNAMIC, ARIDLAND STREAM ECOSYSTEM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LONG-TERM TRENDS IN VARIABILITY OF PRIMARY PRODUCER COMMUNITIES IN A DYNAMIC, ARIDLAND STREAM ECOSYSTEM Intermittent and ephemeral aridland stream ecosystems are characterized by irregular flood disturbance regimes that are highly variable among years. Flood disturbances scour stream beds, resulting in successional regrowth of primary producer communities as a function of time since flood. This study aims to understand how variability in antecedent flood conditions affects the composition and abundance of primary-producer communities over seasonal and annual timescales. Using seven-years of long-term data collected from Sycamore Creek, AZ, we examined changes in the primary-producer community, including dominant wetland plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. We evaluated how antecedent floods influenced patterns in the primary producer community. Flood discharge varied over the seven-year dataset from a maximum discharge of around 350 m^3/s in 2010. Primary producer composition and abundance varied annually as a function of among-year variation in flood events. Years with greater flood discharge magnitudes saw greater abundances of wetland plants, which varied among species. Schoenoplectus americanus experienced large increases in abundance following large flood events. Conversely, algae groups were less sensitive to flood disturbance. Our data illustrate the importance of annual variability of flood regimes on successional patterns of primary-producer communities in aridland streams.

Marina Lauck (Primary Presenter/Author), Arizona State University, mlauck1@asu.edu;


Nancy Grimm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, nbgrimm@asu.edu;


C24 Eutrophication 155 - TRENDS IN CHLOROPHYLL-A AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FINNISH RIVERS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TRENDS IN CHLOROPHYLL-A AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FINNISH RIVERS Anthropogenic nutrient load accelerates eutrophication of surface waters. We studied long–term trends in summer chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and nutrient concentrations in 18 regularly monitored Finnish rivers (1985–2016). We divided the rivers into three groups based on the percentage of organic soil types in the catchment: <13% (Low Peat Rivers), 13–25% (Medium Peat Rivers) and >25% (High Peat Rivers). Catchments with highly erosion-sensitive clay soils form a fourth group. The Mann-Kendall non-parametric test was used for trend detection and the Boosted Regression Tree analysis to study the influence and interaction of explanatory variables with Chl-a. We found decreasing trends for Chl-a in High Peat and Clay Rivers and an increasing trend in Low Peat Rivers. Increasing trends were found for total organic carbon, water temperature and turbidity, while both increasing and decreasing trends appeared for total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) depending on the river group. TP, TN, water temperature and turbidity explained best the variations in Chl-a. TP showed more >50% relative influence on Chl-a in the combination of all river’s data. Higher water temperatures led to Chl-a increases suggesting that warming will challenge management of rivers suffering eutrophication.

José Enrique Cano Bernal (Primary Presenter/Author), Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), jose.cano-bernal@ymparisto.fi;


C24 Eutrophication 156 - PATTERNS OF NUTRIENT LIMITATION IN SIXTEEN NORTHEASTERN US LAKES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PATTERNS OF NUTRIENT LIMITATION IN SIXTEEN NORTHEASTERN US LAKES Increased anthropogenic loading of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to aquatic systems has resulted in an increase in the frequency and intensity of harmful algal blooms. Despite the prevalence of P limitation in many lakes, there is spatial and temporal variation in limitation patterns, with evidence for both N limitation and co-limitation. In this study, we performed standardized nutrient limitation experiments in 16 lakes across the northeastern United States. After one-week in situ incubations, we measured chlorophyll-a in each of four nutrient treatments (Control, N, P, N&P). Our study lakes show variation in nutrient limitation, with co-limitation occurring in 50% of study lakes. Algal communities in all 16 lakes were dominated by either cyanobacteria or chlorophyta. We used Glass’ delta as a metric for effect size for each type of nutrient limitation, and found that the P effect size was positively correlated to N:P (R2 = 0.30, p = 0.036), suggesting that alleviating P limitation results in the strongest phytoplankton response when lake N concentrations are high relative to P. Given the observed spatial variation, there is a need to increase focus on the factors that determine nutrient limitation type.

Denise Bruesewitz (Primary Presenter/Author), Colby College, dabruese@colby.edu;


Brian Kim (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colby College, stkim@colby.edu;


Abigail Lewis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pomona College, allz2015@mymail.pomona.edu ;


Hailee Edwards (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), State University of New York at New Paltz, edwards_hailee@yahoo.com ;


Heather Wander (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), State University of New York at New Paltz, wanderh1@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu ;


Alex Taylor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Vermont, alexander.e.taylor@uvm.edu;


Noah Poulin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ryerson University, noah.poulin@ryerson.ca;


Sarah Princiotta (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hancock Biological Station, princiotta.sarah@gmail.com ;


Kiyoko Yokota (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), State University of New York at Oneonta, kiyoko.yokota@oneonta.edu ;


Courtney Wigdahl-Perry (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), State University of New York at Fredonia, Courtney.Wigdahl@fredonia.edu ;


Kevin Rose (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, rosek4@rpi.edu;


David Richardson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), SUNY New Paltz, Department of Biology, richardsond@newpaltz.edu;


C24 Eutrophication 157 - SATELLITE-BASED MONITORING OF CYANOBACTERIA BLOOMS FROM 2002-2011 FOR 11 RESERVOIRS WITH WATERSHEDS ALONG AN AGRICULTURAL GRADIENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SATELLITE-BASED MONITORING OF CYANOBACTERIA BLOOMS FROM 2002-2011 FOR 11 RESERVOIRS WITH WATERSHEDS ALONG AN AGRICULTURAL GRADIENT Imagery acquired by the Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer from 2002-2011 was used to estimate cyanobacteria cell densities for 11 reservoirs in Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, USA (surface areas 8–43 km2; 864 total images spanning May–September). This initial analysis is based on the means of all pixels (300 m resolution) for each reservoir on each observation date. Cyanobacteria cell densities significantly increased as watershed percent forested land cover decreased, and this relationship was strongest in June and July. Mean cyanobacteria cell densities were positively correlated with the means of chlorophyll a, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, which were sampled intermittently during the timespan coinciding with satellite imagery. Based on the maximum mean cell density observed each year for each reservoir (n=110), 23% of observations had densities posing low risk, 22% had densities posing moderate risk, and 55% had densities posing high risk to human health. Additional work will examine temporal trends and make comparisons to field collected phytoplankton, but based on relationships with watershed land cover and field-based nutrient and chlorophyll measurements, these results highlight the potential usefulness of satellite derived estimates of cyanobacteria.

Nathan Smucker (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, smucker.nathan@epa.gov;


Blake Schaeffer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. EPA, schaeffer.blake@epa.gov;


Jake J. Beaulieu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Environmental Protection Agency, beaulieu.jake@epa.gov;


Christopher Nietch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, nietch.christopher@epa.gov;


C24 Eutrophication 158 - MONITORING NUTRIENT LEVELS AND SEDIMENT IN MACATAWA WATERSHED

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MONITORING NUTRIENT LEVELS AND SEDIMENT IN MACATAWA WATERSHED Project Clarity, a $12M restoration project initiated in 2013, works to restore the 179 mi2 hypereutrophic Lake Macatawa Watershed. Our goal is to assess Project Clarity’s impact on water quality by collecting weekly samples from 12 representative watershed sites. Physical and chemical parameters including total suspended solids, nutrients (phosphate and nitrate), temperature, stream discharge, dissolved oxygen, and biological oxygen demand are measured and correlated to the composition of the watershed’s microbiome. The watershed’s land use and hydrology make it flashy, causing rapid surges in stream height and discharge during large rain events. This causes runoff that often carries large amounts of fine grained sediment that has the tendency to adsorb nutrients. Most of these sediments end up entering nearby waterways, causing a decrease in water quality. Project Clarity implements best management practices for land use in an attempt to minimize the impacts of rain events large enough to produce heavy runoff. This study is, in part, a way to monitor those efforts by providing a baseline of water quality characteristics for monitoring remediation efforts in the watershed. Correlations between data are explored for potential influence on large-scale biogeochemical cycling.

Mallory Luke (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, mallory.luke@hope.edu;


Abbygale Parshall (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, abbygale.parshall@hope.edu;


Jacob Spry (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, jacob.spry@hope.edu;


Sarah Brokus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, brokus@hope.edu;


Randall Wade (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, wade@hope.edu;


Brent Krueger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, kruegerb@hope.edu;


Michael Pikaart (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, pikaart@hope.edu;


Aaron Best (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, best@hope.edu;


Eleda Plouch (Primary Presenter/Author), Hope College, eleda.plouch@hope.edu;


Abagail Jeavons (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, abagail.jeavons@hope.edu;


Daniel Wade (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, daniel.wade@hope.edu;


C24 Eutrophication 260 - CHRONIC PHOSPHORUS ENRICHMENT PRESSES STREAM ECOSYSTEMS INTO A NUISANCE FILAMENTOUS ALGAL REGIME

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CHRONIC PHOSPHORUS ENRICHMENT PRESSES STREAM ECOSYSTEMS INTO A NUISANCE FILAMENTOUS ALGAL REGIME We demonstrate that chronic over-enrichment of phosphorus triggers a regime shift from biofilm-based stream ecosystems to ones dominated by nuisance filamentous green algae. We sampled reaches bimonthly for 2 y from 35 temperate, open-canopy, moderate-gradient streams that spanned a continuum of total phosphorus (TP) from <10 to 150 µg/L. Streams with TP < 25 µg/L supported relatively high biomass of biofilms that were predominantly comprised of diatoms and cyanobacteria. However, streams with TP > 25-35 µg/L shifted to a regime dominated by the filamentous green alga Cladophora glomerata. Most streams with TP > 25-35 µg/L experienced multiple blooms and sustained relatively high levels of C. glomerata biovolume, even during non-bloom periods. Blooms re-occurred in year 2 despite frequent spates, including a widespread bloom just 2 mo after a 500-y flood. Chronic P enrichment above threshold levels reported in this study is likely to press ecosystems into a nuisance filamentous algal regime, even in the face of frequent, intense hydrological disturbance.

Ryan S. King (Primary Presenter/Author), Baylor University, Ryan_S_King@baylor.edu;


Stephen C. Cook (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Stephen_Cook@baylor.edu;


Jeffrey A. Back (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Jeff_Back@baylor.edu;


Morgan W. Bettcher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Morgan_Bettcher@baylor.edu;


Stephen Elser (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, selser2014@gmail.com;


Katherine V. Hooker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, khooker@ou.edu;


Lauren Housley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Lauren_Housley@baylor.edu;


Caleb J. Robbins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Caleb_Robbins@baylor.edu;


C25 Food Webs 159 - IS INDIVIDUAL BODY SIZE A RELIABLE PREDICTOR OF TROPHIC POSITION IN EASTERN U.S. STREAMS?

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

IS INDIVIDUAL BODY SIZE A RELIABLE PREDICTOR OF TROPHIC POSITION IN EASTERN U.S. STREAMS? Because predators must be large enough to capture, handle, and ingest their (usually smaller) prey, trophic position (TP) is generally predicted to increase with body size. However, empirical studies of the relationship between size and TP in aquatic ecosystems have yielded mixed results, with strong positive relationships reported in some systems and weak or non-existent relationships reported in others. We collected fish and invertebrate stable isotope samples from four eastern U.S. streams, distributed along a latitudinal gradient from ~39°N (Front Royal, VA) to ~33°N (Moundville, AL), to test for a positive body mass vs. TP relationship. Importantly, we use body mass and TP estimates from individual specimens, rather than species-level averages, in our analyses; this is done to account for ontogenetic shifts in feeding behavior, which can bias species-level estimates that only incorporate juvenile or adult size and TP data. Finally, we use linear regression to test for differences in the body mass vs. TP relationship among sampling sites.

Daijona Revell (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, revelldt@mymail.vcu.edu;


Serena Moncion (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Virginia, sam7dz@virginia.edu;


Raquel Wetzell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, wetzellrm@mymail.vcu.edu;


Felisha Walls (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, wallsfn@vcu.edu;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


C25 Food Webs 160 - HIGH THROUGHPUT SEQUENCING, HABITAT, AND BEHAVIORAL STUDIES TO ANALYZE THE ROLE OF OLIGOCHAETES IN THE DIET OF LEBERTIA WATER MITES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

HIGH THROUGHPUT SEQUENCING, HABITAT, AND BEHAVIORAL STUDIES TO ANALYZE THE ROLE OF OLIGOCHAETES IN THE DIET OF LEBERTIA WATER MITES Background: Among microinvertebrates, water mites are understudied esthetically beautiful carnivorous animals. Until high-throughput sequencing studies by Vasquez (2017 Ph.D. dissertation), the hypothesized diets of water mites was mainly based on laboratory feeding studies and not on what animals ingested in nature. Using LCOI/mLep primers, Vasquez identified chironomid DNA in freshly collected Lebertia mites and made the unexpected discovery of numerous oligochaete sequences as well. Methods: Using a species-specific Lebertia COI blocking primer to reduce Lebertia amplification, non-Lebertia dietary DNA was amplified with LCOI/HCOI Folmer primers, followed by GenBank BLASTS of miSeq sequences to determine diet diversity. We also compared sequences of oligochaetes from the Lebertia habitat, and conducted behavioral/DNA experiments to determine if water mites attack oligochaetes and ingest their DNA. Results: Oligochaete DNA was found, including invasive Branchiura sowerbyi, confirmed also in the habitat. Lebertia avidly attacked B. sowerbyi. Many detected oligochaete sequences are unknown (GenBank identities <95%) while many naidid oligochaetes in the habitat were not in the mites, possibly indicating feeding selectivity. Conclusion: The Vasquez (2017) observation of oligochaetes in water mite diets is confirmed but selectivity, universality, etc remain to be explored.

Gina Wulff (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, gwulff@med.wayne.edu;


Adrian Vasquez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, avasquez@med.wayne.edu;


Mario McGhee, Jr. (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, mario.mcghee@wayne.edu;


Tiffany Burris (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, tiffany.burris@wayne.edu;


Jasmine Brockman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, jasmine.brockman@wayne.edu;


Zeyu Li (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, zeyu.li@wayne.edu;


Katherine Gurdziel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, gurdziel@wayne.edu;


Obadeh Mohiddin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, obadeh.mohiddin@wayne.edu;


Jeffrey Ram (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, jeffram@wayne.edu;


C26 Invasive Species 161 - IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CHANGE ON FRESHWATER PLANT SPECIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CHANGE ON FRESHWATER PLANT SPECIES Freshwater systems are considered particularly vulnerable to human impact, through changes to water regimes and quality, invasion by exotic species and climate change. We investigated the growth responses of two invasive exotic (Egeria densa and Salvinia molesta) and one native (Vallisneria spiralis) species to additional low nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations. Egeria densa and V. spiralis produced more biomass under higher nitrate concentrations but S. molesta biomass production was greatest at the mid-range nitrate concentrations (0.05 – 0.1 mg NO3-NL-1). In a second experiment, we compared growth responses of two native species (Azolla filliculoides and Vallisneria spiralis) and the exotic Salvinia molesta at ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations. Biomass production of the native A. filiculoides was significantly higher under elevated CO2 whereas its specific leaf area (SLA) was lower under elevated CO2 concentration. Biomass production and growth traits of the invasive exotic S. molesta and the native V. spiralis were unaffected by elevated CO2. We conclude that exotic species are now an important component of Australia’s freshwater systems and that human impact, through eutrophication and climate change, is likely to further facilitate some exotic plant species in these ecosystems.

Guyo Gufu (Primary Presenter/Author), Macquarie University, guyo-duba.gufu@hdr.mq.edu.au;


C26 Invasive Species 162 - OPTIMIZATION OF EDNA EARLY MONITORING TOOL FOR BIGHEADED CARP IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

OPTIMIZATION OF eDNA EARLY MONITORING TOOL FOR BIGHEADED CARP IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER Natural resource managers conduct landscape-level monitoring using environmental DNA (eDNA)-based sampling approaches. Analyzing eDNA-based sampling data requires addressing three probabilities: the probability of occurrence of eDNA at a site, the probability of occurrence of eDNA within a sample, and the probability of molecular detection. Occurrence (or synonymous occupancy) models allow the estimation of these probabilities. We developed a three-level occurrence model to examine the occupancy of Bighead and Silver Carps in the Upper Mississippi River. We collected water samples from 3 habitat types in pools 17 & 18 of the Upper Mississippi to validate and inform our model. Samples were analyzed for eDNA. Our objectives were to: 1. Better inform when, where, and what sample size is adequate to effectively use eDNA as a bigheaded carp monitoring tool in the Upper Mississippi River, 2. Determine the detection probability of eDNA in the study area, and 3. Determine the optimal spatial sampling pattern and design for eDNA as a monitoring tool. Our findings illustrate the importance of considering study design and sample sizes when planning eDNA-based research, monitoring, and management decisions.

Christopher Merkes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, cmerkes@usgs.gov;


Richard Erickson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, rerickson@usgs.gov;


Nick Berndt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, nicholas_berndt@usgs.gov;


Katie Bockrath (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, katherine_bockrath@fws.gov;


Jeena Credico (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, jeena_credico@fws.gov;


Nikolas Grueneis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, nikolas_Grueneis@fws.gov;


Jenna Merry (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, jenna_merry@fws.gov;


Kyle Mosel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, kyle_mosel@fws.gov;


Maren Tuttle-Lau (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, maren_tuttle-lau@fws.gov;


Kyle Von Ruden (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, Kyle_vonruden@fws.gov;


Zeb Woiak (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, zebadiah_woiak@fws.gov;


Jon Amberg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, jamberg@usgs.gov;


Sam Finney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, sam_finney@fws.gov;


Emy Monroe (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USFWS, emy_monroe@fws.gov;


Erica Mize (Primary Presenter/Author), US Fish and Wildlife Service, erica_mize@fws.gov;


C26 Invasive Species 163 - COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF ROADS AND STREAMS ON INVASIVE PLANT ABUNDANCE IN APPALACHIAN PROTECTED AREAS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF ROADS AND STREAMS ON INVASIVE PLANT ABUNDANCE IN APPALACHIAN PROTECTED AREAS The economic, environmental, and societal impacts of invasive species are well documented, and there is overwhelming evidence that prevention of new invasions is more effective than treatment. With limited funds available to land management agencies, it is becoming increasingly important for land managers to effectively allocate prevention funding by quickly identifying locations most likely to experience biological invasions and their most severe impacts. We compare the effects of roads and streams, two significant pathways for delivery of invasive plant propagules, on the abundance of non-native invasive plants in 27 protected areas in Appalachia from Pennsylvania to Alabama. In addition to road and stream variables, we include other anthropogenic (e.g., distance to nearest urban area) and natural (e.g., slope, elevation, and canopy cover) covariates in our model. Initial results indicate that road variables are more strongly correlated than stream variables with parcel invadedness. The ability to predict invasion patterns will allow land managers to better prioritize prevention, outreach, and early detection efforts for invasive plants when acquiring and managing protected areas.

Eric Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


Gwen Iacona (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Queensland, g.iacona@uq.edu.au;


Paul Armsworth (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Tennessee, p.armsworth@utk.edu;


Melissa Daniels (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, md13@illinois.edu;


C26 Invasive Species 164 - VARIABLE RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE BETWEEN INVASIVE DAPHNIA LUMHOLTZI CLONES ESTABLISHED AT DIFFERENT LATITUDES IN NORTH AMERICA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

VARIABLE RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE BETWEEN INVASIVE DAPHNIA LUMHOLTZI CLONES ESTABLISHED AT DIFFERENT LATITUDES IN NORTH AMERICA Daphnia lumholtzi, a freshwater zooplankter, native to Africa, Australia, and Southwest Asia was found in reservoirs in the Southern US in 1991, and has since rapidly expanded its range to as far north as Lake Superior. We address the hypothesis that adaptive evolution and selection for tolerance of lower temperatures has occurred in populations of D. lumholtzi, facilitating its northward range expansion. To test this, Daphnia lumholtzi clones, including one from Holt Lake AL, and three from Lighthouse Point, Lake St Clair, Canada were used to quantify fitness response to temperature. We reared them at 3 temperature treatments: 15, 20, and 25 C, and then we measured fitness using the proxy of reproductive success. We measured age at maturation, and quantified and preserved the first three reproductive events. We then used the Euler method to calculate r.

Bana Kabalan (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, fh2107@wayne.edu;


Alison Rifenburgh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, alisonrifenburgh@gmail.com;


C26 Invasive Species 165 - EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON NATIVE DAPHNIA AND THE EXOTIC DAPHNIA LUMHOLTZI FROM THE ALABAMA RIVER DELTA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON NATIVE DAPHNIA AND THE EXOTIC DAPHNIA LUMHOLTZI FROM THE ALABAMA RIVER DELTA Daphnia lumholtzi is a nonindigenous zooplankton that has demonstrated an exceptional ability to rapidly invade diverse habitats throughout the U.S. following its unintentional introduction to Texas reservoirs during exotic sport fish stocking. Recreational fishing activities facilitated inland range expansion to reservoirs throughout south-central states, where high thermal tolerance allowed D. lumholtzi to occupy a vacant niche that occurs during the seasonal decline of native Daphnia during summer. However, less is known about the factors that allowed D. lumholtzi to reach and colonize other environments. Here, we investigated the presence of D. lumholtzi in Alabama estuaries. Surveys of the zooplankton community structure showed that unlike the pattern observed in reservoirs, D. lumholtzi and native Daphnia occur together year-round, at temperatures ranging from 13°C-32°C. Assays using laboratory clones showed that 36-hour survival following acute exposure to 32°C was not significantly different, but varied at 37°C, with survival in order from lowest to highest being D. ambigua, D. laevis, D. lumholtzi and D. obtusa. Currently, we’re using DNA barcoding to confirm native species identity and haplotype analysis to determine the source of D. lumholtzi populations in the estuary.

Robert Fischer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Middle Tennessee State University, Bud.Fischer@mtsu.edu;


Melissa Pompilius (Primary Presenter/Author), Middle Tennessee State University, mp4n@mtmail.mtsu.edu;


C26 Invasive Species 166 - STREAM BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES RESPOND TO HEMLOCK DECLINE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STREAM BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES RESPOND TO HEMLOCK DECLINE Eastern hemlock trees often dominate the vegetation in riparian zones of headwater ravine streams in central Appalachia, and the invasive pest Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) has decimated hemlock stands in this region. Although research concerning HWA impacts on soil, hydrology, and forest structure is emerging, associated changes in stream structure and function is less known. We quantified HWA invasion effects on the structure and potential functions of benthic macroinvertebrate communities in 21 headwater streams across Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia, representing unimpacted, intermediate, and severe invasion intensity, respectively. We observed differences in benthic invertebrate composition; severely invaded sites had the highest diversity, while intermediate sites had the lowest diversity. Functional composition exhibited shifts as well; for example, the relative abundance of herbivorous invertebrates increased from 4% (±3%) at unimpacted sites to 23% (±14%) at severely impacted sites, consistent with an observed decrease in non-labile hemlock needles. Our results suggest that resource alterations associated with HWA-invasion and subsequent hemlock decline are associated with changes in stream invertebrate diversity and trophic relationships. We demonstrate how a pervasive terrestrial invader can influence in-stream biotic communities and their functions.

Kristen M. Diesburg (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, diesburg.1@osu.edu;


S. Mazeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


David W. P. Manning (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, manning.413@osu.edu;


C27 Landuse and Non-Point Source Impacts 167 - REMOTE SENSING AS A TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF NUTRIENTS IN THE LAKE SIMCOE BASIN, ONTARIO, CANADA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

REMOTE SENSING AS A TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF NUTRIENTS IN THE LAKE SIMCOE BASIN, ONTARIO, CANADA Non-point sources of nutrients pose one of the greatest threats to water quality in agricultural basins. By definition, non-point sources are difficult to identify and manage. Through a pilot study conducted in the Lake Simcoe basin, Ontario, Canada we looked to identify whether multispectral satellite imagery from LandSat 8 and Sentinel 2A, could be used to map nutrient hotspots at a watershed scale. By utilizing terrestrial plant growth (chlorophyll abundance) as a proxy for nutrient availability, random forest modelling was used to infer phosphorus deposits using multispectral analysis of chlorophyll across the landscape. Significant correlation was observed between inferred soil phosphorus and soil samples collected throughout the watershed. Once a map of inferred phosphorus has been established, we used hydrological flow mapping to assess the relationship between soil phosphorus and water total phosphorus samples collected throughout the watershed. Being able to identify non-point sources of phosphorus at a landscape scale, provides a powerful tool for targeting resource limited nutrient reduction efforts and best management practices to areas where they will be most beneficial in protecting water quality.

MacKenzie Waller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), River Institute, mwaller@riverinstitute.ca;


Mark MacDougall (Primary Presenter/Author), River Institute, mmacdougall@riverinstitute.ca;


C27 Landuse and Non-Point Source Impacts 168 - MUSSEL GROWTH AND ENERGY STORAGE IN RIVERS WITH DIFFERING LEVELS OF AGRICULTURAL IMPACT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MUSSEL GROWTH AND ENERGY STORAGE IN RIVERS WITH DIFFERING LEVELS OF AGRICULTURAL IMPACT Numerous studies indicate that freshwater mussel abundance and richness is often reduced in rivers impacted by agriculture. We found similar results in four river systems in Minnesota across an agricultural land-use gradient. Three of these rivers are part of the Minnesota River watershed that has heavy agricultural land use, and one, serving as a low-agricultural land-use reference site, is located in the St. Croix River watershed. We also found that in watersheds with more agriculture, mussels tended to be larger than in watersheds with less agriculture. For two species (Lampsilis cardium and Lasmigona complanata) we measured glycogen content (an energy storage compound) and found that glycogen content increased with increased levels of agriculture. We also estimated mussel growth rates in two species (Lampsilis cardium and Amblema plicata) using the length of external growth rings. Again, mussels from watershed with higher levels of agriculture exhibited greater growth rates. These results suggest that while agricultural impacts may negatively impact mussel abundance and richness, individual mussels may receive more nutrition resulting in higher growth, potentially from nutrient enrichment in agricultural river systems.

Dan Hornbach (Primary Presenter/Author), Macalester College, hornbach@macalester.edu;


Mark Hove (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, mark_hove@umn.edu;


Kelly MacGregor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Macalester College, macgregor@macalester.edu;


Jessica Kozarek (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, jkozarek@umn.edu;


Patricia Ries (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, pries@usgs.gov ;


Teresa Newton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, tnewton@usgs.gov;


C27 Landuse and Non-Point Source Impacts 169 - IMPACT OF WATERSHED LAND USE ON WATER QUALITY IN NORTHERN ETHIOPIAN HEADWATER STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

IMPACT OF WATERSHED LAND USE ON WATER QUALITY IN NORTHERN ETHIOPIAN HEADWATER STREAMS Scattered across the Amhara Region in northern Ethiopia are some 19,000 church forests, the last few remaining fragments of indigenous Afromontane forests in Ethiopia. Local communities use church forest streams for cooking, cleaning, and drinking. Streams may be polluted due to soil erosion and fecal waste. Our study examines whether streams in Ethiopia are more polluted from erosion when surrounded by agriculture, grazing, and urbanization as opposed to streams surrounded by church forests. We have collected total suspended solid (TSS) filters at 15 sites, 5 per stream reach, along an Ethiopian headwater stream (Qusquam Mariam) across a gradient of agricultural to forested land cover every two weeks for eight weeks. We paired field-sampling results with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis to relate examine the role of riparian land use on over time. TSS in forested reaches averaged 8 mg L-1, and increased to 40 mg L-1 in agricultural reaches of the stream. Findings suggest riparian forest vegetation reduces soil input to the streams, even in watersheds that are dominated by agriculture. We are continuing bi-weekly sample collection through the rainy season to determine how these trends vary over time.

Denise Bruesewitz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colby College, dabruese@colby.edu;


Atalel Wubalem (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bahir Dar University, wubalematalel@yahoo.com;


Travis Reynolds (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colby College, twreynol@colby.edu ;


Taylor Garner (Primary Presenter/Author), Hawai'i Pacific University , tgarner@my.hpu.edu;


C27 Landuse and Non-Point Source Impacts 170 - IMPACT OF SURFACE RUNOFF AND SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE ON LAKE MICHIGAN TRIBUTARIES IN AGRICULTURAL LAND USE REGIONS OF EASTERN WISCONSIN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

IMPACT OF SURFACE RUNOFF AND SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE ON LAKE MICHIGAN TRIBUTARIES IN AGRICULTURAL LAND USE REGIONS OF EASTERN WISCONSIN Water quality in Lake Michigan is impacted by a variety of watersheds along the Wisconsin shoreline, each with diverse land uses and resulting contributions. Phosphate loading, which contributes to overgrowth of the nuisance alga Cladophora, nitrogen pollution, which can exacerbate eutrophication, and coliform bacterial contamination, which indicates fecal contamination and can create public health hazards, are key concerns. We analyzed weekly samples from 22 sites along 5 tributary streams (Centerville, Fischer, Point, Calvin, and Pine Creeks) in Manitowoc County, WI, an agriculturally dominated region of the state. Our data indicate that nutrient and bacterial levels are consistently and notably above surface water quality thresholds. Analysis of samples collected pre- and post-rain events of >0.5” showed spikes of phosphorus, turbidity, and E. coli bacterial levels, indicating surface level runoff influence. However, in other instances, rain events did not elevate relatively high background levels indicating other sources. Visual assessment of stream beds and discussion with local agricultural professionals leads us to hypothesize that subsurface drainage, such as tile drainage lines from agricultural fields, are a significant and continuous source of nutrient loading into these streams.

Rebecca Abler (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin-Manitowoc, rebecca.abler@uwc.edu;


Richard Hein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Manitowoc, richard.hein@uwc.edu;


C27 Landuse and Non-Point Source Impacts 171 - SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FINE RESOLUTION LAND USE DATA AND STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FINE RESOLUTION LAND USE DATA AND STREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES The Dallas-Fort Worth International (DFW) Airport area is located in a densely-urbanized area with one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S.A. The airport property includes a large tract of “protected” riparian forest that is unique to the urban surroundings. In 2014, the DFW Airport sponsored a biomonitoring survey of its surface waters. One objective of this study was to identify areas within the watershed that had the potential to affect water quality. To achieve this, a land use analysis was conducted using 5-meter resolution satellite imagery and eCognition, an object-based-image-analysis software. Relationships were explored at different spatial scales (watershed, riparian corridor, and reach corridor) and results were analyzed alongside benthic macroinvertebrate data. Similar studies that relate land use to stream conditions utilize coarse (30-meter) resolution datasets with varying results. Our methods, at a finer resolution, have the potential to further elucidate the importance of land use changes that take place within the watershed.

Megann Harlow (Primary Presenter/Author), Univeristy of North Texas, megannharlow@my.unt.edu;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, kennedy@unt.edu;


C27 Landuse and Non-Point Source Impacts 172 - INVESTIGATING RADIUM ISOTOPE ACTIVITIES AND ACTIVITY RATIOS IN MARCELLUS SHALE STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INVESTIGATING RADIUM ISOTOPE ACTIVITIES AND ACTIVITY RATIOS IN MARCELLUS SHALE STREAMS Increased hydraulic fracturing activity in the Marcellus Shale region has the potential to pollute surface water at an unknown scale. Produced waters from hydraulic fracturing often contain high levels of radium, so spills could potentially lead to elevated radium levels in surface water. In 2015 and 2016, we measured levels of four radium isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra and 228Ra) at 88 stream sites within the Marcellus Shale with varying levels of hydraulic fracturing. Activities of 223Ra, 224Ra and 228Ra were measured on a radium delayed coincidence counter (RaDeCC) system, and 226Ra activities were measured on a RAD7 radon detector. Differences were observed between sites that were impacted by hydraulic fracturing and those that were not. Additionally, differences were observed between sites in Virginia and Maryland, neither of which have hydraulic fracturing. Correlations between the intensity of hydraulic fracturing and other landscape characteristics were also investigated.

Abigail Dias (Primary Presenter/Author), American University, ad0780a@student.american.edu;


Karen Knee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, knee@american.edu;


Colin Casey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, cc9869a@student.american.edu;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 173 - ABUNDANCE, DISTRIBUTION, AND GEOMETRY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MACROPORES IN STREAM BANKS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ABUNDANCE, DISTRIBUTION, AND GEOMETRY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MACROPORES IN STREAM BANKS Macropores are a type of preferential flow path where conduit-like voids exist in soil. They form by biological processes, erosive action in subsurface flow, or soil cracking. They can increase the flow of water in stream banks and may affect riparian transport of nutrients and pollutants, yet their geographic distribution is unknown. We examined the distribution, abundance, and geometry of naturally occurring macropores in the banks of 20 streams across five physiographic provinces in the eastern USA. Macropores were present in all 20 streams despite variations in physiographic province, stream order, and soil texture. However, macropore distribution, abundance, and geometry varied among streams, with soil texture having the greatest influence. For example, soils primarily containing silt and clay had more macropores than soils consisting of sand or gravel, possibly due to differences in soil cohesiveness and/or hydraulic conductivity. This work represents the first attempt to characterize macropores across a variety of riverine systems and presents evidence that macropores may play an important role in hyporheic exchange within stream banks.

Amiana McEwen (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, amcewen@vt.edu;


Erich Hester (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ehester@vt.edu;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 174 - USING HIGH FREQUENCY AUTOMATED DATA COLLECTION TO DESCRIBE BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN AN IMPAIRED TRIBUTARY OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

USING HIGH FREQUENCY AUTOMATED DATA COLLECTION TO DESCRIBE BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN AN IMPAIRED TRIBUTARY OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY There is increasing awareness of the utility of long-term, high frequency data collection for understanding dynamic environmental systems. High frequency data collection allows for the investigation of environmental processes at fine scales and can provide insight into mechanisms that would be obscured by more infrequent sampling. The Longwood Environmental Observatory (LEO), is a network of environmental sensors that collects high frequency data on atmospheric and water chemistry parameters at a piedmont and coastal plain site in the Chesapeake Bay watershed in Virginia. We used the data collected from the coastal plain site to evaluate the range and variation in temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, fluorescent dissolved organic matter, turbidity, and salinity in Aimes Creek, a tributary of the Potomac River estuary. Aimes Creek is eutrophic with consistently poor water quality that has led to the closure of its shellfish fishery. Describing fine scale variation in ecologically relevant water parameters will allow for greater insight in the processes that may be contributing to the continued impairment of Aimes Creek and will help to guide future research into the management and assessment of this tributary to the Chesapeake Bay.

Brittney Beazley (Primary Presenter/Author), Longwood University , brittney.beazley@live.longwood.edu;


Kenneth Fortino (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, fortinok@longwood.edu;


Dina Leech (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, leechdm@longwood.edu;


Mark Fink (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, finkml@longwood.edu;


Kathy Gee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, geekd@longwood.edu;


Alec Hosterman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, hostermanar@longwood.edu;


Chris Labosier (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, labosiercf@longwood.edu;


Robert Marmorstein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Longwood University, marmorsteinrm@longwood.edu;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 175 - DOES WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM HERBIVORY ALTER MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND STREAM FOOD-WEB DYNAMICS?

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DOES WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM HERBIVORY ALTER MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND STREAM FOOD-WEB DYNAMICS? In the Pacific Northwest, herbivorous Western Spruce Budworm (WSB) outbreaks have increased intensity and extent along Douglas-fir forest riparian areas. As headwaters rely on riparian energy and nutrient subsidies, WSB outbreaks could increase headwater stream resources. We hypothesized that frass inputs from WSB herbivory would directly elevate stream resources and solar radiation via canopy defoliation. We predicted higher diversity in headwater streams with high herbivory from more heterogeneous food resources. We also predicted greater total macroinvertebrate density and more collectors from increased energy and nutrient inputs in headwaters exposed to high WSB herbivory. Macroinvertebrate communities were compared between headwater streams with low (n=4) and high (n=4) WSB herbivory. We found total density was greater in high WSB herbivory sites, but contrary to our prediction, diversity was greater in the low WSB herbivory sites. Increased shredder and scraper densities in high WSB herbivory sites may be from added frass as a food resource. Additional stable isotopic analysis of food resources are needed to determine contribution of frass to macroinvertebrates. Our results will quantify the effects of herbivorous WSB outbreaks on community composition and stream food-web interactions.

Deion Everhart (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Central Arkansas, deioneverhart@gmail.com;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 176 - FROM THE BENTHIC TO THE RIPARIAN: EFFECTS OF UNIONOID MUSSEL-DERIVED NUTRIENTS ON VASCULAR PLANTS AT THE AQUATIC-TERRESTRIAL INTERFACE

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

FROM THE BENTHIC TO THE RIPARIAN: EFFECTS OF UNIONOID MUSSEL-DERIVED NUTRIENTS ON VASCULAR PLANTS AT THE AQUATIC-TERRESTRIAL INTERFACE The loss of native freshwater mussels (Unionoida) from North American rivers threatens both biodiversity and freshwater ecosystem function. Mussels occur in dense multi-species aggregations, creating hotspots of biogeochemical activity. As filter feeders they consume organic particles containing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) then release waste rich in bioavailable N and P. Mussel-derived nutrients enter various compartments of the food web, including the emergent vascular macrophyte Justicia americana. J. americana is widespread and commonly found in habitats where mussels occur. It is unknown if mussel-derived nutrient uptake alters J. americana stoichiometry or growth in a way that would benefit terrestrial herbivores which consume it, such as deer. We hypothesize that changes in availability of recycled N and P caused by manipulating the density of an experimental mussel community will affect J. americana stoichiometry (C:N:P ratios) and biomass accrual. We are testing this using stream mesocosms that model mussel communities found in nature. We predict the results will show that increased mussel density is associated with greater biomass accrual and decreased C:N:P in J. americana. These effects could reveal a previously unknown pathway by which aquatic resources subsidize terrestrial food webs.

Thomas Parr (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, Thomas.parr@ou.edu;


Caryn C. Vaughn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, cvaughn@ou.edu;


Jonathan Lopez (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, jlopez2411@gmail.com;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 177 - INVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF HABITAT HETEROGENEITY ON DIVERSITY OF TERRESTRIAL ARTHROPODS IN A RIVER-FLOODPLAIN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF HABITAT HETEROGENEITY ON DIVERSITY OF TERRESTRIAL ARTHROPODS IN A RIVER-FLOODPLAIN The emergence of adult aquatic insects represents a temporally important food resource for a suite of terrestrial insectivores, including many arthropods. In our study, we are assessing the influence of habitat heterogeneity within river-floodplain ecosystems on the emergence of aquatic insects and the subsequent consequences for density and diversity of ground-dwelling beetles and spiders. From June to September 2017, in addition to estimating insect emergence, we used pitfall traps to sample beetles and spiders monthly across 7 unique habitats within a floodplain segment of the Snake River, Idaho. Overall, we observed higher beetle and spider abundance and richness in the summer than in the fall. Some families and superfamilies were ubiquitous (e.g., Lycosidae), whereas others were distributed more sparsely among habitats (e.g., Salticidae), and yet a few were observed exclusively at a single habitat (e.g., Thomisidae). A thought-experiment, whereby we sequentially and randomly aggregated species richness from all the unique habitats, revealed richness increased linearly with increasing habitat heterogeneity. Our observations suggest that river-floodplains with greater habitat complexity may have higher beetle and spider richness than those with reduced complexity.

Jade Ortiz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, ortijade@isu.edu;


Colden Baxter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, baxtcold@isu.edu;


Joseph Cornell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, jcornell@isu.edu;


Paige Miller (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, millpai2@isu.edu;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 178 - EFFECTS OF STREAM PH REGIME ON MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOMASS AND LEAF DECAY RATE IN HIGH AND LOW SOLUTE STREAMS IN LA SELVA, COSTA RICA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF STREAM PH REGIME ON MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOMASS AND LEAF DECAY RATE IN HIGH AND LOW SOLUTE STREAMS IN LA SELVA, COSTA RICA Freshwater stream ecosystem services can be altered by variation in their physicochemical parameters. In this study we examined the effects of pH on stream ecosystems in La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Some streams receive high-solute groundwater inputs due to geothermal activity outside the watershed. As a result of increased bicarbonate concentrations, these streams have a naturally higher and more stable pH than neighboring low-solute streams that do not receive high-solute groundwater. To examine the effect of pH on stream ecosystem function, we used a sodium bicarbonate drip to experimentally increase the pH of a naturally low-solute stream to mimic the pH regime of a high-solute stream. The pH range of the manipulated site did not differ from that of the reference high-solute stream, while the reference low-solute stream had a significantly lower pH ranges. We quantified macroinvertebrate biomass from leaf packs in the treatment stream as well as low and high solute reference streams. Leaf decay increased with time but showed no correlation with pH. Macroinvertebrate biomass did not vary with pH. The results of this experiment indicate that factors other than pH are significant in influencing stream ecosystems.

Rupert England (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alabama A&M University, renglan2@bulldogs.aamu.edu;


Carissa Ganong (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri Western State University, carissa.ganong@gmail.com;


C28 Land-Water Interfaces 180 - TOWARD QUANTIFYING THE RISK OF VOC EXPOSURE VIA VAPOR INTRUSION IN POST-INDUSTRIAL CITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TOWARD QUANTIFYING THE RISK OF VOC EXPOSURE VIA VAPOR INTRUSION IN POST-INDUSTRIAL CITIES In Michigan, recent emphasis has been placed on the issue of vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. At the basic level, VOCs have the ability to volatilize from shallow groundwater and contaminated soil into the soil gas from where they can move into buildings. Importantly, most people in the U.S. spend at least 90% of their time indoors. Despite the importance of VOC vapor intrusion, little is known in part because of the difficulty in measuring and analyzing the type of data necessary to assess this exposure pathway.

ORLANDO RIOS (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University , orlando.rios3@upr.edu;


C30 Molecular Ecology 181 - PHYLOGEOGRAPHY AND POST-GLACIAL COLONIZATION HISTORY OF THE IMPERILED FRESHWATER MUSSEL, OBOVARIA OLIVARIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY AND POST-GLACIAL COLONIZATION HISTORY OF THE IMPERILED FRESHWATER MUSSEL, OBOVARIA OLIVARIA Obovaria olivaria is a freshwater mussel (order: Unionida) from the Mississippi River and Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River drainages of central North America. This mussel, like many other unionid species has experienced population declines across its large parts of its distribution and is considered imperiled in many jurisdictions. Obovaria olivaria uses the similarly imperiled Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) as a host. Lake Sturgeon declines were the result of historical overharvest, damming of rivers, and pollution and may have affected O. olivaria populations. Understanding the genetic structure, diversity, and phylogeography of remaining populations of O. olivaria will assist in the development of conservation and recovery strategies. Obovaria olivaria samples were collected from 16 sites across its distribution in the upper Mississippi River system, tributaries of the Great Lakes, and the St. Lawrence River system (n = 141). Using COI mtDNA sequences, the genetic structure and diversity of O. olivaria from across the species’ range will be examined. These analyses should reveal insights into the post-glacial colonization history of O. olivaria into the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River system that will be relevant for making informed conservation decisions for this species.

Jamie Bucholz (Primary Presenter/Author), Central Michigan University, bucho1j@cmich.edu;


David Zanatta (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Michigan University, zanat1d@cmich.edu;


C30 Molecular Ecology 182 - MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF EXUVIAE TO DETERMINE SPECIES IDENTITY AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF GOMPHID DRAGONFLIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF EXUVIAE TO DETERMINE SPECIES IDENTITY AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF GOMPHID DRAGONFLIES Dragonfly exuviae are a convenient source of information about dragonfly populations. However, the exuviae of some species can be difficult to distinguish. For example, Gomphurus ventricosus, a dragonfly with low and possibly declining populations closely resembles Gomphurus fraternus, which has relatively stable populations where the species co-occur. DNA from the exuviae could confirm specimen identification and contribute to better information on population status than adult observations alone. Additionally, the DNA may provide information on population structure: the relatedness of members of a single species from different sites. To determine the feasibility of obtaining DNA from dragonfly exuviae, I extracted DNA from exuviae for eight Gomphid species collected from nine rivers in Wisconsin. After performing PCR with Gomphid primers, I used an agarose gel to check for amplification and contamination. I will sequence the amplified fragments of the gene for cytochrome c oxidase subunit I to confirm the identification of each specimen. I will use separate primers to amplify microsatellite regions of the DNA to examine the relatedness of dragonflies among sites. Thus, I will demonstrate how DNA from dragonfly exuviae can be used for species identification and population genetics.

Cora Bilhorn (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - Parkside, bilho003@rangers.uwp.edu;


Jessica Orlofske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Parkside, orlofske@uwp.edu;


C30 Molecular Ecology 183 - DEVELOPMENT OF QPCR METHODS TO ASSESS THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DEVELOPMENT OF QPCR METHODS TO ASSESS THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS Microcystis is a common bloom forming cyanobacteria genera that is capable of creating harmful algal blooms (HABs) through the production of the hepatotoxin, microcystin. HABs can cause many negative effects to the surrounding environment that include scums on surface waters, hypoxia, or unsafe drinking water. The goal of my project is to develop quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods that allow for early detection and quantification of toxic or non-toxic Microcystis strains to aid in the management of water resources. Currently, nutrient and environmental samples have been collected and analyzed from our study sites: Muskegon and Bear Lakes in Muskegon, Michigan. This information will be used to assess what factors are driving algal blooms and contributing to microcystin production. Furthermore, standards of our genes of interest have been developed for qPCR, and this will allow us to quantify the abundance and toxicity of Microcystis present in the water. In tandem, this data will provide a spatial and temporal profile of the bloom status in these lakes. The development of these qPCR methods will serve as a tool for lake managers to make informed decisions regarding public and environmental health.

Andrew Pyman (Primary Presenter/Author), Grand Valley State University, pymana@mail.gvsu.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 184 - DECOUPLING OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER PATTERNS BETWEEN STREAM AND RIPARIAN GROUNDWATER IN A HEADWATER FORESTED CATCHMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DECOUPLING OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER PATTERNS BETWEEN STREAM AND RIPARIAN GROUNDWATER IN A HEADWATER FORESTED CATCHMENT Streams are important sources of carbon to the atmosphere, though whether they merely outgas allochthonous carbon dioxide or mineralize allochthonous dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still under debate. For a year, we analyzed DOM concentration and its chromophoric properties along a forested headwater stream (3.7 km reach) and adjacent riparian groundwater (GW). For both stream water and riparian GW, DOM had an eminently protein-like character and was originated mostly from microbial sources and recent biological activity. However, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentrations as well as spectroscopic indexes differed between the two water compartments. During the leaf litter period, stream DOM concentrations were higher and its spectroscopic signature had a major influence of terrestrial vegetation than riparian GW. In-stream processes along the reach contributed to reduce DOC and DON fluxes by 50% and 30%, respectively. Yet, DOC and DON uptake were unrelated to each other, suggesting different biogeochemical pathways. Our study highlights that stream DOM is not merely a reflection of riparian GW entering the stream and that headwater streams have the capacity to internally produce, transform, and consume DOM.

Eugènia Martí (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), eugenia@ceab.csic.es;


Susana Bernal (Primary Presenter/Author), Centre d’Estudis Avançats de Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), sbernal@ceab.csic.es;


Anna Lupon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, anna.lupon@slu.se;


Núria Catalan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), ncatalan@icra.cat;


Sara Castelar (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), saracastelar@hotmail.com;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 185 - ASSESING THE DEGRADATION OF TERRESTRIALLY DERIVED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN THREE TEMPERATE LAKES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ASSESING THE DEGRADATION OF TERRESTRIALLY DERIVED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN THREE TEMPERATE LAKES In lake ecosystems, both biodegradation and photodegradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) can occur. It is not clear which of the above processes are dominant in temperate lakes and on what time-scales these processes operate. Recent research highlights a strong link between a lake ecosystem and its surrounding terrestrial environment. To test the above hypothesis, we conducted short and long-term studies that focused on the processing of terrestrially derived DOM. Three experiments were conducted to determine whether biodegradation or photodegradation was more influential. In all experiments, terrestrial DOM samples were collected via lysimeters, which were installed in wetlands surrounding Lake Lacawac, Lake Giles, and Lake Waynewood (all in the Pocono region of Pennsylvania). The first experiment was conducted at the surface of Lake Lacawac, while the second and third experiments were conducted in the laboratory using controlled environmental chambers. Experiments ranged in length from 48 hours to 90 days. Changes in DOC concentration and quality (absorbance scans) were analyzed. Initial results show that photodegradation is more important than biodegradation, but that the response was variable by lake. Distinct differences were noted between the short and long-term rates of processing.

Chris Dempsey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Gannon University, Biology Department, dempsey007@gannon.edu;


Sarah Magyan (Primary Presenter/Author), Gannon University, Biology Department, magyan001@knights.gannon.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 186 - RATES AND PATHWAYS OF ELEMENT LOSS FROM LEAF LITTER: INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RATES AND PATHWAYS OF ELEMENT LOSS FROM LEAF LITTER: INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES Pathways of element flow from leaf litter depend on and are best predicted by its rate of decomposition, a function of the traits of the litter, and of the environment. Here we use litter enriched with 13C and 15N to quantify carbon and nitrogen assimilation from leaves to invertebrate taxa. We demonstrate a new method for calculating C and N assimilation by invertebrates during decomposition. We incubated twelve leaf species in large mesh bags in Oak Creek (AZ). By measuring mass loss, changes in the %C and %N of leaf litter packs, and changes in stable isotope values we estimated C and N loss during decomposition. We also quantified the pathway of C and N transfer to the macroscopic food web by calculating the amount of C and N assimilated by different invertebrate species. Using these data we show differential assimilation rates across leaf species. Additionally, we show that element assimilation is a more sensitive metric for detecting differences across leaf types than comparisons of leaf-associated invertebrate assemblages.

Meghan Schrik (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern Arizona University, ms3398@nau.edu;


Benjamin Koch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ben.koch@nau.edu;


Courtney Roush (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, cmr627@nau.edu;


Adam Siders (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, acs427@nau.edu;


Jane Marks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, jane.marks@nau.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 187 - RATES AND PATHWAYS OF ELEMENT LOSS FROM LEAF LITTER: THE MICROBES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RATES AND PATHWAYS OF ELEMENT LOSS FROM LEAF LITTER: THE MICROBES The rate at which leaf litter decomposes in streams varies predictably with physical and chemical traits of the litter itself, declining with lignin and tannin concentrations, and increasing with sugars. The rate of litter decomposition is well studied because it is an important ecosystem process. Yet, the simplicity of a single rate to describe litter disappearance masks the variety of fates of the elements the litter contains and the multiple pathways through which they flow. Results from our group suggest that litter traits retarding decomposition disproportionately favor element transfer up the food chain to insect grazers, whereas elements from rapidly decomposing leaves tend to be lost downstream and to the atmosphere. Thus, both the rates and pathways of element flow from decomposing litter are at least equally important for understanding the roles of allochthonous leaves within stream food webs. Our approach using 15N and 13C enables quantitative tracing of element flux from litter through the food web and ecosystem. Here we demonstrate, using 12 leaf species, how leaf litter type affects the relative strength of three pathways of C and N loss rates: leaching, microbial processing, and invertebrate shredding.

Courtney Roush (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern Arizona University, cmr627@nau.edu;


Meghan Schrik (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ms3398@nau.edu;


Benjamin Koch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ben.koch@nau.edu;


Egbert Schwartz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, egbert.schwartz@nau.edu;


Paul Dijkstra (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, Paul.Dijkstra@nau.edu;


Jane Marks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, jane.marks@nau.edu;


Adam Wymore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, adam.wymore@unh.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 188 - RATES AND PATHWAYS OF ELEMENT LOSS FROM LEAF LITTER: LARGE DETRITIVORES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RATES AND PATHWAYS OF ELEMENT LOSS FROM LEAF LITTER: LARGE DETRITIVORES Our research tests how leaf litter traits affect growth rates and element assimilation from leaves to a large shredding caddisfly. We used leaf litter from 12 tree species grown in the greenhouse and enriched in 15N and 13C. Leaves were incubated in Oak Creek, AZ. One caddisfly was placed in each leaf pack. Caddisflies were weighed in their cases at the beginning of the experiment, and we estimated dry weights using a regression for dry weights without a case and damp weights in the case. For each of three harvests, caddisflies were removed from their cases, dried and weighed. Decomposition rate was estimated for each leaf type in the presence and absence of detritivores. We estimated total C and N lost from each leaf pack at each harvest by measuring mass loss, %C and %N of leaves and microbes and the 13C and 15N values of each leaf pack. We estimated C and N assimilation using stable isotope values of each insect. We describe differences in absolute and relative assimilation across leaf types and harvests.

Zasha Welsh (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern Arizona University, zkw3@nau.edu;


Rachel Mudry (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, rmm384@nau.edu;


Alan Gruetzmacher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ag2635@nau.edu;


Rebecca Fritz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, rjf227@nau.edu;


Adam Siders (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, acs427@nau.edu;


Jane Marks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, jane.marks@nau.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 189 - QUANTIFYING INTERANNUAL AND AMONG-STREAM VARIATION IN ORGANIC-MATTER DECOMPOSITION RATES TO EVALUATE STREAM ‘HEALTH’

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

QUANTIFYING INTERANNUAL AND AMONG-STREAM VARIATION IN ORGANIC-MATTER DECOMPOSITION RATES TO EVALUATE STREAM ‘HEALTH’ Human activities increasingly compromise the ecological integrity or ‘health’ of streams. Organic-matter decomposition has been proposed as process-based tool for evaluating the impact of these activities. A key first step toward developing this tool is to quantify spatial and temporal variability in decomposition among reference streams. Using the cotton-strip assay, we evaluated the among-stream and interannual variation of organic-matter decomposition in 26 reference streams in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan (USA) during the same month for 8 years (~208 stream-years). We observed significant variation in decomposition rates among streams and among years. Spatial and temporal factors explained a similar amount of variation on a per-stream and per-year basis. Subsequent analysis of temperature-corrected decomposition rates, to address the role of temperature, did not reduce much of this variation among streams and years, suggesting that other factors are important. Further analyses of impacts of in-stream characteristics will be performed to account for this variation in order to create a decomposition-based tool that is more sensitive to human impacts.

Mark Isken (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Decision and Information Sciences, School of Business Administration, Oakland University, isken@oakland.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


Emily Messick (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, elmessic@oakland.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 190 - LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN LONG-LEAF PINE WETLANDS UNDER ALTERED FIRE REGIMES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN LONG-LEAF PINE WETLANDS UNDER ALTERED FIRE REGIMES Disturbances play crucial roles in many ecosystems, but common forms of disturbance are often artificially altered or removed by anthropogenic factors. Historically, Longleaf Pine forests of the southeastern U.S. experienced regular wildfires in intervals ranging from 1–10 years depending on habitat type. Fire suppression became widespread during the 1900s, and the effects on upland forests have been well documented. However, the impacts of altered fire regimes on wetlands embedded within Longleaf Pine forests have been less studied. Here, we examine decomposition rates and invertebrate communities in fire-suppressed versus firemaintained pine flatwoods wetlands using litter packs of three different types (Longleaf Pine, Black Gum, and Wiregrass). After 25d, average decomposition rates were faster in Black Gum (–0.015±0.002) than in pine (–0.010±0.001) and wiregrass (–0.008±0.001) regardless of fire history. This trend remained after 104d, with only 53% of Black Gum remaining compared to 76% of pine and 77% of wiregrass litter. Invertebrate samples from litter bags are still being processed, but we predict communities will differ based on litter type. Measuring decomposition rates of several litter types presents us with a better understanding of how altered disturbance regimes impact fundamental ecosystem processes.

Khalil Carson (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY, kc06218@georgiasouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


Houston Chandler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The ORIANNE SOCIETY, hchandler@oriannesociety.org;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 191 - SOURCES AND DECOMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A DESERT STREAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SOURCES AND DECOMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A DESERT STREAM In aquatic ecosystems, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the main substrate for heterotrophic respiration. However, the molecular composition of DOM, and thus its biolability, varies depending on its source. Low terrestrial gross primary production in arid ecosystems results in a smaller input of allochthonous carbon to streams compared to those in mesic regions. This study aims to understand how in-stream primary producers (i.e., algae and wetland plants) in a desert stream influence streamwater DOM composition and benthic microbial respiration. There were significant differences in DOM composition (assessed using fluorescent and optical analyses) between two reaches that differed in dominant type of in-stream primary producer. DOM from the benthic algae-dominated reach had lower molecular weight, was less humic, and was younger than DOM in a wetland plant-dominated reach. Laboratory incubation of stream sediments with leachates derived from either algae or wetland plants demonstrated no significant difference in sediment respiration rates between leachate types. However, changes in DOM composition over the incubation period indicated a substantial microbial contribution to the DOM pool, an increase in its degree of aromaticity, and an overall loss of DOC over the course of the incubation.

Kathrine Kemmitt (Primary Presenter/Author), Arizona State University, kkemmitt@asu.edu;


Nancy Grimm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, nbgrimm@asu.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 192 - A LONG-TERM LOOK AT THE EFFECT OF CLIMATE VARIABILITY ON LEAF LITTER PROCESSING IN THE OGEECHEE RIVER

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A LONG-TERM LOOK AT THE EFFECT OF CLIMATE VARIABILITY ON LEAF LITTER PROCESSING IN THE OGEECHEE RIVER The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) predicts a raise in temperatures and changes to precipitation patterns for the 21st century. These changes are expected to lead to a higher frequency of extreme events such as drought and floods which lead to the alteration of the hydrology, communities, and processes of freshwater ecosystems. Leaf litter decomposition in stream ecosystems is an important component of the energy and nutrient cycle representing a food source for aquatic organisms. This has made it a tool for assessing long term responses to disturbance due to changes in the assemblage of macroinvertebrates that colonize leaf packs. My objective is to use long-term data (6 years of decomposition data at the same site) to evaluate and predict the effects climate variability may have on leaf decomposition and the invertebrate community. Preliminary results from 2012, a year following an extensive drought (>1 yr), vs subsequent years reveal a faster rate of decomposition, insect abundance and diversity, and a shift to a majority scraper functional feeding group in comparison with majority collector-gatherers the from consequent years.

Jose Sanchez-Ruiz (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras, jas091988@gmail.com;


Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 193 - THE EFFECTS OF TETRAKIS (HYDROXYMETHYL) PHOSPHONIUM CHLORIDE (THPC) ON LEAF DECOMPOSITION AND MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE EFFECTS OF TETRAKIS (HYDROXYMETHYL) PHOSPHONIUM CHLORIDE (THPC) ON LEAF DECOMPOSITION AND MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES. Fire retardant chemicals are sprayed around forests to prevent fires. They have little impact on terrestrial environments, however, are toxic to aquatic environments. Adding these pollutants to freshwater systems can impact consumers negatively, but the effects are temporary. Although their impacts are known for consumers, little is known about their effects on microbial communities and ecosystem processes. Microbial communities can be important role players in the decomposition of organic matter and their diversity and distribution can regulate the early stages of the decomposition process. We used mesocosms with different concentrations of Tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) and a control to test its impact on leaf decomposition and microbial communities. Water oak leaf packs were placed in tanks 2-weeks prior to adding THPC to allow for conditioning. After 14-d, replicates were removed to assess microbial communities and decomposition during initial conditioning. Remaining replicates were removed after 14-d with treatment and processed for decomposition and microbial colonization. We predicted that higher concentrations of THPC would inhibit microbes and slow decomposition. Preliminary results indicate that different concentrations of THPC may have differential effects on decomposition rates with the lowest concentrations yielding faster rates than controls.

Sara Alemar (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, sa03382@georgaisouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


C31 Organic Matter Processing 194 - MICROORGANISMS, BUT NOT SHREDDERS, RESPOND TO TEMPERATURE ACCORDING TO THE METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MICROORGANISMS, BUT NOT SHREDDERS, RESPOND TO TEMPERATURE ACCORDING TO THE METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Breakdown of terrestrial organic matter in streams and rivers is an essential part of the global carbon cycle. This process is driven by both microbial decomposers and macroinvertebrate detritivores, whose relative activity affects the ultimate fate of carbon in streams. These dynamics are especially important in the context of projected stream temperature increases, which may shift the relative contributions of microbes and detritivores to litter breakdown. Specifically, the rate of detritivore-mediated litter breakdown in streams may be lower than expected based on the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) due to these organisms' sensitivity to increased temperature. Building on preliminary data that suggest that the relationship between litter breakdown and temperature is steeper than expected based on MTE, we conducted a series of litter incubations in streams across a temperature gradient at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (NC, USA). We compared litter breakdown rates between coarse and fine mesh litterbags to quantify the relative contributions of detritivores and microbes to organic matter processing across temperatures. This work expands our understanding of how organismal responses to temperature shifts may scale up to affect ecosystem-level carbon cycling in streams.

Carolyn Cummins (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Georgia, carolynsc1225@gmail.com;


Amy Rosemond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


Phillip Bumpers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, bumpersp@gmail.com;


Jonathan Benstead (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, jbenstead@ua.ed;


Vlad Gulis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Coastal Carolina University, vgulis@coastal.edu;


C32 Primary and Secondary Production 195 - A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A RIVER: LAGRANGIAN PROFILING OF RIVER METABOLISM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A RIVER: LAGRANGIAN PROFILING OF RIVER METABOLISM River ecosystem processes vary in time and space. The reference frame employed to investigate ecosystem dynamics constrains what can be learned. Over 60 years of Eulerian (i.e., fixed station) measurements of stream metabolism have yielded enormous insights about the controls and constraints on primary production and respiration through river networks. With this work, we extend metabolism measurements to a Lagrangian reference frame, wherein spatial variation in ecosystem processes is of particular interest. Using a citizen science approach, we obtained many longitudinal temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles from multiple spring-fed rivers over a single day. These ca. 5 km profiles are analyzed for spatial patterns of primary production and respiration, and the results contrasted to contemporaneous fixed-station measurements. The profiles reveal substantial spatial variation in the rates of DO production and depletion, from which spatially dis-aggregated metabolism estimates were obtained. These rates were entirely consistent with reach-scale estimates from fixed-point DO time series, but reveal considerable within-reach heterogeneity. Where spatial variation in metabolism is expected to be important, as in river networks and heterogeneous channels, this Lagrangian approach is simple and informative.

Matthew Cohen (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, mjc@ufl.edu;


Robert Hensley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, bhensley@ufl.edu;


Lauren Devito (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, ldevito@ufl.edu;


C37 Stoichiometry 196 - HIGH VARIATION IN NUTRIENT EXCRETION WITHIN A GUILD OF CLOSELY RELATED CADDISFLY SPECIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

HIGH VARIATION IN NUTRIENT EXCRETION WITHIN A GUILD OF CLOSELY RELATED CADDISFLY SPECIES Understanding the amount of variation in functional traits between closely related species within guilds is critical for understanding links between community composition and ecosystem processes. Nutrient excretion by aquatic animals can supply a considerable proportion of nutrient demand, but the functional redundancy within closely related guilds is unknown. To determine the magnitude of variation in nutrient excretion within a guild, we quantified nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) excretion rates of 10 larval caddisfly species that inhabit high elevation ponds. We found considerable interspecific variation in mass-specific excretion of N, P, and molar N:P ratios. We compared the success of species and trait-based models in explaining this variation, and found that traits can predict excretion as well as or better than species identity alone. A meta-analysis revealed a large range in variation among guilds of vertebrates and invertebrates, and that the variation within this caddisfly guild is comparatively high for N and intermediate for P excretion. Thus, despite similarities of species within biological groups such as guilds, using broad groupings could hinder predicting the consequences of species gains or losses due to substantial species-level variation in functional traits.

Jared Balik (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University, jabalik2@ncsu.edu;


Brad Taylor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University Dept. of Applied Ecology; Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, bwtaylo3@ncsu.edu ;


Susan Washko (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, susan.washko@aggiemail.usu.edu;


Scott Wissinger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Allegheny College, swissing@allegheny.edu;


C37 Stoichiometry 197 - HOST DIET STOICHIOMETRY INFLUENCES MYXOBOLUS CEREBRALIS SPORE PRODUCTION OF INFECTED TUBIFEX TUBIFEX

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

HOST DIET STOICHIOMETRY INFLUENCES MYXOBOLUS CEREBRALIS SPORE PRODUCTION OF INFECTED TUBIFEX TUBIFEX Whirling disease in salmonids is caused by the myxozoan parasite Myxobolus cerebralis, who’s complex life cycle involves infecting the benthic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex. Previous work has shown that diet C:P strongly influences the rate and total number of infectious propagules emitted by T. tubifex in laboratory microcosms. We present an observational study in which M. cerebralis infected T. tubifex were collected from 12 whirling disease positive sites in Central Colorado, and held in the lab to observe spore production. Worms were fed diets of fine benthic organic matter collected with them. Total spore production per worm increased with diet C:P. These results agree with our previous study, which also showed a positive relationship between spore production and diet C:P over a similar range. The slope of the relationship between diet C:P and total spores produced was similar between the laboratory and field study. These results may indicate that M. cerebralis is C limited at low diet C:P, or that T. tubifex has greater immune function, or lower tolerance for M. cerebralis infection, at low C:P. Overall, these lab and field results show that diet quality alters the host-pathogen interaction.

Andrew Sanders (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina State University Dept. of Applied Ecology; Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, ajsande5@ncsu.edu;


Brad Taylor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University Dept. of Applied Ecology; Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, bwtaylo3@ncsu.edu ;


S01 Dams, big data, and meta-analyses 199 - TRENDS OF ATRAZINE AND METOLACHLOR CONCENTRATION IN STREAMS AT MULTIPLE SPATIAL SCALES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

TRENDS OF ATRAZINE AND METOLACHLOR CONCENTRATION IN STREAMS AT MULTIPLE SPATIAL SCALES Atrazine and metolachlor are detected in U.S. waters at concentrations that may have adverse effects on aquatic organisms and human health. Stream samples were collected for quantification of pesticide and nutrient concentrations in Indiana. A meta-analysis of national data was conducted for comparison. Regionally, concentration of atrazine was positively related to metolachlor (95% CI = 0.06 to 0.40) and peak concentrations did not occur during high discharge. Sediment-bound metolachlor were positively related to sediment-bound atrazine (95% CI = 0.14 to 0.54) and total organic carbon (95% CI =0.20 to 0.76). Nationally, peak atrazine and metolachlor were detected in spring with highest mean concentrations of atrazine in the Midwest and metolachlor in California. Regionally, discharge was not the best predictor of observed pesticide concentrations due to drought conditions. Nationally, atrazine concentrations were positively related to metolachlor concentrations ((95% CI = 0.95 to 1.00) and ammonium (95% CI = <0.01 to 0.04). metolachlor concentration were positively related to nitrate (95% CI = 0.03 to 0.08), phosphate (95% CI = <0.01 to 0.04), and atrazine (95% CI = 0.66 to 0.70), but negatively to pH (95% CI = -0.04 to -0.01).

Melody Bernot (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, mjbernot@bsu.edu;


DANIEL ELIAS (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina Wesleyan College, delias@ncwc.edu;


Jason Doll (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, dolljas1@msu.edu;


S02 The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Assessing Beneficial Use Impairments in Areas of Concern 200 - SEDIMENT-TOXICITY ASSESSMENT AND CONTAMINANT-SOURCE TRACKING AT TWO WISCONSIN AREAS OF CONCERN (AOCS) AND NON-AOC COMPARISON TRIBUTARIES TO LAKE MICHIGAN

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SEDIMENT-TOXICITY ASSESSMENT AND CONTAMINANT-SOURCE TRACKING AT TWO WISCONSIN AREAS OF CONCERN (AOCS) AND NON-AOC COMPARISON TRIBUTARIES TO LAKE MICHIGAN Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs) are some of the most degraded areas within the Great Lakes basin. Two Lake Michigan AOCs, the Sheboygan River and Milwaukee Estuary, were listed, in part, because of sediment contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and metals. In fall 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey collected composite samples of streambed sediment from 19 sites— 11 at the Sheboygan River and Milwaukee Estuary AOCs and 8 at non-AOC comparison sites. Sediment was analyzed for concentrations of PCBs, PAHs, and selected metals, along with midge and amphipod toxicity. Amphipod toxicity at the sites was found to be primarily related to PAHs and secondarily to metal concentrations in the sediment. Source tracking techniques, such as the comparison of PAH diagnostic ratios and proportional concentrations of PAH congeners in each sediment sample to published PAH sources, were used to estimate the most likely sources of PAHs to sediment at each AOC and non-AOC comparison site. The results from this study will be used to evaluate remediation progress and determine future remedial actions for improving contamination and toxicity to benthic invertebrates at these sites.

Hayley Olds (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, htolds@usgs.gov;


Barbara Scudder Eikenberry (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, beikenberry@usgs.gov;


John Besser (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, jbesser@usgs.gov;


Rebecca Dorman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, rdorman@usgs.gov ;


S02 The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Assessing Beneficial Use Impairments in Areas of Concern 201 - EVALUATING THE DEGRADATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON AND ZOOPLANKTON POPULATIONS BENEFICIAL USE IMPAIRMENT (BUI) AT THE WAUKEGAN HARBOR AREA OF CONCERN (AOC)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EVALUATING THE DEGRADATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON AND ZOOPLANKTON POPULATIONS BENEFICIAL USE IMPAIRMENT (BUI) AT THE WAUKEGAN HARBOR AREA OF CONCERN (AOC) Several decades of industrial contamination at Waukegan Harbor in Lake Michigan led to its listing as a Great Lakes Area of Concern (AOC). After extensive remediation efforts, evaluations are underway toward the removal of six Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) to delist Waukegan Harbor as an AOC. To address the "Degradation of Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Populations" BUI, we collected semi-monthly samples in 2017 and compared plankton communities from the Waukegan Harbor AOC to a nearby reference site, North Point Marina, and nearshore lake locations outside of each harbor. We found plankton communities between the AOC and reference site were most similar during summer months, but species composition shifted in September, resulting in divergent assemblages within and between sites. Comparable levels of dissimilarity were detected between harbors and respective nearshore locations, indicating a patchy distribution. Dissimilarities among zooplankton communities were largely driven by the presence of dreissenid veligers and rotifer taxa composition. Due to seasonal variation and patchy distribution of plankton, we suggest that plankton communities should be frequently assessed over multiple seasons and years to ensure effective statistical evaluation toward the potential delisting of this BUI category.

Scot Peterson (Primary Presenter/Author), Illinois Natural History Survey- Lake Michigan Biological Station, scotpete@illinois.edu;


Emily Reed (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey- Lake Michigan Biological Station, reedemil@gmail.com;


Sergiusz Czesny (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey- Lake Michigan Biological Station, czesny@illinois.edu;


S02 The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Assessing Beneficial Use Impairments in Areas of Concern 261 - A WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE APPROACH TO ASSESSING BENTHOS BENFICIAL USE IMPAIRMENTS USING MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY AND SEDIMENT TOXICITY DATA IN NEW YORK AOCS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

A WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE APPROACH TO ASSESSING BENTHOS BENFICIAL USE IMPAIRMENTS USING MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY AND SEDIMENT TOXICITY DATA IN NEW YORK AOCs The United States and Canada agreed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement in 1972. In subsequent amendments, 43 Areas of Concern (AOCs), including six in New York, were identified where legacy industrial contamination and physical disturbance caused up to 14 beneficial use impairments (BUIs) in each AOC. With a focus on remediation and delisting AOCs through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, efforts are underway to assess the current status of the benthos and other BUIs. Following guidelines established by the International Joint Commission in 1991, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and U.S. Geological Survey developed a broadly applicable, ecosystem-based approach to BUI assessment in which both benthic community condition and sediment toxicity are compared between AOC and reference locations. This approach helps separate the effects of AOC-specific contaminants from broader regional stressors and provides a robust weight-of-evidence assessment of specific BUIs and their removal criteria. Since 2011, this approach has been effectively applied to multiple BUI assessments in 4 of the 5 active AOCs in New York.

Brian Duffy (Primary Presenter/Author), New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, brian.duffy@dec.ny.gov;


Scott George (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, sgeorge@usgs.gov;


Barry Baldigo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, bbaldigo@usgs.gov;


S04 Expanding regulatory frameworks to include detrital responses in streams 202 - THE DUAL ARRHENIUS - MICHAELIS MENTEN MODEL TO PREDICT TEMPERATURE AND NUTRIENTS EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE DUAL ARRHENIUS - MICHAELIS MENTEN MODEL TO PREDICT TEMPERATURE AND NUTRIENTS EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN STREAMS Among global change drivers, nutrient enrichment and temperature raises have received considerable attention, and their effects on ecosystems are relatively well understood. However, anticipating the functional consequences of their concomitant variations remains challenging. Here we measured microbial leaf litter decomposition in 12 streams that exhibit contrasting dissolved nutrient concentrations along a seasonal temperature gradient. We then used the Bayesian inference to assess the relevance of several alternative models to predict litter decomposition from temperature and nutrient availability. The most complete model included an Arrhenius term (temperature effect) and Michaelis-Menten relationships for nitrogen and phosphorus effects, and allowed a linear influence of temperature on both half-saturation constants. From this full model, we derived several nested models that were compared using the Akaike Information Criterion. The Dual Arrhenius - Michaelis-Menten model gave a satisfying fit to our data, with the estimated activation energy value being 0.42 eV (±0.27 sd), and half saturation constants estimates 0.050 (±0.01 sd) mg N/L and 0.044 (±0.003 sd) mg P/L. We discuss the relevance of these estimates based on the existing knowledge on leaf decomposition limitations by temperature and nutrients.

Jérémy Jabiol (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, jeremy.jabiol@univ-lorraine.fr;


Baba Camara (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, bcamara@univ-metz.fr;


Michaël Danger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, michael.danger@univ-lorraine.fr;


Franck Gilbert (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, CNRS, Toulouse, franck.gilbert@univ-tlse3.fr;


Alice Gossiaux (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, alice.gossiaux@univ-lorraine.fr;


François Guérold (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, francois.guerold@univ-lorraine.fr;


Antoine Lecerf (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Univ.Toulouse, France, antoine.lecerf@univ-tlse3.fr;


Pascal Poupin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Univ. Lorraine, France, pascal.poupin@univ-lorraine.fr;


Eric Chauvet (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, CNRS, France, eric.chauvet@univ-tlse3.fr;


S04 Expanding regulatory frameworks to include detrital responses in streams 203 - HEIRARCHICAL VARIATION IN DECOMPOSITION RATES ACROSS SOUTHERN ONTARIO REFERENCE STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

HEIRARCHICAL VARIATION IN DECOMPOSITION RATES ACROSS SOUTHERN ONTARIO REFERENCE STREAMS The cotton strip assay (CSA) has been promoted as a method to study the rate of organic-matter decomposition, as a means of incorporating functional indicators into standardized river assessments. However, operationalization of the CSA as an indicator requires testing the spatial and temporal controls of variance in decomposition of cotton strips at regional reference sites. We conducted a hierarchically structured study of decomposition rates in Ontario, Canada. Cotton strips were deployed during the spring, summer and autumn in pool and riffle habitats of 22 streams located in three distinct physiographic regions. Partitioning of variation among hierarchical scales associated with rates of decomposition will be examined using nested ANOVAs. In addition, a PLS regression analysis will be performed to identify environmental variables associated with decomposition patterns. We anticipate that seasonal and regional-scale differences will account for the majority of variation in decomposition rates, whereby temperature and nutrients will be the primary environmental controls of decomposition. By quantifying the natural heterogeneity in decomposition rates, this study will inform biomonitoring practices, enabling progress towards inclusion of the CSA in regional monitoring programs.

Jenna R. Webb (Primary Presenter/Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, jwebb28@uwo.ca;


Kristin J. Painter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, kpainte3@uwo.ca;


Nolan J.T. Pearce (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, npearce7@uwo.ca;


Robert Bailey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Ontario Institute of Technology, robert.bailey@uoit.ca;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


Adam G. Yates (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


S04 Expanding regulatory frameworks to include detrital responses in streams 204 - SUB-LETHAL ION CONCENTRATIONS ALTER SHREDDER PERFORMANCE AND LEAF LITTER PROCESSING

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SUB-LETHAL ION CONCENTRATIONS ALTER SHREDDER PERFORMANCE AND LEAF LITTER PROCESSING Salinization from agriculture and resource extraction can have lethal and sub-lethal effects on aquatic detritivores. For example, sodium chloride concentrations lethal to detritivores (5x above ambient) reduce leaf litter processing, but whether sub-lethal concentrations slow processing rates is not known. We predict sub-lethal salt concentrations may change litter-processing rates by reducing energy required by microbes and shredders for osmoregulation, and by altering litter quality for shredders. Here we predict salt-induced changes in microbial community composition and activity will decrease processing rates by reducing shredder litter palatability or nutrition. Isopods, a crustacean, were fed leaves incubated in natural streamwater (~3 mg/L NaCl), and leaves incubated in one of six NaCl or NaHCO3 treatments (16, 32, 64 mg/L). Isopods grew ~20% less in the intermediate salt concentrations compared with natural streamwater. The rate of respiration and amount that isopods ate did not differ between natural and intermediate salt concentrations. Therefore, we predict insect shredder growth will also decrease from altered nutrition when fed salt-incubated leaves. The same experiment will be performed with a common shredding stonefly. Results will show whether sub-lethal salt concentration can indirectly alter stream detrital processing.

Brooke Howard-Parker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, bbhowardparker@gmail.com;


Natalie Clay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Louisiana Tech University, nclay@latech.edu;


Michelle Evans-White (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


Anastasia Mogilevski (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas, amogilevski1@cub.uca.edu;


S04 Expanding regulatory frameworks to include detrital responses in streams 205 - COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF SUB-LETHAL GRADIENTS OF TWO SODIUM SALTS ON AQUATIC MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF SUB-LETHAL GRADIENTS OF TWO SODIUM SALTS ON AQUATIC MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES Salinization of freshwaters is a global issue due to anthropogenic activities such as road salting, irrigation practices, resource extraction, and discharge of inadequately treated waste water. Arkansas streams have relatively low concentrations of salts currently, but are at risk due to expanding agriculture and urbanization. Few studies address the effects of sub-lethal salinization on freshwater microbes; likewise, little attention has been given to the possibly differential effects of specific salt ions on freshwater biota. We investigated the effects of two common Na salts (NaCl and NaHCO3) at sub-lethal concentrations on detrital-associated microbial communities. We predicted 1) autotrophic (algal) and heterotrophic (fungal and bacterial) microbial biomass would positively relate to salt concentrations (subsidy response), 2) respiration would decrease with increasing salinity, and 3) remaining leaf litter detritus mass would decrease with increasing salinity. In most cases, at least low to moderate salt additions yielded a subsidy response pattern for microbial biomass. Sodium bicarbonate (NaCO3) had a stimulatory effect and NaCl elicited suppression of respiration rates for microbial communities. Remaining leaf litter detritus mass was similar across treatments. Results suggest aquatic microbes respond differently to specific salt ions even at sub-lethal concentrations.

Brooke Howard-Parker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, bbhowardparker@gmail.com;


Thomas Williams (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Arkansas, tw016@email.uark.edu;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas , sentrekin@uca.edu;


Natalie Clay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Louisiana Tech University, nclay@latech.edu;


Michelle Evans-White (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


S04 Expanding regulatory frameworks to include detrital responses in streams 206 - STOICHIOMETRY OF STANDARDIZED WOOD SUBSTRATES IS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR DETECTING NUTRIENT POLLUTION IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STOICHIOMETRY OF STANDARDIZED WOOD SUBSTRATES IS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR DETECTING NUTRIENT POLLUTION IN STREAMS Tools to detect negative effects of excess nutrients, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), on detrital resources are needed for management. We tested the response of standardized detrital materials to landscape gradients in N and P to determine whether breakdown and respiration rates of labile (cellulose sponge) or recalcitrant (wood veneer) substrates increased with N or P. In a longer-term study, we tested whether detrital stoichiometry or streamwater nutrient concentrations was a better predictor of breakdown rates. We found that both respiration and breakdown rates of labile and recalcitrant substrates increased in short-term studies and responded more to P than N. In the longer-term study, streamwater P concentrations also greatly increased breakdown of wood veneers (4x over the P gradient we studied). Detrital nutrient content was a better predictor of mass loss than streamwater nutrient concentrations; carbon:N and carbon:P of detrital substrates explained 62% and 54% of mass loss, respectively. Our study reveals that standardized detrital substrates respond to gradients in nutrients in complex, human modified ecosystems and that stoichiometry of standardized wood substrates may be an effective and low-cost tool for detecting nutrient effects on an essential ecosystem function.

Phillip Bumpers (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, bumpersp@gmail.com;


Rachel Usher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rlusher2@gmail.com;


Amy D. Rosemond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia , amy.rosemond@gmail.com;


James Wood (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), West Liberty University, James.Wood@westliberty.edu;


Seth Wenger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, swenger@uga.edu;


S05: Damming the Amazon - hydropower proliferation in the world's largest river system 207 - VEGETATION PATTERNS, HABITATS, AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN AMAZON FOREST FLOODPLAINS: POTENTIAL IMPACTS BY DAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

VEGETATION PATTERNS, HABITATS, AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN AMAZON FOREST FLOODPLAINS: POTENTIAL IMPACTS BY DAMS Freshwater habitats of the Amazon region (wetlands, floodplains, lakes, and rivers) represent 14% of the total basin area. Despite their low extent with respect to area, freshwater habitats have provided irreplaceable ecosystem services to local Amazon communities for millennia. Locally, the production of ecosystem services in these habitats include fisheries, wildlife meat, edible fruits, navigation, and fertile areas for seasonal agriculture. Other ecosystem services linked to these habitats have a more global-level impact, namely carbon sequestration by recently discovered Amazon peatlands. These ecosystem services are being threatened by the recent impetus for the construction of > 300 new hydropower projects in the region. We identify key ecosystem services associated with Amazon forest floodplains, and discuss the potential impacts of dams in relation to dam characteristics and their location in the different Amazon sub-basins.

Roosevelt García-Villacorta (Primary Presenter/Author), Cornell University, roosevelt.garcia@gmail.com;


Xiaojian Wu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Microsoft, CA, USA, xiaojian.academy@gmail.com;


Qinru Shi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, qs63@cornell.edu;


Elizabeth Anderson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, eanderson8@gmail.com;


Bruce Forsberg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Institute of Amazon Research, Manaus, AM, Brazil, brforsberg@gmail.com;


Stephen Hamilton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, hamilton@kbs.msu.edu;


Scott Steinschneider (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, ss3378@cornell.edu;


Carla Gomes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, gomes@cs.cornell.edu;


Alexander Flecker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA, asf3@cornell.edu;


the Amazon Dams CompSust Working Group (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, Amazon.Dams.Comp.Sust@gmail.com;


S06 Social-Ecological Systems and Ecosystem Services 208 - THE IMPORTANCE OF RELATIONAL VALUES IN A RIVERINE SOCIAL ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE IMPORTANCE OF RELATIONAL VALUES IN A RIVERINE SOCIAL ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM Relational values refer to the way people relate to nature and each other, at either the individual level, such as local identity, or the collective level, such as family cohesion. A recent interest in the incorporation of this new value approach has emerged to enhance the ecosystem services framework. However, there is a challenge in assessing relational values because of the difficulty in finding methodologies to properly characterize them. We conducted a total of 282 face-to-face surveys to perform a socio-cultural valuation of ecosystem services in the Henrys Fork Watershed of southeastern Idaho, a world-renowned fishing destination. With the goal of understanding relational values in river systems, we explored the benefits provided by fishing and its links to components of human well-being (e.g., cultural identity). Our results showed that family cohesion and relaxation were the benefits most frequently chosen by from local respondents as the most important to maintaining their well-being. Our study emphasizes the importance of incorporating this type of river-related value in river management and planning.

Loni Nelson (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, nelsloni@isu.edu;


Adam Eckersell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, eckeadam@isu.edu;


Cristina Quintas-Soriano (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, quincris@isu.edu;


Rob Van Kirk (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Henry's Fork Foundation, rob@henrysfork.org;


Colden Baxter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, baxtcold@isu.edu;


Antonio J. Castro (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, castanto@isu.edu;


S07 Landscape Influences on Freshwater Habitats and Biological Assemblages 209 - DO FOOD WEB DYNAMICS SHIFT ACROSS A GRADIENT OF SPRING TO WETLAND HABITATS IN A DESERT ECOSYSTEM?

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DO FOOD WEB DYNAMICS SHIFT ACROSS A GRADIENT OF SPRING TO WETLAND HABITATS IN A DESERT ECOSYSTEM? Like many aquatic habitats around the world, Cuatro Ciénegas, México is facing threats of increasing water usage and land use change. These influences have a strong effect on the basin's sensitive spring habitats, causing a shift towards wetland habitats, which are more thermally variable and dependent on runoff than are springs. While these springs are undergoing large biogeochemical changes, their inhabitants are often forced to adapt or become extirpated. Drastic habitat alterations affect inhabitant physiology, behavior, and, therefore, diet. However, little is known about the food web dynamics of these threatened ecosystems. Gambusia marshi, a fish species present throughout the basin, provides a way to study these dynamics. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen will be used to determine how dependent the diet of G. marshi is on terrestrial input, and whether this dependence varies across a gradient from spring to wetland habitats. Determining how G. marshi diet shifts between habitats will provide insight on arid spring food web function and response to environmental change. Moreover, this study contributes to the conservation and management of spring ecosystems in general, which are facing similar threats of change and destruction worldwide.

Christina Lupoli (Primary Presenter/Author), Arizona State University, caclupoli@gmail.com;


Hector Espinosa-Perez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, hector@unam.mx;


Eric Moody (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Iowa State University, erickmoody@gmail.com;


Margarita Ojeda (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, margojeda@gmail.com;


John Sabo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, John.L.Sabo@asu.edu;


S07 Landscape Influences on Freshwater Habitats and Biological Assemblages 210 - ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN OHIO STREAMS AND RESERVOIRS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN OHIO STREAMS AND RESERVOIRS Nutrient enrichment can have strong effects on macroinvertebrate communities, yet the comparative effects of nitrogen and phosphorus is not well understood. Here, we examine relationships between nutrient concentrations and macroinvertebrate communities in streams and reservoirs in the Ohio River Basin. Benthic macroinvertebrates were surveyed and nitrogen, phosphorus, nitrate, and orthophosphate concentrations measured at 37 sites distributed across agricultural, mixed-use, and forested catchments (n= 3). On average, total nitrogen concentrations were higher in agricultural than forested streams and in the mixed-use reservoir than the agricultural and forested reservoirs. Orthophosphate concentrations were higher in mixed-use than forested streams. In streams, preliminary data indicate that macroinvertebrate density and species richness were positively correlated with total nitrogen and nitrate, but not phosphorus. In contrast, density, species richness, and Shannon diversity first increased and then decreased at higher total nitrogen concentrations in reservoirs, thus showing a subsidy-stress response. Density and species richness were also significantly higher in the agricultural vs. the forested reservoir. These results provide initial evidence that nitrogen enrichment may exert stronger effects than phosphorus on macroinvertebrate communities in this system, although we anticipate that stoichiometric relationships will likely be most predictive.

Rebecca Czaja (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, czaja.3@osu.edu;


Krystal Pocock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, pocock.20@buckeyemail.osu.edu;


Kay C. Stefanik (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, stefanik.13@osu.edu;


Lauren M. Pintor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, pintor.6@osu.edu;


S. Mazeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


S07 Landscape Influences on Freshwater Habitats and Biological Assemblages 211 - RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WATERSHED LAND USE AND BACTERIAL COLONIZATION AND DECOMPOSITION OF TERRESTRIAL LITTER IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WATERSHED LAND USE AND BACTERIAL COLONIZATION AND DECOMPOSITION OF TERRESTRIAL LITTER IN STREAMS Terrestrial organic matter is a key carbon and energy source for headwater streams, and microbial colonization and decomposition of terrestrial litter plays a critical role in the entry of this allochthonous organic material into stream food webs. Changes in land use can impact the composition and activity of stream microbial communities, so we designed an experiment to explore the relationships between watershed land use and the microbial colonization and decomposition of terrestrial litter. We incubated model terrestrial litter substrates (cotton and silk strips, representing low and high nitrogen substrates, respectively) in 18 streams in northeast Ohio with large differences in watershed land use (e.g. percentage urban, agriculture, and forest/herbaceous). After the two month incubation the strips were analyzed for tensile strength (an indicator of decomposition) and the taxonomic composition of attached bacterial communities (via high-throughput amplicon sequencing). Decomposition of cotton strips was strongly correlated with bacterial community composition, whereas for silk strips decomposition was not correlated with bacterial community composition but was strongly correlated with watershed land use. These results suggest an interactive effect of substrate quality, land use, and microbial community composition on decomposition of terrestrial organic matter.

Andrea Fitzgibbon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University , afitzgib@kent.edu;


David Costello (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


John Kelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, Jkelly7@luc.edu;


Paul Risteca (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biology, Loyola University Chicago, pristeca@luc.edu;


S07 Landscape Influences on Freshwater Habitats and Biological Assemblages 212 - RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL WATER QUALITY ACROSS LAND USES OF SOUTHERN OHIO

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL WATER QUALITY ACROSS LAND USES OF SOUTHERN OHIO Degradation of geophysical and chemical water quality due to land use change is a growing concern. We assessed these impacts by surveying thirty-eight stream reaches across three study catchments with contrasting land use in southern and central Ohio. Sampling occurred seasonally in 2016-2017 for nutrient concentrations, in-stream habitat quality, and geomorphic parameters. Nutrient concentrations were found to vary seasonally and by catchment: total phosphorus and orthophosphate were highest in the mixed-use watershed and total nitrogen and nitrate were lowest in the forested watershed. As expected, stream habitat quality was higher in forested and mixed-use watersheds than in the agricultural watershed. Accounting for catchment land use, habitat quality increased with increasing median grain size and width:depth ratio. Total phosphorus and orthophosphate decreased with increasing median grain size, while orthophosphate concentrations were positively associated with glide habitat. Siltation, width-depth ratio, amount of instream cover, and relative proportion of pool/riffle/run habitat were not related to nutrient concentrations. Our results suggest that some fluvial geomorphic features may aid in regulating nutrient dynamics in streams, and highlight the potential role of stream restoration in improving stream habitat quality and reducing stream phosphorus loading.

Kay C. Stefanik (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, stefanik.13@osu.edu;


S. Mazeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


Lauren M. Pintor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, pintor.6@osu.edu;


Kaiguang Zhao (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, zhao.1423@osu.edu;


S07 Landscape Influences on Freshwater Habitats and Biological Assemblages 213 - VARIABILITY IN INVERTEBRATE ECOLOGICAL TROPHIC NETWORKS ALONG A GRADIENT OF NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

VARIABILITY IN INVERTEBRATE ECOLOGICAL TROPHIC NETWORKS ALONG A GRADIENT OF NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT Food webs represent one of the principal categories of ecological networks, which describe biotic interactions and integrate energy pathways within ecosystems. These ecological networks can be vulnerable to changes in land use and cover associated with anthropogenic activity, such as nutrient enrichment. In streams, nutrient enrichment can alter the amount and type of basal resources available for consumers, which in turn alters food-web dynamics. Here, we investigate the complexity and architecture of invertebrate ecological trophic networks in streams as a function of in-stream nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. Preliminary results indicate that functional feeding group composition of macroinvertebrate communities varies by total phosphorus and orthophosphate concentrations, shifting towards higher relative abundances of scraper-grazers at higher concentrations. Connectance – which reflects the proportion of links among species that are realized – appears to be negatively correlated with nitrate concentrations. These results provide initial evidence that nutrient enrichment may alter invertebrate trophic networks with implications for energy flow and upper food-web compartments. Subsequent analysis will explore nutrient relationships with trophic-network characteristics representing additional species, link, and chain properties.

Travonya Kenly (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University , kenly.1@osu.edu;


S. Mazeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


S09 Spatial aspects of freshwater ecology: understanding, managing, predicting 214 - PROCESS-BASED EVALUATION OF THE GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE SPATIAL PATTERNS IN PEATLANDS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PROCESS-BASED EVALUATION OF THE GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE SPATIAL PATTERNS IN PEATLANDS Groundwater discharge magnitude and distribution can have a significant impact on ecosystem services provided by the peatland environment; however, peatlands can be a challenge to manage and restore due to their spatial extent, matrix heterogeneities, and the multi-scale interactions that exist within these ecosystems. Anthropogenic degradation, such as dewatering and sediment addition, further complicates the implementation of effective wetland restoration strategies. This research evaluates spatial patterning of groundwater discharge and the subsurface structure of a Massachusetts legacy cranberry farm peatland using heat-tracing methods and ground penetrating radar. Our results indicate two unique groundwater discharge processes that are spatially distinct, but both correlate to the subsurface peat basin structure. The two types of groundwater discharge are diffuse lower-flux spatially peripheral matrix seepage and, spatially interior discrete higher-flux preferential flow path seepage. These results informed stream channel restoration to enhance ecosystem services throughout the site’s large-scale project. Understanding the drivers and patterns of groundwater discharge may allow resource managers to more efficiently predict and locate groundwater seepage without invasive or laborious investigations, and incorporate this information into restoration design for these critical ecosystems.

Danielle Hare (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Connecticut, danielle.hare@uconn.edu;


David Boutt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Massachusetts, Amherst, dboutt@geo.umass.edu ;


William P. Clement (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Massachusetts, Amherst, wclement@geo.umass.edu ;


Christine Hatch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Massachusetts, Amherst, chatch@geo.umass.edu ;


Glorianna Davenport (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Living Observatory at Tidmarsh Farms, gid@media.mit.edu ;


Alex Hackman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration, alex.hackman@state.ma.us ;


S09 Spatial Aspects of Freshwater Ecology: Understanding, Managing, Predicting 215 - CHARACTERIZING COMPLEXITY IN WEBS OF FEAR: ROLES OF PREDATOR TYPE, DIET, AND HABITAT IN THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ZOOPLANKTON AND FISH IN LAKES AND RESERVOIRS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CHARACTERIZING COMPLEXITY IN WEBS OF FEAR: ROLES OF PREDATOR TYPE, DIET, AND HABITAT IN THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ZOOPLANKTON AND FISH IN LAKES AND RESERVOIRS Infochemicals (kairomones) of planktivores influence the movement of zooplankton. We investigated the response of Daphnia pulex in the presence or absence of macrophytes to a piscivore (Esox masquinongy), a planktivore (Lepomis macrochirus) with either a diet of zooplankton or crickets, and a control. We observed avoidance of D. pulex to the four fish stimuli in tanks with a barrier restricting fish at the edge of one third of the tank and macrophyte treatments on the opposing side, where D. pulex were introduced. Fewer D. pulex moved from the introduction area in the presence of bluegill with a conspecific diet than in other treatments; avoidance of the fish stimuli was least in the control and muskellunge treatments. Movement out of the introduction area was also greater when macrophytes were there. Movement into the fish zone from the central zone was less frequent in the presence of a predator and macrophytes, suggesting D. pulex prefer edges of macrophytes in the presence of fish to open water or the interior of macrophytes. This study shows that Daphnia response to fish is not conserved and habitat arrangement structures the landscape of fear.

Thomas Detmer (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois, tdetmer@illinois.edu;


David Wahl (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, d-wahl@illinois.edu;


S09 Spatial aspects of freshwater ecology: understanding, managing, predicting 216 - DO IMPACTS FROM FOREST HARVESTING SPATIALLY ACCUMULATE IN STREAMS? A MULTI-INDICATOR STUDY

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DO IMPACTS FROM FOREST HARVESTING SPATIALLY ACCUMULATE IN STREAMS? A MULTI-INDICATOR STUDY Despite a suite of provincial guidelines working in concert with federal policy to promote sustainable forestry in Canada, legacies of ecosystem degradation persist, many of which are specific to aquatic environments. Forest harvesting-induced impacts to small headwater streams tend to be well-studied and reasonably predictable, but it is lesser known whether impacts occurring upstream magnify or dissipate in larger downstream areas. In response, this study examines whether impacts caused by selection-based harvesting of mixed hardwood stands on the northeastern shore of Lake Superior accumulate spatially in forest streams. Indicators to quantify impact at sites along a spatial gradient include water temperature and chemistry, sediment deposition, leaf-litter decomposition and associated invertebrate community structure, bioaccumulation and biomagnification of methylmercury, and analysis of the terrestrial contribution to stream consumer diet. These analyses will help to determine if best management practices designed to protect against stand level impacts are effective at broader spatial scales. Moreover, a comprehensive and predictive understanding of the spatially cumulative impacts associated with harvesting is critical to maintaining healthy future forests and their provisioning of aquatic ecosystem services.

Karen Kidd (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), McMaster University, karenkidd@mcmaster.ca;


Michelle Gray (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Brunswick, mgray1@unb.ca;


David Kreutzweiser (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, dave.kreutzweiser@canada.ca;


Erik Emilson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, erik.emilson@canada.ca;


Paul Sibley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Guelph, psibley@uoguelph.ca ;


Nelson O'Driscoll (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Acadia University, nelson.odriscoll@acaidau.ca;


Kelli Charbonneau (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Brunswick, kelli.charbonneau@unb.ca;


S09 Spatial aspects of freshwater ecology: understanding, managing, predicting 217 - OCCUPANCY AND DETECTION OF YELLOW PERCH IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

OCCUPANCY AND DETECTION OF YELLOW PERCH IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS Accurately estimating the distribution of a species is important for managing sustainable populations of fishes. The yellow perch (Perca flavescens) is one of the most abundant fishes in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, which they commonly use for spawning and nursery habitat. Many management decisions are based on results from sampling, but these methods rarely account for incomplete detection (i.e., presence of a species that is not detected by sampling). We applied the method of occupancy modeling, which takes incomplete detection into account, to yellow perch presence/absence data from coastal wetlands across all five Great Lakes. We used occupancy models with environmental variables to predict the detection probability of fyke-net sampling and the occupancy of yellow perch under different environmental conditions. We found that both detection probability and occupancy of yellow perch varied among all five Great Lakes and with changes in other environmental variables. The best models included wetland class, vegetation, and Great Lake basin, and yellow perch occupancy was predicted to be highest in Lake Superior, areas with submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) or bulrush, and riverine wetlands. Our results predict which coastal wetland habitats were preferred by yellow perch.

Kaitlyn Dykstra (Primary Presenter/Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, emelandk@mail.gvsu.edu;


Carl R. Ruetz III (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University, ruetzc@gvsu.edu;


Matthew Cooper (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation, Northland College, mcooper@northland.edu;


Donald Uzarski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University, uzars1dg@cmich.edu;


S09 Spatial aspects of freshwater ecology: understanding, managing, predicting 218 - QUANTIFYING THE ACCURACY OF LANDSAT IN ESTIMATING RESERVOIR WATER SURFACE AREA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

QUANTIFYING THE ACCURACY OF LANDSAT IN ESTIMATING RESERVOIR WATER SURFACE AREA Water is a crucial resource for food production in semi-arid regions of the world, such as parts of West Africa. Thus, the management of water storage plays a critical role in human well-being. In this research, we are trying to understand the dynamics of water storage in small reservoirs in the Volta Basin by using remotely sensed imagery. Google Earth images are more accurate than Landsat images, but Google Earth has only been collecting data for about fifteen years. However, the Landsat program has collected more than three million images for about forty years. First, we will assess the accuracy satellite images (Landsat 7 or 8) by comparing them to available aerial photography (Google Earth). We will quantify how accuracy changes with soil color, latitude and size of reservoir from 2000-2016. A detailed accuracy assessment will improve our ability to estimate changes in storage across semi-arid regions of the world to inform water resources management. In addition, we hope to detect changes in water quantity by assessing the impact of the local communities and their activities in these small reservoirs in the Volta Basin.

Lambert Ngenzi (Primary Presenter/Author), Washington State University-Pullman, lambert.ngenzi@wsu.edu;


S10 Land-water Boundaries: Towards Harmonizing Hydrological and Biogeochemical Concepts in Riparian Zones Across Ecoregions 219 - BEAVER-INDUCED BIOGEOCHEMICAL ALTERATIONS IN MOUNTAIN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BEAVER-INDUCED BIOGEOCHEMICAL ALTERATIONS IN MOUNTAIN STREAMS Beavers (Castor canadensis) are integral components of many alluvial stream ecosystems. Beavers cut wood and build dams, which decreases stream energy and causes the water column to drop fine sediment upstream of the dam. Accumulation of sediment, increased water residence time and hyporheic exchange alter stream biogeochemistry within ponds, compared to downstream reaches. This research aims to understand how maintained and unmaintained beaver dams alter the flux of nutrients in mountain stream ecosystems. Water and sediment samples were collected from a stream with beaver dams (n=4) and a stream with abandoned beaver dams (n=3) in Logan Canyon, UT. Results suggest an increase in pH (p < 0.01), dissolved oxygen, temperature, conductivity and dissolved organic carbon (p < 0.05) in maintained beaver ponds as compared to downstream reaches. The stream with maintained beaver dams differed significantly from the stream with unmaintained beaver dams with respect to longitudinal temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a. Breached dams exhibited little effect on most biogeochemical parameters tested, and measurements at the most upstream site differed insignificantly from the furthest downstream site. Results from this study suggest that maintained beaver dams strongly influence stream biogeochemistry.

Deni Murray (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, Department of Watershed Sciences and the Ecology Center, deni_murray@yahoo.com;


S11 At the Confluence of Freshwater Science and the Humanities 220 - WRITING ESSAYS FOR BROADER AUDIENCES: EXPERIENCES, ADJUSTMENTS, AND COMPROMISE.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

WRITING ESSAYS FOR BROADER AUDIENCES: EXPERIENCES, ADJUSTMENTS, AND COMPROMISE. In 2014, I received a call to wrangle a desert centipede that had been mailed from Texas to a Vermont grade school. I wrote a tongue-in-cheek essay about the experience for the Vermont Entomological Newsletter. An editor for “The Outside Story”, a syndicated weekly natural history essay series, contacted me and asked me to rewrite the essay for their series. I have since become a regular contributor to the essay series, their annual conference, and had essays reprinted in other outlets. Through the editorial process I have learned to simplify my writing, reduce jargon, and compromise between the precise nature of scientific writing, and a more readable and audience friendly style suitable for readers of local newspapers. I have had significant help from editors that includes writing help, topic selection, and distribution of the end products. The experience has resulted in the production of accessible essays that reach a far broader audience than is typical for my scientific writing. The essays advance the mission of my institution and have broader impact that is appreciated by my funding agencies.

Declan McCabe (Primary Presenter/Author), Saint Michael's College, dmccabe@smcvt.edu;


S12 Status and Trends in Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Across the Circumpolar Region 221 - REVIEW OF AVAILABLE DOCUMENTED TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS AND BIOTA IN THE CIRCUMPOLAR ARCTIC

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

REVIEW OF AVAILABLE DOCUMENTED TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS AND BIOTA IN THE CIRCUMPOLAR ARCTIC The inclusion of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) in the assessment of biodiversity is important to provide a more holistic understanding of observed or studied phenomenon and to include Indigenous voice and knowledge. As with many northern projects, it is cost-prohibitive to work across vast regions with distant communities to conduct in-community TEK studies; however, the use of existing TEK records provides the opportunity to incorporate these knowledge bases into freshwater assessments and has the added value of providing a compilation of this documented knowledge. This paper presents the results of a systematic literature review for circumpolar Arctic TEK on freshwater ecosystems and biota. Emergent trends in freshwater biodiversity, as identified through the TEK in the published literature, are discussed and suggestions are made for ways to improve the incorporation of this documented knowledge into scientific assessments.

Brianna Levenstein (Primary Presenter/Author), Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunwsick, brianna.levenstein@unb.ca;


Jennifer Lento (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, jlento@gmail.com;


Jennie Knopp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oceans North, jennie.knopp@yahoo.com;


Annette Watson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College of Charleston, WatsonAM@cofc.edu;


S12 Status and Trends in Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Across the Circumpolar Region 222 - BENTHIC MACROINVERTREBRATE SIZE SPECTRA IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN ARCTIC

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BENTHIC MACROINVERTREBRATE SIZE SPECTRA IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN ARCTIC Body size is an important life history trait that affects all aspects of an organism’s existence. A common method of analyzing body size is to create a biomass size spectrum of individuals sampled within an area. While studies in temperate regions have shown that the slopes of benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) size spectra are highly consistent, there is limited understanding of whether consistency exists in the Arctic. We collected BMI kick net samples in rivers in four areas of the western Canadian Arctic: Peel Plateau, NWT; Cambridge Bay, NU; Sachs Harbour, NWT; and Aulavik National Park, NWT. Individuals were measured and normalized biomass size spectra were created and analyzed for variations in slope using GLMs. Size spectra slopes were not consistent among sample sites, varying from -2.2 to 2.9. The number of size classes also differed, with the largest size class found at a site ranging from 500 to 65 500 mg biomass. These results suggest BMI size spectra do not display the same consistency in the Arctic as has been shown in temperate regions, which may be a response to the harsh Arctic environment.

Joseph M. Culp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada and Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3C5, joseph.culp@canada.ca;


Jennifer Lento (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, jlento@gmail.com;


Allison Dykstra (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Brunswick, adykstra@unb.ca;


S12 Status and Trends in Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Across the Circumpolar Region 223 - CONDITION OF FRESHWATER RESOURCES IN ALASKA’S ARCTIC COASTAL PLAIN: WATER QUALITY, PHYSICAL HABITAT, AND BIOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES OF WETLANDS, LAKES AND STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CONDITION OF FRESHWATER RESOURCES IN ALASKA’S ARCTIC COASTAL PLAIN: WATER QUALITY, PHYSICAL HABITAT, AND BIOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES OF WETLANDS, LAKES AND STREAMS We sampled wetlands, lakes, and streams in the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska between 2011 and 2015 using USEPA’s National Aquatic Resource Surveys study designs. We selected sites using a generalized random tessellation survey design, measured physical habitat and water quality parameters, and collected diatoms at each site. For wetlands and lakes, we also sampled sites with suspected anthropogenic impacts. We visualized differences in biological community composition using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) based on Bray-Curtis distances, and compared environmental variables to the NMS ordinations to examine relationships between habitat gradients and community composition. Benthic macroinvertebrate and diatom communities responded similarly to measured environmental variables, correlated with macrophyte cover, percent sand substrate, chloride and total suspended solids. Diatoms communities were additionally correlated with calcium concentrations and pH. Additionally, we attempted to identify unique communities using indicator species analysis.

Rebecca Shaftel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alaska Center for Conservation Science at University of Alaska Anchorage, rsshaftel@alaska.edu;


Dustin Merrigan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alaska Center for Conservation Science, University of Alaska Anchorage, dwmerrigan@alaska.edu;


Matthew Carlson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alaska Center for Conservation Science, University of Alaska Anchorage, mlcarlson@alaska.edu;


Daniel Bogan (Primary Presenter/Author), Alaska Center for Conservation Science at University of Alaska Anchorage, dlbogan@alaska.edu;


S14 Crossing Brook Trout Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Salvelinus fontinalis Research, Management, and Outreach 224 - BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE AND PERIPHYTON RESPONSE TO ANTIMYCIN DURING BROOK TROUT RESTORATION IN A SMALL HEADWATER STREAM

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE AND PERIPHYTON RESPONSE TO ANTIMYCIN DURING BROOK TROUT RESTORATION IN A SMALL HEADWATER STREAM The piscicide antimycin has been used as an alternative to rotenone to eradicate nuisance fish in small streams. In many cases, antimycin is a better piscicide than rotenone because it is not as detectable by fish and is highly effective in eradicating coldwater fishes such as trout. The objective of this study is to identify potential negative effects of both the antimycin and potassium permanganate detoxifier treatments on non-target organisms. The study was done during a brook trout restoration project in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Fall 2017. Nine sites within adjacent treated and untreated streams were sampled five times bracketing an antimycin treatment to remove nonnative rainbow trout. At each site, periphyton chlorophyll and ash-free dry mass, macroinvertebrate composition, and water quality were collected. Preliminary results suggest small effects on macroinvertebrates. While this study is ongoing, it is predicted that the antimycin treatment will have no large effect on periphyton and water quality in the stream, but the effect of the detoxifying agent is unclear. If minimal effects are found, this study would reinforce the idea that antimycin is a preferred piscicide to use in coldwater streams.

Aden Blackburn (Primary Presenter/Author), Tennessee Technological University, ajblackbur42@students.tntech.edu;


Justin Murdock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Tech University, jnmurdock@tntech.edu;


Keith Gibbs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Technological University, kgibbs@tntech.edu;


S14 Crossing Brook Trout Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Salvelinus fontinalis Research, Management, and Outreach 225 - INFLUENCE OF FINE SEDIMENTS ON INTRA- AND INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION IN SALMONIDS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INFLUENCE OF FINE SEDIMENTS ON INTRA- AND INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION IN SALMONIDS Competition among fluvial salmonids may involve aggressive interactions over profitable foraging locations, but changes in habitat such as aggradation of fine streambed sediments can alter food availability. Changes in food availability can alter the value of a site and cause foraging modes to shift. In 2017 we conducted snorkel surveys to observe behavioral interactions among Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in sandy and less sandy sites within the heavily sediment aggraded Salmon Trout River, Marquette County, Michigan. During snorkel surveys of mid-channel habitats, 5 fish were observed across 3 sites including juvenile Coho Salmon chasing smaller Rainbow Trout and Coho Salmon. Foraging forays were observed at 3 sites with drift foraging being the most common method of prey capture. Observations of woody debris microhabitats revealed higher fish densities than mid-channel habitats but were not observed for foraging behaviors or interactions. Moving forward, we will pair snorkel surveys with underwater videography of mid-channel and woody debris microhabitats pre and post sediment removals to assess competition and detect foraging mode shifts.

Bradley Wells (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Technological University, bawells@mtu.edu;


Casey Huckins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, cjhuckin@mtu.edu;


S15 Crossing boundaries: watershed-tributary-lake exchanges in the Great Lakes region 226 - DENTRIFICATION AND NITROGEN FIXATION – DO THEY OCCUR IN LAKE SUPERIOR TRIBUTARIES?

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DENTRIFICATION AND NITROGEN FIXATION – DO THEY OCCUR IN LAKE SUPERIOR TRIBUTARIES? Lake Superior receives inputs from approximately 2800 tributaries whose periphyton are limited by both nitrogen and phosphorus. Nitrogen can be rapidly taken up in these tributaries during all seasons of the year, yet we know little about the specific processes that contribute to this instream uptake. We measured denitrification, nitrogen fixation and N2 flux at 7 locations in 6 Lake Superior tributaries in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in June to August 2016. Total nitrogen (TN) concentrations across all sites averaged 0.65 mg/L and nitrate-N concentrations averaged 0.37 mg/L. We found that rates of nitrogen fixation measured using acetylene reduction were low at all sites. Rates of denitrification measured using acetylene block ranged from zero in two streams, up to 0.5-10 mg N/m2/hr on rock and/or sediment substrates in four streams. Together, our results suggest that denitrification may be an important mechanism that removes N from Lake Superior tributaries as they transport nutrients from watersheds to Lake Superior.

Andrea Norton (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Technological University, annorton@mtu.edu;


Kevin Nevorski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, kcnevors@mtu.edu;


Amy Marcarelli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


S16 Ecological Stoichiometry as a Bridge Across Disciplinary Boundaries in Freshwater Science 227 - STOICHIOMETRY, FUNGAL DYNAMICS, AND DECOMPOSITION OF STANDING DEAD EMERGENT MACROPHYTES: A SYNTHESIS OF FIELD STUDIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

STOICHIOMETRY, FUNGAL DYNAMICS, AND DECOMPOSITION OF STANDING DEAD EMERGENT MACROPHYTES: A SYNTHESIS OF FIELD STUDIES The standing dead phase is an important stage of decomposition of emergent vegetation in marshes, yet few studies have examined how intrinsic litter traits constrain standing dead decomposition across plant organ types or species. We synthesized field studies quantifying carbon:nitrogen (C:N), carbon:phosphorus (C:P), and fungal biomass during decomposition of leaf, sheath, and culm tissues of several emergent macrophyte species (Typha, Juncus, Erianthus, and Phragmites). Across 12 datasets, plants resorbed 8-70% N and 15-93% P from living-green to senescence. All tissues exhibited net N mineralization whereas some tissues showed P immobilization during decomposition. Lower-C:N tissues exhibited greater decomposition rates (r=-0.80, P<0.01) and greater proportional N mineralization (r=-70, P<0.05). Tissue C:P was also negatively related to decomposition rates (r=-0.73, P<0.01) whereas tissue C:P was only weakly related to P mineralization (r=-0.36, P=0.251). Estimated fungal C use efficiencies ranged from 0.006 to 0.233 but were not related to tissue stoichiometry. A stoichiometric model of litter decomposition estimated critical C:N and C:P ratios and predicted most tissues begin N and P mineralization immediately after senescence. Our study will improve prediction of the fates of C and nutrients in standing dead vegetation across marsh ecosystems.

Tori Hebert (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Southern Mississippi, tori.hebert@usm.edu;


Halvor Halvorson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, halvorso@gmail.com;


Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


S18 Aquatic Biodiversity Surveillance Using Environmental Genomics 228 - EXPANDING GENETIC RESOURCES TO SUPPORT SPECIES DETECTION AND BIODIVERSITY MONITORING USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EXPANDING GENETIC RESOURCES TO SUPPORT SPECIES DETECTION AND BIODIVERSITY MONITORING USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA Due to challenges with detection of rare or difficult to sample species and the expansion of genetic technologies, fisheries professionals are increasingly augmenting fish biodiversity studies with emerging eDNA techniques. Using environmentally collected DNA samples, presence/absence can be assessed either for single species (qPCR) or multiple species (metabarcoding). However, both assessment methods depend on a tissue archive and reference sequences for marker design and testing. To facilitate marker design and testing, the USFWS Northeast Fishery Center is developing a tissue archive and conducting mitochondrial DNA reference sequencing. The tissue archive provides DNA marker testing and source material for mitochondrial genome sequencing. In turn, these sequence data support marker design and serve as a reference dataset for species identification in metabarcoding studies. Using custom-designed family-specific long-range PCR primer sets, we are expanding the representation of mitochondrial genomes from freshwater fish, with specific emphasis in the Great Lakes region. To date, 136 mitochondrial genomes representing 55 species from 9 different fish families have been successfully sequenced, all of which are publically available through GenBank. Increased availability of mitochondrial genomes will help diversify future applications of eDNA sampling.

Julie C. Schroeter (Primary Presenter/Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, julie_schroeter@fws.gov;


Aaron P. Maloy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, aaron_maloy@fws.gov;


Christopher B. Rees (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, Christopher_Rees@fws.gov;


Meredith L. Bartron (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, meredith_bartron@fws.gov;


S18 Aquatic Biodiversity Surveillance Using Environmental Genomics 229 - BIOINFORMATICS RECIPES: A NOVEL APPROACH TO SHARING AND DISSEMINATING BIOINFORMATICS PROTOCOLS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BIOINFORMATICS RECIPES: A NOVEL APPROACH TO SHARING AND DISSEMINATING BIOINFORMATICS PROTOCOLS Bioinformatics is experiencing a reproducibility crisis. It has become challenging to understand how analyses are performed and even more difficult to repeat the same processes. We have developed a novel, python-based web application that allows scientists to document, distribute, rerun and modify data analysis scripts. We call these analysis scripts “bioinformatics recipes”. Our application provides access to scientists that may not be proficient in using command line tools by creating an easy-to-use graphical interface for each recipe. Users may adapt, modify and remix recipes to match their needs, then share these on the same site. By supporting these interactions, we foster a collaborative environment that facilitates creativity, efficiency and reproducibility. Besides storing, sharing and executing data analysis scripts, our software supports public and private project-based workflows and can provide complete data storage and management solutions as a laboratory information management system. The application is designed to serve sequencing facilities and has been deployed and tested within the Penn State Bioinformatics Consulting Center. Our software is open source, runs on Unix, MacOS and Windows systems and may be accessed via https://www.bioinformatics.recipes

Natay Aberra (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, nba5048@psu.edu;


Aswathy Sebastian (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, azs13@psu.edu;


Aaron P. Maloy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, aaron_maloy@fws.gov;


Meredith L. Bartron (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, meredith_bartron@fws.gov;


Istvan Albert (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, iua1@psu.edu;


S19 Aquatic Invasive Species in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region Organizers 230 - EFFECTS OF EXOTIC NEW ZEALAND MUDSNAILS ON LEAF DECOMPOSITION

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF EXOTIC NEW ZEALAND MUDSNAILS ON LEAF DECOMPOSITION The invasive New Zealand mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), or NZMS, is expanding its range across much of North America and the world. Though NZMS have existed in the Laurentian Great Lakes since at least1991, only very recently have they secondarily invaded streams and rivers in the region, including economically important trout streams, where their ecological consequences are unknown. We examined leaf decomposition in the Au Sable River (Michigan, USA), where NZMS were discovered in 2016. We performed a leaf-litter assay at seven sampling sites with varying levels of NZMS abundance over multiple seasons, and a manipulative experiment in which 25 NZMS were enclosed in fine-mesh bags with a known quantity of leaf litter. Preliminary results suggest that NZMS do not impact leaf decomposition in the Au Sable River at the low densities that characterize the early stages of the invasion process. A minor difference between mesh sizes was found suggesting little shredder activity, with additional differences observed among seasons. Forthcoming analysis will further examine the potential impact that NZMS in various abundances have on leaf decomposition in the Au Sable River.

Kennedy Phillips (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, kpphillips@oakland.edu;


Jasmine Mancuso (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jlmancuso@oakland.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


S19 Aquatic Invasive Species in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region Organizers 231 - EFFECT OF LEAF-LITTER SPECIES ON NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL (POTAMOPYRGUS ANTIPODARUM) GROWTH RATES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECT OF LEAF-LITTER SPECIES ON NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL (POTAMOPYRGUS ANTIPODARUM) GROWTH RATES The New Zealand mud snail (NZMS) (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) is an invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes where populations have existed since at least 1991, with very recent secondary invasions into rivers and streams. The factors that determine growth rates of populations and individuals have yet to be determined. Since NZMS are considered herbivore/detritivores, the quality and species of leaf litter they consume could affect growth rates, and their success as invaders. In response, a laboratory experiment was conducted in which individual snails were reared on ash, cottonwood, sugar maple, and red oak, and no leaves for 5 weeks. Snail length and leaf decomposition rates were measured weekly. Growth rates significantly differed among leaf species. Cottonwood and ash had the highest growth rates and grew by 54.4% and 46.7% respectively. Snails given maple, oak, and no leaves grew by 19.9%, 14.1%, and 6.1%. Leaf decomposition rates did not differ between species, suggesting that assimilation efficiency, rather than feeding rates, differed among litter species. This research lends insights into how forest community changes in the Great Lakes region could affect NZMS growth and their subsequent invasion success.

Emily Bovee (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, enbovee@oakland.edu;


Jeremy Geist (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Justine Lawson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, lawsonjustine@hotmail.com;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


S19 Aquatic Invasive Species in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region Organizers 232 - USING LANDUSE TO PREDICT AT-RISK INLAND LAKES FOR HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM (HABS)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

USING LANDUSE TO PREDICT AT-RISK INLAND LAKES FOR HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM (HABS) The emergence of harmful cyanobacteria threatens freshwater ecosystems and a risk for human health. The rapid growth of blue-green algae can cause rapid decline of water quality if left unchecked. For a large scale study on harmful algal blooms (HABs), detection with quick, robust, and cheap methods is needed. A survey of 28 inland lakes was conducted using three analytical methods. Quanititative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) was used to detect and quantify the 16s rRNA for cyanobacteria. QPCR was also used to detect mcyE, cyrA, and sxtA gene which is responsible for microcystin, cylindrospermonsin, and saxitoxin respectively. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in tandem (LC-MS/MS) was used in identifying and quantifying the toxin variants. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) kit from Abraxxis was used in parallel. The results shown a positive correlation with percentage of developed areas within the watershed, and a negative correlation with forested areas. QPCR results shown various levels of mcyE gene, however no detectable levels of cyrA and sxtA. Using geographic information system (GIS), analysis of land use, nutrient levels, and quantification of microcystins can enable a classification method of ranking other water-bodies for HABs.

Hamzah Ansari (Primary Presenter/Author), Oakland University, hdansar2@oakland.edu;


David Szlang (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oakland University, szlag@oakland.edu;


S19 Aquatic Invasive Species in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region Organizers 233 - CONTROLLING THE SPREAD OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS BY DECONTAMINATING FISHING GEAR: COMPARING APPROACHES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CONTROLLING THE SPREAD OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS BY DECONTAMINATING FISHING GEAR: COMPARING APPROACHES New Zealand Mud Snails (NZMS) are an invasive species recently discovered in economically important trout streams in the Great Lakes region. NZMS are thought to be translocated within and among water bodies by attaching to fishing equipment. To help control NZMS spread we evaluated the effectiveness of several chemical compounds (Virkon Aquatic, Formula 409, bleach, and water as a control), 2 application methods (soaking and spraying) and two application durations (10 and 20 minutes) at decontaminating fishing waders. Following chemical exposure we assessed NZMS mortality at timed intervals after placing snails in recovery chambers. One hour after exposure we observed differences in mean NZMS mortality (+/- SD) among chemical treatments, with the greatest caused by Formula 409 (100% +/- 0). Virkon resulted in 56.3% +/-23.9, bleach resulted in 68.8% +/- 23.9, and water had no effect on NMZS mortality. Neither application method nor duration had a significant effect on mortality. These results show that Formula 409, a readily available household cleaning product, holds promise as a practical way to decontaminate fishing gear, and minimize the spread of NZMS in aquatic ecosystems.

Diana Ethaiya (Primary Presenter/Author), Oakland University, dethaiya@oakland.edu ;


Jeremy Geist (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


S19 Aquatic Invasive Species in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region Organizers 234 - INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE AND SUBMERGENCE DEPTH ON PASSIVE SORTING OF INVASIVE SEA LAMPREY, CREEK CHUB AND WHITE SUCKER ACROSS LOW-HEAD LAMPREY BARRIERS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE AND SUBMERGENCE DEPTH ON PASSIVE SORTING OF INVASIVE SEA LAMPREY, CREEK CHUB AND WHITE SUCKER ACROSS LOW-HEAD LAMPREY BARRIERS The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has negatively affected the aquatic ecosystem of the Great Lakes. Physical barriers are used to control sea lamprey populations but often prevent native fishes from moving through rivers and migrating upstream. This research investigates the kinematics of sea lamprey swimming at 1, 3 and 7 cm water depths and assesses the abilities of creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) to swim up wetted, inclined ramps designed for fish passage across low-head lamprey barriers. The frequencies, amplitudes, and velocities of the sea lamprey tail beat were determined. Creek chubs and white suckers swam up inclined fish passage devices at two temperature ranges (10-13°C and 18-20°C) typical of sea lamprey migration. Initial results indicate that sea lamprey swimming efficiency is reduced at a depth of 1 cm and that both creek chubs and white suckers can pass a fish passage device with a configuration that was shown to block sea lamprey. This study provides support for the use of our ramp as a fish passage device for at least two native fishes and shows that shallow water can restrict lamprey movement.

Nayeli Sanchez (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Michigan University , nayeliksanchez@gmail.com;


Nicholas Corniuk (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, ncorniuk@emich.edu;


Ulrich Reinhardt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University , ureinhard@emich.edu;


S21 Navigating Between Ecosystem Structure and Functioning in Research and Management 235 - COMPARISON OF MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOINDICATORS TO ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION ACROSS A GRADIENT OF AGRICULTURAL IMPAIRMENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

COMPARISON OF MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOINDICATORS TO ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION ACROSS A GRADIENT OF AGRICULTURAL IMPAIRMENT The ability to assess stream health efficiently and accurately is vital for predicting the impact of land use on aquatic systems. Historically, this has been done using structural attributes such the composition of the resident macroinvertebrate community. However, there has been increased interest in incorporating functional attributes like stream metabolism and nutrient uptake into assessment programs. For this study, we simultaneously assessed macroinvertebrate community composition and ecosystem function along a gradient of agriculture impact (n=19) in central Pennsylvania, with varying intensities of agriculture within the catchment area. The Functional parameters included extracellular enzymes, ecosystem metabolism, and nitrogen and phosphorous uptake. We collected macroinvertebrates through kick netting, and then quantified steam health using a calculated index of biotic integrity (IBI). Findings indicate that both ecosystem function and macroinvertebrates reflect similar impairment to land alterations from agriculture. For example, there appears to be a strong inverse relationship between fluctuations in diel oxygen obtained from stream metabolism data and biotic indexes as well as abundance of sensitive taxa. These findings could have major implications for improving stream health assessment and understanding the complex relationship of ecosystem functions and community composition.

Corey Conville (Primary Presenter/Author), Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania , cjc37025@gmail.com;


Steven Rier (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, srier@bloomu.edu;


Aaron Gordon-Weaver (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, amg43366@huskies.bloomu.edu;


Jennifer Soohy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bloomsburg University, jat18435@huskies.bloomu.edu;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 236 - UNDERSTANDING LANDSCAPE DRIVERS OF ENDANGERED COHO SALMON OUTMIGRATION TIMING TO MAXIMIZE RETURNS TO THE RUSSIAN RIVER, CALIFORNIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

UNDERSTANDING LANDSCAPE DRIVERS OF ENDANGERED COHO SALMON OUTMIGRATION TIMING TO MAXIMIZE RETURNS TO THE RUSSIAN RIVER, CALIFORNIA California’s Pacific salmon are in widespread decline and population recovery requires suitable habitat in both marine and freshwater environments. Adult return rates to natal streams for breeding are higher when outmigrating juvenile salmon reach the ocean during periods of high food productivity. However, marine food availability is variable over time because biological productivity is driven by temporally variable coastal upwelling. Therefore, diversity in salmon outmigration timing among populations within a complex is expected to stabilize returns as a whole. This asynchrony in subpopulation dynamics that contributes to population stability has been coined the “portfolio effect”. Still, the mechanisms that control salmon outmigration timing and contribute to the portfolio effect remain unclear. This study investigates how variation in landscape characteristics, including channel form and streamflow dynamics, influence outmigration timing of endangered coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in California’s Russian River tributaries. We are developing statistical models to identify factors that explain outmigration timing variation among tributaries and years, focusing on stream geomorphology, hydrology, hydraulics, and their interactions. Results will inform the prioritization of streams for protection and enhancement with the goal of optimizing variation in outmigration timing to stabilize anadromous fish populations.

Ted Grantham (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, tgrantham@berkeley.edu;


Stephanie Carlson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, U.S., smcarlson@berkeley.edu;


Mariska Obedzinski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California Sea Grant, mobedzinski@ucsd.edu;


Sarah Nossaman Pierce (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California Sea Grant, snossamanpierce@ucsd.edu;


Brian Kastl (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Berkeley, bkastl@berkeley.edu;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 237 - HOW DOES STREAM DRYING INFLUENCE MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ACROSS CLIMATE GRADIENTS? A COMPARATIVE STUDY IN DESERT, GRASSLAND, AND FORESTED STREAMS.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

HOW DOES STREAM DRYING INFLUENCE MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ACROSS CLIMATE GRADIENTS? A COMPARATIVE STUDY IN DESERT, GRASSLAND, AND FORESTED STREAMS. Intermittent streams are extremely common in the contiguous United States, occurring in all terrestrial biomes. One might expect differences in how drying impacts stream communities across broad climate gradients due to predicted differences in drying duration and intensity in arid versus mesic climates. But cross-biome comparisons of how drying influences stream communities are scarce. We studied the impacts of drying on macroinvertebrate communities in three riverine systems across a broad climate gradient: a forested stream in southeastern Oklahoma; a grassland stream in northeastern Kansas, and a desert stream in central Arizona. Within each stream network, ten sites were chosen among 1st-4th order wadeable streams, with varying degrees of water permanence throughout the year. Sites were instrumented with a time-lapse camera system and stream temperature/conductivity sensors to gather data on surface water presence and flow state. Macroinvertebrates were collected quarterly at each site when surface water was present. Here we describe the first results from this research project, integrating flow, temperature, and insect data to understand how stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities are shaped by stream drying patterns across broad spatial scales.

Daniel Allen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, dcallen@ou.edu;


Michelle Busch (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, buschmh@ou.edu;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 238 - LINKING LANDSCAPE-LEVEL PROCESSES AND AQUATIC REFUGIA IN INTERMITTENT STREAMS OF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LINKING LANDSCAPE-LEVEL PROCESSES AND AQUATIC REFUGIA IN INTERMITTENT STREAMS OF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA Intermittent streams occur globally and are especially common in arid regions, accounting for nearly 75% of the stream network in California. During dry periods, remnant pools act as critical habitats that support the persistence of biotic populations, from which they may recolonize surrounding habitats upon rewetting. The factors governing the occurrence of these remnant pools is largely unknown, although geology and geomorphology often result in variable decoupling of stream pools from regional climate, allowing pools to persist under severe drought conditions. Given the importance of intermittent stream habitats for sustaining aquatic biodiversity, an improved understanding of the geomorphic controls on persisting pools is required. This study is located at an intermittent stream in central California, which is strongly influenced by mass wasting events and landslide debris, which have deposited large boulders into the stream channel. Field observations indicate that the location of the large boulders (>3m in diameter) are associated with persistent pools. By linking boulder location and channel geomorphology with climatic data and biotic field measurements of remnant pools throughout the drying period, I aim to identify the landscape-level processes that sustain these unique habitat refugia in intermittent streams.

Hana Moidu (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Berkeley, hanamoidu@berkeley.edu;


Robert Leidy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, Leidy.Robert@epa.gov;


Ted Grantham (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, tgrantham@berkeley.edu;


Stephanie Carlson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, U.S., smcarlson@berkeley.edu;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 239 - GOOD YEARS AND NOT-SO-GOOD YEARS: PATTERNS IN FALL EGG PRODUCTION BY CLADOCERAN ZOOPLANKTON OF FLOODPLAIN PONDS (BLACK FORK OF THE MOHICAN RIVER, OH)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

GOOD YEARS AND NOT-SO-GOOD YEARS: PATTERNS IN FALL EGG PRODUCTION BY CLADOCERAN ZOOPLANKTON OF FLOODPLAIN PONDS (BLACK FORK OF THE MOHICAN RIVER, OH) We are investigating the dynamics of zooplankton in shallower, temporary ponds of a forested floodplain vs. nearby permanent ponds that are inundated year-round. We previously found that total summer-fall precipitation, though highly variable among years, increased significantly over 6.5 decades. We also found that for more temporary ponds, fall zooplankton are much more abundant in dry vs. wet years; in more permanent ponds, overall abundances are relatively high in dry and wet years. This study focused on wet and dry years for both pond types. Do hydrologic differences correlate with differences in zooplankton resources? Size-specific clutch size (SSCS) serves as an index of resource availability. We measured individual body length and clutch size for two cladoceran genera (Simocephalus, Daphnia) with high potential egg production. In the wet year, Simocephalus egg production in the temporary pond was very low until an increase in early December (SSCS = 10 per 1.5 mm indiv.), similar to the abundance pattern. In the dry year, SSCS was high in early fall for both pond types. Patterns in SSCS differed between pond types and between dry and wet years, possibly contributing to differences in zooplankton abundance.

Patricia A. Saunders (Primary Presenter/Author), Ashland University, psaunder@ashland.edu;


Rosalie Sepesy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ashland University, rsepesy@outlook.com;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 240 - CREATING A DRYNESS INDEX FOR NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

CREATING A DRYNESS INDEX FOR NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS Non-perennial rivers and streams (NPRS) are found globally and are becoming more prevalent due to human land use and climate change. NPRS play a key role in overall watershed health and serve as habitat for many organisms. One important aspect for NPRS is the level of dryness that ranges from flowing most of the time to seldom flowing. The current classification is characterized into two groups, “intermittent” and “ephemeral”, which is a rudimentary distinction. Developing a continuous index of dryness should better characterize this important aspect. We analyzed a ten-year data set consisting of annual maps of dry and wet stream segments and gage data from the Santa Lucia Conservancy in Carmel, California. We calculated the proportion of dry and wet segments. We compared the amount of spatial drying occurring in each stream to temporal gage data to determine if they are related. We ultimately would like to produce a dryness index that reflects both spatial and temporal aspects of dry streams. If this index proves generally applicable, it will help the scientific community to better understand and evaluate how the amount of dryness in these systems affects ecosystem processes.

Emma Haines (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University Monterey Bay, ehaines@csumb.edu;


John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 241 - BIOGEOCHEMICAL PATTERNS OF INTERMITTENT STREAMS IN SPACE AND TIME: IMPACTS OF DRYING AND WILDFIRE ON CARBON DYNAMICS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

BIOGEOCHEMICAL PATTERNS OF INTERMITTENT STREAMS IN SPACE AND TIME: IMPACTS OF DRYING AND WILDFIRE ON CARBON DYNAMICS Stream drying (intermittency) and wildfire are expected to increase under current climate change projections for the western United States. However, the impacts of both stream drying and fire on stream carbon and nutrient dynamics are not well understood. In 2016, we examined spatial and temporal patterns in surface water biogeochemistry of a burned and an unburned headwater stream in southwest Idaho. We predicted that constituent heterogeneity increases with drying, and hypothesized that as streams dry, carbon concentrations increase due to evapoconcentration and/or increased in-stream production. We expected that spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemistry would decrease with time following fire. In 2016 there was more than a 2-fold increase in DOC and DIC concentrations from upstream to downstream. 2016 DIC overall semivariance showed a 20-fold increase for the burned stream and a 3-fold increase for the unburned stream from April to June. We conclude that stream DIC chemistry becomes more heterogeneous with stream drying, and that heterogeneity increases following fire.

Ruth MacNeille (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, macnruth@isu.edu;


Kathleen Lohse (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, klohse@isu.edu;


Colden Baxter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, baxtcold@isu.edu;


Sarah Godsey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, godsey@isu.edu;


DeWayne Derryberry (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, derrdewa@isu.edu;


Emma McCorkle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, mccoemma@isu.edu ;


Susan Parsons (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, parssusa@isu.edu ;


S22 Transcending Aquatic-terrestrial Boundaries: Ecology, Conservation and Management of Temporary Freshwaters 262 - EFFECTS OF FISH CONNECTIVITY AND DRYING REGIME ON STREAM ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION: RESULTS FROM A MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT.

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF FISH CONNECTIVITY AND DRYING REGIME ON STREAM ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION: RESULTS FROM A MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT. Prairie streams are home to diverse assemblages of organisms that live in harsh and unpredictable environments. Small prairie streams frequently dry, creating disconnected habitat patches throughout the landscape. Climate change is increasing the frequency and duration of drying events in streams, so there is a need to better understand how spatial and temporal patterns of drying influence stream ecosystem structure and function. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to study the effect of connectivity between intermittent habitats on food web and community dynamics. We mimicked a landscape of isolated stream pools using thirty mesocosms and experimentally manipulated fish connectivity by manually moving fish between tanks in connected treatments, and manipulated drying with three treatments: completely dry, no surface water but wet sediment, and a no drying control. To measure the ecosystem responses to the connectivity and drying treatments, we measured algae accrual and benthic invertebrate abundance weekly throughout the 11 week-long experiment, and at the end of the experiment we sampled fish stomach contents and determined food web structure using community-wide stable isotope analysis. Our results indicate that drying and connectivity in streams have important consequences for stream ecosystems.

Daniel Allen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, dcallen@ou.edu;


Steven Bittner (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, stevenmbittner@gmail.com;


S25 Effects of Multi-stressors in Stream Ecology Across Regional Landscapes and Mesocosm Studies 243 - EFFECTS OF ACIDIFICATION AND TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND LEAF LITTER BREAKDOWN BY CRANEFLY LARVAE (TIPULIDAE)

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF ACIDIFICATION AND TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND LEAF LITTER BREAKDOWN BY CRANEFLY LARVAE (TIPULIDAE) Acid Mine Drainage from metal and coal mines lowers water quality and negatively affects macroinvertebrate diversity and abundance. Macroinvertebrates like Tipulidae play a key role in the breakdown of leaf litter on streams. Tipulid growth rates and leaf litter breakdown were measured under two pH's, 4.0 and 7.0, and under cold (6-9 °C) and warm (12-15 °C) conditions . Fallen silver maple (Acer saccharinum) leaves were placed into leaf litter bags. Litter bags were placed in each stream channel and allowed 7 days to condition before tipulids were added. Water was acidified daily using sulfuric acid. 60 tipulids were collected from three unimpaired streams and added to stream channels. 15 days later, litter bags were weighed after the tipulids were removed and reweighed. T-tests confirmed that larvae grew more slowly at cold temperatures (N=6, P=0.012, one tailed) and under acidic conditions (N=6, P=0.036, one tailed). However, the rates of breakdown did not differ across treatments. Larvae appeared to be consuming the same amounts of food but growing more slowly under acidic or cold treatments. This may suggest that there are higher metabolic costs under those two conditions.

Tristan Hoffman (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio University, th797213@ohio.edu;


Kelly Johnson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, johnsok3@ohio.edu;


S25 Effects of Multi-stressors in Stream Ecology Across Regional Landscapes and Mesocosm Studies 244 - EXPOSURE TO AN ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT MIXTURE OF PHARMACEUTICALS ALTERS ACTIVITY AND COMPOSITION OF STREAM BIOFILM COMMUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EXPOSURE TO AN ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT MIXTURE OF PHARMACEUTICALS ALTERS ACTIVITY AND COMPOSITION OF STREAM BIOFILM COMMUNITIES Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are biologically active compounds that are pervasive in aquatic ecosystems globally. Multiple studies have demonstrated that PPCPs can affect benthic microbial communities, which are key components of stream ecosystems. Most prior studies have analyzed effects of single compounds, but in nature PPCPs are generally present in low concentrations and complex mixtures, creating the possibility for synergistic effects. To assess potential effects of PPCP mixtures, we added a cocktail of eight pharmaceuticals to laboratory-scale stream mesocosms at a concentration observed in an urban field site. After 21 days, biofilms from pre-colonized rocks in streams that received the pharmaceutical cocktail showed no difference in total biomass, but a decrease in community respiration compared to control streams. Furthermore, bacterial communities within biofilms in streams that received the pharmaceuticals were significantly different in taxonomic composition and had significantly higher taxonomic diversity relative to control streams, as indicated by high-throughput sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Taken together, these data indicate that an environmentally relevant concentration of a mixture of pharmaceuticals can have significant effects on benthic microbial communities, which could have broader implications for stream ecosystem function.

Brianne Coffey (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, bcoffey2@luc.edu;


Stephanie Robson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Monash University, stephanie.robson@monash.edu;


John Kelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, Jkelly7@luc.edu;


Michael Grace (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Monash University , michael.grace@monash.edu;


Emma Rosi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, rosie@caryinstitute.org;


S26 Ecological Perspectives on the Movement and Transformation of Anthropogenic Materials in Freshwaters 245 - DISTRIBUTION AND MOVEMENT OF MICROPLASTIC IN URBAN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

DISTRIBUTION AND MOVEMENT OF MICROPLASTIC IN URBAN STREAMS Plastic production and disposal has accelerated since the 1950s, generating global accumulations of plastic litter. Rivers are considered a conduit of microplastic (< 5 mm) to oceans, but the capacity for rivers to retain, transform, and redistribute microplastic is unknown. We measured microplastic retention and transport rates in 3 Chicago-area streams by adapting organic matter 'spiraling' methods. We quantified microplastic and fine particulate organic matter (FPOM) abundance by habitat (surface water, water column, benthos) at 3 points in 100 m reaches of each stream. We calculated downstream velocity, turnover rate, spiraling length, and index of retention for microplastic and FPOM. Downstream velocity and indices of retention were similar between microplastic and FPOM. However, the slow rate of plastic biodegradation results in a much lower turnover rate and longer spiraling length for microplastic relative to FPOM. Overall, microplastic is quickly retained within streams, but is long-lived enough to undergo many more 'spirals' downstream than organic particles. Spiraling metrics have not previously been used to quantify microplastic movement in streams, and these data are needed to contribute to global plastic budgets.

Anna Vincent (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, avincent1@luc.edu;


Timothy Hoellein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


S26 Ecological Perspectives on the Movement and Transformation of Anthropogenic Materials in Freshwaters 246 - MICROPLASTIC IN AQUATIC FOOD WEBS: MUSEUM SPECIMENS AND INGESTION EXPERIMENTS REVEAL CONTROLS ON MICROPLASTIC INGESTION BY FRESHWATER FISH

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MICROPLASTIC IN AQUATIC FOOD WEBS: MUSEUM SPECIMENS AND INGESTION EXPERIMENTS REVEAL CONTROLS ON MICROPLASTIC INGESTION BY FRESHWATER FISH Plastic is pervasive in modern economies and ecosystems. Early research suggests freshwater fish commonly ingest microplastic (particles < 5 mm), triggering lethal and sub-lethal effects, but no studies have examined historical patterns in microplastic consumption or rates of microplastic retention in fish. We measured microplastic in digestive tissue of specimens collected and preserved over the last century (Field Museum, Chicago). We selected Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) and Notropis stramineus (sandshiner) because each was well represented in the museum collection, with specimens from urban rivers. Preliminary results from 1908, 1988, and 2003 suggests a steady increase of microplastic concentration over time. With further analysis, we expect to show a clear and sustained increase from the 1950’s to present. In a second project, we collected Neogobius melanostomus (round goby) from Lake Michigan in Chicago to conduct feeding trials to measure microplastic ingestion, retention, and egestion rates. Results from this research will aid in understanding ecological interactions of microplastic and freshwater fish, and contribute to our understanding of its physiological impacts and movement with aquatic food webs.

Loren Hou (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, Lhou1@luc.edu;


Rachel McNeish (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, rachel.e.mcneish@gmail.com;


Timothy Hoellein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


S26 Ecological Perspectives on the Movement and Transformation of Anthropogenic Materials in Freshwaters 247 - SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN MICROPLASTICS IN THE KENNEBEC RIVER, MAINE, USA: A PILOT STUDY

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN MICROPLASTICS IN THE KENNEBEC RIVER, MAINE, USA: A PILOT STUDY Microplastics (<5mm) are well-documented in marine and urban freshwater environments, but the distribution and characterization of microplastics in rural freshwater ecosystems is less understood. Our study aims to determine whether microplastics are present in a Maine river system, the Kennebec River and its tributary Messalonskee Stream, with primarily forested and rural watersheds. Surface water and sediment samples were gathered from 6 sites along the Kennebec and Messalonskee, including sites above and below the Kennebec Sanitary Treatment Plant (KSTP). Microplastic from water and sediment samples were counted and categorized as either a fragment, film, foam, pellet, or fiber. Microplastics were found at all sites, but concentrations of microplastics are higher below the KSTP. Microplastic concentrations in the water below the KSTP averaged 13 L -1, while they averaged 8 L -1 above KSTP. Plastic fibers dominated all other categories across sampling sites. This pilot study will provide insight into the types and quantity of microplastic present in a rural river catchment, and may provide foundation for future work on microplastic in the region.

Denise Bruesewitz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colby College, dabruese@colby.edu;


Travis Reynolds (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colby College, twreynol@colby.edu ;


Emily Carter (Primary Presenter/Author), Colby College, escart20@colby.edu;


S26 Ecological Perspectives on the Movement and Transformation of Anthropogenic Materials in Freshwaters 248 - MICROPLASTIC ABUNDANCE IN RIVERINE FISH ALONG A LAND-USE GRADIENT

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MICROPLASTIC ABUNDANCE IN RIVERINE FISH ALONG A LAND-USE GRADIENT The increase in global plastic production has led to an accumulation of plastic pollution in aquatic ecosystems worldwide, and microplastic (plastic particles < 5 mm in length) has been detected in aquatic food webs. Research to identify the main sources of microplastic entering aquatic ecosystems is the first step towards addressing the problem of microplastic contamination in fish food webs. We assessed microplastic abundance in fish collected from 8 major tributaries of Lake Michigan, USA, that spanned a forest to urban-agriculture land-use gradient. Results suggest that microplastic abundance in fish is not linked to land-use, but may be related to fish functional feeding groups. For example, preliminary data from 3 sites indicate that zoobenthivores contained more microplastic than detritivores. Investigating connections between land-use, fish traits, and microplastic abundance in fish will provide novel information on environmental conditions and ecological traits that make fish susceptible to consuming microplastic. This information could inform future fish management and conservation efforts.

Melissa Achettu (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University of Chicago, machettu@luc.edu;


Rae McNeish (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, rachel.e.mcneish@gmail.com;


Timothy Hoellein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


John Kelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, Jkelly7@luc.edu;


S26 Ecological Perspectives on the Movement and Transformation of Anthropogenic Materials in Freshwaters 250 - THE ROLE OF SUBSTRATE, DISCHARGE, AND BIOFILM GROWTH ON THE TRANSPORT AND RETENTION OF MICROPLASTIC FIBERS IN STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

THE ROLE OF SUBSTRATE, DISCHARGE, AND BIOFILM GROWTH ON THE TRANSPORT AND RETENTION OF MICROPLASTIC FIBERS IN STREAMS Microplastics (< 5mm) represent emerging aquatic pollutants and are of increasing concern in freshwater ecosystems globally. Microplastics adsorb harmful chemicals, enter aquatic food webs, and persist in the environment. Research on microplastic transport in lotic ecosystems is needed to understand the role streams and rivers play in plastic’s movement across the landscape. We used spiraling metrics designed to measure organic matter retention and transport to quantify microplastic deposition in the replicated experimental streams at the Notre Dame Linked Experimental Ecosystem Facility (ND-LEEF). We explored the influence of benthic substrate (cobble, pea-gravel, sand, and mixed), stream discharge (high vs. low), and benthic biofilm colonization (late successional community and after scouring) in a fully-crossed design. We released pulses of microplastic fibers, which are the most common microplastic found in streams, and collected synchronized samples at three locations downstream. After filtering, we counted fibers under a dissecting microscope. We predict the depositional velocity of fibers will be lower with high discharge, low biofilm, and larger substrate size. Our goal is to quantify factors that drive microplastic retention in streams, thereby parameterizing models which can scale depositional patterns to larger downstream rivers.

Anna Vincent (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, avincent1@luc.edu;


Arial Shogren (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, ashogren@nd.edu;


Martha Dee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, mdee@nd.edu;


Jennifer L. Tank (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, tank.1@nd.edu;


John Kelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, Jkelly7@luc.edu;


Timothy Hoellein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


Elizabeth Berg (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, eberg@luc.edu;


S26 Ecological Perspectives on the Movement and Transformation of Anthropogenic Materials in Freshwaters 264 - MICROPLASTIC DISTRIBUTION ABOVE AND BELOW LARGE DAMS IN INDIANA, USA

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MICROPLASTIC DISTRIBUTION ABOVE AND BELOW LARGE DAMS IN INDIANA, USA Microplastics (plastic particles <5 mm in size) pose environmental threats of unknown magnitude to aquatic ecosystems. Microplastics can enter aquatic systems through wastewater effluent, breakdown of plastic debris, precipitation events, and atmospheric deposition. If ingested by aquatic organisms (e.g., filter-feeders), microplastics and sorbed toxins can be transferred through the food web, thereby accumulating in predators. Previous studies have shown that sediment and other contaminants can accumulate behind large dams. Here we investigate whether and how dams affect microplastic distribution in flowing water. Water samples were taken upstream, downstream, and within the reservoirs of three dams in Indiana, USA. Samples were filtered and then microplastics were quantified and classified. We expected to observe a higher concentration of microplastics upstream of dams than downstream due to settlement in the reservoir of less buoyant particles. Preliminary results suggest that microplastics are higher in concentration both in tributaries upstream of a reservoir and within the reservoir than downstream of a dam. Dam removal can be a controversial subject, but knowledge of microplastic transport past dams may contribute to decision-making.

Margaret Hartlage (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Notre Dame, mhartlag@nd.edu;


Whitney Conard (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, wconard@nd.edu;


Katherine O'Reilly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, koreill2@nd.edu;


Gary Lamberti (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, glambert@nd.edu;


S27 Green meets Brown: Ecological Significance of Interacting Autotrophy and Heterotrophy in Freshwaters 251 - PERIPHYTIC EXTRACELLULAR ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY RESPONSES TO MANIPULATION OF OXYGEN, PH, AND LABILE ORGANIC CARBON

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

PERIPHYTIC EXTRACELLULAR ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY RESPONSES TO MANIPULATION OF OXYGEN, PH, AND LABILE ORGANIC CARBON Periphyton is an aquatic community comprised of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms bound together in an extracellular matrix. Extracellular enzymatic activity of periphytic microbes contributes to decomposition. Previous studies have documented increased rates of periphytic extracellular enzymatic activity in the presence of active algal photosynthesis. Environmental factors including pH, O2, and labile organic carbon concentration are altered by algal photosynthesis. We experimentally manipulated these environmental factors and observed the responses of four enzymes (leucine-aminopeptidase, beta-xylosidase, phosphatase, and beta-glucosidase), to test the hypothesis that one or more of these environmental factors increases periphytic enzyme activity. Typha (cattail) leaf litter was placed into floating wire-mesh litter baskets and submerged in a wetland pool in southeast Michigan. Enzyme assays were conducted on litter-associated periphyton after 10, 31, and 49 days following litter basket deployment. We observed little change in enzyme activities in response to experimental manipulations, except for a significant increase in phosphatase activity in response to increased pH following the 49-day deployment. These data suggest that photosynthetically-mediated pH shifts could be stimulatory to enzyme activity, and that factors other than those included in our experiments may be more influential.

Jennifer Harper (Primary Presenter/Author), Biology Department, Eastern Michigan University, jharpe18@emich.edu;


Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


Robert Findlay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, rfindlay@ua.edu;


Steve Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Biology Department, Eastern Michigan University, steve.francoeur@emich.edu;


S27 Green meets Brown: Ecological Significance of Interacting Autotrophy and Heterotrophy in Freshwaters 252 - EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND LIGHT GRADIENTS ON ALGAL STIMULATION OF LITTER-ASSOCIATED MICROBIAL HETEROTROPHS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND LIGHT GRADIENTS ON ALGAL STIMULATION OF LITTER-ASSOCIATED MICROBIAL HETEROTROPHS Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that periphytic algae can stimulate litter-associated microbial heterotrophs in the presence of light, but few studies have tested how this stimulation varies with environmental gradients such as light and temperature. We grew natural periphyton communities on submerged Typha litter, and then manipulated temperature (15, 20, 25, and 30°C) and light (0, 25, 53, 123, and 388 µmol m-2 s-1 PAR) while simultaneously quantifying rates of algal and fungal productivity in the laboratory. Michaelis-Menten saturation curves were used to examine the effects of light on algal production and exudation as well as fungal production. As expected, increasing light stimulated periphytic algal production and exudation rates (P<0.001) on Typha litter, with the greatest light half-saturation constants for photosynthesis and maximal photosynthetic rates at 25°C. Likewise, fungal production rates were also significantly stimulated by light gradients (P<0.001), but only at the two highest temperatures. These data suggest algae can stimulate litter-associated decomposers in both a light- and temperature-dependent manner. These findings advance our understanding of autotroph-heterotroph interactions on plant litter, improving prediction of directions and strengths of algal priming effects on decomposition across environmental gradients.

Cody Pope (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Cody.pope@usm.edu;


Halvor Halvorson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Halvor.Halvorson@usm.edu;


Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


Steven Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, sfrancoeu@emich.edu;


Robert Findlay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, rfindlay@ua.edu;


S27 Green meets Brown: Ecological Significance of Interacting Autotrophy and Heterotrophy in Freshwaters 253 - RESOURCE LIMITATION OF BIOFILMS IN BOREAL FOREST HEADWATER STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

RESOURCE LIMITATION OF BIOFILMS IN BOREAL FOREST HEADWATER STREAMS Permafrost loss due to increasing temperature at high latitudes alters watershed flowpaths and is predicted to increase nutrient export to streams. Slight changes in water chemistry and energy supply can significantly impact stream food webs. Within biofilm communities, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms compete for inorganic nutrients with the outcome dependent on temperature, light availability, and quality of dissolved organic matter. In the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (AK, USA), sub-catchments are underlain with varying permafrost extents, creating an ideal location for quantifying the impacts of permafrost thaw and resulting variation in stream water chemistry on biofilm structure and function. Our objective was to determine how changes in light availability, inorganic nutrient concentration, and lability of dissolved organic matter influence competition between autotrophs and heterotrophs in stream biofilms. We predicted that with abundant light and labile dissolved organic matter, inorganic nutrient concentrations will dictate autotrophic primary production and heterotrophic respiration, as well as biomass, but with low light and recalcitrant dissolved organic matter, inorganic nutrients will become secondary controls. We used nutrient diffusing substrata and nutrient uptake experiments to explore the outcome of competition for nutrients within boreal forest headwater stream biofilms.

Sophie Weaver (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, saweaver2@alaska.edu;


Jeremy Jones (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Univeristy of Alaska Fairbanks, jbjonesjr@alaska.edu;


S28 Reframing the Science of Urbanized Headwater Streams 254 - ASSESSING TRENDS IN STREAM COMMUNITIES ACROSS AN URBAN GRADIENT IN PUGET SOUND, WA, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR MEASURING RESTORATION EFFECTIVENESS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

ASSESSING TRENDS IN STREAM COMMUNITIES ACROSS AN URBAN GRADIENT IN PUGET SOUND, WA, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR MEASURING RESTORATION EFFECTIVENESS The Puget lowlands Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity – the BIBI – has been used since the 1990s to assess freshwater quality and condition in streams throughout the Puget Sound basin. Using King County’s long-term BIBI data from 126 sites, we will present the current status and trends in BIBI scores. BIBI scores at nearly 85% of sites are not significantly improving or declining, despite an increase in urbanization over the sampling period. Analysis and discussion address how sensitive trends in BIBI scores are to land use change and stormwater best management practices within their contributing basins, and what that may mean for detecting trends following mitigation or restoration efforts. Although not perfect, the BIBI has been recognized as the best available biological measure for freshwater quality by agencies working to restore and protect Puget Sound. With that designation comes the unproven expectation that the BIBI will be responsive to restoration actions. Trends analysis across ambient monitoring sites should help inform our restoration plans and our expectations for measuring improvements.

Kate Macneale (Primary Presenter/Author), King County - Water and Land Resources, kate.macneale@kingcounty.gov;


S28 Reframing the Science of Urbanized Headwater Streams 255 - URBANIZATION IN SMALLER CITIES: HOW HETEROGENEITY IN URBAN LANDUSE ACROSS A MEDIUM-SIZED CITY AFFECTS INSECT COMMUNITIES IN HEADWATER STREAMS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

URBANIZATION IN SMALLER CITIES: HOW HETEROGENEITY IN URBAN LANDUSE ACROSS A MEDIUM-SIZED CITY AFFECTS INSECT COMMUNITIES IN HEADWATER STREAMS While it is clear that urbanization fundamentally changes stream ecosystem functioning and community dynamics, much of the landmark work in urban ecology has been done in large cities. Information about how urbanization affects headwater streams in smaller cities, where urban land cover is less and more heterogeneous, may help provide insight into the progression of urbanization. We studied aquatic insect communities in five urban headwater streams in Greater Binghamton, NY, a medium-sized metropolitan area with a population of approximately 272,000 people. Aquatic insects were collected monthly from downstream urban (7.47-42.99% developed) and upstream rural (0.73-16.17% developed) reaches in each stream from April-September 2014 and 2015. We found that aquatic insect taxonomic and functional feeding group richness and abundance was significantly degraded in the urban sites. However, we also found surprisingly similar regional gamma-diversity between urban and rural sites, which corresponded to a higher among-site beta-diversity in the urban sites. While urbanization had an overall negative impact on aquatic insect communities in our streams, the heterogeneity of the urban landuse throughout this medium-sized city allowed for the harboring of surprising high biodiversity in our urban streams.

Weixing Zhu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Binghamton University, wxzhu@binghamton.edu;


Matthew Lundquist (Primary Presenter/Author), Bingahmton University, mlundqu1@binghamton.edu;


S28 Reframing the Science of Urbanized Headwater Streams 256 - MOVING FROM CONCENTRATION-DISCHARGE CURVES TO PROCESS-DISCHARGE RELATIONSHIPS

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

MOVING FROM CONCENTRATION-DISCHARGE CURVES TO PROCESS-DISCHARGE RELATIONSHIPS Concentration-discharge (CQ) analyses have traditionally been used to explain solute fluxes driven by catchment connectivity; yet the prevalence of nonlinear CQ relationships can inform the complex dynamics of stream processes across variable flows. Using two years of high-frequency data from three stream reaches with varying land use and riparian connectivity (urban drainage, urban-agricultural, and agricultural with restored floodplain connections), we examined the influence of lateral connectivity and catchment morphology on physicochemical-discharge breakpoints in segmented regressions. Statistically-derived changes in slope were significant (p < 0.05) across all parameters (dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, turbidity, conductivity), and CQ slopes displayed chemodynamic and chemostatic trends, exhibiting four of the possible CQ modalities. Slope breakpoints relative to median flow were used as indicators of catchment connectivity. In the urban reach CQ slopes were segmented after median flow, while slope breakpoints within the restored agricultural reach occurred before median flow and signified enhanced connectivity with riparian floodplains. The change of slopes at the urban-agricultural intermediary site varied relative to median flow. Ongoing research compares nonlinear CQ relationships of bioreactive parameters (e.g., dissolved oxygen) to ecosystem metabolism to elucidate the relationship between CQ curves and process-discharge responses.

Erin Hotchkiss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ehotchkiss@vt.edu;


Brynn ODonnell (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, brynno@vt.edu;


S28 Reframing the Science of Urbanized Headwater Streams 258 - SOCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO URBAN STREAM REHABILITATION: INSIGHTS, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

SOCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO URBAN STREAM REHABILITATION: INSIGHTS, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES The 4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology brought together a large group of ecologists, engineers, managers, and others from academia, government, private industry, and non-governmental organizations to discuss current research in urban stream ecology. One focus of the symposium was to characterize the social and institutional barriers to urban stream rehabilitation to generate novel avenues for transformative research in urban stream ecology. Most symposium participants acknowledged 1) the influence these barriers have on project success and 2) the challenges that exist for implementing effective strategies to overcome these barriers. Yet, plans for future initiatives to improve urban streams presented during the symposium typically neglected to characterize the depth of work needed to address these issues. We present observations from the 4th Symposium and discuss challenges and opportunities that exist for stream ecologists. This interdisciplinary work requires a diverse skillset best achieved through collaborative approaches that engage social scientists, stakeholders, landscape planners, and others whose expertise can be applied to urban streams. Through fostering these connections and utilizing a social-ecological systems framework, stream ecologists may be better equipped to tackle the challenges facing urban stream rehabilitation.

Robert Smith (Primary Presenter/Author), Lycoming College, smithr@lycoming.edu;


Rikki Lucas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, lucasr2@mymail.vcu.edu;


Jade Ortiz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, ortijade@isu.edu;


Keysa G. Rosas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, keysa.rosas@gmail.com;


Peter Zaidel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Massachusetts Amherst, pzaidel@umass.edu;


Jessica Miller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dragons Wynd, jessica@dragonswynd.com;


Josh Ward (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri Department of Conservation, Josh.Ward@mdc.mo.gov;


S29 Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Freshwater Science 259 - LEARNING BY GIVING: USING STUDENT PHILANTHROPY TO TEACH WATER RESOURCES

5/23/18  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Grand Riverview Ballroom A

LEARNING BY GIVING: USING STUDENT PHILANTHROPY TO TEACH WATER RESOURCES The goals of experiential philanthropy include making a difference in the civic life of the community through learning. A typical model includes a community donor providing a class with a sum of money and the students decide how to invest the money in a way that will provide community benefit. While the topic of philanthropy is easily applied to social issues or public administration, I have uniquely applied experiential philanthropy to the study of water resources. In a general education course, students research water-related nonprofit organizations, review proposals, and interview top choices. Throughout the project, students learn from community members about the state of local water bodies and ongoing protection efforts. Student feedback is tremendous in supporting the use of experiential philanthropy to learn about water resources. Course alum found that participating in philanthropy improved their interest in the course, their ability to apply course content, and their development of skills such as problem solving and working collaboratively. Overall, after the opportunity to engage in giving and learning with a group of their peers, young people are able to understand philanthropy’s impact and continue to increase their community stewardship.

Kristy Hopfensperger (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern Kentucky University, hopfenspek1@nku.edu;