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SFS Annual Meeting

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1 - EFFECTS OF RIPARIAN RHODODENDRON REMOVAL AND TOP-DOWN CONTROL BY CRAYFISH ON DIATOM COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECTS OF RIPARIAN RHODODENDRON REMOVAL AND TOP-DOWN CONTROL BY CRAYFISH ON DIATOM COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN STREAMS Primary producers in headwater streams are controlled by both bottom-up (e.g., light, nutrients) and top-down (e.g., stream consumers) factors. In the southern Appalachians, Rhododendron maximum is a pervasive evergreen shrub in headwater riparian zones that severely limits light availability to algal communities year-round. Previous studies indicate that increased light conditions after rhododendron removal had a positive effect on algal growth, although algal consumption by macroconsumers mediated this effect. In this study, we examine how top-down control by crayfish interacts with increased light availability created by reach-scale removal of riparian rhododendron to influence diatom community structure. We experimentally excluded crayfish from localized benthic areas using electric “fences.” Crayfish exclosure treatments were paired with crayfish access controls. We ran two 32-day experiments, pre-rhododendron/post-rhododendron removal, whereby diatoms were sampled weekly. Preliminary analyses indicate that pre-rhododendron removal, diatom communities were dominated by adnate forms (e.g., Eunotia and Nupela spp.) and crayfish exclusion had little effect on diatom community composition. Post rhododendron removal, crayfish exclusion shifted diatom community composition from adnate diatoms (e.g., Eunotia and Achnanthidium spp.) in access plots to upright diatoms (e.g., Gomphonema and Encyonema spp.) in exclusion plots.

Kelsey Solomon (Primary Presenter/Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, kjsolomon89@gmail.com;


Maura Dudley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oglethorpe University, maurapdudley@gmail.com;


Rebecca Bixby (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, bbixby@unm.edu;


Catherine Pringle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


2 - NITROGEN-FIXING DIATOMS AS INDICATORS OF HISTORICAL NITROGEN LIMITATION IN LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NITROGEN-FIXING DIATOMS AS INDICATORS OF HISTORICAL NITROGEN LIMITATION IN LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS The purpose of this study was to examine historical nitrogen limitation in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. Previous research has suggested that the presence of nitrogen-fixing diatoms can indicate nitrogen scarcity in wetlands. We obtained herbarium macrophytes from the University of Michigan Herbarium, acid-digested macrophyte material to isolate attached diatoms, and determined the relative abundance of the nitrogen-fixing diatoms Epithemia and Rhopalodia. Present-day nutrient enrichment experiments with a concurrent collection of epiphytic diatoms and water samples were also used to validate the relationship between diatoms and nitrogen scarcity. Preliminary analysis of present day data suggest that benthic algae in some Great Lakes coastal wetlands are nitrogen limited, and analysis of historical samples is ongoing. Understanding the prevalence of nitrogen limitation in Great Lakes coastal wetlands from 1896 to 2018 will shed new insights on wetland ecology and nutrient cycling, and may suggest the need for new nutrient management policies in the Great Lakes region.

Matthew Cooper (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation, Northland College, mcooper@northland.edu;


Laura Moore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Michigan University, moore1lp@cmich.edu;


Donald Uzarski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University, uzars1dg@cmich.edu;


Steven Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, sfrancoeu@emich.edu;


Willow Newman (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Michigan University, wnewman2@emich.edu;


3 - SEASONAL NUTRIENT LIMITATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN A HYPER-EUTROPHIC RESERVOIR: THE ROLE OF PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN FORM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SEASONAL NUTRIENT LIMITATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN A HYPER-EUTROPHIC RESERVOIR: THE ROLE OF PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN FORM Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs impact the structure and function of algal communities, and excess supply results in harmful algal blooms (HABs). N and P loading is influenced by watershed landuse activities and seasonal discharge patterns. However, the interaction between seasonality in nutrient supply and algal nutrient limitation remains poorly understood. We examined these processes in Acton Lake, a hyper-eutrophic reservoir in Ohio, that experiences high nutrient inputs from watershed agriculture. Dissolved inorganic N inputs to Acton Lake are declining, which could promote N-limited cyanobacterial blooms. We focused on how phytoplankton groups are limited by N or P, and by different N forms (ammonium vs. nitrate). We quantified limitation with bioassay experiments weekly for 21 weeks in 2018. Phytoplankton were P-limited early in the growing season, transitioned to N-limitation in early summer, and returned to P-limitation following fall turnover. During the N-limitation period, green algae and cyanobacteria were strongly limited by ammonium, whereas diatoms responded strongly to nitrate addition. Cyanobacteria heterocyst development largely followed the onset of N-limiting conditions. Understanding the limitation status of phytoplankton provides critical insight on how to best manage watershed landuse to prevent HABs.

Isabelle Andersen (Primary Presenter/Author), Miami University of Ohio, andersi4@miamioh.edu;


Tanner Williamson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University of Ohio, tanner.williamson@gmail.com;


Michael Vanni (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University, vannimj@miamioh.edu;


4 - EVALUATING REMOTE SITE INCUBATORS TO SUPPORT ARCTIC GRAYLING RESTORATION IN MICHIGAN

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EVALUATING REMOTE SITE INCUBATORS TO SUPPORT ARCTIC GRAYLING RESTORATION IN MICHIGAN The Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was extirpated from Michigan by 1936, and subsequent efforts to reintroduce the species failed. However, efforts to restore Arctic grayling in Montana have been successful through the use of remote site incubators (RSIs), which allow fish to be reared and stocked at the site of introduction. To support future reintroduction efforts of Arctic grayling, we conducted a study using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs (as surrogates for Arctic grayling) to evaluate RSIs in three Michigan streams. Our objectives were to: (1) compare hatching success between two different RSI designs (19-L vs. 256-L RSIs), and (2) test if the removal of dead eggs from 19-L RSIs affected hatching success. Survival ranged from 40.3% to 42.4% (mean=41.4%) across the three study streams. Mean survival in picked RSIs (45.6%) was not significantly different from unpicked RSIs (44.4%; p>0.1). Survival between 256-L and 19-L RSIs by stream differed from 1.8% to 10.3% (mean=5.3%). Preliminary results suggested that removing dead eggs from RSIs during incubation did not markedly increase hatching success, and both small and large RSI designs can be used successfully in Michigan streams.

Carl R. Ruetz III (Primary Presenter/Author), Grand Valley State University, ruetzc@gvsu.edu;


Alan Mock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, mocka@mail.gvsu.edu;


Dan Mays (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Little River Band Ottawa Indians, dmays@lrboi-nsn.gov;


Archie Martell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Little River Band Ottawa Indians, ArchieMartell@lrboi-nsn.gov;


5 - EXPLORING DISPERSAL AND GENETIC CONNECTIVITY THROUGH A NEWLY DISCOVERED ARIZONA TREEFROG POPULATION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EXPLORING DISPERSAL AND GENETIC CONNECTIVITY THROUGH A NEWLY DISCOVERED ARIZONA TREEFROG POPULATION The survival of a population, even that of a species, can depend on certain population genetic components, especially diversity, connectivity, and structure. For that reason, population genetic studies can provide beneficial guidelines for conservation and management actions when attempting to manage species in the face of climate change. The Huachuca Mountains and Canelo Hills of Arizona are home to isolated populations of the Arizona Treefrog, Hyla Wrightorum, a species of conservation concern. These isolated populations are morphologically and genetically unique, and they face threats from invasive species, human water use, fires, and climate change. Understanding the population genetic attributes of these unique populations is crucial for guiding conservation efforts in this region. In 2018, DNA was collected from individuals from a previously unsampled population, discovered only in 2015; the new population is geographically isolated from other previously studied populations. This new population may provide insight into the dispersal dynamics of this species in this region. Individuals will be genotyped and analyzed to determine similarity and connectivity to other populations. This project will help us understand the basic and applied ecology of this potentially vulnerable group of frogs.

Meryl Mims (), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


Jacob Helmann (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, hjacob@vt.edu;


Meryl Mims (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


6 - FISH COMMUNITY DIVERSITY AND ABUNDANCE ACROSS AN URBANIZATION GRADIENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FISH COMMUNITY DIVERSITY AND ABUNDANCE ACROSS AN URBANIZATION GRADIENT The diversity and abundance of organisms in an ecosystem may confer community stability, drive ecosystem function, or determine the strength of consumer-driven nutrient dynamics. Urbanization reduces the abundance and diversity of organisms. However, species vary in their response to urban stressors, and some species may even benefit, such as by release from inter- or intra-specific competition. Therefore, any ecosystem-level effect of urbanization depends on changes in the composition and abundance of member species. We investigated the effect of impervious surface cover on the diversity and abundance of stream fishes across 28 stream sites surrounding Athens, GA from 2015-2017. We estimated the “true” number of species present and their abundance at each site as a function of surrounding impervious surface land cover, while accounting for imperfect detection as a function of species identity using Bayesian n-mixture models. Results show how urbanization differentially affects diversity and abundance of fishes in these systems, and may be extended to estimate emergent ecosystem-level consequences.

Greg Jacobs (Primary Presenter/Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, greg.jacobs25@uga.edu;


Phillip Bumpers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, bumpersp@gmail.com;


Seth Wenger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, swenger@uga.edu;


8 - ONE FISH, TWO FISH, LOW STREAM... FULL FISH? AN EXPLORATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT ON STREAM DARTERS AND THEIR PREY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ONE FISH, TWO FISH, LOW STREAM... FULL FISH? AN EXPLORATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT ON STREAM DARTERS AND THEIR PREY Droughts are increasing in frequency and intensity in the southeastern United States. Drought can affect fish and the small invertebrates they rely on for food by reducing prey production, while fish may change their consumption patterns, altering prey community composition. Previous studies in a Piedmont river have shown increased densities of a benthic fish, a key predator of aquatic invertebrates, during drought as adults and young-of-year crowd into diminished shoal habitat. However, the effect of these concentrated fish populations on the invertebrate prey community remains largely unstudied, as is how prey quality and thus fish development may concurrently change. To address these questions, we examined the diet of a dominant benthic fish, the turquoise darter (Etheostoma inscriptum), in the Middle Oconee River during low- and high-flow years. Preliminary findings indicate an increase in the biomass proportion of Chironomidae larvae in fish diets during low-flow periods. Higher proportions of Chironomidae are also significantly correlated with smaller darter lengths. Together, these findings of smaller fish size and smaller prey in fish diets show that consumption patterns of a dominant fish may change with drought, with potential implications for fish and invertebrate production.

Caitlin Conn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, caitlin.conn25@uga.edu;


Mary Freeman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, mcfreeman@usgs.gov;


Amy Rosemond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


Isabel Evelyn (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, isabel.evelyn25@uga.edu;


9 - PLASTICS POLLUTION SURVEY OF FOUR RIVERS IN MONGOLIA AND THE UNITED STATES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PLASTICS POLLUTION SURVEY OF FOUR RIVERS IN MONGOLIA AND THE UNITED STATES Plastic pollution is of emerging concern globally. Plastics, which enter rivers through a variety of anthropogenic pathways, can negatively impact aquatic organisms through both direct consumption and indirect contamination from absorbed debris. Microplastics are especially difficult to remove from aquatic systems due to their small size, which makes source tracking and input reduction essential. Here, we tested two major hypotheses: first, whether rivers in areas of high population density have higher plastic pollution, and second, whether plastic is transported to rivers by natural factors (wind, runoff, stream flow). We surveyed and collected large ‘macroplastics’ from river shorelines, as well as and absorbed ‘microplastics’ and ‘mesoplastics’ within river at a total of 30 sites in 4 rivers of Mongolia and USA. Preliminary results suggest that plastic pollution is higher in parts of rivers near densely populated settlements. In addition, as the distance from the settlement becomes larger, the density of plastic decreases. We expect natural factors to influence how quickly plastic are transported to the river. Identifying the sources and types of plastics in flowing waters and their shorelines is critical for the development of management actions.

Amarbat Otgonganbat (Primary Presenter/Author), National University of Mongolia, aamarbat1@gmail.com;


10 - RESPONSE OF FISH COMMUNITIES TO AN EXPERIMENTAL ADDITON OF LARGE WOOD IN THREE NORTHERN MICHIGAN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RESPONSE OF FISH COMMUNITIES TO AN EXPERIMENTAL ADDITON OF LARGE WOOD IN THREE NORTHERN MICHIGAN STREAMS Large wood (LW) additions to streams have been used as an effective management tool to create pool habitat and increase food resources for fishes. In comparison with the Pacific Northwest, little evidence exists on the effect of LW in Midwestern US systems, which are typically lower gradient and possess lower densities of LW at present. The objective of this study was to evaluate responses of stream fishes to a replicated addition of LW in Midwestern streams. In 2004, 25 logs were added to a 100-m reach (treatment) in three streams, while a 100-m reach located upstream of each treatment did not receive any LW additions (control). Fishes were sampled using triple-pass electrofishing from 2003 to 2018. Mean total abundance and biomass, along with mean Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis abundance and biomass did not statistically differ between treatment and control reaches. Responses did vary among the three streams, and the stream with the lowest level of natural wood recruitment exhibited an increase in abundance and biomass in the treatment reaches. Our findings suggest that LW additions may be beneficial as a management tool in streams where natural LW recruitment is limited.

Amanda Popovich (Primary Presenter/Author), Lake Superior State University, apopovich@lssu.edu;


Ashley Moerke (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Center for Freshwater Research and Education, Lake Superior State University, amoerke@lssu.edu;


Patrick Shirey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Pittsburgh, patrickdshirey@gmail.com;


Gary Lamberti (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, glambert@nd.edu;


11 - RISING TEMPERATURES, DIMINISHING RETURNS: LAKE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON THE MASS OF LARVAL FISH CAUGHT WITHIN KENTUCKY LAKE.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RISING TEMPERATURES, DIMINISHING RETURNS: LAKE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON THE MASS OF LARVAL FISH CAUGHT WITHIN KENTUCKY LAKE. Temperature is a major abiotic environmental factor that strongly influences phenology of larval fishes. In years when spring temperatures fluctuate from average, possible asynchrony between larval fish and critical food resources such as zooplankton could occur. In these sensitive life stages, stressors may influence survival and ultimately population demographics. The larval fish community was sampled in Kentucky Lake from April to May from 2014-2018. Samples were collected using tandem larval pushnets (net=0.5m^2, mesh=1mm). Fish were enumerated in the lab and identified to family. The dry masses of Gizzard Shad (the primary forage fish in this system) were collected from various size classes (5-15 millimeters). Using a regression analysis, a model was created to estimate the average biomass of larval Gizzard Shad. Lake temperature data was obtained from the Kentucky Long-Term Monitoring Program and data was used from the closest monitoring station to our sampling sites. The mean biomass of a larval Gizzard Shad on a warmer year was <50% of the mean biomass on a colder year. With climate change, predicted increases in frequency of warmer springs could negatively affect the recruitment of fishes into the Kentucky Lake system.

Christy Soldo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, csoldo@murraystate.edu;


Nathan Tillotston (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, ntillotson@murraystate.edu;


Benjamin Tumolo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, bbtumolo@gmail.com;


Michael Flinn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, mflinn@murraystate.edu;


Spencer Phillips (Primary Presenter/Author), Murray State University , sphillips21@murraystate.edu;


12 - SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATION IN LONG-TERM FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF BUCK CREEK, INDIANA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATION IN LONG-TERM FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF BUCK CREEK, INDIANA Buck Creek is a spring-fed, cool-water tributary of the West Fork White River, Indiana. The Muncie Bureau of Water Quality sampled fishes and monitored water temperature in Buck Creek annually from 1986-2018. The watershed is dominated by row crop agriculture and urbanization. We tested for effects of hydrology and water temperature on local fish assemblages using long-term data from the BWQ. We hypothesized that species richness and trophic guild vary with stream order. Water temperature and altered hydrology were predicted to result in increased relative abundance of tolerant species. We predicted that upstream fish assemblages are embedded subsets of downstream assemblages. We identified a positive relationship for stream size and species richness, that is likely a result of additional available habitats with increasing stream order.

Paul DeRolf (Primary Presenter/Author), Ball State University, pmderolf@bsu.edu;


13 - THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR IN A RIVERINE HABITAT IN TEXAS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR IN A RIVERINE HABITAT IN TEXAS Most research on the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) has focused on populations residing in lentic and wetland habitats while little is known about alligator distributions within river ecosystems. We conducted a population survey of alligators along a 96-mile section of the lower Neches River within the Big Thicket National Preserve in southeast Texas. Nighttime eyeshine surveys of alligators recorded 65 individuals in the Fall 2017, 63 in Spring 2018, and 110 in the summer 2018. Most alligators in the river were subadults or juveniles. All three surveys had similar distributions, with alligators congregating in the northern and southern ends of the park, near large lakes or wetlands. There were very few alligators in the remaining river. Alligator density was compared to water chemistry, weather, land use, riparian geomorphology, season, and moon phase using a general linear model. Proximity to ideal habitat, open water with large riparian wetlands, was the main driver of alligator distributions within the river. This, coupled with the small size of river alligators, indicate that alligators residing in the river may have been forced out of better habitat by larger adults.

Matthew Pyne (Primary Presenter/Author), Lamar University, mattpyne@hotmail.com;


Jami Brown (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lamar University, jbrown44@my.lamar.edu;


14 - A SPACIAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACTS OF LOW-HEAD IMPOUNDMENTS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES COMMUNITIES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A SPACIAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACTS OF LOW-HEAD IMPOUNDMENTS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES COMMUNITIES Impoundments block the flow of water and sediments and thereby affect water quality and macroinvertebrate communities. The United States has around two million dams, 96% of which are low-head dams (<2 m). However, most environmental concern focuses on the effects of large-scale dams and their range of impacts. Here we shall examine both upstream and downstream macroinvertebrate communities of low-head impoundments and if possible, attempt to determine the spatial range of their effects. Sampling was conducted upon six different dams along the East Fork of Indiana’s White River throughout July of 2018. Water quality variables were measured, and the invertebrate community sampled at seven upstream and seven downstream locations at each dam. Results suggest that there were differences between upstream and downstream communities with the potential to determine spatial differences. The results have implications for river conservation.

Daniel Edwards (Primary Presenter/Author), Purdue University, djedward@purdue.edu;


15 - ARE CHAOBORUS MANDIBLES IN LAKE SEDIMENTS A RELIABLE INDICATOR OF HISTORICAL FISH ABSENCE IN POST-GLACIATED REGIONS OF MAINE AND MINNESOTA?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ARE CHAOBORUS MANDIBLES IN LAKE SEDIMENTS A RELIABLE INDICATOR OF HISTORICAL FISH ABSENCE IN POST-GLACIATED REGIONS OF MAINE AND MINNESOTA? Fish introductions can have cascading effects on biological community composition and water quality in historically fishless lakes. The distribution of historically fishless lakes across the landscape in post-glaciated regions is unclear, owing to poor documentation of fish introductions. The aquatic phantom midge, Chaoborus americanus (order: Diptera, family Chaoboridae),is a reliable bioindicator of fish absence in lakes, because it is highly vulnerable to fish predation. Additionally, subfossil remains of C. americanus are persistent in lake sediments, potentially providing a record of historical occurrence of fish in a lake. We isolated Chaoborus mandibles from sediment cores collected from 21 lakes in Maine, and we developed a paleolimnological inference model with logistic regression to predict historical presence of fish. We tested the model with mandibles extracted from 210Pb dated cores collected from 15 Maine lakes with known stocking histories. We compared Chaoborus mandible composition in sediments collected from 15 Minnesota lakes to assess similarities across biogeographic regions, and we found congruence in the two datasets. Our cross-regional model developed from the combined Maine and Minnesota datasets provides a robust tool to assess fish colonization history across a large geographic area.

Holly Kundel (Primary Presenter/Author), Augsburg University, kundelh@augsburg.edu;


Katie DeGoosh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rhode Island Department Of Environmental Management, katie.degoosh@dem.ri.gov;


Cynthia Loftin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, cynthia.loftin@maine.edu;


Emily Schilling (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg University, schillin@augsburg.edu;


16 - ASSESSING CHIRONOMID LONGEVITY IN THERMALLY VARIABLE ICELANDIC STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING CHIRONOMID LONGEVITY IN THERMALLY VARIABLE ICELANDIC STREAMS Chironomids spend their immature life stages in water and emerge as adults into the terrestrial environment. Once out of the water, they are exposed to air temperatures. It is probable that their ability to adapt to variable air temperatures is a result of their exposure to specific water temperatures as immatures. Research conducted in Minnesota indicates that chironomids emerging from trout streams in winter are cold adapted and long-lived when exposed to cold air temperatures. However, a comparison between chironomids emerging from cold and warm streams still warrants investigation. Results from my study at the alpine Hengill geothermal area in southwestern Iceland shows that 80% of female Diamesa (Diptera: Chironimidae) emerging from cold springs during the summer survived up to 28 days when incubated at 6°C in the lab. Eighty percent of males survived up to 17 days at the same temperature. In contrast, 0% of both males and females survived past day 7 when incubated at 20°C. Other chironomid taxa collected from cold springs followed a similar trend. Results from this project support our Minnesota research with Diamesa adults indicating that they are adapted to cold air temperatures.

Corrie Nyquist (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, nyqui095@umn.edu;


Leonard Ferrington, Jr. (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, ferri016@umn.edu;


Gisli Mar Gislason (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Iceland, gmg@ghi.is;


Sigrun Oddgeirsdottir (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Iceland, sio56@hi.is;


17 - BIOGEOGRAPHY OF BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE BIOMASS: DOES FAMILY-LEVEL BIOMASS TRACK REGIONAL VARIATION IN STREAM TEMPERATURE?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

BIOGEOGRAPHY OF BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE BIOMASS: DOES FAMILY-LEVEL BIOMASS TRACK REGIONAL VARIATION IN STREAM TEMPERATURE? Rising stream temperatures are likely to have important consequences for benthic macroinvertebrate abundance and growth. Previous research on invertebrate secondary production has highlighted the importance of water temperature for discrete taxa, but relatively little is known about the potential effects of altered temperature on higher-level groups, such as families. We addressed this knowledge gap by testing for correlations between the standing stock biomass of benthic macroinvertebrate families (pooled genera within families) and mean annual stream temperatures. At each of six study sites, three in the eastern U.S. and three in the western U.S., we collected fixed-area benthic macroinvertebrate samples. Individual dry mass estimates were obtained with published length-mass regressions, then pooled within families. Total family-level dry mass is now being compared with the model-predicted mean annual water temperature at each site to determine whether some macroinvertebrate families are more strongly associated with stream temperature than others.

Khalil Carson (Primary Presenter/Author), GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY, kc06218@georgiasouthern.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


18 - BIOMONITORING AT THE DALLAS-FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: THE USE OF CHIRONOMIDAE (DIPTERA) LARVAE IN DETECTING ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN URBAN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

BIOMONITORING AT THE DALLAS-FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: THE USE OF CHIRONOMIDAE (DIPTERA) LARVAE IN DETECTING ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN URBAN STREAMS The Dallas-Fort Worth International (DFW) Airport is in a densely-urbanized area with one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S.A. The airport property includes a large tract of riparian forest that is unique to the urban surroundings. Urban streams surrounding the airport were assessed by the University of North Texas (UNT) Benthic Ecology Lab via a multi-year biomonitoring study funded by the DFW Airport. The objective of these studies was to identify the major human activities, within the airport watershed, that could potentially affect water quality. Freshwater environments support a diversity of larvae of the Dipteran family Chironomidae. Chironomidae are the most prevalent taxa in this study, making up 20-50% of the benthic macroinvertebrates. Despite the knowledge that this family contains representatives with a wide range of tolerances to ecological conditions, larva are often only identified to the family level. As part of the biomonitoring study, larvae were identified to the lowest feasible taxonomic level, usually genus, and their distributions evaluated based on responses to land use. Identification of Chironomidae genera improved our ability to detect environmental changes in the urban streams surrounding the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

Kaitlynn Davis (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, KaitlynnDavis@my.unt.edu;


Megann Harlow (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Univeristy of North Texas, megannharlow@my.unt.edu;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, james.kennedy@unt.edu;


19 - CHIRONOMIDAE SURFACE-FLOATING PUPAL EXUVIAE ALONG A SUB ANTARCTIC ALTITUDINAL GRADIENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CHIRONOMIDAE SURFACE-FLOATING PUPAL EXUVIAE ALONG A SUB ANTARCTIC ALTITUDINAL GRADIENT This project is part of an ongoing study of the invertebrates along the Róbalo watershed, which is located on Navarino Island in Chile and supplies drinking water to the world’s southernmost town, Puerto Williams. It is a part of the UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve and spans the altitudinal gradient of the Dientes de Navarino mountain range. Areas at higher latitudes and altitudes are the most susceptible to temperatures changes related to global climate change. Because of the drastic changes in thermal gradient and plant community over a small change in altitude, this river serves as an excellent natural laboratory to study the impacts of a warming climate on flora and fauna. A study of Chironomidae pupal exuviae in the Róbalo River was initiated in 2018 to assess their utility as a potential tool to measure community responses to environmental changes in the watershed. Surface-floating chironomid pupal exuviae were collected from 15 locations between December 19, 2018, and January 9, 2019, along an altitudinal gradient of 3m to 689m. Although the results are preliminary, changes in pupal exuviae were observed along the gradient and a longer-term study will be initiated.

Tamara Contador (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidad de Magallanes, tamara.contador@umag.cl;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, james.kennedy@unt.edu;


Taylor Gillum (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, taylorgillum@my.unt.edu;


Sabrina Moore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, sabrinamoore2@my.unt.edu;


Katherine Cline (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, katherinecline@my.unt.edu;


20 - DETERMINING THE IMPACT OF INCREASED PH ON CHIRONOMID GROWTH RATES IN NEOTROPICAL STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DETERMINING THE IMPACT OF INCREASED PH ON CHIRONOMID GROWTH RATES IN NEOTROPICAL STREAMS Stream pH can play a key role in determining ecosystem structure and function. In the Neotropics, some streams undergo episodic acidification seasonally or due to individual rainfall events. However, some streams are resistant to pH declines due to high levels of geothermally-derived solutes (especially bicarbonate) that serve as buffers. In this study, we explored the impacts of artificial alkalinization on chironomid growth rates in two Neotropical streams. One stream had a natural pH gradient and included both naturally low-solute and naturally high-solute reaches, and the other (a naturally low-solute stream) included a control reach and a reach artificially alkalinized by a calcium carbonate addition. We predicted that chironomids in higher-solute (buffered) reaches would have higher growth rates than chironomids subjected to the lower pH of low-solute (unbuffered) reaches. We collected chironomid larvae from leafpacks in each of the four reaches and conducted 48-hour in-stream growth trials. Chironomid growth rate and survival did not differ significantly between the reaches, suggesting that these chironomid communities may be resistant to changes in stream pH.

Carissa Ganong (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri Western State University, carissa.ganong@gmail.com;


Chris Watson (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri Western State University, cwatson12@missouriwestern.edu;


21 - DIVERSITY AND DISTRIBUTION OF ELMIDAE (COLEOPTERA) IN TWO ADJACENT MOUNTAIN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DIVERSITY AND DISTRIBUTION OF ELMIDAE (COLEOPTERA) IN TWO ADJACENT MOUNTAIN STREAMS Diversity and abundance of Elmidae (Coleoptera) assemblages collected from 2006 to 2018 in two adjacent mountain streams were studied. The beetles were represented by seven genera. Diversity and abundance of elmid population differed between the streams. Possible factors including water temperature, water velocity and depth will be analysed to explain spatial difference of assemblage richness and abundance.

Uttam Rai (Primary Presenter/Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., ukrai@geiconsultants.com;


Jennifer Shanteau (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jshanteau@geiconsultants.com;


Kimberly Gerlock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., kgerlock@geiconsultants.com;


Jeniffer Lynch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jlynch@geiconsultants.com;


Grant DeJong (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pensacola Christian College, gdejong@geiconsultants.com;


22 - EPHEMERAL LIFE: A COMPARISON OF INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FOUND IN SEVERAL TYPES OF POOLS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EPHEMERAL LIFE: A COMPARISON OF INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FOUND IN SEVERAL TYPES OF POOLS Due to their ephemeral nature, vernal pools may harbor unique animals that do not otherwise thrive in permanent bodies of water. We test the hypothesis that vernal pools have higher biodiversity than more permanent forest pools, and that both have more biodiversity than abandoned mine pools. We counted and identified invertebrates found in leaf packs placed in six pools: three vernal pools, two forest pools, and a slow-moving flow of abandoned mine drainage. All pools were in forest settings and without fish. We found that ephemeral pools had the highest species richness with 16 families, compared to 15 in forest and 4 families in the AMD pool. Forest pools had the highest overall abundance with 2,037 total organisms found, compared to 1,168 in the vernal pools and 6 in the AMD pool. NMDS plots showed moderate taxonomic turnover over two months in most pools, but two pools experienced almost no change. Our findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of vernal pools, and suggest that forest pools may be more productive seasonally. Additional leaf packs will be analyzed to assess biodiversity patterns within and across sites over the next few years.

Morgan Eytcheson (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , chwt@iup.edu;


Allison Crowell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, lmvv@iup.edu;


Holly Travis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, njqh@iup.edu;


David Janetski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.eud;


23 - EXPLORING DRIFT-BENTHOS RELATIONSHIPS WITHIN A 3RD ORDER REDWOOD STREAM ON CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL COAST

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EXPLORING DRIFT-BENTHOS RELATIONSHIPS WITHIN A 3RD ORDER REDWOOD STREAM ON CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL COAST Invertebrate drift, or the transport of invertebrate biomass within the water column, is an important ecosystem process within lotic environments. Multiple studies have explored the direct relationships between drifting invertebrates and source populations upstream. Conclusions from these studies suggest that drift concentrations should increase in proportion to invertebrate densities upstream, however little is known about the drift-benthos relationship within coastal redwood streams. We conducted a study to explore the effects of upstream benthic density and food resources on invertebrate drift composition and frequency. Preliminary results from this study have found that drift within our study system is composed of primarily of invertebrate families with a high propensity to drift (i.e. Baetidae, Simullids, and Chironomid sp.). We predict that the composition of our benthos samples will be a good proxy for estimating invertebrates within the drift

Nicholas Macias (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Cruz, niamacia@ucsc.edu;


Eric Palkovacs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California - Santa Cruz, epalkova@ucsc.edu;


Laura Bajurin (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Cruz, lbajurin@ucsc.edu;


24 - IMPACTS OF THE BRIAN HEAD FIRE ON THE FRESHWATER MACRINVERTEBRATES OF THE MARKAGUNT PLATEAU (2016-2019)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

IMPACTS OF THE BRIAN HEAD FIRE ON THE FRESHWATER MACRINVERTEBRATES OF THE MARKAGUNT PLATEAU (2016-2019) In the summer of 2017, a fire started near Brian Head in Iron County, Utah burned more than 70,000 acres of coniferous forest on the Markagunt Plateau. We measured the effects of this fire on the macroinvertebrate fauna in three streams that run through and adjacent to the burn area. Samples were taken from Mammoth, Castle and Lowder Creeks during the fall and winter of 2018/2019. We were able to compare these data with a pre-fire study done in the same streams in the fall of 2016. We found a decrease in diversity for most taxa sampled. Future sampling will continue to monitor the recovery of these streams.

Makayla Oborn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, makaylaoborn@suumail.net;


Irania Hernandez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, irania_02@yahoo.com;


Courtney Webb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, webbcourt13@gmail.com;


Michael Contente (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, contentemichael@gmail.com;


Samuel Wells (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, samuelwells@suu.edu;


Fredric Govedich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Utah University, govedich@suu.edu;


25 - INSECT EMERGENCE FROM A SHALLOW POND IN A WET MEADOW IN THE CONIFEROUS FOREST OF THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

INSECT EMERGENCE FROM A SHALLOW POND IN A WET MEADOW IN THE CONIFEROUS FOREST OF THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS Insects were collected in five floating and five shore emergence traps on a two meters deep fishless pond that was surrounded by wet meadows in the coniferous forest of the Cascade Mountains. The pond had an area of 0.65 hectares. The emergence did not start until the entire pond was ice-free. The 1584.4 insects that emerged per square meter per year in the floating traps in 1972 after a thaw on 7 July included 1383.4 of a tiny Tanytarsus species (Diptera: Chironomidae) and 201.0 other insects. The 311.4 milligrams dry weight of insects that emerged per square meter per year in the floating traps in 1972 included 111.9 milligrams of the detritivore-omnivore Clistoronia magnifica (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae), 103.5 milligrams of the detritivore Limnephilus santanus (Limnephilidae), 2.2 milligrams of the late-emerging detritivore Halesochila taylori (Limnephilidae), 48.4 milligrams of the tiny Tanytarsus species, 0.4 milligrams Chaoborus (Diptera: Chaoboridae) and 45.0 milligrams other insects. The 293.8 milligrams that emerged per square meter per year in the shore traps included 93.4 milligrams Somatochlora albicincta (Odonata: Corduliidae), 75.6 milligrams Aeshna palmata (Odonata: Aeshnidae), 39.3 milligrams Limnephilus santanus and 85.5 milligrams other insects.

Truman Sherk (Primary Presenter/Author), retired, tsherk@gmail.com;


27 - MACROINVERTEBRATES AS BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF WATER QUALITY IN RIVERS OBA AND OSUN, SOUTH WEST, NIGERIA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MACROINVERTEBRATES AS BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF WATER QUALITY IN RIVERS OBA AND OSUN, SOUTH WEST, NIGERIA Macroinvertebrates and water quality of rivers Oba and Osun in Iwo, south west, Nigeria was investigated. Two sampling stations were identified at each of the two rivers. Sampling was from February, 2018 to June, 2018. Biotic indices were used for the assessment of the water bodies, this include Hilsenhoff Family Biotic Index (FBI), Biodiversity indices and Sorensen Quotient (SQ). A total of 24 taxa (Family level) in 3 phyla inhabited the two rivers. The phyla are Arthropods, Molluscs and Annelids. Station 1 had the largest number (23) of taxa while the least (14) was in Station 4. The highest taxa diversity occurred at station 3, while the least was at Station 4. Based on the outcome of FBI analysis, there was very little variation in the water quality at River Oba, but marked variation was recorded in River Osun. SQ revealed that paired stations 2 and 4 were the most similar stations while stations 2 and 4 were the most dissimilar paired stations. In conclusion, Station 3 was substantially polluted while station 4 may have some organic pollutant but can be rated as good.

Adu Babasola (Primary Presenter/Author), The Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria , bwadu@futa.edu.ng;


28 - POPULATION GENETICS OF NY POPULATIONS OF PTERONARCYS BILOBA AND ITS POSITION WITHIN THE GENUS.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

POPULATION GENETICS OF NY POPULATIONS OF PTERONARCYS BILOBA AND ITS POSITION WITHIN THE GENUS. Although morphological keys exist for the genus Pteronarcys, a molecular phylogeny of the group has not yet been performed. Using the mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase I, we created a Bayesian phylogeny for the genus and then further examined population structure of P. biloba populations within the major management basins in New York State. These are the first COI sequence data for P. biloba and P. comstocki, at least according to GenBank. Genetic diversity of P. biloba populations was reasonably high for populations this far north, with more than 6 alleles at a single site. A total of ten populations will be included in this study, looking at genetic diversity within and gene flow between populations. The nuclear gene Wingless will also be amplified and these data will be used in conjunction with COI data in the exploratory analysis of genetic structure.

Nicole Pedisich (Primary Presenter/Author), State University of New York College at Oneonta, pedina99@oneonta.edu;


Jeffrey Heilveil (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), SUNY College at Oneonta, heilvejs@oneonta.edu;


29 - SEASONAL VARIATION IN CHIRONOMID COMMUNITIES IN TWO FAROESE STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SEASONAL VARIATION IN CHIRONOMID COMMUNITIES IN TWO FAROESE STREAMS The aim of this study was to compare the seasonal variation in chironomid communities in two adjacent streams in the Faroe Islands, with different environmental characteristics. Streams in the Faroes are generally steep and very short, on average less than one kilometer in length. The basaltic bedrock is mostly impermeable to water, so precipitation runs off after a short retention time and the discharge fluctuates accordingly. The smaller streams do dry out in periods of little rainfall. The water temperatures vary from freezing in winter to 15 ºC on sunny days. The two streams sampled for this study were located a short distance from each other in neighbouring waterbasins,but differed in length and average discharge. Invertebrate samples were taken over the course of 14 months using a Surber sampler. The invertebrate fauna in both streams was dominated by chironomids of the subfamily Orthocladiinae, with Eukiefferiella minor and Tvetenia sp. as the most abundant species. Peak of chironomid emergence was in the month of May. Chironomid density was higher in the small stream compared to the larger stream.

Leivur Janus Hansen (Primary Presenter/Author), Faroe Islands National Museum – Nature and Culture, janush@savn.fo;


Agnes-Katharina Kreiling (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Iceland, kreiling@holar.is;


Gisli Mar Gislason (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Iceland, gmg@hi.is;


30 - SEASONAL VARIATION OF INVERTEBRATE ABUNDANCE AND DIET COMPOSITION OF ARCTIC CHARR IN AN ICELANDIC SPRING SYSTEM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SEASONAL VARIATION OF INVERTEBRATE ABUNDANCE AND DIET COMPOSITION OF ARCTIC CHARR IN AN ICELANDIC SPRING SYSTEM The seasonal dynamics of invertebrate abundance and diet composition of fish as top predators were studied in the thermally stable environment of freshwater springs. We conducted a mark-recapture study on small benthic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in the spring sources of a stream in South-Iceland, and sampled their stomach contents repeatedly over the course of a year. In addition, benthic invertebrate samples were taken at each sampling occasion to estimate the invertebrate availability in the habitat. Among a total of 635 processed fish, 55 were recaptured, some of them several times. Recaptured fish were usually re-captured at the same locations of the sampling area, which suggests site fidelity of fish in this system. Seasonal variation in invertebrate availability was reflected in the composition of prey items in the Arctic charr stomachs. While Chironomidae larvae were the most common prey items all year round, Plecoptera nymphs were most abundant in May, and Ostracoda and groundwater Amphipoda were more common during the wintermonths. The results indicate a clear seasonal shift in the diet of Arctic charr in the spring system, and lay the ground for future studies on spring food webs.

Agnes-Katharina Kreiling (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Iceland, kreiling@holar.is;


Eoin O'Gorman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Essex, e.ogorman@essex.ac.uk;


Jón S. Ólafsson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Marine and Freshwater Research Institute, Iceland, jon.s.olafsson@hafogvatn.is;


Bjarni K. Kristjánsson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hólar University College, Iceland, bjakk@holar.is;


Snæbjörn Pálsson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Iceland, snaeb@hi.is;


31 - STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF CRAYFISH ORCONECTES VIRILIS DIET IN VARIABLE RIVERS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF CRAYFISH ORCONECTES VIRILIS DIET IN VARIABLE RIVERS Stable isotope analysis provides a way to examine likely carbon sources as well as relative trophic position of sampled species. Within streams, there are terrestrial carbon sources and aquatic carbon sources that are available to consumers that theoretically separate out through their 13C isotope ratios. Our study examines how the diet of crayfish (Orconectes virilis) changes with hydrologic and seasonal variation in Arizona streams. Previous studies have not found variation in seasonal diet in crayfish in lakes, but it is unknown how crayfish change their diet sources with an extremely variable habitat. Preliminary results show variation in 13C signature for basal resources between seasons, and further analysis hopes to show how hydrologic variation plays a part in the diets of crayfish. Variation will likely become a more prominent factor for ecosystems as climate change continues and this study will provide information on how a resilient organism's diet responds to hydrologic variation.

Sara Thompson (Primary Presenter/Author), Arizona State University, thompsonsaran@gmail.com;


32 - TENDER LOVING LEECHES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TENDER LOVING LEECHES Leeches (Hirudinida) are an important component of most freshwater lakes, ponds, and quieter flowing streams and rivers with many important species occurring throughout the United States. There are approximately one hundred described species in North America with the majority of these leeches being predators that feed on a variety of invertebrate prey including chironomids, oligochaetes, amphipods, and molluscs. Many other leech species are temporary sanguivorous (blood-feeding) ectoparasites of vertebrates including fish, turtles, amphibians, waterfowl, and mammals including humans. One aspect of leech biology that is often ignored is their reproductive biology. Leeches are simultaneous hermaphrodites that produce an egg-containing cocoon. Many species provide nutrients in the cocoon and then abandon it, leaving the young leeches to fend for themselves after hatching. One family, the Glossiphoniidae, have a different strategy: they have extended post-hatching parental care. In this family we have species that nest or brood the eggs and young for day or even weeks. Here we present information on these leeches and show how they can be interesting study organisms for examining parental care in invertebrates.

Fredric Govedich (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, govedich@suu.edu;


Bonnie Bain (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dixie State University, bain@dixie.edu;


33 - THRESHOLD DISCHARGE EFFECTS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES ALONG AN URBANIZATION GRADIENT IN PIEDMONT HEADWATER STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THRESHOLD DISCHARGE EFFECTS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES ALONG AN URBANIZATION GRADIENT IN PIEDMONT HEADWATER STREAMS Urban streams are characterized by altered hydrographs, increased nutrient concentrations, altered geomorphology, and decreased biodiversity. Threshold discharge (Qcritical) is the flow value that results in the mobilization of a specific sediment size and depends on 1) the median grain size and 2) the two-year flood discharge value. We asked how Qcritical impacts stream macroinvertebrates in Piedmont headwater streams to better understand the potential of Qcritical to integrate flow impacts on stream organisms. We sampled eight sites that ranged across watershed area (0.90 - 3.66 square miles) and percent impervious cover (0.81-33.3 %) in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Macroinvertebrates, background water quality (dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity, pH, temperature, nutrients), and Wolman pebble counts were collected during fall 2018 and winter 2019. Flow data were taken from nearby USGS gages for two years prior to sampling. The diversity of macroinvertebrates decreased along the impervious cover gradient. Qcritical did not vary systematically with %IC due to local variability in streambed D50. Linking sediment mobilization and macroinvertebrate diversity may provide insights into best practices for stream restoration design for controlling sediment transport and improving ecological health.

Rebecca Black (Primary Presenter/Author), UNC Charlotte , rblack27@uncc.edu;


Sandra Clinton, PhD (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;


34 - USING MACROINVERTEBRATES AS BIOINDICATORS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION OF MUSKEGON LAKE, MICHIGAN

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING MACROINVERTEBRATES AS BIOINDICATORS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION OF MUSKEGON LAKE, MICHIGAN Three littoral sites in Muskegon Lake, a drowned rivermouth lake in west Michigan connecting the Muskegon River and Lake Michigan, were surveyed for aquatic macroinvertebrates using Hester-Dendy plates, a passive artificial sampling technique. Single, nine-plate Hester-Dendy samplers were placed in three different locations at each site from September 2018 to March 2019, with each location characterized by percent macrophyte cover. After each four-week colonization period, the Hester-Dendy plates were removed from their respective locations and a new set of plates were installed. Samples were taken from three distinct habitats: submergent (25%-49% submerged aquatic vegetation); emergent (1%-24% total surrounding vegetation); and open (0% surrounding vegetation). A similar study conducted in the summer of 2018 found the two sites most dominated by macrophytes had lower species richness and evenness than the open site, and were associated with low DO, cooler water temperatures, and high turbidity. In contrast, the open site had a higher overall diversity and richness and was associated with high DO, warmer water, and an even distribution of macrophytes. These unexpected results led to the current study, comparing the influence of different habitats on invertebrate richness and diversity.

Alan Steinman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute-Grand Valley State University, steinmaa@gvsu.edu;


Rachel Orzechowski (Primary Presenter/Author), Annis Water Resources Institute- Grand Valley State University, orzechra@mail.gvsu.edu;


35 - VERTICAL MIGRATION OF ADULT PLECOPTERA (STONEFLIES) ABOVE FORESTED HEADWATER STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

VERTICAL MIGRATION OF ADULT PLECOPTERA (STONEFLIES) ABOVE FORESTED HEADWATER STREAMS Aquatic insects have a life cycle that includes a larval aquatic stage and an adult terrestrial stage. Adult stream insects generally stay above the stream channel, but dispersal through upland areas connects populations. Vertical migrations up through the forest canopy may be the result of adaptations to avoid predators, complete reproduction, or for dispersal. Comparing insect abundance between the forested canopy and near the stream can provide information about a species’ life history and dispersal behavior. We examined the abundance of adult plecopteran in the forest canopy and near the stream. We set up malaise and canopy traps at four streams in the Mosquito Creek Watershed (Lycoming County, PA) in summer 2017 and 2018 and autumn 2018. We identified all Plecoptera to family and Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera to order. A significantly higher abundance of adults were captured in malaise than canopy traps for Plecoptera and Trichoptera but not Ephemeroptera. Leuctridae had the largest number of individuals in the canopy. A significantly greater number of individuals were caught in malaise than canopy traps for four of the six plecopteran families found in our study.

Ruric Bowman (Primary Presenter/Author), Lycoming College, bowruri@lycoming.edu;


Brittany Lenze (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lycoming College, lenbrit@lycoming.edu;


Robert Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lycoming College, smithr@lycoming.edu;


36 - A TEST OF ALGAL PRIMING EFFECTS DURING TYPHA LATIFOLIA DECOMPOSITION UNDER CONTRASTING DISSOLVED NUTRIENT LEVELS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A TEST OF ALGAL PRIMING EFFECTS DURING TYPHA LATIFOLIA DECOMPOSITION UNDER CONTRASTING DISSOLVED NUTRIENT LEVELS The algal priming effect describes the stimulatory influence of labile carbon additions (e.g. exudates) on the microbial decomposition and mineralization of refractory organic matter. In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of dissolved nutrients could affect algal priming of microbial decomposition and mineralization of detritus. We incubated Typha latifolia leaf litter in greenhouse aquatic mesocosms under contrasting light/dark and low/high dissolved nutrient availability. Litter was collected to measure mass loss and litter-associated algal, fungal, and bacterial biomass and growth rates. Litter-associated algal production rates responded positively to increased light (P<0.001) and nutrients (P<0.05) additively. There were no significant effects of light or nutrient treatments on litter decomposition rates, although decomposition rates were consistently higher in dark treatments. While fungal biomass also did not respond to light or nutrient treatments, fungal growth rates were strongly stimulated by light (P<0.001). These findings suggest algae stimulate fungal growth short-term but may elicit weaker effects on long-term fungal biomass accrual or litter decomposition. Our findings carry important implications for our understanding of carbon cycling in aquatic ecosystems and suggest increased nutrient concentrations may not always affect the strength of algal priming during litter decomposition.

Tori Hebert (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Southern Mississippi, tori.hebert@usm.edu;


Halvor Halvorson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, halvor.halvorson@usm.edu;


Cody Pope (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Cody.pope@usm.edu;


Robert Findlay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, rfindlay@ua.edu;


Steven Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, sfrancoeu@emich.edu;


Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


37 - EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY ON ALGAL STIMULATION OF MICROBIAL HETEROTROPHS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMPOSING WOOD

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY ON ALGAL STIMULATION OF MICROBIAL HETEROTROPHS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMPOSING WOOD Recent evidence suggests periphytic algae stimulate leaf litter heterotrophs and decomposition in the presence of light, but these algal priming effects have yet to be tested on highly recalcitrant wood. To better understand algal stimulation of heterotrophic activity and organic matter decomposition, we incubated wood veneers of Quercus alba in aquatic mesocosms under separate light/dark conditions and low or high concentrations of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus. After 7 and 18 weeks of biofilm establishment, we measured mass loss and sectioned veneers to measure biomass and growth rates of wood-associated algae, bacteria, and fungi. We found that increased dissolved nutrient availability coupled with light increased algal production rates on wood in an additive manner (P<0.05). In turn, increased light and nutrients interactively stimulated fungal growth rates (P=0.004) but decreased fungal biomass accrual (P<0.05), with light effects consistently stronger under high nutrient levels. Rates of wood decomposition were consistently greater in the dark treatment, and light more strongly suppressed decomposition under high nutrient levels (P<0.05). Our data advance understanding of autotroph-heterotroph interactions on decomposing wood, improving prediction of directions and strength of algal priming effects on decomposition in response to environmental factors.

Halvor Halvorson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Halvor.Halvorson@usm.edu;


Tori Hebert (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, tori.hebert@usm.edu;


Robert Findlay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, rfindlay@ua.edu;


Steven Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, sfrancoeu@emich.edu;


Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


Cody Pope (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Cody.pope@usm.edu;


38 - PRETREATMENT OF WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE WITH CALDICELLULOSIRUPTOR BESCII INCREASES METHANE PRODUCTION DURING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PRETREATMENT OF WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE WITH CALDICELLULOSIRUPTOR BESCII INCREASES METHANE PRODUCTION DURING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION Wastewater treatment not only protects freshwater resources, but also constitutes a potential source for renewable energy. Waste activated sludge (WAS) from aerobic sewage treatment can be converted to biogas through anaerobic digestion (AD). The methane content of this biogas, however, is often too low with a baseline of approximately 5-10% carbon conversion into methane. We investigated the effectiveness of pretreatment with hyperthermophilic anaerobe Caldicellulosiruptor bescii to enhance methane production and conversion. In a 30L pretreatment and 60L anaerobic digester vessel, C. bescii increased methane yield almost two-fold and increased methane conversion to upwards of 63% in only 72 hours. The pretreatment of WAS also allowed a dramatic reduction in the hydraulic retention time of AD from >20 days for untreated WAS, to 5-10 days for pretreated WAS. By increasing methane conversion, elevating the total biogas output, and decreasing processing time, biological pretreatment with C. bescii may prove WAS to be a feasible feedstock for biopower applications.

Jaron Hansen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, jhansen@chem.byu.edu;


Zachary Aanderud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, zachary_aanderud@byu.edu;


Anne Bennion (Primary Presenter/Author), Brigham Young University, anniebennion@gmail.com;


Hanna Burgin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, hannanoorda@gmail.com;


Kate Thorpe (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, kate98thorpe@gmail.com;


39 - THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND TEMPERATURE GRADIENT EXPOSURE ON ENZYME ACTIVITY OF LEAF LITTER-ASSOCIATED MICROBIAL DECOMPOSERS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND TEMPERATURE GRADIENT EXPOSURE ON ENZYME ACTIVITY OF LEAF LITTER-ASSOCIATED MICROBIAL DECOMPOSERS Algae, bacteria, and fungi develop complex litter-associated biofilms during decomposition of plant litter in aquatic ecosystems, and recent studies suggest algae can alter heterotrophic decomposition of organic matter in the presence of light by exuding photosynthates (labile carbon) via the priming effect. To better understand this stimulation of fungi and bacteria by algae, we quantified decomposition rates and degradative enzyme activity from Typha domingensis litter pieces exposed to dark, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), or PAR + Ultraviolet light under contrasting temperatures (7, 14, 21, 28?C) conditions in aquatic mesocosms. Temperature significantly affected all enzyme activities and decomposition rates (P<0.001) with the highest rates consistently observed at 28?C. B-glucosidase, phosphatase, and leucine aminopeptidase activities were all significantly affected by light (P<0.05). Carbon-acquiring B-glucosidase activity was higher in the dark treatment, while nutrient-acquiring phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase activities were higher in the PAR+UV and PAR treatments. Although there were only weak light effects on decomposition, these enzyme patterns suggest decomposition rates could differ longer-term. Broadly, the differences in enzyme activity suggest algal exudates alleviate heterotrophic carbon limitation, but competition with algae may exacerbate nutrient limitation of heterotrophic microbes during litter decomposition.

Stephanie Koury (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Southern Mississippi, steph.koury@gmail.com;


Halvor Halvorson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Halvor.Halvorson@usm.edu;


Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


Steve Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Biology Department, Eastern Michigan University, steve.francoeur@emich.edu;


Joel Bonney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, jbonney@emich.edu;


Robert Findlay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, rfindlay@ua.edu;


40 - THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND TEMPERATURE ON FRESHWATER MICROBIAL BIOMASS, PRODUCTION, COMPOSITION AND INTERACTIONS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND TEMPERATURE ON FRESHWATER MICROBIAL BIOMASS, PRODUCTION, COMPOSITION AND INTERACTIONS Decaying plant litter in aquatic ecosystems harbors autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms, as algae, bacteria, and fungi often form complex litter-associated biofilms. We hypothesized that microbial groups would differ in their overall responses to temperature manipulation, which could have implications upon microbial communities via seasonal temperature shifts and as global warming continues. We used wetland mesocosms at the University of Alabama to assess the effects of light and temperature on freshwater microbial communities colonizing submerged Typha domingensis litter. Biomass and production of algae, bacteria, and fungi, as well as algal community composition, were measured after 78 and 127 days of growth. Initial results indicate that all groups grew best when exposed to light, suggesting positive stimulation of heterotrophs by algal photosynthesis. Algal, bacterial, and fungal communities displayed different temperature optima, suggesting that temperature may influence autotrophic/heterotrophic balance in litter-associated microbial communities. Analysis of a potential interaction between temperature and algal photosynthetic stimulation of heterotrophs is ongoing.

Kevin Kuehn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, kevin.kuehn@usm.edu;


Halvor Halvorson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Southern Mississippi, Halvor.Halvorson@usm.edu;


Robert Findlay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, rfindlay@ua.edu;


Steven Francoeur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Michigan University, sfrancoeu@emich.edu;


Joel Bonney (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Michigan University, jbonney@emich.edu;


41 - VARIATIONS IN RIVERINE MICROPLASTIC ABUNDANCE AND ASSOCIATED MICROBIOMES WITH WATERSHED LAND USE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

VARIATIONS IN RIVERINE MICROPLASTIC ABUNDANCE AND ASSOCIATED MICROBIOMES WITH WATERSHED LAND USE Microplastic particles (< 5mm) have been identified as contaminants in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Some of the highest concentrations of microplastic in aquatic habitats have been found in urban rivers downstream from wastewater treatment plants, suggesting domestic wastewater as a major source of microplastic to the environment. Within aquatic ecosystems microplastic supports dense microbial biofilms, and microplastic microbiomes in urban rivers include high abundances of potentially pathogenic bacterial taxa. The presence of pathogens on microplastic in urban rivers further supports wastewater as a route of microplastic entry to the environment and raises concerns related to human health and pathogen transport. Questions remain about variations in microplastic abundance and microbiome composition across different watershed land use types. To address this knowledge gap, we sampled surface water from 8 major Lake Michigan tributaries that varied in watershed land use. Urban and agricultural land-use were positively related to water column microplastic concentrations across all sites, and watershed forest coverage showed a negative relationship. Ongoing work is using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons to assess variations in microplastic microbiome composition across these land use types.

Paul Risteca (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biology, Loyola University Chicago, pristeca@luc.edu;


Kelli Rogers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, krogers5@luc.edu;


Rachel McNeish (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University Bakersfield, rachel.e.mcneish@gmail.com;


Lisa Kim (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, lkim1@luc.edu;


Timothy Hoellein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


John Kelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, Jkelly7@luc.edu;


42 - ASSESSING RISK TO IMPERILED SPECIES: MODELING FRESHWATER MUSSEL POPULATIONS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING RISK TO IMPERILED SPECIES: MODELING FRESHWATER MUSSEL POPULATIONS Freshwater mussels are a highly diverse and imperiled faunal group; of 296 species currently identified in the US more than 70% are considered threatened or endangered (”listed”), or of special concern. Because of restrictions on testing listed species and the difficulty of working with freshwater mussels, development of predictive methods to better assess potential risk of various aquatic stressors posed to this taxa is paramount. An additional limitation is the lack of physiological and life-history data for many freshwater mussel species. Here we present a trait-based modeling approach to represent freshwater mussel populations with a focus on environmental risk assessment applications. Our model of mussel population dynamics utilizes Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory and individual-based modeling. DEB describes the uptake and allocation of energy for individuals. The generic nature of DEB theory allows for broad applicability across species, even in cases of data scarcity. The flexibility of individual-based modeling facilitates the inclusion of relevant ecological complexities. Ultimately this project aims to improve population modeling approaches for understanding and assessing potential environmental risks for data-sparse endangered species.

Nika Galic (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Syngenta Crop Protection LLC, nika.galic@syngenta.com;


Richard Brain (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Syngenta Crop Protection LLC, richard.brain@syngenta.com;


Dan Hornbach (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Macalester College, hornbach@macalester.edu;


Valery Forbes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, veforbes@umn.edu;


Adrian Moore (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, moorea@umn.edu;


43 - MUSSEL-FISH DIVERSITY RELATIONSHIPS AT DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MUSSEL-FISH DIVERSITY RELATIONSHIPS AT DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES Species richness of freshwater mussels and fish is often positively correlated. However, the strength of the correlation observed varies considerably among studies. This variability raises the question of how important fish hosts versus abiotic environmental factors are to mussel diversity. In this study, we hypothesized that mussel-fish richness correlation is dependent on 1) the spatial scales used; and 2) the completeness of species inventory. Using extensive fish and mussel data compiled for Illinois waters over a century by Illinois Natural History Survey and IL Department of Natural Resources, we examined the mussel-fish correlation in species richness at three spatial scales, USGS-HUC6, HUC8 watershed, and sampling site. The correlation in species richness increased with spatial scales (Pearson r = 0.42. 0.59, 0.77). Intensive mussel sampling at the site scale also improved the correlation (r = 0.50). These results suggest that environmental constrains (e.g., water and habitat quality) could be be as important as fish hosts at the local scale; however, increased habitat heterogeneity at a broader scale could moderate the effects of those local factors, and fish-host diversity thus play a greater role in shaping the pattern of mussel diversity.

Yong Cao (Primary Presenter/Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, University of illinois, yongcao@illinois.edu;


44 - PREDICTING NATIVE UNIONID DISTRIBUTIONS ACROSS INDIANA, USA, USING AN ENSEMBLE MODELING APPROACH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PREDICTING NATIVE UNIONID DISTRIBUTIONS ACROSS INDIANA, USA, USING AN ENSEMBLE MODELING APPROACH Despite their critical contributions to stream ecosystem health, freshwater mussels (Unionidae) are one of the most globally imperiled groups of aquatic organisms. The state of Indiana historically supported a rich unionid assemblage, which has suffered declines in abundance and diversity likely due to stressors such as pollution, loss of fish host species, and habitat degradation and fragmentation. However, for many of Indiana’s unionid species, specific drivers of declines have not yet been identified. To this end, we are developing species-specific ensembles of models that link recent Indiana mussel distributions (presence and relative abundance) to environmental and habitat characteristics. By developing models using multiple approaches (e.g., recursive partitioning, generalized linear modeling), we aim to take advantage of differential strengths and overcome biases associated with any single modeling approach. We will evaluate site capacity to support species of interest by averaging and ranking model residuals. Ultimately, this ranking and evaluation process will be used to identify and prioritize sites for conservation and management actions, including focused habitat protection and potential reintroductions.

Susanna LaGory (Primary Presenter/Author), Purdue University, slagory@purdue.edu;


Brant Fisher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife, BFisher@dnr.IN.gov;


Tomas Hook (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue University & Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program, thook@purdue.edu;


Carolyn Foley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue University & Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program, cfoley@purdue.edu;


45 - UNDETECTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL DRIVERS OF UNIONID MUSSEL GROWTH IN TROUT LAKE, WI

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

UNDETECTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL DRIVERS OF UNIONID MUSSEL GROWTH IN TROUT LAKE, WI Annual growth rates in freshwater mussels have been shown to correlate with important environmental variables such as discharge and temperature in lotic systems, but drivers of growth in lentic systems have yet to be examined. We analyzed thin-sections of Lampsilis siliquoidea shells to calculate long-term annual growth rates from Trout Lake, Wisconsin—a cool, oligotrophic lake, studied extensively as a part of the North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research network. Mussel shells displayed a moderately high level of synchrony in annual growth among individuals spanning nearly 30 years (n = 19, interseries correlation = 0.405). However, annual growth was not significantly correlated with any physical, chemical, or biological variable we assessed. It is unclear the extent to which these results are general across other freshwater lake ecosystems, but serve as an important reminder that life-history dynamics and their environmental drivers are poorly understood in freshwater mussels.

Vincent Butitta (Primary Presenter/Author), Center for Limnology, vincent.butitta@wisc.edu;


Emily Stanley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin - Madison, ehstanley@wisc.edu;


Andrew Rypel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California-Davis, andrewrypel@gmail.com;


46 - EVALUATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF LARGE WOOD AND ITS IMPACT ON FISH COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EVALUATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF LARGE WOOD AND ITS IMPACT ON FISH COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER Large wood is geomorphically and ecologically important in streams and rivers and is often used for restoration. However, we know little about its distribution and ecological role in great rivers. Our study sought to 1) understand the spatial distribution of large wood in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) as it relates to river hydrogeomorphology and 2) characterize the relationship between wood and fish community composition across riverine habitats. We analyzed a long-term dataset of wood occurrence and fish assemblages in three reaches of the UMR using random forest and mixed-effects models and t-tests. We found strong relationships between wood presence and aquatic habitat type, water depth, and wing dam or revetment presence--indicating that wood transport- and source-related variables, as well as river infrastructure, are important to understanding wood dynamics in great rivers. Large wood presence was associated with significantly higher fish species abundance, richness, and diversity, although this varied across habitats. Of all groups, Centrarchids (sunfish family) showed strongest preference for wood. Our results suggest large wood as a useful restoration tool in UMR fish communities, but hydrogeomorphic factors should be considered when evaluating its effectiveness and longevity.

Serenity Budd (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Vassar College, sebudd@vassar.edu;


Kaija Gahm (Primary Presenter/Author), Yale University , kaija.gahm@yale.edu;


47 - DO INTRODUCED FISH AND NUTRIENTS AFFECT THE PREVALENCE OF CYANOBACTERIA BLOOMS IN MOUNTAIN LAKES?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DO INTRODUCED FISH AND NUTRIENTS AFFECT THE PREVALENCE OF CYANOBACTERIA BLOOMS IN MOUNTAIN LAKES? Mountain lakes are important freshwater resources due in part to their perceived pristine state, yet their isolation does not preclude them from anthropogenic disturbances such as fish stocking. Fish introductions can increase algal biomass and the frequency of algal blooms through changes in: 1) bottom-up forcing as fish increase rates of phosphorous recycling; and 2) top-down forcing as fish reduce the abundance of large-bodied grazers. The resilience of mountain lakes, like those in the Cascade Range, to fish stocking or other perturbations remains uncertain, especially in the context of varying landscape and climate. Variation in nutrients across this region may be a significant factor in phytoplankton growth. We analyzed existing monitoring data on 30 historically fishless lakes in the Oregon Cascades across a gradient of ultra-oligotrophic to eutrophic systems, either with or without stocked trout. Preliminary analysis suggests cladoceran abundances increase with decreasing fish stocking densities. Cladoceran grazers reduce the abundance of diatoms and in a potential competitive release, cyanobacteria levels were positively correlated with cladoceran abundance, possibly due to altered ratios of N:P availability via recycling by zooplankton. These results will guide upcoming field surveys and mesocosm experiments.

Lara Jansen (Primary Presenter/Author), Portland State University, ljansen@pdx.edu;


Angela Strecker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Portland State University, strecker@pdx.edu;


48 - ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN PONDS WITH DIFFERING STABLE STATES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN PONDS WITH DIFFERING STABLE STATES Shallow ponds and lakes constitute over 91% of the number of standing water bodies and are important in global carbon cycling. Many small ponds exist in alternative stable states: either turbid, phytoplankton-dominated or clear, macrophyte-dominated. State may be regulated by either bottom-up or top-down mechanisms. We examined the rates of ecosystem metabolism (EM; gross primary production, respiration and net ecosystem production) in four ponds in Minnesota: one with brook stickleback, dominated by phytoplankton; three fishless, dominated by macrophytes. We assessed EM by measuring changes in O2 levels every 10 minutes from May-October, 2018. We measured phytoplankton biomass (Chl a) every two weeks, and mapped relative abundance of macrophytes. Components of EM varied daily with no obvious seasonal trends. On average the ponds were heterotrophic. Water temperature had a greater impact on the components of EM than surface light availability. The presence of macrophytes influenced EM potentially by influencing atmospheric oxygen exchange. The variability among fishless ponds exceeded the difference between ponds with and without fish. The alternative state of a pond has less impact on EM than more local factors.

Dan Hornbach (Primary Presenter/Author), Macalester College, hornbach@macalester.edu;


Emily Schilling (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg University, schillin@augsburg.edu;


Holly Kundel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg University, kundelh@augsburg.edu;


49 - INFLUENCE OF ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS ON ESCHERICHIA COLI LEVELS IN STREAMS AND BEACHES OF LAKE ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

INFLUENCE OF ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS ON ESCHERICHIA COLI LEVELS IN STREAMS AND BEACHES OF LAKE ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA Lake Erie beaches are closely monitored for harmful levels of Escherichia coli (E. coli), yet questions remain about how these levels are influenced by local ecological conditions. Additionally, E. coli levels in the biological components of freshwater ecosystems, namely fish and invertebrates, remain largely unknown. To address these questions, we measured E. coli in water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from three streams and two beaches near Erie, Pennsylvania. Water and sediment were sampled during high and low flow during spring and summer. E. coli in water and sediment increased 100-1,000-fold from minimum (during Spring low-flow conditions) to maximum levels (during both Spring and Summer high-flow conditions). Temperature, more so than flow conditions, appears to be a primary abiotic driver of E. coli levels. E. coli in fish were highly variable, with walleye from offshore Lake Erie showing the lowest E. coli levels, and round goby sampled from nearshore zones showing the highest levels (~1,000-fold higher than in walleye). These differences may be explained by species’ biology or proximity to stream inputs. Our findings illustrate the direct relationship between ecological fluctuations and microbial transport to nearshore lake sites such as beaches

Devin McClain (Primary Presenter/Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , ttfw@iup.edu;


David Janetski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, janetski@iup.eud;


Kevin Regan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana Univeristy of Pennsylvania , ngzw@iup.edu;


Dakotah Shaffer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, vfvw@iup.edu;


Jeffery Larkin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania , nzqw@iup.edu;


Nicholas Christensen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, wtnv@iup.edu;


Jeffery Larkin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, larkin@iup.edu;


Paul Nealen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, pnealen@iup.edu;


Vida Irani (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Indiana University of Pennsylvania, virani@iup.edu;


50 - THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HIGH CHLOROPHYLL CONCENTRATIONS AND PHYTOPLANKTON BIOMASS UNDER LAKE ICE.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HIGH CHLOROPHYLL CONCENTRATIONS AND PHYTOPLANKTON BIOMASS UNDER LAKE ICE. Ice-associated algae in the Artic can account for 20 to 30 percent of total annual productivity, but far less is known about the contribution of winter primary productivity to total productivity in temperate ecosystems. Sparkling Lake, a 63 ha seepage lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin often has higher concentrations of chlorophyll-a in the winter than the summer; which indicates that under ice algae may be a significant contributor to annual primary production. Interestingly, lakes in the surrounding area do not show this pattern. Here, we present data from twenty years of unanalyzed phytoplankton slides from Sparkling Lake (1997-2017, NTL-LTER dataset). Phytoplankton counts were conducted via microscopy and biomass was compared with chlorophyll-a concentrations, snow depth, and ice thickness. From this, we can infer chlA:carbon content of phytoplankton and assess the degree to which winter production is important on a seasonal basis. Understanding under ice ecology provides a baseline to assess future changes associated with lake-ice loss.

Emily Whitaker (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin Madison, ewhitaker2@wisc.edu;


Thomas Shannon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin Madison, tshannon3@wisc.edu;


Hilary Dugan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Madison, hdugan@wisc.edu;


51 - URBAN PONDS: THE LINK BETWEEN TYPES OF AQUATIC VEGETATION AND ODONATE BIODIVERSITY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

URBAN PONDS: THE LINK BETWEEN TYPES OF AQUATIC VEGETATION AND ODONATE BIODIVERSITY The City of Denton, located in a semi-arid region of Texas, has over 200 man made ponds within its city limits. Many of these ponds, located in densely populated areas, are engineered to control stormwater runoff. There is a general lack of recognition of the value these waters contribute to regional or local biodiversity and as green-spaces. This study, as part of a larger study of all benthic macroinvertebrates, monitors habitat variables and Odonate diversity in a series of ponds selected to represent a gradient of urban influences. The objective of this study is to identify the variables and stressors associated with biodiversity. The study has determined that the storm water ponds have comparable levels of diversity, but differing Odonate species composition. There is also data to support that certain types of aquatic vegetation are important for diversity as well as development patterns. Results of this study will be used to develop a conservation plan to maximize the aquatic health of the ponds and if implemented, contribute to the sustainable development in Denton.

Gillian Graham (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, GillianGraham@my.unt.edu;


Marti Sanders (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, martisanders@my.unt.edu;


52 - ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER ON CHICAGO BEACHES RAUL LAZCANO, LAUREN WISBROCK, ANNA VINCENT, TIMOTHY HOELLEIN

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER ON CHICAGO BEACHES RAUL LAZCANO, LAUREN WISBROCK, ANNA VINCENT, TIMOTHY HOELLEIN Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) accumulates on beaches worldwide, which negative ecological and economic impacts. Previous work examined density and composition of AL on Great Lakes beaches, but factors which drive the spatial distribution of AL are not well known. We predict AL distribution will accumulate in the same patterns as coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) We measured AL and organic matter on four beaches in Chicago, IL. At each beach we collected data at transect adjacent to a pier/sea wall and a non-pier transect. Each transect location was divided into habitats: upland, beach, and strand line. We collected all CPOM and AL within 1m on either side of each habitat. AL was counted and categorized, and CPOM dried and weighed. Significant positive relationships between CPOM and total AL show sites with enhanced CPOM retention (i.e., strand, pier) also have highest AL density. However, the relationship was not universal across all AL types (e.g., cigarette butts), some of which have even distribution through the beach. The data obtained will inform beach grooming protocols and management efforts to reduce AL pollution.

Raul Lazcano (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, rlazcanogonzalez@luc.edu;


53 - EXPERIMENTALLY TESTING THE QUALITY OF GOLF COURSE LENTIC ECOSYSTEMS: A MESOCOSM APPROACH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EXPERIMENTALLY TESTING THE QUALITY OF GOLF COURSE LENTIC ECOSYSTEMS: A MESOCOSM APPROACH Managed ecosystems, such as golf courses, can harbor biodiversity, however little is known about the types of habitat courses are providing for native organisms. Turfgrass management on golf courses is essential to create an adequate playing area, but this management often involves the use of chemicals that enter surface waters, affecting water quality and native organisms. The objective of this experiment was to use mesocosms to examine the impact on water quality and algae of several chemicals that enter golf course lentic ecosystems: the fungicide, Azoxystrobin, and Nitrogen and Phosphorus. We used data from field surveys to replicate two concentrations of Azoxystrobin, nitrogen, phosphorus, and N+P and examined water quality variables and algal concentrations from May to August 2018. We found these chemical inputs did not have a measurable influence on several water quality variables or concentrations of algae (measured by chlorophyll a and phycocyanin). These data suggest chemical inputs into these systems may not hinder the quality of habitat that golf course lentic systems are providing, and data similar to this could lead to a greater understanding of the contributions these courses provide to biodiversity in urban areas.

Courtney Carmack (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, ccarmack@luc.edu;


Michael Vosburgh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mvosburgh@luc.edu;


Isabella Lentini (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, ilentini@luc.edu;


Joseph Milanovich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, jmilanovich@luc.edu;


Martin Berg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mberg@luc.edu;


54 - FUNGICIDE (AZOXYSTROBIN) HAS VARIABLE EFFECTS ON AMERICAN TOAD AND LEOPARD FROG FITNESS: A MESOCOSM APPROACH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FUNGICIDE (AZOXYSTROBIN) HAS VARIABLE EFFECTS ON AMERICAN TOAD AND LEOPARD FROG FITNESS: A MESOCOSM APPROACH Landscapes are increasingly fragmented by human development causing the remaining viable habitat to become vitally important. One land-use that is thought of as fragmenting landscapes are golf courses. Turfgrass management on golf courses is essential to create an adequate playing area, but this management often involves the use of chemicals that enter surface waters, affecting water quality and native organisms. Our objective was to examine the influence of a widely used fungicide on golf course lentic ecosystems, Azoxystrobin. We used a randomized experimental design in a mesocosm setting to examine the effects of two concentrations (based on field surveys) of Azoxystrobin on survival and time to/size at metamorphosis of Northern Leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and American toads (Anaxyrus americanus). Azoxystrobin had no statistically measurably impact on survival of Leopard frogs, but lower concentrations decreased time to and increased size at metamorphosis. American toad survival and time to metamorphosis showed no response to Azoxystrobin, however toads in the lower concentration were smaller than individuals in the control and high concentration treatments. Our research suggests that Azoxystrobin has a varied, species-specific, effect on anurans and warrants further investigation.

Michael Vosburgh (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University, mvosburgh1@luc.edu;


Michael Vosburgh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mvosburgh@luc.edu;


Isabella Lentini (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, ilentini@luc.edu;


Martin Berg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mberg@luc.edu;


55 - IMPACTS AND RESILIENCE IN THE SPOKANE RIVER, WA, USA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

IMPACTS AND RESILIENCE IN THE SPOKANE RIVER, WA, USA The Spokane River is a central feature of the Spokane metropolitan area, and a major recharger of the Spokane Valley - Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer, the sole source of drinking water for over 500,000 people. The river has a history of human impact, including discharge of untreated sewage for 50+ years, hydroelectric dams, and metals from historic mining. Portions are listed as impaired by the US EPA for metals, PCBs, temperature, and DO. We observed significantly higher macroinvertebrate diversity downstream of the City of Spokane, and community composition indicating widespread impacts of toxic metals. We are investigating effects of sediment from Hangman Creek, a major agricultural tributary. We monitored phosphorus loading during spring 2017. Loads consistently exceeded the TMDL allocation, with highest loads over 400x the allocation. We observed strong relationships between TP and discharge (R² = 0.83, p < 0.0001) and turbidity (R² = 0.997, p < 0.0001). We are also investigating the effects of these sediments on invertebrates in the Spokane River. Through ongoing research, we hope to better understand interactions among diverse sources of impact and resilience affecting the Spokane River.

Carolyn Connelly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Washington University, cccarolynconnelly@gmail.com;


Larissa Delahunt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Washington University, larissa.severance@gmail.com;


Anwar Bushnaq (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Eastern Washington University , anwar.sb1992@gmail.com;


Camille McNeely (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Washington University, fmcneely@ewu.edu;


57 - MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGICAL VARIATION IN EXPERIMENTAL WETLANDS.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGICAL VARIATION IN EXPERIMENTAL WETLANDS. Wetlands provide important ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and carbon storage. Macroinvertebrates can account for a substantial portion of wetland biodiversity and play key roles in ecosystem processes. Predicted increases in the frequency of intense storms and periods of severe drought due to climate change represent a threat to wetland communities through the alterations to the hydrological regime. We used experimental wetlands to assess the effects of water permanence (i.e., duration of flooding) and prescribed burns on macroinvertebrate community structure. We hypothesize that wetlands with extended periods of flooding (i.e., permanent) would harbor higher diversity of longer-lived taxa due to environmental stability and larger availability of colonizable area. Whereas, wetlands that experienced flooding followed by rapid receding of water (i.e., temporary) would only harbor quick turnover taxa and support lower consumer diversity due to limited availability of space and decreasing water quality. Preliminary results suggest that macroinvertebrate communities differ between permanent and temporary wetlands, but that factors affecting diversity and structure may vary over time. The goal of the study is to understand wetland ecosystem responses to climate change predicted scenarios.

Checo Colón-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


Sergio Andres Sabat-Bonilla (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, Biology Department, Statesboro, GA, ss35863@georgiasouthern.edu;


58 - MEASURING NUTRIENT DYNAMICS TO INFORM DEVELOPMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC CRITERIA FOR WETLANDS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MEASURING NUTRIENT DYNAMICS TO INFORM DEVELOPMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC CRITERIA FOR WETLANDS Wetlands are unique ecosystems which provide many critical ecosystem services. They are especially suited to improve water quality through the removal of sediments, nutrients, and other contaminants from water. The extent to which impounded wetlands surrounding the Great Salt Lake, Utah are able to process and remove nutrients remains unknown, although basic knowledge of wetland function suggests that this ecosystem service could be extensive. Our objective is to develop and test easy methods to evaluate, in situ, wetland responses to nutrient pollution (nitrogen and phosphorus) and to understand the role of environmental covariates in mediating these responses. We hypothesize that key environmental covariates affecting the rate of nutrient uptake in wetlands include salinity, ambient nutrient levels, and the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Treatments of increased salinity, decreased ambient phosphate, and removal of SAV were applied in a block design with three replicates. We performed an experimental pulse release of nutrients (NO3 and PO4) and measured the removal from the water column over a four-hour period. Nitrate uptake was five times faster than phosphate uptake, and the presence of SAV substantially increased the uptake of both nutrients.

Rachel Buck (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, rachel.buck11@gmail.com;


Michelle Baker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, michelle.baker@usu.edu;


59 - NITRATE DYNAMICS IN RESTORED RIPARIAN WETLANDS IN WESTERN KENTUCKY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NITRATE DYNAMICS IN RESTORED RIPARIAN WETLANDS IN WESTERN KENTUCKY Nutrient runoff from agricultural lands cause hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico each summer. The USDA NRCS Wetlands Reserve Program has restored easements of riparian wetlands along tributaries of the Mississippi River to mitigate this problem. However, few studies have quantified ecological effects of wetland restoration and denitrification success. We are monitoring changes in nitrate concentrations during flooding events on easements ranging in restoration age from one to twelve years in western Kentucky. We are using automatic water samplers to collect discrete samples across various flood states and analyzing samples for nitrate/nitrite concentrations. Preliminary results from winter flood events indicate that, while in some easements nitrate concentrations remained stable, in other easements nitrate levels decreased 34-56% throughout a flood event, from 0.92±0.14 mg L-1 to 0.51±0.11 mg L-1 (means ± standard error). Comparing these patterns with those of adjacent river channels and with denitrification potential of wetland soils will help us understand the ability of these easements to reduce nutrient loads. Monitoring ecological processes in these restored wetland easements can help inform future adaptive management practices that include a variety of restoration goals for nutrient reduction.

Michael B. Flinn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Watershed Studies Institute, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Murray State University, mflinn@murraystate.edu;


Howard Whiteman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Watershed Studies Institute, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Murray State University, hwhiteman@murraystate.edu;


Karen Baumann (Primary Presenter/Author), Watershed Studies Institute, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Murray State University, kbaumann1@murraystate.edu;


60 - QUANTIFYING NET NUTRIENT MITIGATION POTENTIAL OF ESTABLISHING RICE CUTGRASS IN AGRICULTURAL DITCHES: NUTRIENT UPTAKE VERSUS RELEASE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

QUANTIFYING NET NUTRIENT MITIGATION POTENTIAL OF ESTABLISHING RICE CUTGRASS IN AGRICULTURAL DITCHES: NUTRIENT UPTAKE VERSUS RELEASE Emergent wetland plants vary in their capacity to regulate nutrient levels in shallow aquatic environments and can play a significant role in mitigating nutrient runoff from agricultural fields. Fully understanding the role of plant species in nutrient mitigation requires quantifying seasonal patterns of nutrient uptake and release over annual cycles of growth and senescence. We studied nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake and release in simulated wetland ecosystems planted with rice cutgrass [Leersia oryzoides (L.) Sw.]. We conducted simulated runoff events that enriched mesocosms with high DIN across a gradient of increasing P enrichment to quantify uptake rates during the summer growing season. We also measured cutgrass breakdown and nutrient release from mesocosms across 14 storm events after senescence. Results show that P loss during winter storm events was not significantly different among mesocosms representing the P enrichment gradient, indicating that excess P was not lost through plant senescence. Similarly, N loss during storms represented less than 10% of N removal during the summer. Rice cutgrass appears to be a viable candidate for enhancing management of ditches and wetlands to mitigate impacts of nutrient runoff on downstream aquatic ecosystems.

Sam Testa (Primary Presenter/Author), USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Sedimentation Lab , sam.testa@ars.usda.gov;


Jason M. Taylor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Sedimentation Lab, jason.taylor@ars.usda.gov;


Matt Moore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Sedimentation Lab, matt.moore@ars.usda.gov;


61 - REPETITIVE DISAPPEARANCE OF AQUATIC HABITAT IN A TEMPORARY WETLAND ECOSYSTEM: HOW DO ORGANISMS COPE?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

REPETITIVE DISAPPEARANCE OF AQUATIC HABITAT IN A TEMPORARY WETLAND ECOSYSTEM: HOW DO ORGANISMS COPE? As one of the most common temporary ecosystems, ephemeral wetlands are present in landscapes across the world. Characterized by their repetitive cycling hydroperiod, ephemeral wetlands are home to diverse communities of aquatic organisms. These communities are subject to a constant state of change and have adapted to cope with the continuous assembly and disassembly of ephemeral wetlands. Community disassembly is the non-random process of progressive species declines and losses. This study seeks to examine how disassembly proceeds in vegetated and clear areas of ephemeral wetlands. If such a difference does exist, we hope to examine where the inhabitants of these temporary ecosystems go during disassembly. To examine community disassembly, a variety of wetlands in Colorado’s Pawnee National Grassland were sampled in the Summer of 2015 throughout their hydroperiods. Vegetated areas were found to be more diverse than clear areas. Further analysis is required on the last sampling date to further determine the patterns of community disassembly. These findings contribute to a more complete understanding of temporary ecosystems, and shed light onto the less explored topic of disassembly.

Chantelle Wernecke (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, WerneckeCM19@uww.edu;


Brian O'Neill (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, oneillb@uww.edu;


62 - A NOVEL METHOD OF MEASURING STREAM N CYCLING USING 15NH4+ IN RECIRCULATING CHAMBERS: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT ON BENTHIC N DYNAMICS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A NOVEL METHOD OF MEASURING STREAM N CYCLING USING 15NH4+ IN RECIRCULATING CHAMBERS: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT ON BENTHIC N DYNAMICS Climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of droughts in the Great Plains. These droughts can lead to the disruption of longitudinal connections in streams, influencing numerous ecological processes including nutrient cycling. We studied drought-isolated pools in Kings Creek on Konza Prairie Biological Station, Kansas, USA on two dates in July. We utilized recirculating chambers filled with 15NH4+-enriched stream water to estimate N remineralization, uptake, and nitrification associated with biofilms. On the first sampling date, rates of remineralization averaged 1.46 mmol-N/m2/hr (SE=0.04) and uptake averaged 0.69 mmol-N/m2/hr (SE=0.13). On the second sampling date, rates of remineralization averaged 0.46 mmol-N/m2/hr (SE=0.04) and uptake averaged 1.44 mmol-N/m2/hr (SE=0.23). O’ Brien et al. 2008, collected NH4+ uptake and remineralization rates in Kings Creek during normal flow. Remineralization averaged 0.03 mmol-N/m2/hr (SE=0.03) and uptake averaged 0.01 mmol-N/m2/hr (SE=0.01). Generally, remineralization and uptake rates during drought were higher than results taken during normal flow. As pools dried, nutrients became more concentrated in the water resulting in high background NH4 levels, consistent with our hypothesized increased remineralization rates.

Molly Fisher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Simpson College , molly.fisher@my.simpson.edu;


James Guinnip (Primary Presenter/Author), Kansas State University, jguinnip@ksu.edu;


Walter Dodds (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, wkdodds@ksu.edu;


63 - CONTROLS ON MICROBIAL PROCESSING OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN BOREAL FOREST STREAMS DRAINING WATERSHEDS UNDERLAIN WITH DISCONTINUOUS PERMAFROST

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CONTROLS ON MICROBIAL PROCESSING OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN BOREAL FOREST STREAMS DRAINING WATERSHEDS UNDERLAIN WITH DISCONTINUOUS PERMAFROST In the boreal forest, permafrost thaw is resulting in changes in vegetation and deepening of watershed flowpaths. Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (CPCRW); (50 km NE Fairbanks, AK, USA) contains sub-catchments underlain with varying permafrost extents (4-53% cover), providing the opportunity to study how permafrost extent affects water chemistry and nutrient cycling. We measured nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and carbon processing ectoenzyme activity along a continuum of springs, headwater, and higher order streams, and related ectoenzyme activity to organic and inorganic nutrient and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Relating ectoenzyme activity to water chemistry explained how variation in inorganic and organic N and P and carbon availability control microbial investment towards organic nutrient and carbon acquisition, elucidating what resources are limiting microbial processing of DOM. Water chemistry data at CPCRW indicates that P is likely limited. Preliminary ectoenzyme data supports this, with relatively high P processing ectoenzyme activity across water sources. P processing ectoenzyme activity was negatively correlated to soluble reactive P and positively correlated to nitrate concentrations, suggesting that inorganic nutrients are important in controlling organic matter utilization.

Marie Schmidt (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, mfschmidt@alaska.edu;


Jeremy Jones (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, jbjonesjr@alaska.edu;


64 - DEVELOPING STANDARD COLLECTION PROCEDURES FOR INTACT SEDIMENT CORE INCUBATIONS IN CONTINUOUS FLOW EXPERIMENTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DEVELOPING STANDARD COLLECTION PROCEDURES FOR INTACT SEDIMENT CORE INCUBATIONS IN CONTINUOUS FLOW EXPERIMENTS Intact sediment cores are thought to provide robust estimates of ambient nutrient cycling in aquatic systems. However, anomalies are often observed between core replicates designed to represent consistent field conditions. Inconsistencies may be initiated during core collection and transport, where holding time and temperature may vary. My objective is to systematically examine how core transport temperature and holding time alters estimates of dissolved nutrient (N and P) retention and gas (N2, O2, and CH4) flux. Cores collected from a local wetland will be randomly assigned a temperature (ambient or on ice) and holding time (1, 6, 12, or 24 hours) until laboratory incubation at ambient field temperature. Paired inflow and outflow water samples will be collected from each core at regular intervals for 3 days and analyzed for dissolved nutrient or gas concentrations. Lower storage temperatures should slow microbial activity, requiring a longer acclimation time for consistent measurements. Longer holding times should allow continued microbial activity, resulting in different initial incubation biogeochemical conditions. Results from this work will improve understanding of anomalous and inconsistent data observed in flow-through core incubations and inform standardized core collection protocols in aquatic systems.

Robert Brown (Primary Presenter/Author), Tennessee Technological University, brownrs1991@gmail.com;


Justin Murdock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Tech University, jnmurdock@tntech.edu;


Jordan Evans (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Technological University, jlevans@tntech.edu;


65 - ECOSYSTEM DRIVERS OF METABOLIC REGIMES ACROSS SEVERAL STREAMS IN THE MAUMEE RIVER WATERSHED.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ECOSYSTEM DRIVERS OF METABOLIC REGIMES ACROSS SEVERAL STREAMS IN THE MAUMEE RIVER WATERSHED. We present a comprehensive review of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) across six agriculturally dominated stream systems in the Maumee River watershed. We used continuous measurements of DO and light, as well as environmental factors such as flow, sediment and nutrient concentrations to characterize factors that influence long term (yearly), seasonal, and short term (storm events) metabolic regimes across our sample streams. Stream metabolism values (GPP and ER) were estimated using the Bayesian metabolic framework in the streamMetabolizer package in R.

Nathan Manning (Primary Presenter/Author), Heidelberg University NCWQR, nmanning@heidelberg.edu;


Laura Johnson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Heidelberg University, ljohnson@heidelberg.edu;


Jakob Boehler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Heidelberg University, jboehler@heidelberg.edu;


Anna McNabb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Heidelberg University NCWQR, amcnabb@heidelberg.edu ;


66 - FACTORS LIMITING DENITRIFICATION RATES IN A HYPER-EUTROPHIC MIDWESTERN RESERVOIR AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FACTORS LIMITING DENITRIFICATION RATES IN A HYPER-EUTROPHIC MIDWESTERN RESERVOIR AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE Humans have altered global nitrogen cycling, increasing bioreactive nitrogen in our environment. Excess nitrogen contributes to eutrophication and dead zones, with profound socioecological and economic consequences. Denitrification, the conversion of nitrate to dinitrogen gas, is an important ecosystem service that removes excess nitrogen. Denitrification rates in Acton Lake, a hyper-eutrophic reservoir in southwestern Ohio, are relatively high in spring and decrease through summer and fall, corresponding to seasonal declines in nitrate concentration. Nitrate drawdown likely limits denitrification rates, but organic carbon may limit rates in shallow areas near stream inflow. Our objective was to assess whether denitrification rates were limited by nitrate or organic (algal) carbon at sites near the inflow and outflow of the lake. We added nitrate and algal carbon separately and in combination to lake sediment cores, which were incubated in flow-through chambers. We found that denitrification rates in the inflow were significantly higher than in the outflow, likely due to higher temperature. Denitrification rates were limited by nitrate at both sites, and carbon additions did not increase rates. Our findings contribute insights to processes that govern this valuable ecosystem service and the availability of reactive N.

Ashley Mickens (Primary Presenter/Author), Miami University, mickenam@miamioh.edu ;


Michael Vanni (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University, vannimj@miamioh.edu;


Tanner Williamson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University of Ohio, tanner.williamson@gmail.com;


67 - FROM HILLSLOPES TO SURFACE WATERS: PATTERNS IN CO2 AND CH4 FLUXES FROM INTERMITTENT AND PERENNIAL WATERWAYS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FROM HILLSLOPES TO SURFACE WATERS: PATTERNS IN CO2 AND CH4 FLUXES FROM INTERMITTENT AND PERENNIAL WATERWAYS Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from intermittent streams, areas where watercourses run dry, are often neglected in estimates of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes. We estimated CO2 and CH4 emissions from two headwater stream corridors in different watersheds, including hillslopes, drybeds, and perennial surface waters, at Coweeta Hydrologic Lab, North Carolina. During June 2018, we sampled gas fluxes every ten meters along 145 m reaches of two streams. During August 2018, we returned to compare emissions from habitats within the stream corridors. Hillslopes had the highest CO2 fluxes of the three habitats (median=260 mmol m-2d-1, range 40-1300), followed by streams (median=126 mmol m-2d-1, range 13-1150) and drybeds (median=62 mmol m-2d-1, range 29-587). CH4 fluxes from drybeds and hillslopes (-0.3 - 0.4 mmol m-2d-1) were more variable than stream emissions (-0.1 - 0.2 mmol m-2d-1). Neither of the stream corridors was consistently a CH4 source. These results reinforce the need to include the variability of gas emissions within stream corridors in our studies of carbon dynamics. We will use these data to estimate corridor-scale CO2 and CH4 emissions for an improved understanding of intermittent and perennial stream carbon dynamics.

Sumaiya Rahman (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, Sumaiya@vt.edu;


Erin Hotchkiss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ehotchkiss@vt.edu;


69 - NUTRIENT LIMITATION OF NITROGEN FIXATION AND DENITRIFICATION RATES DETERMINED USING NUTRIENT DIFFUSING SUBSTRATES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NUTRIENT LIMITATION OF NITROGEN FIXATION AND DENITRIFICATION RATES DETERMINED USING NUTRIENT DIFFUSING SUBSTRATES Denitrifiers are commonly limited by nitrogen (N) and organic carbon (C), whereas N fixers can be limited by phosphorus (P) and suppressed by N. To test how nutrient limitation of these processes differed between adjacent stream and wetland habitats, nutrient diffusing substrates (NDS) were deployed for 28 days on the Pilgrim River in Michigan. NDS were enriched with C, N and P with fritted glass disks for autotrophs and cellulose sponges for heterotrophs (4-way full factorial design). At the stream, denitrification measured using acetylene block was higher on NDS enriched with C but were modulated by N and P (C*N*P interaction F1,22 = 4.7, p = 0.04). N fixation measured using acetylene reduction was not influenced by nutrients but was 2.4 times higher on glass versus sponge (F1,30 = 8.13, p = 0.008). At the wetland, N alone increased denitrification (F1,31 = 41.7, p < 0.001), and N fixation increased with P and decreased with N and C additions (N*P, F1,22 = 6.4, p < 0.02; N*C, F1,22 = 5.8, p < 0.025). Nutrient limitation of processes may vary in close proximity, leading to spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical cycling.

Erin Eberhard (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University , ekeberha@mtu.edu;


Kevin Nevorski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, kcnevors@mtu.edu;


Amy Marcarelli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


Katie Mazanec (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri University of Science and Technology, kmm6df@mst.edu;


70 - PRIMARY CONTROLS ON NUTRIENT USE: ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM AND DISTURBANCE IN A SMALL HEADWATER STREAM, WESTERN MONTANA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PRIMARY CONTROLS ON NUTRIENT USE: ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM AND DISTURBANCE IN A SMALL HEADWATER STREAM, WESTERN MONTANA Ecosystem metabolism and disturbance can alter nutrient retention in aquatic systems. During summer and fall months of 2018, nitrate concentrations followed consistent diel swings in Miller Creek of western MT. Research addressing the interacting determinants of nitrate retention was conducted with a single-station method in November 2018. Fine-scale temporal measurements collected from a suite of in-situ sensors placed in the stream revealed significant daily trends. Generalized linear models were used to determine the relative roles of physicochemical characteristics and stream metabolism on daily changes in nitrate retention. Average declines in nitrate concentrations from night to day (-0.03 mg/L) corresponded with elevated average rates of gross primary production (0.02 mg O2 m-2 s-1). Rates of GPP may reflect discharge influences on sediment stability, given fine-grained bed materials introduced by past land use. Further research is needed to address how reduced sediment stability and metabolism may change nitrate retention at a whole-system scale over multiple seasons in Miller Creek.

H. Maurice Valett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, Division of Biological Sciences, maury.valett@umontana.edu;


Kim Bray (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, bray.k.kim@gmail.com;


71 - PROSPECTING FOR SUBMICRON METAL PARTICLES IN A MINE WASTE CONTAMINATED RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PROSPECTING FOR SUBMICRON METAL PARTICLES IN A MINE WASTE CONTAMINATED RIVER Metals have historically been thought to enter aquatic food webs in the “dissolved” fraction, operationally defined as anything passing through a filter of a given size (e.g., 700 nm). This definition of dissolved may be inaccurate because it lumps small, submicron particles (colloids) with truly dissolved solutes (< 1 nm). For elements like iron, the iron itself may not be toxic, but colloidal iron may serve as a vector for toxic metals by sorbing them and indirectly driving their accumulation in organisms. The goal of this study was to examine the elemental composition of particles in a mine waste contaminated river. We collected water samples during base flow and characterized the elemental composition of individual particles under 1000 nm. Iron and manganese were most abundant and had sizes in the lower end of the colloidal size range. Lead, zinc, cadmium, and copper were commonly found as particles and were sometimes found associated with iron particles, suggesting that iron may indeed be serving as a vector. These data begin to illuminate the potential importance of colloids in both the transport of contaminants and driving exposure to organisms.

Kaitlin Perkins (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, kaitlin.perkins@umontana.edu;


72 - SPATIAL VARIATION IN WATER AND SEDIMENT PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN MILFORD LAKE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SPATIAL VARIATION IN WATER AND SEDIMENT PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN MILFORD LAKE Phosphorous (P) is a key nutrient that can encourage algal and cyanobacterial growth. Should these “blooms” turn toxic, cyanobacteria can contaminate drinking water, creating human health concerns. Phosphorous (P) from water is assimilated into algal and cyanobacterial cells to support growth and held inside the cell until it dies, creating organic phosphorus that is broken down into the sediment and then dissolved back into the lake water column. For this study we want to know how P, as soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), varies in the surface and bottom waters of Milford Reservoir. To analyze SRP in the water column, we collected triplicate filtered samples from the epilimnion and hypolimnion at 30 locations in Milford Reservoir in August and October 2018. In August, we found a 2-fold change across the lake, with the highest concentrations of SRP in the hypolimnion of Zone C. This is likely due to high sediment phosphorus and anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface. Our work can assist managers with understanding how variation in water and sediment P may fuel areas of high algal growth, thereby fueling the persistent harmful algal blooms at Milford Lake.

Abagael Pruitt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, abagaelpruitt@ku.edu;


Emma Overstreet (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, evover@live.com;


Amy Burgin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, burginam@ku.edu;


Kynser Wahwahsuck (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, kwahwah11@gmail.com;


73 - THE ROLE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON METHANE PROCESSES IN ICELANDIC LAKES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE ROLE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON METHANE PROCESSES IN ICELANDIC LAKES As the climate warms, it is critical to understand feedback mechanisms influencing ecosystem greenhouse gas emissions, particularly in polar lakes, which contribute disproportionately to the global methane budget. Yet there is considerable uncertainty surrounding the mechanisms that control methanogenesis and methanotrophy within these systems. In addition to temperature, recent work has emphasized the role of ecosystem productivity and the associated quality and quantity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in determining methanogen abundance, community structure, and rates of CH4 flux. In this study, we combined lake physiochemical data, in-situ experiments measuring the rate of methane production and oxidation from water and sediment/water incubations, and lake-surface emission measurements to relate methane dynamics in nine polymictic lakes in Iceland to environmental controls. Stepwise regression identified DOC and temperature as important variables in predicting in-lake CH4 concentrations. Experimental incubations suggest that increased DOC may contribute to increased methane production and emission, while warming may lead to increased methane consumption and reduced emissions from Icelandic lakes. As temperatures continue to warm, it is increasingly important to understand and predict how these changes will influence feedback loops in the biosphere that further magnify or mitigate warming.

Kristin Strock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environmental Science Department, Dickinson College, strockk@dickinson.edu;


Bridget Deemer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Southwest Biological Science Center, bdeemer@usgs.gov;


Nicole Hayes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, hayes.nicolemarie@gmail.com;


Madaline Ritter (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Environmental Science, Dickinson College, ritterm@dickinson.edu;


74 - WINTER UNDER-ICE PATTERNS OF GREENHOUSE GASES IN LAKES OF INTERIOR ALASKA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

WINTER UNDER-ICE PATTERNS OF GREENHOUSE GASES IN LAKES OF INTERIOR ALASKA Arctic lake greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) are poorly defined, in part due to limited sampling access and restricted sampling during winter and shoulder seasons. To better understand patterns and drivers of winter under-ice GHG buildup and potential for emissions at spring thaw, we surveyed CO2 and CH4 concentrations and isotopic composition in late winter in thirteen remote interior Alaskan lakes. Gas partial pressures ranged widely and were positively correlated to each other (~400 to 18000 ppm (CO2), ~2 to 30000ppm (CH4)). Across the region, shallow, low elevation lakes were sites of greatest under-ice concentrations of both gases. These sites also had the greatest content of dissolved organic carbon to fuel GHG production. Elevated CH4 content was restricted to lakes with hypoxic conditions, while elevated CO2 was observed in both oxic and hypoxic conditions, inversely proportional to oxygen content. Stable isotope values of CH4 ranged widely, over 50 permil, indicating the net importance of CH4 oxidation may vary greatly among the lakes. This survey provides key information to help explain the spatial patterns and factors related to winter greenhouse gas buildup in lakes, currently a major unknown in many arctic regions.

David Butman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, dbutman@uw.edu;


Matthew Bogard (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, bogard.matt@gmail.com;


Mark Dornblaser (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, mmdornbl@usgs.gov;


Robert Striegl (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, rstriegl@usgs.gov;


Catherine Kuhn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, ckuhn@uw.edu;


Madeline O'Dwyer (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Washington, odwyerm@uw.edu;


76 - A COMPARISON OF FUNCTIONAL FEEDING GROUP METRICS IN AN URBANIZED WATERSHED USING BOTH NUMERIC AND BIOMASS DATA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A COMPARISON OF FUNCTIONAL FEEDING GROUP METRICS IN AN URBANIZED WATERSHED USING BOTH NUMERIC AND BIOMASS DATA The Mill Creek Watershed, located in Cincinnati, Ohio, has been historically implicated as a degraded urban watershed due to cumulative effects of industrial effluents, combined sewage overflows, and channelization. While local and state efforts to monitor and improve water quality have been ongoing, more baseline data is needed throughout the watershed to better understand the impact of current and future management efforts. The objective of this study was to compare macroinvertebrate functional feeding group metrics utilizing both numeric and biomass data. Combined, both numerical and biomass data may provide a more thorough assessment of structure and function within streams of the Mill Creek Watershed. Standardized macroinvertebrate samples were collected from multiple habitats (3 riffle and 1 composite multi-habitat) in three stream sites within the watershed from 2014-2018. Macroinvertebrates were identified to family level, functional feeding groups were assigned, and biomass was determined using a new expedited field/lab method. Preliminary analyses indicated little variation between both data sets (numeric and biomass) overtime; however, variation was observed among sites within the watershed.

Rachel Neff (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xavier University, neffr1@xavier.edu;


Sophie Racey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sir74000@uga.edu;


Mollie McIntosh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xavier University, mcintoshm2@xavier.edu;


77 - A FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES WITHIN STREAMS OF THE MILL CREEK WATERSHED, CINCINNATI, OHIO

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES WITHIN STREAMS OF THE MILL CREEK WATERSHED, CINCINNATI, OHIO Similar to other urbanized watersheds, the Mill Creek Watershed, Cincinnati, Ohio, has been historically degraded by human activities resulting in pollution, sewage overflows and channelization. There have been numerous efforts to improve ecosystem health throughout the watershed; however, more baseline data is needed to better understand the impact of current and future management practices. Numerous assessment methods focusing on macroinvertebrate communities are in use today, including the analysis of functional feeding groups (FFGs). This approach analyses macroinvertebrates by groups based on mode of food acquisition. The main objective of this study was to conduct a functional analysis of macroinvertebrate communities across the Mill Creek Watershed. Individual rapid biological assessments were conducted at a total of nine sites within four streams of the watershed from 2014-2018. Standardized macroinvertebrate samples were collected from multiple habitats, all macroinvertebrates were identified to family level and FFGs assigned. Numerical data were then used to calculate common functional metrics, including ecosystem parameter estimates (e.g., P/R, channel stability). Preliminary analyses indicate that gathering collectors dominate at most sites throughout the watershed; however, some variation does exist among sites overtime.

Sophie Racey (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, sir74000@uga.edu;


Rachel Neff (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xavier University, neffr1@xavier.edu;


Mollie McIntosh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Xavier University, mcintoshm2@xavier.edu;


78 - FUNCTIONAL TRAITS OF REGIONAL SPECIES POOLS INTERACT WITH MULTIPLE DISPERSAL PATHWAYS TO SHAPE REGIONAL BIODIVERSITY PATTERNS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FUNCTIONAL TRAITS OF REGIONAL SPECIES POOLS INTERACT WITH MULTIPLE DISPERSAL PATHWAYS TO SHAPE REGIONAL BIODIVERSITY PATTERNS The functional connectivity of river networks is dictated by the dendritic structure of the network, the topology of the surrounding landscape, and the functional traits of regional species pools. In arid river networks, highly dynamic streamflow causes connectivity and aquatic habitat to be temporally dynamic. Aquatic macroinvertebrates have evolved diverse life histories that allow them to use multiple dispersal pathways, including overland flight, that structure their populations. In this study we combine monthly macroinvertebrate sampling across dry and wet seasons in a dynamic river (Indian Creek, San Jacinto Mountains, CA) and long-term archived macroinvertebrate sampling across California in addition to monitoring of artificial colonization habitat placed in surrounding landscapes to quantify connectivity between habitat. We pair this empirical data with metacommunity (MCSIM) and population (Riverfly) models to simulate the effects of varied connectivity and disturbance on regional diversity. This study hypothesized that beta diversity fluctuates with hydrological flow, with greater dissimilarity of species in dry months and decreased dissimilarity when flow is restored in wet months, with these results contingent upon species functional traits and overland connectivity.

Kurt Anderson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Riverside, kurt.anderson@ucr.edu;


Ryan Conway (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Riverside, rconw002@ucr.edu;


79 - IDENTIFYING KEY STRESSORS OF ONTARIO LAKE FISH COMMUNITIES THROUGH MULTISPECIES SIZE-SPECTRUM MODELLING

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

IDENTIFYING KEY STRESSORS OF ONTARIO LAKE FISH COMMUNITIES THROUGH MULTISPECIES SIZE-SPECTRUM MODELLING In aquatic communities, abundance scales strongly with body size, such that large organisms are less abundant than small ones. This relationship leads to a characteristic size spectrum, typically displayed as a negative, linear relationship between abundance and body size on a log-log scale. Two characteristics of the spectrum that are of special interest are the intercept and slope, as these have been linked to community productivity and structure and are sensitive to environmental perturbations. Size spectrum theory has been applied to numerous ecological models in attempts to capture fish community dynamics and understand how community biomass may change over time. In this study, we use multispecies size spectrum modelling to simulate fish community dynamics in lakes in Ontario, Canada. We then compare the simulated spectra to those based on empirical data collected through the Ontario Broad-scale Monitoring Program, which has monitored fisheries in Ontario’s lakes through standardized gill-netting since 2008. Deviations between the two, particularly in the intercept and slope of each spectrum, will then be analyzed to identify key stressors that may be altering community dynamics, including fishing pressure, habitat degradation, and climate change.

David Benoit (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Toronto, d.benoit@mail.utoronto.ca;


Donald Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Toronto, don.jackson@utoronto.ca;


Henrique Giacomini (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, henrique.giacomini@ontario.ca;


Cindy Chu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, cindy.chu@ontario.ca;


80 - QUANTIFYING CHANGES IN OLIGOCHAETA ASSEMBLAGES INFLUENCED BY PHOTIC ZONES IN NEOTROPICAL RESERVOIRS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

QUANTIFYING CHANGES IN OLIGOCHAETA ASSEMBLAGES INFLUENCED BY PHOTIC ZONES IN NEOTROPICAL RESERVOIRS Research was carried out to determine whether the influence of the photic zones have significant impacts on Oligochaeta assemblage structure in 13 reservoirs in the State of São Paulo (Brazil) during the period of June 2014 to July 2016. The sampling design considered two groups of sites: Euphotic and Aphotic. Secchi depth was used to calculate the light attenuation coefficient, adjusted to tropical environments. Oligochaeta assemblage samples and water physiochemistry, were evaluated at each site. Statistical analyzes comprise combination of multivariate and univariate procedures, as well the Indicator Species Analysis (IndVal) over the biotic and environmental datasets. Water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and electrical conductivity are responsible for explaining environmental conditions changes between treatments. During the study, five subfamilies, 12 genera, and 28 species were recorded. We found a clear decrease in abundance, richness and species diversity at the aphotic assemblages when compared to the euphotic. Aphotic assemblages present high average values of Simpson dominance index. IndVal indicated significant relationships of species Dero righii, Dero digitata, Dero sawayai, Branchiura sowerbyi, Stephensoniana trivandrana, and Nais communis with euphotic sites. Tubificinae density presents a strong association with aphotic sites.

Guilherme Gorni (Primary Presenter/Author), São Paulo University - USP, grgorni@gmail.com;


Juliano Corbi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of São Paulo, julianocorbi@usp.br;


Vanessa Colombo-Corbi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Araraquara - UNIARA, vanessacolombo25@yahoo.com.br;


Douglas Girolli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Araraquara - UNIARA, douglasgirolli@gmail.com;


81 - RESPONSE OF BENTHIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE TO RESTORATION EFFORTS IN MAD RIVER WATERSHED

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RESPONSE OF BENTHIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE TO RESTORATION EFFORTS IN MAD RIVER WATERSHED Cold water habitats are rare in the state of Ohio, but important, because they contain unique flora and fauna adapted to colder water temperatures. One of these cold water systems, Macochee Creek (Mad River Watershed, Ohio), was channelized in the 1800s for agricultural purposes, but a small section (0.8 km) underwent an extensive restoration during 2007 to restore sinuosity and improve riparian and in-stream habitat. The objectives of this study were to assess the biological and environmental response ten years post-restoration within the Machchee tributary. In the fall of 2017, nine sites were selected: three upstream of the restoration, three downstream of the restoration and three sites within the restored stream reach. During the fall of 2018, the restoration segment was sampled again as were three unrestored neighboring tributaries in the Mad River watershed. At each site, a suite of environmental parameters was recorded and macroinvertebrates and periphyton were collected from riffle habitats. Data suggests that a number of environmental and habitat variables in the restored section of Macochee Creek differed significantly from unrestored sections of Macochee Creek, but the biological response was mixed.

Alex Fields (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, a-fields.1@onu.edu;


Crystal Scales (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, c-scales@onu.edu;


Leslie Riley (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


82 - TROPHIC NICHE DIFFERENTIATION WITHIN FRESHWATER MUSSEL COMMUNITIES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TROPHIC NICHE DIFFERENTIATION WITHIN FRESHWATER MUSSEL COMMUNITIES Freshwater mussels occur in dense speciose communities. While all freshwater mussels occupy the same trophic guild unclear to what degree species are differentiated. We investigated whether freshwater mussel species had undergone niche differentiation or if traits have been conserved, and whether patterns were consistent among communities. Individuals of the most common species were collected from eight sites along the Sipsey River, AL, we also collected seston and benthic organic matter at these sites. Samples were run for ?13C and ?12N. Gill tissue was collected from a subset of individuals, which we used to determine cilia density using scanning electron microscopy. Using standard ellipse area (SEA) we determined trophic niche width and overlap. We found that freshwater mussels did partition into trophic niches based on isotopic signature within site, but species trophic width was variable across sites. There was also differentiation of gill structure within communities, this differentiation was consistent across sites but cilia density varied among sites. Our findings suggest that freshwater mussel do partition into niches to limit competition locally, but diet and gill structure is flexible based on available resources.

Brian van Ee (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alabama, bcvanee@gmail.com;


Carla Atkinson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama, carla.l.atkinson@ua.edu;


83 - BLACK FLY (DIPTERA: SIMULIIDAE) PARASITE DISTRIBUTION IN WESTERN OHIO

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

BLACK FLY (DIPTERA: SIMULIIDAE) PARASITE DISTRIBUTION IN WESTERN OHIO Mid-to late instar black fly immatures were collected from 163 mid-size streams in western Ohio during mid-March to mid-April. The black fly larvae and pupae were preserved in Carnoy’s solution. The streams were located in Ohio’s Huron-Erie Lake Plains (HELP), Eastern Corn Belt Plains (ECLP) and the Interior Plateau (IP) ecoregions. The overall larval infection rate for western Ohio was 2.8 percent and the highest parasitism rate for a stream was 29.2 percent; this stream was located in the ECLP. Throughout the study, 23 percent of the streams contained black flies that were infected with parasites. The parasites (in order of prevalence) consisted of nematodes (family Mermithidae), microsporidia (Polydispyrenia simulii), and fungus (Coelomycidium simulii). A total of 19 species of black flies were collected and 9 of those species were infected with parasites. P. simulii and C. simulii were only found on Simulium and Stegopterna species. Prosimulium albionense was the most heavily parasitized (mermithids) species of black fly. Mermithid parasitism was highest in streams located in the southern part of the ECLP. The transitional boundaries between the ecoregions had lowest black fly larval infection rates.

Mike Mendel (Primary Presenter/Author), Cedarville University, mmendel@cedarville.edu;


Peter Adler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, padler@clemson.edu;


Rhonda Mendel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EnviroScience Inc., rmendel@enviroscienceinc.com;


84 - CONSERVATION ASSESSMENT OF ODONATA IN ILLINOIS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CONSERVATION ASSESSMENT OF ODONATA IN ILLINOIS Conservation of freshwater organisms requires fundamental species distribution information across space and time for status assessments, management actions, and setting priorities. Historically, knowledge gaps have prevented adequate protection for aquatic insects in state wildlife action plans and other direct conservation efforts. Currently, measures such as broad-scale species status assessment, identification of biogeographic patterns, and designation of critical habitat are greatly needed in light of land-use and global climate change. Odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) inhabit a variety of freshwater habitats and thus are sentinel organisms for habitat quality assessment, tracking environmental change, and restoration efficacy. Furthermore, odonate biology and life history have been integrated into ecological studies, and their bipartite life-cycle underscores their role in terrestrial-aquatic linkages. We present an analysis of collections records across the state of Illinois to assess underrepresented species and geography. A framework to address knowledge gaps, via identifying focal taxa and targeted sampling, in the Odonata will be useful for state and regional wildlife management programs.

Erika Bilger (Primary Presenter/Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, ebilger@illinois.edu;


John Crawford (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Great Rivers Research and Education Center, joacrawford@lc.edu;


Brittany Ousterhout (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Great Rivers Research and Education Center, bousterhout@lc.edu;


86 - RANGE-WIDE DECLINES AND SPATIAL SYNCHRONY IN AMBER DARTER (PERCINA ANTESELLA) POPULATIONS IDENTIFIED WITH MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RANGE-WIDE DECLINES AND SPATIAL SYNCHRONY IN AMBER DARTER (PERCINA ANTESELLA) POPULATIONS IDENTIFIED WITH MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS High spatial synchrony—correlated abundance fluctuations among distinct populations—is associated with increased extinction risk, but is not examined in status assessments mandated by the Endangered Species Act. Alongside traditional viability metrics (i.e., the number of populations, their spatial extent, and the status of each population), consideration of spatial synchrony in these assessments may provide additional insight into extinction risk as well as the relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on population dynamics. We demonstrate a method for estimating abundance trends in populations of the Endangered Amber Darter (Percina antesella), while simultaneously quantifying spatial synchrony among its two populations in the Conasauga and Etowah rivers in Georgia, U.S.A. Our analysis was performed using multivariate autoregressive state-space (MARSS) models with annual sampling data from 1996-2017. Our results indicate that Amber Darters have declined substantially in both rivers, with greater than 9% annual losses in both the Conasauga and Etowah rivers, suggesting range-wide imperilment. Furthermore, there was little evidence for independent population fluctuations between the rivers, which may compound overall extinction risk. Broadly, this analysis demonstrates the utility of MARSS modeling and considerations of spatial synchrony in vulnerability assessments.

Edward Stowe (Primary Presenter/Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, stowe.edward@gmail.com;


Seth Wenger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sethwenger@fastmail.fm;


Bud Freeman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, bud@hemip.nhm.uga.edu;


Mary Freeman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, mcfreeman@usgs.gov;


87 - USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA TO IDENTIFY HABITAT REQUIREMENTS AND RESTORATION OBJECTIVES FOR THE ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSEL LASMIGONA DECORATA (BIVALVIA:UNIONIDAE)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA TO IDENTIFY HABITAT REQUIREMENTS AND RESTORATION OBJECTIVES FOR THE ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSEL LASMIGONA DECORATA (BIVALVIA:UNIONIDAE) The Carolina Heelsplitter (Lasmigona decorata) is a critically endangered freshwater mussel endemic to North and South Carolina. Because of its rarity, there is a deficit of information regarding the specific habitat requirements for colonization and persistence and where suitable habitat may exist. Understanding these requirements is essential for determining factors driving species decline and for guiding future management and restoration efforts. As part of an ongoing study, we developed a quantitative PCR assay to quantify the presence/absence of the Carolina Heelsplitter and a known host fish throughout the Upper Lynches River sub-basin in South Carolina. We will collect water samples during March of 2019, coinciding with the spring release of mussel larvae by gravid females. We will collect replicate water samples to account for imperfect detection and negative controls to monitor for potential contamination. We will investigate occupancy and detection probabilities as functions of environmental covariates, such as water chemistry, channel morphology, riparian characteristics, and land use attributes. Our preliminary results, which include controls and initial field samples, demonstrate the utility of eDNA as a highly sensitive survey tool, despite the extremely low density of the target species.

Stephen Spear (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Wilds Conservation Center, sspear@thewilds.org;


Amelia Tomi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Wilds Conservation Center, atomi@thewilds.org;


Cathy Jachowski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, cjachow@clemson.edu;


Benjamin Schmidt (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, bcschmi@clemson.edu;


88 - HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH? SYNTHESIZING SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ON SENSITIVE AQUATIC INSECTS USING A META-ANALYTIC APPROACH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH? SYNTHESIZING SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ON SENSITIVE AQUATIC INSECTS USING A META-ANALYTIC APPROACH Both the total concentration and diversity of novel synthetic chemicals have increased across surface waters globally. Pesticide use has increased since the 1970’s resulting in the loss of sensitive aquatic taxa from surface waters polluted by pesticide effluent. However, most freshwater organisms are likely not extirpated by environmentally relevant pesticide concentrations. Instead, chronic pesticide presence at sublethal concentrations may disrupt physiological and behavioral functions in sensitive taxa. Such sublethal effects have yet to be quantitatively synthesized. To bridge this gap, we used meta-analysis to synthesize sublethal effects of pesticides on mayfly, stonefly, and caddisfly taxa (EPT taxa). Our analysis of 162 effect sizes from 26 papers indicates that pesticide concentrations well below lethal concentrations negatively affect behavior, growth, and metabolism in EPT taxa. The magnitude of these effects increases as exposure to pesticides increases and negatively affects all three EPT orders, but stoneflies tend to respond more strongly to pesticides than mayflies or caddisflies. Given the pervasive use of pesticides in agricultural and urban environments, our work indicates that reliance on lethal endpoints to set water quality criteria may overlook significant sublethal effects that freshwater communities face.

Ariel Wooldridge (Primary Presenter/Author), Regis University, woold729@regis.edu;


Kristofor Voss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Regis University, kvoss@regis.edu;


89 - LABORATORY EVALUATION OF IMPACTS OF EXPOSURE CONCENTRATION AND DURATION ON SILVICULTURE HERBICIDE TOXICITY TO AQUATIC PLANTS (LEMNA GIBBA)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

LABORATORY EVALUATION OF IMPACTS OF EXPOSURE CONCENTRATION AND DURATION ON SILVICULTURE HERBICIDE TOXICITY TO AQUATIC PLANTS (LEMNA GIBBA) Herbicides to control competing vegetation during stand establishment is a key component of intensive silviculture. Although some field studies have shown that modern best management practices effectively reduce movement of herbicides into forest streams, peak stream concentrations of some herbicides still exceed toxicity thresholds for some aquatic plants. Exposure duration is key in determining the magnitude of herbicide effects, and peak stream herbicide concentrations occur for brief periods of time in response to storm runoff. Because toxicity values are typically derived from 7- or 14-day continuous exposures, the short-term exposures associated with forestry herbicide may represent a significant mitigating factor in actual toxicity. We used a hybrid approach to quantify the duration-exposure concentration-toxicity relationship for herbicide mixtures and Lemna, and evaluated recovery from exposure of varying durations. Growth response was measured as frond area and counts, and biomass. Tested herbicides and mixture ratios represented those most commonly used based on application area in the southeast and northwest US, with highest test concentrations calculated using the US Forest Service Risk Assessment upper peak concentration and the highest application rate used by the industry. Test methods and preliminary findings are presented.

Camille Flinders (Primary Presenter/Author), NCASI, cflinders@ncasi.org;


William Arthurs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NCASI, warthurs@ncasi.org;


Joan Ikoma (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NCASI, jikoma@ncasi.org;


Vickie Tatum (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), NCASI, vtatum@ncasi.org;


90 - LAKE MICHIGAN SPORT FISH AS RECIPIENTS OF PFAS – AN EMERGING CONTAMINANT IN THE GREAT LAKES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

LAKE MICHIGAN SPORT FISH AS RECIPIENTS OF PFAS – AN EMERGING CONTAMINANT IN THE GREAT LAKES The Great Lakes have a long legacy of environmental contamination from human activities. While the sources of many of these historical contaminants have been eliminated (e.g., PCBs, DDT), contaminants of emerging concern threaten the lakes with potentially serious consequences for human and environmental health. Among these are per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), which are organic compounds found in fire retardants, furniture, waterproof clothing, and food packaging. PFAS can enter rivers and streams that flow into the Great Lakes through a variety of pathways (e.g., wastewater effluent, leaching from landfills, surface water runoff) with a high potential for uptake and biomagnification in aquatic food webs. At Notre Dame, we have developed a novel technique using Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) spectroscopy to measure total fluorinated compound concentrations. Using PIGE, we have detected and quantified PFAS concentrations in popular Great Lakes sportfish and compared results with sportfish from Alaska. Preliminary results show PFAS concentrations in Great Lakes salmon to be nearly twice as high as salmon from Alaska. This project is among the first to determine PFAS levels in Great Lakes fish, thereby providing valuable information to assist with pollution prevention and amelioration.

Whitney Conard (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, wconard@nd.edu;


Graham Peaslee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, gpeaslee@nd.edu;


Gary Lamberti (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, glambert@nd.edu;


92 - THE EFFECTS OF ACETAMINOPHEN ON CARASSIUS AURATUS FEEDING AND MOVEMENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE EFFECTS OF ACETAMINOPHEN ON CARASSIUS AURATUS FEEDING AND MOVEMENT Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are increasingly detected in freshwater ecosystems and may have adverse effects on aquatic biota. Acetaminophen is a widely-used analgesic and antipyretic drug that might be discharged directly (e.g. sewage) into rivers and lakes. Thus, organisms inhabiting streams or manmade impoundments receiving wastewater effluent might be affected by this drug. Fish species in these habitats are likely tolerant to low dissolved oxygen, high turbidity, high salinity and forage on benthic vegetation and detritus (e.g. Cyprinidea: carps, minnows, and goldfish). Carassius auratus (common goldfish) were exposed to 0 µg/L, 100 µg/L, and 200 µg/L concentrations of acetaminophen for 216 hours to assess their feeding rate and movement. After 120 hours, feeding rate of fish exposed to 200 µg/L of acetaminophen was significantly higher than the other treatments. Specifically, 83% higher than control and 69% higher than 100 µg/L. After 216 hours, there was no difference across treatments. Movement was measured using ANY-maze behavioral tracking software. Acetaminophen had no effects on fish movement. Future research is needed to determine the effects of chronic acetaminophen exposure on C. auratus and other aquatic organisms.

DANIEL ELIAS (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina Wesleyan College, delias@ncwc.edu;


Kayla Lavan (Primary Presenter/Author), North Carolina Wesleyan College, kl234511@my.ncwc.edu;


93 - TOXICITY OF AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE TO THREE HETEROTROPH SPECIES IN COSTA RICAN LOWLAND WET FOREST STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TOXICITY OF AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE TO THREE HETEROTROPH SPECIES IN COSTA RICAN LOWLAND WET FOREST STREAMS Ethoprophos, an organophosphate insecticide, is widely used on fruit plantations in Central America and has the potential to be transported beyond plantations (via air or waterways) to affect aquatic ecosystems in protected areas. Our goal was to identify the threshold concentrations at which ethoprophos impacts the behavior and survival of three common species of tropical lowland wet forest stream heterotrophs (the mayfly Traverella holzenthali, caddisfly Phylloicus sp., and guppy Priapichthys annectens) at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We predicted that mayflies and caddisflies, taxa considered sensitive to pollution, would have lower toxicity thresholds than P. annectens. Our preliminary data suggest that the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) may be as low as 100 ?g/L for Priapichthys annectens, with an LD50 of approximately 1500 ?g/L. The LD50 value for Phylloicus is approximated to be below 10 ?g/L with LOEC as low as 2?g/L. The LD50 of Traverella appears to be around 50 ?g/L, and LOEC may be lower than 1 ?g/L. These results support our prediction and underscore the need for further study of the ecological effects of pesticides. Our future work will include more accurate quantification of threshold concentrations.

Rebecca Prest (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri Western State University, rprest@missouriwestern.edu;


Carissa Ganong (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri Western State University, carissa.ganong@gmail.com;


94 - TRACE ELEMENT ACCUMULATION FROM COAL COMBUSTION WASTE CONTAMINATION DIFFERS AMONG AQUATIC INVERTIVORES IN A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TRACE ELEMENT ACCUMULATION FROM COAL COMBUSTION WASTE CONTAMINATION DIFFERS AMONG AQUATIC INVERTIVORES IN A COASTAL PLAIN STREAM Coal combustion waste contamination exposes aquatic organisms to a broad array of metals and metalloids. Consequently, accumulation patterns of multiple elements can be compared among species. We evaluated accumulation of 13 elements in over 750 biota samples collected from a coastal plain stream contaminated by coal combustion waste on the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site. Analyses included 27 species of invertivorous fishes distributed across 11 families. Additionally, 5 genera of predaceous aquatic insects belonging to 4 orders were included. Invertivorous fish and predaceous insects represent a critical and diverse component of coastal plain stream food webs. Despite often overlapping in trophic level, differences in morphology may indicate differential habitat use and feeding habits that interact with physiology to cause disparity in contaminant accumulation. Habitat use stratifies vertically in the water column and also laterally as driven by water velocity and substrate type. Habitat use and mobility of prey can influence contaminants ingested. Multiple taxonomic levels were compared. Among fishes, feeding strategy, and habitat use appeared to influence trace element accumulation. Accumulation differed both among and within families. Overall, patterns of trace element accumulation often tended to be species specific.

Christina Fulghum (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, cfulghum@uga.edu;


Brooke Lindell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, elindell@uga.edu;


Angela Lindell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, lindell@srel.uga.edu;


Paul Stankus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, stankus@srel.uga.edu;


J McArthur (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, mcarthur@srel.uga.edu;


Dean Fletcher (Primary Presenter/Author), Savannah River Ecology Laboratory-University of Georgia, fletcher@srel.uga.edu;


95 - ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN HYDROGEOMORPHIC CHARACTERISTICS AND PRIMARY PRODUCER DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE UPPER CLARK FORK RIVER, MONTANA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN HYDROGEOMORPHIC CHARACTERISTICS AND PRIMARY PRODUCER DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE UPPER CLARK FORK RIVER, MONTANA A downstream trend in dominance from macroalgae (primarily Cladophora glomerata) to various macrophyte species was investigated through a longitudinal survey of a 40-km reach of the Upper Clark Fork River, Montana. We surveyed transects every 2 -km along to determine taxonomic identities and distributions of macrophytes and macroalgae relative to fundamental physical, chemical, and hydrologic variables. We measured water velocity, depth, and sediment size distribution at the patch level to relate hydrogeomorphic characteristics to presence of macrophytes or macroalgae. Predominantly, Cladophora was associated with sediment patches consisting of fairly large proportions of very coarse (mean= 39%) and coarse gravels (mean= 18%). Macrophyte species (Potamogeton pectinatus, Elodia canadensis, and Ceratophyllum demersum) were associated with finer-grained sediments. Sediment size distribution among macrophyte patches varied by species type, likely due to differences in growth habit. Spatial variation in the hydrogeomorphic template has implications for the identity and abundance of primary producers in this well-lit, productive river.

Carly Andlauer (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, carly.andlauer@umontana.edu;


H. Maurice Valett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, Division of Biological Sciences, maury.valett@umontana.edu;


96 - USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA TO PREDICT SEA LAMPREY POPULATION SIZE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA TO PREDICT SEA LAMPREY POPULATION SIZE The population of invasive sea lamprey in the Great Lakes has been successfully reduced using Integrated Pest Management (IPM), but this requires detailed knowledge of lamprey presence and population size. Collecting information using traditional techniques can be time-consuming and costly. Environmental DNA (eDNA) assessment holds promise as a cost-efficient alternative; however, environmental factors may influence eDNA concentrations in stream systems, thus reducing its capacity to generate reliable population estimates. The goal of the study was to evaluate the use of quantitative eDNA for estimating population size of an invasive lamprey species in stream ecosystems. Using data from three streams, we developed a multiple linear regression model for predicting the adult lamprey population entering streams during the spawning season. Increased streamflow corresponded to a decrease in eDNA concentrations, but the magnitude of effect of streamflow as a predictor for eDNA concentrations varied across streams. Along with previous literature, our results suggest that eDNA-based population models require an understanding of stream-specific factors leading to DNA dilution and degradation. Our recommendations for data collection and analysis will help guide future studies seeking to use eDNA for sea lamprey population prediction or IPM.

James Kitchens (Primary Presenter/Author), Warren Wilson College, kitchensjn@gmail.com;


Emily Morris (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Olivet Nazarene University, emilygmo@gmail.com;


Barbara Bennie (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, bbennie@uwlax.edu;


Douglas Baumann (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, dbaumann@uwlax.edu;


Roger Haro (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), River Studies Center, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, rharo@uwlax.edu;


Richard Erickson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, rerickson@usgs.gov;


Molly Van Appledorn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, mvanappledorn@usgs.gov;


KathiJo Jankowski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, kjankowski@usgs.gov ;


97 - CHANGES IN STREAM HABITAT QUALITY FOLLOWING CULVERT RESTORATIONS IN NORTHERN GREAT LAKES STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CHANGES IN STREAM HABITAT QUALITY FOLLOWING CULVERT RESTORATIONS IN NORTHERN GREAT LAKES STREAMS Monitoring the effectiveness of culvert restorations is useful for predicting stream habitat and food web improvements and can aid restoration decisions. We monitored four culvert restorations in northern Wisconsin, three using bankfull/backwater design (BBD) and one using partial stream simulation design (SSD). We measured substrate composition, organic matter standing crop, silt depth, water depth, and current velocity upstream and downstream of the culverts, before and after restoration. We observed an increase in substrate size above and decrease below two of the BBD culverts following culvert replacement. Leaves, wood, and fine benthic organic matter standing crops decreased at two upstream BBD reaches and increased at another. Wood standing crop increased at the upstream SSD reach, likely exposed as fine sediment was flushed downstream. Silt depth decreased at two upstream BBD reaches, but increased downstream, while water depth decreased at the three BBD upstream reaches, and increased below for one reach. Current velocity varied across reaches and sites. Increased culvert size likely led to habitat quality improvements at the restored sites due to the transport of organic matter and silt from the above to below reaches or from the site entirely.

Coleson Wrege (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, cwrege@umn.edu;


Sue Eggert (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, seggert@fs.fed.us;


98 - EFFECTS OF STREAM SIMULATION DESIGN ROAD-STREAM CROSSINGS ON THE INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY IN A NORTHERN FORESTED STREAM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECTS OF STREAM SIMULATION DESIGN ROAD-STREAM CROSSINGS ON THE INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY IN A NORTHERN FORESTED STREAM Increasing storm magnitudes and undersized culverts are resulting in more failed road-stream crossings, economic losses, and impaired aquatic communities. Stream simulation design (SSD) is a geomorphic and ecologically-based approach to designing road-stream crossings that mimic natural channel structure, sediment, velocity, and depths. Previous research in Hawkins Creek, a headwater stream, demonstrated improvements in basal food resources and substrate diversity within the SSD culvert following restoration. We also compared invertebrate abundance and biomass in stream reaches above, within, and below the culvert, before and after SSD restoration. Improved habitat and food resources within the restored culvert resulted in increased total invertebrate abundance (6-17x) and biomass (9-12x) within 4-12 months and the colonization of 25 taxa that had not previously been found within the culvert. Proportionately, shredders (Tipula, Taeniopteryx), gatherers (Amphinemura, Paraleptophlebia), and filterers (Hydropsyche, Dolophilodes) responded most strongly to SSD culvert restoration with smaller increases in abundance and biomass of the scraper and predator functional feeding groups. Although aquatic organism passage and flood resiliency has been the primary design priorities of stream simulation design, our work in a northern forested stream demonstrated improved food web function within the restored SSD culvert.

Sue Eggert (Primary Presenter/Author), USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, seggert@fs.fed.us;


Coleson Wrege (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, cwrege@umn.edu;


99 - GEOMORPHIC AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO BANK STABILIZATION AND RESTORATION OF AGRICULTURAL STREAM CHANNELS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

GEOMORPHIC AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO BANK STABILIZATION AND RESTORATION OF AGRICULTURAL STREAM CHANNELS Sediment and nutrient loading from agriculture is the leading source of stream impairment and coastal eutrophication in many parts of the world. Erosion from banks of incised agricultural streams constitutes a major source of sediment loads to streams in the eastern United States. Several management agencies are using bank stabilization and riparian management approaches in a number of agriculturally impaired streams in central Pennsylvania to reduce sediment loading and improve benthic habitat. We surveyed channel morphology, substrate size, mesohabitat composition, and invertebrate and fish communities in two stream reaches before and after bank stabilization and channel modification projects were installed. Post-restoration, both streams were deeper and faster and had higher proportions of riffle and run habitat with less silty substrate. Despite apparent improvement in physical habitat, invertebrate and fish communities were very similar before and after restoration, most likely due to continued impairment of water quality from ongoing agricultural activities in the streams’ watersheds. Bank stabilization could reduce sediment transport downstream and improve instream habitat, but ecological benefits to local streams might depend on riparian management and agricultural practices that reduce nutrient loading and restore natural riparian vegetation.

Matthew McTammany (Primary Presenter/Author), Bucknell University, mmctamma@bucknell.edu;


Catherine Bille (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bucknell University, katerose.mcfadden@gmail.com;


Savannah Weaver (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bucknell University, sjw018@bucknell.edu;


Christine Kehrli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bucknell University, christine.kehrli@bucknell.edu;


Jonathan Niles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, niles@susqu.edu;


Michael Bilger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, mdbilger@verizon.net;


Matthew Wilson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, mjw029@bucknell.edu;


100 - USING FUNCTIONAL TRAIT METRICS TO MONITOR SHORT-TERM CHANGES IN MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FOLLOWING RESTORATION OF AGRICULTURALLY IMPAIRED STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING FUNCTIONAL TRAIT METRICS TO MONITOR SHORT-TERM CHANGES IN MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FOLLOWING RESTORATION OF AGRICULTURALLY IMPAIRED STREAMS Changes in physical habitat and water quality of freshwater ecosystems as a result of degradation are reflected in the taxonomic and functional trait composition of biological communities. The response of biological communities to perturbation and recovery following management is an important and informative component of biomonitoring. Efforts to monitor restored streams however are rare and often short in duration. Thus, additional metrics documenting improvements shortly after project implementation could serve to improve assessment and inform restoration efforts. Changes in functional composition (feeding or habit organization) of insect communities may occur over shorter time scales than conventional metrics and may serve to more immediately inform projected success of restoration efforts. This study details the results from a field survey of three agricultural streams in central Pennsylvania one year prior and three-four years after undergoing restoration. We compared taxonomic and functional trait diversity between sites along the same stream as well as between streams of restored, unmanaged, and near pristine condition. As biotic indices reflective of the invertebrate community have shown little improvement, our goal is to investigate changes in functional trait diversity that may provide insight about biological responses to restoration.

Catherine Bille (Primary Presenter/Author), Bucknell University, katerose.mcfadden@gmail.com;


Matthew McTammany (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bucknell University, mmctamma@bucknell.edu;


Jonathan Niles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, niles@susqu.edu;


Michael Bilger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, mdbilger@verizon.net;


Matthew Wilson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Susquehanna University, mjw029@bucknell.edu;


101 - COMPARISONS AND ANALYSES OF DIFFERENT SAMPLING TYPES FOR REGULATORY PROTOCOLS IN MULTIPLE WESTERN STATES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

COMPARISONS AND ANALYSES OF DIFFERENT SAMPLING TYPES FOR REGULATORY PROTOCOLS IN MULTIPLE WESTERN STATES Protocols utilized to evaluate the health of macroinvertebrate populations vary from state to state, with different sampling, analysis, and assessment methods, as well as different regulatory outcomes. While sampling methods vary in terms of the targeted habitat, number of samples collected, and sorting protocols, several states utilize some form of a multi-metric index to report results and determine attainment or impairment of aquatic life. While the overall composition of the multi-metric indices vary among states and ecoregions, some similar metrics are incorporated into these multimetric indices. We utilized these specific metrics that are common to one or more state protocol to discuss the potential effects of differing sampling methods on variability in metric values among replicates, seasons, or years in metric scores. In addition, if our results suggest that some methods result in more substantial variability than others even when natural factors are accounted for when possible, we will discuss how this could affect regulatory outcomes.

Jennifer Shanteau (Primary Presenter/Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jshanteau@geiconsultants.com;


Jeniffer Lynch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., jlynch@geiconsultants.com;


Jamie Carmon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants Inc, jcarmon@geiconsultants.com;


Kimberly Gerlock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GEI Consultants, Inc., kgerlock@geiconsultants.com;


102 - EXPANDING THE GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE OF THE CANADIAN AQUATIC BIOMONITORING NETWORK

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EXPANDING THE GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE OF THE CANADIAN AQUATIC BIOMONITORING NETWORK The Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) is a national program led by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) that promotes inter-agency collaboration and data sharing through a common database to achieve consistent and comparable collection and reporting on freshwater aquatic ecosystem conditions. Over 10,000 sites have been sampled across Canada with the majority on the coasts and in Ontario. Canada’s north, the three territories and regions of the provinces with permafrost, covers nearly two thirds of Canada’s landmass. Monitoring in the north provides critical information about the effects of climate change. ECCC faces major challenges in expanding CABIN in the north as remote areas are difficult to access and much of Canada’s north is covered by wetland habitat. To address these challenges, ECCC is developing a Northern Biomonitoring Plan that will focus on engaging Indigenous communities, promoting community-based monitoring and offering alternative training delivery formats that will better meet community needs. In spring 2019, ECCC will also launch the training program for a new standardized wetland sampling protocol to address the monitoring needs for wetland habitats in the north as well as the Prairie Provinces.

Cari-Lyn Epp (Primary Presenter/Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, cari-lyn.epp@canada.ca;


103 - HIGH-THROUGHPUT ENVIRONMENTAL DNA ANALYSIS INFORMS BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF AN URBAN STREAM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

HIGH-THROUGHPUT ENVIRONMENTAL DNA ANALYSIS INFORMS BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF AN URBAN STREAM There is growing interest in the use of DNA barcoding and metabarcoding approaches to aid biological assessments and monitoring of waterbodies. While biodiversity measured by morphology and by DNA often has been found correlated, few studies have compared DNA data to established measures of biological condition, such as indices based on pollution tolerant and sensitive metrics used by many bioassessment programs. We incorporated environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding of seston into a watershed-scale bioassessment of an urban stream to examine the extent to which DNA patterns correlated with multimetric indices and ecological impairment status designations. Seston eDNA revealed a wide diversity of eukaryotic taxa but was dominated by diatoms (36%). Correlations among seston DNA diversity and multimetric indices for fish and macroinvertebrates were generally weak, possibly because Metazoa were not highly represented in our DNA dataset. Nonetheless, sites could be differentiated based on the biological condition status, with more impaired sites having lower seston eDNA diversity as measured by the Shannon index, but higher taxonomic richness. These results suggest that even a simple seston DNA filtering protocol can provide biodiversity information of value to stream bioassessment programs.

Mark Bagley (Primary Presenter/Author), US Environmental Protection Agency, bagley.mark@epa.gov;


Erik Pilgrim (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USEPA/NERL/SED, Cincinnati, OH, pilgrim.erik@epa.gov;


Martin Knapp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Midwest Biodiversity Institute, mknapp@mwbinst.com;


Chris Yoder (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Midwest Biodiversity Institute, cyoder@mwbinst.com;


Jorge Santo Domingo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Environmental Protection Agency, santodomingo.jorge@epa.gov;


Aabir Banerji (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. EPA, banerji.aabir@epa.gov;


104 - HOW DO FINE SEDIMENTS AND HANGMAN CREEK DISCHARGE AFFECT BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN THE SPOKANE RIVER?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

HOW DO FINE SEDIMENTS AND HANGMAN CREEK DISCHARGE AFFECT BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN THE SPOKANE RIVER? One of the most common causes of stream degradation globally is fine sediment deposition. Hangman Creek is a major tributary and source of fine sediment to the Spokane River (Washington, USA). The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of fine sediments on Spokane River macroinvertebrates. We sampled macroinvertebrate communities from 3 substrate types with different levels of fine sediment (sand, 0 - 25% embedded cobbles, and 75-100 % embedded cobbles) in the Spokane River upstream and downstream of its confluence with Hangman Creek and in Hangman Creek itself. The most three common invertebrates in the Spokane River were Chironomidae, Baetis, and Hydropsyche. To determine effects of sediment and Hangman Creek discharge on macroinvertebrate metrics we performed two-way ANOVAs with site and substrate type as independent variables. In early summer 2018, substrate significantly affected density of macroinvertebrates; family richness for Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT); proportion EPT; proportion Clinger functional group; and the proportion of the dominant taxon. Family richness for all taxa and Shannon-Weaver diversity were not affected. This work will contribute to our understanding of the biotic effects of these sediments.

Anwar Bushnaq (Primary Presenter/Author), Eastern Washington University , anwar.sb1992@gmail.com;


105 - STREAM ALGAL BIOMASS ACROSS A GRADIENT OF AGRICULTURE AND UNCONVENTIONAL NATURAL GAS WELLS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

STREAM ALGAL BIOMASS ACROSS A GRADIENT OF AGRICULTURE AND UNCONVENTIONAL NATURAL GAS WELLS Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development has exploded globally, but little is known about how this activity might impact freshwater resources. Data collection to inform regulation for protection has lagged behind UOG infrastructure development. We used a published multimetric index to predict a stream’s vulnerability to UOG development from existing and readily available landscape data. Vulnerability was represented as the product of two multi-variable metrics: sensitivity (background physical properties) and exposure (anthropogenic stresses). Anthropogenic impacts often increase stream algal biomass, which can reduce dissolved oxygen, and cause shifts away from sensitive species. We used algal community and biomass patterns to test the effectiveness of this index. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare slopes of the algal response variable across an exposure gradient dominated by either agriculture or UOG activity in sensitive or less sensitive watersheds. We hypothesized sites with greater sensitivity scores will have similar algal biomass and greater proportions of sensitive algal taxa than sites with lower sensitivity scores. Forty stream reaches in the Fayetteville shale were sampled in May and June of 2015. The results indicated no relationship between algal metrics and vulnerability or its metrics.

Lucy Baker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas, lucybaker540@gmail.com;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, sallye@vt.edu;


Michelle Evans-White (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


Zachary Tipton (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, ztipton@uark.edu;


106 - ALPHA AND BETA DIVERSITY OF ZOOPLANKTON ASSOCIATED TO TROPICAL LOG JAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ALPHA AND BETA DIVERSITY OF ZOOPLANKTON ASSOCIATED TO TROPICAL LOG JAMS Log jams retain organic matter and increase habitat heterogeneity for different organisms that inhabit freshwater ecosystems. However, information on how log jams improve zooplankton diversity even when the log jam is located between the transition of the river and a reservoir is very limited. The log jam we study is located between the transition of the La Miel river and the Amani reservoir in Colombia. Sampling was carried out in February, October and December 2016, thus covering dry and wet seasons. When we were evaluating the three diversities (0D, 1D, 2D) among sites, we found the highest richness in the middle of the log jam. While among the sampling seasons we found that the richness showed highest richness in October and December (wet season) compared to February (dry season). On the other hand, spatial turnover and nesting contributed with similar percentage to beta diversity. This work demonstrate that the presence of log jams between the transition of a river and a reservoir is supporting the presence of higher diversity of zooplankton by increasing heterogeneity and food availability. Especially when zooplankton is composed of groups that differ in their niche requirements.

Yesica Velasques-Duque (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Biology, Caldas University, Cl. 65 # 26-10, Manizales, Colombia., yesi.duquevela@gmail.com;


Silvia Villabona-González (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Natural Sciences, Catholic University of Orient. Cr. 46-40 B-50, Rionegro, Colombia. , svillabona@uco.edu.co;


Hilda Palacio (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Facultad de Ciencias y Biotecnología, Programa de Biología y Ecología. Universidad CES. Cl. 10a #22 – 04, Medellín, Colombia; hpalacio@ces.edu.co, hpalacio@ces.edu.co;


107 - AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATES FROM HIDROLOGICAL SYSTEM IN A NATURAL PROTECTED AREA IN CENTRAL MEXICO

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATES FROM HIDROLOGICAL SYSTEM IN A NATURAL PROTECTED AREA IN CENTRAL MEXICO In Natural Protected Areas (NPA) in Mexico, flora and vertebrates are well studied; however, aquatic macroinvertebrates (AM) are scarcely known, especially in Sierra Gorda (Central México). The aim of this study was to describe the AM diversity and their relationship with water quality along five streams in two periods (dry and rainy). AM were collected using multi-habitat method (kick net 500 µm), water samples and physicochemical characteristics were taken. Samples were processed to obtain 23 variables. Invertebrate’s diversity indexes and cumulative curves were assessed. An ANOSIM analysis were tested from a matrix (environmental and AM taxa). Analysis were performed with R software. A total of 93 families from 103 possible (Chao 1) were identified along the streams studied. Families, Chironomidae, Baetidae and Elmidae were the most abundant. Sites from streams Extoraz and Santa Maria showed unique assemblages of AM. According with water characteristics and AM diversity, Ayutla stream showed statistical differences with other studied streams (ANOSIM, P= 0.001). Sierra Gorda possess a great diversity of AM, Ayutla stream has the highest diversity, representing a Sanctuary for diversity, meanwhile other studied streams were considered a diversity buffer in the NPA.

Axel Eduardo Rico Sánchez (Primary Presenter/Author), Instituto Politécnico Nacional, axelskx@gmail.com;


Alexis Joseph Rodríguez Romero (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Instituto Politecnico Nacional, josephalexis-08@hotmail.com;


Eugenia López López (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Instituto Politecnico Nacional, eugenia_lopez@hotmail.com;


Jacinto Elías Sedeño Días (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Instituto Politecnico Nacional, biota67@hotmail.com;


108 - ASSESSING AMPHIBIANS IN A CHANGING WORLD: COMPARING ENVIRONMENTAL VARIATION OF ARTIFICIAL PONDS TO NATURAL WETLANDS IN A WARMING EXPERIMENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING AMPHIBIANS IN A CHANGING WORLD: COMPARING ENVIRONMENTAL VARIATION OF ARTIFICIAL PONDS TO NATURAL WETLANDS IN A WARMING EXPERIMENT The world is experiencing anthropogenically driven shifts in climate that are putting multiple pressures on many ecosystems, yet uncertainty regarding how species will respond to multiple climate pressures represents a significant knowledge gap. Experiments are often used to assess how species to respond to these pressures. However, the degree to which experimental ponds reflect environmental variation of wetlands is unclear. The primary goal of this study is to examine the developmental responses of amphibian larvae to warming temperatures and shorter hydroperiods using an experimental approach. We will use mesocosms to evaluate survivorship, body size, and rate of larval development of two anuran species. As an extension of this experiment, we will measure the differences and similarities between the mesocosm and the stream where the amphibian eggs were taken. Specifically, we will measure pH, water temperature, hydroperiod and dissolved oxygen at fixed intervals and compare them between experimental ponds and natural wetlands. This research will provide fundamental and applied insight into how experiments contribute to our understanding of amphibians in a changing world.

Meryl Mims (), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


Alexis Jackson (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, alexisrj@vt.edu;


Elizabeth Shadle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ejshadle@vt.edu;


Meryl Mims (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


110 - PREDICTING CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON NEOTROPICAL STREAM PHYSICOCHEMISTRY: COMPARING IMPACTS OF PRECIPITATION REGIME AND TEMPERATURE VIA WAVELET ANALYSIS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PREDICTING CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON NEOTROPICAL STREAM PHYSICOCHEMISTRY: COMPARING IMPACTS OF PRECIPITATION REGIME AND TEMPERATURE VIA WAVELET ANALYSIS Increasing temperature and shifting precipitation regimes due to climate change are likely to impact stream physicochemistry. However, comparisons of predicted impacts of temperature vs. precipitation (especially from the tropics) are lacking. We used longterm datasets from La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, to examine how precipitation vs. air temperature impact the physicochemistry of streams receiving two distinct groundwater types (low-solute, poorly-buffered local groundwater vs. high-solute, well-buffered regional groundwater). Stream and air temperatures were positively correlated, but neither increased significantly during our study period (1997-2013). Water temperature was lower, more variable, and more strongly related to air temperature in the local-groundwater stream than in the regional-groundwater stream. We used wavelet analysis to show that precipitation drove pH declines in both stream types and that air temperature determined stream temperature but did not otherwise strongly affect physicochemistry. Our data and previous studies suggest that precipitation may have a stronger impact than temperature on stream biota, principally because precipitation drives pH declines that may override effects of more slowly changing temperatures. Our results also indicate that streams receiving regional groundwater are naturally buffered against shifts in temperature.

Carissa Ganong (Primary Presenter/Author), Missouri Western State University, carissa.ganong@gmail.com;


Thomas Barnum (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USAID, tbarnum32@gmail.com;


John Duff (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Geological Survey, duff_john@comcast.net;


Catherine Pringle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


111 - THERMAL ADAPTATION OF DRAGONFLY POPULATIONS MEDIATES TOP-DOWN EFFECT ON STREAM ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES IN A GLOBAL WARMING CONTEXT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THERMAL ADAPTATION OF DRAGONFLY POPULATIONS MEDIATES TOP-DOWN EFFECT ON STREAM ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES IN A GLOBAL WARMING CONTEXT Predicting the consequences of climate warming on ecosystem processes is of major concern. To this regard, the response of dragonfly larvae as apex predators of litter detritivores may be crucial in altering the rate of organic carbon fluxes in streams. We hypothesised (1) such populations to be thermally adapted along a latitudinal gradient, which (2) mediates warming effects on prey abundances, leaf litter decomposition, periphyton biomass and CO2 concentrations. We tested if the respiration rate of larvae from Portugal, southwestern and northeastern France responded to the temperature gradient, i.e. with the three populations expressing different thermal performance curves for whole-organismal metabolic rate. Then, we tested if these populations subjected to three levels of experimental warming within a tri-trophic food chain induced different top-down effects on preys and ecosystem processes. Our results supported both hypotheses. We pointed out the occurrence of cold- and warm-adapted populations together with a warming effect on preys’ density and ecosystem processes being mediated by the origin of populations. In conclusion, considering population-specific rather than species-specific phenotypic traits appears essential when the objective is to quantify the impacts of organisms on ecosystems in a global warming context.

Thibaut Rota (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, thibaut.rota@univ-tlse3.fr;


Antoine Lecerf (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, antoine.lecerf@univ-tlse3.fr;


Cristina Canhoto (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Centre for Functional Ecology, University of Coimbra, Portugal, ccanhoto@ci.uc.pt;


François Guérold (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, France, francois.guerold@univ-lorraine.fr;


Eric Chauvet (Primary Presenter/Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, eric.chauvet@univ-tlse3.fr;


112 - MAKING PUBLICALLY AVAILABLE DATA ACCESSIBLE FOR STUDENTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MAKING PUBLICALLY AVAILABLE DATA ACCESSIBLE FOR STUDENTS The StreamPULSE project has made continuous oxygen measurements and associated metabolism estimates available to scientists and the public. Many ecosystem processes are more difficult for non-scientists to understand than more familiar organismal behaviors and interactions. Thus, available does not necessarily mean accessible. We developed an educational component to complement the data. We endeavored to interactively explain background knowledge so people are comfortable exploring data from different sites and hypothesizing why oxygen varies and what that means for the stream. Wet Beaver Creek in Arizona, a core StreamPULSE site, is located beside a boarding high school. To increase understanding and use of the data, we visited three classes (chemistry, ecology, and biology) and explained aspects of the project to students in relation to things they were learning. Students learned about stream mixing and discharge by performing dilution gauging; about metabolism by measuring oxygen in microhabitats and incubation experiments; about water movement and watersheds by building a 3D ecosystem web (complementing their circulatory system lesson). Increased familiarity with StreamPULSE data allows students to interact with real data relevant to their lives (right outside) in order to better understand and apply classroom material.

Sophia Bonjour (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Illinois University , sbonjour29@gmail.com;


Nancy Grimm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, nbgrimm@asu.edu;


113 - WESTERN STATES COORDINATED RESEARCH EFFORT: INCREASING COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION AMONG AQUATIC SCIENTISTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

WESTERN STATES COORDINATED RESEARCH EFFORT: INCREASING COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION AMONG AQUATIC SCIENTISTS Communication of ideas, findings, and raw data can be accomplished almost instantly by most researchers on Earth. A major constraint faced by those who could potentially collaborate, is a disconnection among scientists whose work is not always published. Examples of this work include regional reports, SOPs, small scale trials, and historical data sets that are filed as internal agency documents. A central repository for this gray literature could help to provide answers to many questions and reduce costly duplication of research efforts. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and the American Fisheries Society are leading an effort to create such a database. The Western States Coordinated Research Effort will begin by producing a searchable list of ongoing and upcoming aquatic research projects. This list will be populated by representatives of each participating state. The initial effort will be followed by a website with links to a full grey literature database, discussion forums, and featured projects. We would like to encourage participation in this effort by collaborating with academic laboratories, federal and state agencies, Tribal organizations, non-profit groups, and consulting firms across North America.

Robert Shields (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, rshields@utah.gov;


114 - DOES ROAD-CULVERT CONSTRUCTION IN SUMMER PROTECT LOCAL WATER QUALITY IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE MUSKINGHAM RIVER BASIN?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DOES ROAD-CULVERT CONSTRUCTION IN SUMMER PROTECT LOCAL WATER QUALITY IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE MUSKINGHAM RIVER BASIN? Advanced notice of a road-culvert replacement project prompted a bioassessment and water-quality study of a 3rd-order stream in rural north-central Ohio. Since 2009, surveys by various undergraduate classes immediately downstream of the Canfield Preserve found good-to-excellent stream quality (CIV=20-30) using the Ohio Stream Quality Monitoring assessment (ohiodnr.gov). In 2018, we measured water-quality parameters (e.g. turbidity, total nitrate, phosphorus) and sampled benthic macroinvertebrates (BMI) from June 1 to October 30. The culvert tributary was dry throughout construction. A second tributary remained wet. Periods of heavier precipitation in June and September were a major driver of short-term changes in water-quality. Tributary nutrient concentrations differed consistently from those in the larger stream. BMI above and below the culvert tributary, before and after construction, showed no difference in species richness or quality. The larger bioassessment surveys done by classes and volunteers in the reach below the main study area showed no change post-construction. Temporal and spatial differences in nutrient concentrations may be due to basin size and local land-use. Summer scheduling of culvert construction may be fortunate for this and other small Ohio streams as it seems to minimize impacts on downstream water-quality.

Patricia A. Saunders (Primary Presenter/Author), Ashland University, psaunder@ashland.edu;


Jenna Dolhi Binder (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ashland University, jbinder@ashland.edu;


Alexis Flagg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ashland University, aflagg@ashland.edu;


Shelby Reutter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ashland University, sreutte3@ashland.edu;


115 - HOW DOES ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING AT NIGHT INFLUENCE STREAM ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

HOW DOES ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING AT NIGHT INFLUENCE STREAM ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM? Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a pervasive environmental stressor at a global scale. Current research suggests that ALAN may impair individuals and populations, but little research to date addresses effects of ALAN on stream ecosystem functioning. We examine impacts of ALAN on stream metabolism under different regimes of light intensity and spectra, with goals of: (1) observationally assessing changes in measures of stream metabolism over 18 months in streams exposed to long-term street-lighting, (2) continuing assessments for 6 months after experimental street-light removal, and (3) experimentally identifying mechanisms underlying ecosystem respiration changes (lab, field, and mesocosm experiments). Early data suggest that benthic primary productivity and P:R ratios may exhibit non-linear associations with light intensity, as indicated by both lab studies of diatom growth under ALAN and field studies showing decreased contribution of aquatically-derived energy to aquatic and riparian invertebrate consumers at intermediate light levels. We anticipate a reduction in leaf litter decomposition rates via topdown controls under experimental lighting and a time lag in metabolic recovery of streams after light removal. Understanding consequences of ALAN for key ecosystem processes will be critical to developing integrative stream management plans.

Rebecca C. Novello (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, novello.10@buckeyemail.osu.edu;


S. Mažeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


116 - DEVELOPING A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR RECONSTRUCTING HISTORIC LAKE TROPHIC STATES USING CALCIUM CARBONATE CO-PRECIPITATION WITH PHOSPHORUS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DEVELOPING A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR RECONSTRUCTING HISTORIC LAKE TROPHIC STATES USING CALCIUM CARBONATE CO-PRECIPITATION WITH PHOSPHORUS Anthropogenic phosphorus pollution is the leading cause of the eutrophication and degradation of water bodies. Managing these systems requires an accurate understanding of historical conditions. However, the vertical mobility of phosphorus (P) in lake sediments has prevented accurate determinations of historical loading. Because P has a high affinity for Ca, and will co-precipitate with CaCO3 in lake systems, we hypothesize the CaCO3-P fraction of sediments can accurately reconstruct historical ambient water column concentrations. We precipitated CaCO3 in a range of P solutions (0, 5, 25, 50, 100, 250 ?g/L) and found the precipitates had P concentrations that closely match the solution from which they formed (R^2=0.9959, P=<0.001). Our research now focuses on P inclusions in individual grains, employing SEM microscopy and microprobe analyses to develop a way to quantify CaCO3-P concentrations.We anticipate developing a calibration relating P concentrations in CaCO3 to P concentrations in the solution from which the grains precipitate. Our results will inform a new approach to measuring trophic history of alkaline, calcareous lakes. Specifically, this method may inform debates regarding whether Utah Lake was eutrophic prior to large-scale development within the watershed.

Janice Brahney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, jbrahney@gmail.com;


Mark Devey (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, mdev.mrd@gmail.com;


117 - WATER QUALITY IN NORTH AMERICAN LAKES: PARTITIONING MACRO- AND MICRO-SCALE ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES USING NON-STATIONARY SPATIAL MODELS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

WATER QUALITY IN NORTH AMERICAN LAKES: PARTITIONING MACRO- AND MICRO-SCALE ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES USING NON-STATIONARY SPATIAL MODELS Freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to anthropogenic environmental changes that occur at broad spatial extents, leading to widespread nutrient pollution and poor water quality. Recent studies suggest that drivers of water quality vary across individual lakes and regions, but elucidating the multiple mechanisms behind those differences remains challenging. Employing new statistical methods, such as non-stationary models, can tell us whether a covariate (e.g., land use, climate) is associated with macro-scale ecological patterns through its importance in the mean function, with micro-scale patterns through its importance in the covariance function, or with both macro- and micro-scale patterns. We estimated non-stationary models using HMC in Stan for water quality data for thousands of lakes in the LAGOS-NE database. Our results show that precipitation, agriculture, and lake depth explained broad-scale variation in mean water clarity, and we found evidence of anisotropy and a non-stationary spatial variance: spatial SD increased by a factor of 1.39 per SD increase in agriculture in the watershed. Overall, these results suggest that both macro- and micro-scale drivers are important for understanding and managing eutrophication.

Sarah Collins (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wyoming, sarah.collins@uwyo.edu;


Pavel Chernyavskiy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wyoming, pchernya@uwyo.edu ;


Charlotte Narr (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, charlottenarr@trentu.ca;


Marie-Agnes Tellier (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wyoming, mtellier@uwyo.edu;


118 - DOES METHANE CONTRIBUTE SIGNIFICANT CARBON TO GREAT PLAINS RIVER FOOD WEBS? STABLE ISOTOPE EVIDENCE AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DOES METHANE CONTRIBUTE SIGNIFICANT CARBON TO GREAT PLAINS RIVER FOOD WEBS? STABLE ISOTOPE EVIDENCE AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS Methane concentrations are frequently supersaturating in lotic waters, a fact somewhat surprising considering that running waters are often well oxygenated. Methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOBs) convert this methane into carbon that is consumable to higher trophic levels, such as invertebrates. How much of the food web trophic base is fueled by this methane-derived carbon (MDC), and what factors might determine contributions of MDC, if any? We address these questions in 14 sites in two northern Great Plains rivers (Little Missouri, Niobrara) using stable isotope signatures (del-13C) of basal resources and invertebrate consumers. Because methane typically has a distinctively low del-13C (compared to stream resources) and is further heavily fractionated by MOB use, consumers with high MDC have suspiciously low del-13C. We used simple mixing models to estimate the proportion of MDC to multiple invertebrate consumers at each site, analyzed these data in light of several possible predictors (geomorphology, nutrient and organic matter quantity), and suggest future directions that will be key to determining the prevalence and importance of methane in lotic food webs.

Caleb J. Robbins (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Kansas, Caleb_Robbins@ku.edu;


Jackob A. Lutchen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, lutch006@ku.edu;


James H. Thorp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas/Kansas Biological Survey, thorp@ku.edu;


119 - EFFECT OF DIET ON THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOME OF OMNIVOROUS RIVER CATFISH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECT OF DIET ON THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOME OF OMNIVOROUS RIVER CATFISH Understanding the relative importance of the aquatic and terrestrial carbon sources that support lotic food webs is a major research goal in aquatic ecology. While some studies suggest that nutritious algal carbon is preferentially consumed when available, others have found evidence for the assimilation of terrestrial carbon into food webs. Environmental microbial colonization and processing of terrestrial material is critical for the incorporation of this recalcitrant carbon into consumer food webs, but recently, some studies suggest that similar microbial processing can also occur post-ingestion, within the intestinal tracts of high-order consumers. For example, organisms that typically consume large amounts of refractile foods tend to possess longer intestinal tracts to support colonization of cellulose-digesting bacteria. To investigate the effect of diet composition on fish microbiome diversity, I collected omnivorous channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) from the Niobrara River (Nebraska, USA) in September 2018, and characterized gut contents, integrated diets (stable isotope analysis), and intestinal microbiome diversity (16S rRNA sequencing) for each individual. The combined use of these methods will help to provide insight into our understanding of allochthony in lotic food webs, as well as the management of an important aquaculture species.

Emily Arsenault (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Kansas, erarsenault@ku.edu;


James H. Thorp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas/Kansas Biological Survey, thorp@ku.edu;


Mark Pyron (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, mpyron@bsu.edu;


120 - ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOTIC DRIVERS OF FOOD WEB STRUCTURE IN OHIO STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOTIC DRIVERS OF FOOD WEB STRUCTURE IN OHIO STREAMS Food webs are a type of ecological network that provide important information about biotic interactions and energy pathways in ecosystems. The determinants of key characteristics of ecological trophic networks—such as food-chain length and linkage density—are still not well understood. Here, we examine relationships between network structure and physical, chemical, and biotic characteristics of streams draining through multiple land uses (agricultural, urban, forested) in the upper Ohio River Basin. Benthic insects were surveyed, physical features such as habitat availability, sediment, and channel geometry were measured, and nitrogen, phosphorus, nitrate, and orthophosphate concentrations assessed at sites distributed across agricultural, mixed-use, and forested catchments (n = 3). Preliminary evidence suggests that nutrient concentrations and stoichiometric relationships were correlated with network properties such as connectance and linkage density. Species traits such as body size and functional feeding groups were also correlated with connectance and linkage density. We anticipate that results will provide a better understanding of the environmental and biological drivers of aquatic invertebrate network structure in modified landscapes, which can in turn play a significant role in the health and stability of stream ecosystems.

Rebecca Czaja (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, czaja.3@osu.edu;


S. Mažeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


Kay C. Stefanik (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, stefanik.13@osu.edu;


Lauren M. Pintor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, pintor.6@osu.edu;


121 - FOOD RESOURCES FOR BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN TWO GREAT PLAINS RIVERS: TESTING STREAM MORPHOLOGY INFLUENCE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FOOD RESOURCES FOR BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN TWO GREAT PLAINS RIVERS: TESTING STREAM MORPHOLOGY INFLUENCE Carbon sources supporting food webs is a heavily researched area in lotic ecology and one fundamental challenge for ecologists is defining how basic stream attributes influence lotic ecosystems. In particular, how does stream morphology influence food webs in prairie river systems? We tested the influence of basic hydrogeomorphic variables on basal carbon sources for macroinvertebrates in rarely studied prairie rivers of the U.S. Great Plains: the Niobrara and Little Missouri. Invertebrates and potential food sources were collected in September 2018 at 14 sites varying in stream order and hydrogeomorphic patch type (functional process zone, FPZ). Samples were sorted by family into functional feeding groups (FFG), and processed for bulk tissue stable isotope analysis. Bayesian mixing models were used to analyze percent reliance of carbon sources by each taxa at each site, and how reliance differed based on different hydrogeomorphic factors and FFGs.

Jackob Lutchen (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, lutch006@ku.edu;


Caleb J. Robbins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, Caleb_Robbins@ku.edu;


James H. Thorp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas/Kansas Biological Survey, thorp@ku.edu;


122 - REVERBERATING RESPONSES TO TROPHIC CASCADES ACROSS ECOSYSTEMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

REVERBERATING RESPONSES TO TROPHIC CASCADES ACROSS ECOSYSTEMS The loss of apex predators is a worldwide phenomenon, and understanding the extent of direct and indirect effects of these losses or the potential responses to restoration of such predators is a fundamental challenge in ecology. We address this challenge in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) where the reintroduction of gray wolves has been hypothesized to initiate a terrestrial trophic cascade resulting in the patchy regeneration of riparian woody vegetation (RWV). RWV is known to influence stream-riparian linkages through changes in stream autochthonous and allochthonous resources. Moreover, insect emergence can be mediated by stream basal resources and fish predation, which ultimately can influence the abundance of riparian insectivores. We began investigating these potential reverberating responses to a terrestrial trophic cascade in YNP in 2018. At each site, we measured fish populations, stream invertebrates, and riparian spiders. Sites with reduced browsing, where top down control was initiated by wolves, tended to have higher stream invertebrate biomass, higher fish biomass, and higher abundances of riparian spiders. These results indicate that the top down control initiated by wolves may influence insect emergence flux and riparian insectivore responses.

Colden Baxter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, baxtcold@isu.edu;


Dana Warren (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, dana.warren@oregonstate.edu;


William Ripple (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, bill.ripple@oregonstate.edu;


Jeremy Brooks (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, broojer2@isu.edu;


123 - TROPHIC STRUCTURE VARIATIONS OF FISH COMMUNITIES ACROSS PHYSICOCHEMICAL GRADIENTS IN THE SCIOTO RIVER, OHIO

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TROPHIC STRUCTURE VARIATIONS OF FISH COMMUNITIES ACROSS PHYSICOCHEMICAL GRADIENTS IN THE SCIOTO RIVER, OHIO Trophic structure constitutes one of the main attributes of ecological communities. Here, we used stable-isotope analyses (13C and 15N) to characterize variability in trophic structure of fish assemblages at 12 reaches of the 6th-order Scioto River system (Ohio, USA). Trophic position ranged from 2.21 to 4.35 across study reaches, with the highest trophic position (i.e., food-chain length) ranging from 3.66 to 4.35. Across all species, trophic position was not related to mean body size, but a positive correlation emerged for carnivores, indicating they are strongly size-structured. For omnivores, we found a weak negative correlation. Both mean trophic position and the relationship between trophic position and body size varied by physicochemical features such as channel width and nutrient concentrations, suggesting that human activities can strongly alter riverine trophic structure and the functions it mediates.

Carlos Cáceres (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, caceres.30@osu.edu;


S. Mažeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


Adam Kautza (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, adam.kautza@state.ma.us;


125 - EFFECT OF LEAF-LITTER SPECIES ON THE POPULATION AND INDIVIDUAL GROWTH RATES OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS (POTAMOPYRGUS ANTIPODARUM)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECT OF LEAF-LITTER SPECIES ON THE POPULATION AND INDIVIDUAL GROWTH RATES OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS (POTAMOPYRGUS ANTIPODARUM) The composition of forests is changing across the globe due to human activities. Are there consequences for invasive species in streams and rivers? The New Zealand mud snail (NZMS) (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) is an invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes region of North America where populations have existed since at least 1991, with very recent secondary invasions into rivers. Since NZMS are considered herbivore/detritivores, the quality and species of leaf litter they consume could affect growth rates, and their success as invaders. Using laboratory mesocosms we performed two experiments to quantify individual and population growth rates of snails on different leaf-litter species that are common, but changing in abundance due to human activities. Individual growth rates significantly differed among leaf species. Cottonwood and ash had the highest growth rates and grew 0.05mm/day and 0.04mm/day, while snails given maple, oak, and no leaves grew by 0.01mm/day, 0.01mm/day, and 0.005mm/day. Population growth did not significantly differ among leaf species. This research highlights how requirements for growth potentially differ between populations and individuals, and how forest community changes in the Great Lakes region could affect NZMS growth and their subsequent invasion success.

Emily Bovee (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, enbovee@oakland.edu;


Justine Lawson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, lawsonjustine@hotmail.com;


Jeremy Geist (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


126 - EFFECTS OF DIDYMOSPHENIA ON LARVAL CHIRONOMID DIVERISITY AND FEEDING STRUCTURES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECTS OF DIDYMOSPHENIA ON LARVAL CHIRONOMID DIVERISITY AND FEEDING STRUCTURES Didymosphenia geminata (didymo) blooms alter the biotic diversity and distribution of freshwater invertebrates, including the reduction of many mayfly, stonefly and caddisfly taxa and their abundances. However, some macroinvertebrate taxa, including oligochaete worms and non-biting midges (chironomids), are tolerant to didymo and increase in abundance. Interestingly, mainly chironomids of the sub-family Orthocladiinae seem to experience this increase in abundance, possibly aided by their consumption of didymo. These dietary changes can potentially impact larval feeding structures, including the mentum. This study examined 1) the differences in genus level diversity of larval chironomids in streams impacted by didymo, 2) the contributions of didymo frustules (siliceous tests) to their diet, and 3) the impact of dietary changes to the wear of menta. Our preliminary results suggest that only a few taxa comprise the majority of chironomids in impacted streams, and those genera consume didymo frustules. Further, menta wearing was most prevalent in chironomid taxa with didymo frustules in their gut contents. Our results suggest that some didymo tolerant chironomids consume didymo frustules, facilitating the increase in chironomid populations, unlike other insect taxa, despite increased wearing on their feeding structures.

Peter Blum (Primary Presenter/Author), Tennessee Technological University, pwblum42@students.tntech.edu;


Matthew Green (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University , mwgreen@g.clemson.edu;


Shea Tuberty (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, tubertysr@appstate.edu ;


Justin Murdock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tennessee Tech University, jnmurdock@tntech.edu;


127 - FEEDING RATES AND PREY SELECTION OF THE INVASIVE ASIAN CLAM, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, ON MICROPLANKTON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER, USA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FEEDING RATES AND PREY SELECTION OF THE INVASIVE ASIAN CLAM, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, ON MICROPLANKTON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER, USA The Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, was introduced into North America in the 1920s and has expanded its range across the continent and into South America and Europe, yet little is known about its ecology and potential to impact food webs. To evaluate prey selectivity and feeding rates of C. fluminea, we conducted laboratory feeding experiments using water from two distinct Columbia River environments (unimpounded river and reservoir) during July and October 2016. The mean clearance rate on microplankton was 270 (+ 53.6 SE) mL water clam-1 hr-1 and mean ingestion rate was 2.45 (+ 0.83 SE) µg C clam-1 h-1, although rates varied with season and location. In the reservoir in July, clams preferred diatoms and showed an avoidance of dinoflagellates and flagellates; during October in the unimpounded river, clams preferred flagellates while showing a significant avoidance of cyanobacteria. Diatoms were dominant at both sites, and were ingested by clams, however clams ingested cyanobacteria at very low rates. Substantial consumption of microplankton such as diatoms and rejection of cyanobacteria by C. fluminea may provide competitive advantages to cyanobacteria, leading to microplankton community composition shifts and other changes to food webs.

Stephen M. Bollens (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University; 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue; Vancouver, WA 98686-9600, sbollens@wsu.edu ;


Benjamin Bolam (Primary Presenter/Author), Washington State University, benjamin.bolam@wsu.edu;


Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver, WA 98686 USA, rollboll@wsu.edu;


128 - FRESH INVASIONS: POPULATION GROWTH OF A RECENT INVADER, THE NEW ZEALAND MUD-SNAIL, AND THE EFFECTS ON NATIVE COMMUNITIES IN THE AU SABLE RIVER (MICHIGAN, USA)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FRESH INVASIONS: POPULATION GROWTH OF A RECENT INVADER, THE NEW ZEALAND MUD-SNAIL, AND THE EFFECTS ON NATIVE COMMUNITIES IN THE AU SABLE RIVER (MICHIGAN, USA) The New Zealand mud-snail (NZMS) (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), a world-wide invader, is expanding its range throughout North America with recent invasions in rivers of the Laurentian Great Lakes region. However, given the recency of the invasion, population dynamics and impacts to invaded systems are currently unknown. Here we present results from a world-renowned trout stream, and the effects of NZMS on native benthic-community structure and higher trophic consumers. Benthic invertebrate samples were taken every 4 months over a three-year period, and fish diet analysis was conducted annually. We found that NZMS is increasing in abundance, with populations exhibiting linear growth at a mean rate of 25,185 individuals/yr., and some samples showing densities exceeding 100,000 individuals/m2. Mean densities showed a 500-fold increase over the three-year time frame. Dietary analysis of brown trout (Salmo trutta) revealed increased consumption of NZMS, over 2 years, with the mean proportion (+/- SD) of mud-snails in diets rising from 8.99% +/- 13.03 to 28.72% +/-32.91 (P = 0.02). These and forthcoming results show that this new invader may affect native community structure and potentially alter the trophic energy flow of the Au Sable River.

Jeremy Geist (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Mark Luttenton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, luttentm@gvsu.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


129 - IS CARBON DIOXIDE AN EFFECTIVE DETERRENT AGAINST INVASIVE BIGHEAD AND SILVER CARP? AN ASSESSMENT OF BEHAVIOR AND MOVEMENT PATTERNS IN OUTDOOR PONDS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

IS CARBON DIOXIDE AN EFFECTIVE DETERRENT AGAINST INVASIVE BIGHEAD AND SILVER CARP? AN ASSESSMENT OF BEHAVIOR AND MOVEMENT PATTERNS IN OUTDOOR PONDS The invasion of bighead and silver carp threatens the ecology and economies of the Upper Mississippi River and Great Lakes regions. As a result, there is great interest in developing non-physical barriers that restrict carp movement while still allowing for commercial and recreational traffic. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has potential for use as a deterrent, but behavioral responses and movement patterns of carp subjected to CO2 barriers are not well-described. Here, we investigated how CO2 exposure may alter the behavior and movement patterns of bighead and silver carp by analyzing high spatial and temporal resolution telemetry datasets from CO2 trials in experimental ponds. We found CO2 exposure changed carp swimming angles and speeds but had no impact on acceleration. We constructed a Markov-chain model to predict movement in response to CO2 and found carp were more likely to move during CO2 exposure than either before or after exposure. Our results show that both species actively avoid CO2, providing evidence that it is a promising deterrent to the spread of invasive carp in natural ecosystems. In addition, our quantitative approaches for assessing behavioral responses are generalizable to other high-resolution telemetry fisheries datasets.

Collin Mulcahy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), State University of New York at Cobleskill, mulcahc736@cobleskill.edu;


Barbara Bennie (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, bbennie@uwlax.edu;


Douglas Baumann (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, dbaumann@uwlax.edu;


Roger Haro (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), River Studies Center, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, rharo@uwlax.edu;


KathiJo Jankowski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, kjankowski@usgs.gov ;


Molly Van Appledorn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, mvanappledorn@usgs.gov;


Richard Erickson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, rerickson@usgs.gov;


Lauren Borland (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Texas at Austin, lauren.borland@utexas.edu;


130 - LIVING ON THE EDGE: POPULATION DYNAMICS OF ZEBRA MUSSELS IN A TEXAS RESERVOIR

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

LIVING ON THE EDGE: POPULATION DYNAMICS OF ZEBRA MUSSELS IN A TEXAS RESERVOIR Canyon Lake, a reservoir in central Texas, was invaded by zebra mussels in 2016 and represents the most southwestern edge of this species current distribution in North America. The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution, population dynamics and potential limiting factors of zebra mussels in this newly invaded lake with a combination of seasonal dive surveys, monthly field monitoring, and lab experiments between 2017 and 2019. Scuba surveys along transects in different parts of the lake found zebra mussel densities tended to increase with depth and decrease with distance away from the dam. Scuba surveys also detected a massive, lake-wide, die off of adult individuals occurring up to approximately 12m depth in late summer of 2018. Temperature was a major driver of both lake veliger densities and juvenile settlement rates and preliminary results from ongoing field and lab experiments suggest that temperature was also a major driver of survival of settled individuals, whereas dissolved oxygen was not. Continued monitoring of population dynamics of different life stages will help to better understand potential driving factors and future studies should examine the impact of massive die-offs on ecosystem processes.

Josi Robertson (Primary Presenter/Author), Texas State University, jjr131@txstate.edu;


Astrid Schwalb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas State University, schwalb@txstate.edu;


131 - STREAM-RIPARIAN TROPHIC LINKAGE RESPONSE TO A RIPARIAN INVADER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

STREAM-RIPARIAN TROPHIC LINKAGE RESPONSE TO A RIPARIAN INVADER The invasive pest hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae; HWA) is decimating the eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis, a foundational tree species in many Appalachian riparian forests. Ecological trophic networks (i.e., food webs) functionally link streams and their adjacent riparian zones, and HWA has high potential to alter these linkages owing to documented changes in stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities. At 21 forested headwater streams in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, we quantified cross-boundary trophic dynamics in response to HWA-driven hemlock decline. For example, in-stream basal resource biomass was 1.7 (periphyton) and 3.9 (hemlock detritus) times larger at the reference sites. Benthic and emergent insect community differences were explained in part by degree of hemlock decline. Although riparian spiders (Araneidae and Tetragnathidae) showed no shift in trophic position or reliance on aquatically-derived energy (i.e., energetic pathways originating from benthic algae), their del15N isotopic signatures did track those of potential aquatic emergent prey. Taken together, our results imply that large-scale hemlock decline due to HWA is associated with cross-ecosystem functional shifts in both resources and consumers, leading to altered stream-riparian food webs and thus ecosystem function.

S. Mažeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


David W.P. Manning (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, manningd@uga.edu;


Kristen M. Diesburg (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, diesburg.1@osu.edu;


132 - THE INVASIVE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL: AN ANALYSIS OF VELOCITY TOLERANCES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE INVASIVE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL: AN ANALYSIS OF VELOCITY TOLERANCES New Zealand mud snails (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) are an invasive species that has successfully spread across the United States since their introduction in 1987. Recently, in 2016, they invaded the Carmel River, California. Their invasion has been successful due to their rapid reproduction, lack of predators and diffusion due to fish populations; however, they are limited by water chemistry and velocity. Because their tolerances has not been studied, our aim is to determine velocity conditions which prevent the snail from traveling upstream. To investigate this, we constructed a recirculating microcosm that we could manipulate velocity in. We then collected snails from the Carmel River and exposed them to different velocities to determine the maximum velocity they could move upstream against. Our findings indicate that 2:25 snails can withstand flow at 71 cm/s and travel upstream at velocities of up to 85.2 cm/s. We observed little to no snail movement at higher velocities, with detachment ranging from 22.4 cm/s to up to 85 cm/s. Ultimately, our goal is to better understand snail tolerances in hopes to implement a model that would predict the limits of their invasion.

Katharina Zimmermann (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, kzimmermann@csumb.edu;


Kelsey Trammell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, ktrammell@csumb.edu ;


John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


133 - TREATING THE ALASKAN ELODEA INVASION WITH FLURIDONE MAY FURTHER ALTER WATER CHEMISTRY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TREATING THE ALASKAN ELODEA INVASION WITH FLURIDONE MAY FURTHER ALTER WATER CHEMISTRY Elodea canadensis is an invasive submerged plant introduced to Alaska from the continental US and Canada, likely from the aquarium trade. Previous studies found Elodea increases turbidity and sedimentation and releases nutrients as it decomposes. The best option for eradication is currently application of herbicides, as Elodea can reproduce from fragments. The herbicide fluridone increases the senescence of aquatic plants, thereby increasing nutrients and organic matter available to the ponds and driving heterotrophic activity. The USDA Forest Service is trialing fluridone in a study of five ponds in the Copper River Delta in southcentral Alaska. We monitored water and sediment chemistry from May-October 2018 in one pond with no Elodea invasion, three ponds with Elodea, and one pond with Elodea that was treated with fluridone. Preliminary results indicate seasonal fluxes in nutrients are related to vegetation species. The treated pond displayed lower pH and dissolved oxygen, and higher conductivity compared to untreated and uninvaded ponds. Untreated invaded ponds had more sediment AFDM, but no differences in dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, or water-column chlorophyll-a. This ongoing study furthers our understanding of the effects of the Elodea invasion and herbicide treatments.

Natalie Levesque (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Notre Dame, nlevesq1@nd.edu;


Theresa Tanner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, theresatanner@fs.fed.us;


Gary Lamberti (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, glambert@nd.edu;


134 - TROPHIC IMPACTS OF INVASIVE CRAYFISH IN ALABAMA WATERSHEDS HARBORING HIGH NATIVE CRAYFISH DIVERSITY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TROPHIC IMPACTS OF INVASIVE CRAYFISH IN ALABAMA WATERSHEDS HARBORING HIGH NATIVE CRAYFISH DIVERSITY Invasive species are a global threat to biodiversity and ecosystem function. The invasion of non-native crayfish species poses particular problems considering the significant ecological roles played by crayfish in aquatic ecosystems. Crayfish are typically considered generalists, yet the trophic ecology of most species is unknown. Moreover, most crayfish invasion studies have focused on effects of a single invasive taxon on relatively depauperate communities. Alabama currently has four documented invasive crayfish species – Faxonius virilis, Faxonius palmeri palmeri, Faxonius juvenilis, and Procambarus clarkii – that can co-occur with up to 35 native crayfish taxa embedded in species-rich assemblages of other aquatic invertebrates and fishes. We plan to compare trophic positions of the four invasive crayfish species with the native crayfish assemblage in 12 watersheds in north and central Alabama, USA. Sample sites have been chosen based on invasive/native crayfish sympatry/allopatry. Trophic measurements will come from quantitative microscopic analysis of stomach gut contents and stable isotope analysis. Previous studies have shown that invasive crayfish significantly alter food webs, so our study will examine the potential for significant differences in trophic position when found in sympatry vs. allopatry with native crayfish taxa.

Emma Arneson (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, emarneson@crimson.ua.edu;


Jonathan Benstead (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, jbenstead@ua.ed;


Stuart McGregor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Geological Survey of Alabama, smcgregor@gsa.state.al.us ;


135 - A UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP MODEL TO IMPROVE REGIONAL WATER QUALITY IN LAKE MICHIGAN WATERSHEDS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP MODEL TO IMPROVE REGIONAL WATER QUALITY IN LAKE MICHIGAN WATERSHEDS The waters that flow into the Great Lakes cover an extensive, varied landscape, from forested areas to agricultural land, cities, and suburbs. Land uses impact the water quality of local tributaries, ultimately affecting Lake Michigan. In order to assess these impacts, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus and Lakeshore Natural Resource Partnership have established a robust collaboration which facilitates systematic, long-term data collection on water quality, community outreach, and watershed education. This poster presents the details of our collaboration which meets many of the criteria of translational ecology. Student interns, mentored by faculty, are responsible for data collection and analysis, coordination with community volunteers, communication of results to the public, and mentoring of high school students.. As students benefit from community engagement and hands-on research, their work creates opportunities for increased citizen awareness of local watershed issues, and provides data for evidence-supported decision-making. One long-term goal of this project is to establish EPA’s 9-Element Watershed Plans for each watershed. Planning is designed to engage landowners as partners with the local agricultural community. This partnership will also play a role in helping structure an emerging TMDL for Lakeshore region watersheds.

Richard Hein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus, heinr@uwgb.edu;


Rebecca Abler (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus, ablerr@uwgb.edu;


136 - STREAM BIOFILM FUNCTION IMPACTED BY NUTRIENTS, BUT NOT VELOCITY, ASSOCIATED WITH SIMULATED STORM EVENTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

STREAM BIOFILM FUNCTION IMPACTED BY NUTRIENTS, BUT NOT VELOCITY, ASSOCIATED WITH SIMULATED STORM EVENTS Storm events temporarily alter stream physiochemistry, including simultaneous altering nutrient concentrations and velocity. We assessed effects of short-term increases in nutrient and velocity on biofilm function by simulating a storm event in artificial streams. A 31-day experiment was conducted in nine outdoor mesocosms in London, Ontario, Canada. Mesocosms were seeded with local biofilm, then received low velocity (0.06m/s) and low phosphorus concentrations (10µg/L) for 17 days, before being assigned to one of three 48-hour treatment levels (1. increased phosphorus (97.3µg/L); 2. increased velocity (0.20m/s); 3. increased phosphorus (97.3 ug/l) and velocity (0.20 m/s)), each replicated in three mesocosms. Benthic metabolism, soluble reactive phosphorus uptake and algal growth (chlorophyll-a) were measured several times before and after the storm event. Decomposition was estimated by measuring the loss of tensile strength in cotton strips over the 31-day experiment. Preliminary results indicate that by the end of the experiment, metabolism and chlorophyll-a were greater in streams that received increased nutrients, compared to just increased velocity. Understanding from our study will help inform river management strategies needed to cope with the effects of increasing storm event severity under predicted land use and climate change scenarios.

Chris Lucas (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, clucas26@uwo.ca;


Nolan J.T. Pearce (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, npearce7@uwo.ca;


Adam G. Yates (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


137 - GROUNDWATER SEEPAGE AND LAKESHORE PRODUCTIVITY: A CASE STUDY AT ONEIDA LAKE, NY.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

GROUNDWATER SEEPAGE AND LAKESHORE PRODUCTIVITY: A CASE STUDY AT ONEIDA LAKE, NY. Cultural eutrophication is considered one of the most important anthropogenic problems on aquatic ecosystem. Excess nutrient loading into waterbodies, as a result of human activity, is considered one of its major drivers. Groundwater (GW) contribution to nutrient budgets has been generally overlooked compare to surface water, mainly due to difficulties in its quantification. However, in many lakes, groundwater can play a key role in hydrological and biogeochemical processes related to nutrient cycles. In this study, we first identify areas with varied GW fluxes at Oneida Lake and aim to analyze the role of GW dynamic on biogeochemical processes occurring at the sediment-water interphase, with a focus on phosphorus release and availability. We measure GW seepage, oxygen conditions, and nutrients concentrations in the pore and lake water during summer 2018. Preliminary results suggest groundwater seepage as a significant source of phosphorus into the lake. Moreover, preliminary analysis of water chemistry showed a weak negative correlation between Total Phosphorus and Dissolved Oxygen. We expect our results to be a significant contribution to the effort on dealing with nutrient excess runoff to water bodies, and its ecological impact.

Sol Lisboa (Primary Presenter/Author), Cornell University, msl282@cornell.edu;


138 - NITROGEN BY HERBIVORY EXPERIMENT ON LAND ALTERS LITTER CHEMISTRY AND SUBSEQUENT IN-STREAM LITTER DECOMPOSITION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NITROGEN BY HERBIVORY EXPERIMENT ON LAND ALTERS LITTER CHEMISTRY AND SUBSEQUENT IN-STREAM LITTER DECOMPOSITION Terrestrial herbivores can influence the chemistry and timing of leaf litter inputs to both terrestrial and aquatic systems. The concentrations of nutrients available to plants can partially determine their defensive responses to herbivory which can also alter litter chemistry. Together, these two terrestrial factors may alter organic matter processing rates in streams that are reliant on carbon and nutrients from riparian leaf litter. Sitka willow (Salix sitchensis) at Mount St. Helens are heavily infested with the introduced stem-boring weevil (Cryptorhynchus lapathi; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and attacked plants show branch die-back and early litterfall. Using an established factorial experimental garden that manipulated the nitrogen inputs and restricted weevil infection to some plants for over 10 years, we found that nitrogen addition had strong effects on litter chemistry and led to decreasing condensed tannins as defense compounds. In addition, we found that litter mass loss in the stream was significantly influenced by both increasing N-addition and increasing condensed tannins. In the early-succession stream systems of Mount St. Helens, the direct influence of nutrient limitation seems to more strongly influence litter dynamics than indirect effects of a hyper-abundant introduced weevil herbivore.

Jordan Moffett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Evergreen State College, mofjor15@evergreen.edu;


Logan Lancaster (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Evergreen State College, lanlog02@evergreen.edu;


Lauren Walker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lewis and Clark College, laurenwalker@lclark.edu;


Joy Ramstack Hobbs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Evergreen State College, hobbsj@evergreen.edu;


Shannon Claeson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, sclaeson@fs.fed.us;


John Bishop (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University, bishopj@wsu.edu;


Mailea Miller-Pierce (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University, m.miller-pierce@wsu.edu;


Carri LeRoy (Primary Presenter/Author), Evergreen State College, leroyc@evergreen.edu;


139 - A DAMSEL IN DISTRESS: CHARACTERIZNG THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL STRESS ON METABOLITES IN DAMSELFLIES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A DAMSEL IN DISTRESS: CHARACTERIZNG THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL STRESS ON METABOLITES IN DAMSELFLIES Climate change is expected to severely impact freshwater ecosystems through changes to both water temperature and water level. Freshwater invertebrates are sensitive to these and other environmental variables and evidence of these environmental changes may be detectable using the organisms’ metabolome. Here, we explore the potential to use metabolite levels of damselflies (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) to indicate thermal stress in lentic freshwater ecosystems using experiments involving temporal or thermal elements. Early instar damselfly larvae were obtained from a pond in Southeastern Wisconsin and placed in individual microcosms. For temporal characterization, larvae were raised and sacrificed in stages over several weeks. In a second experiment, damselfly larvae were collected and housed similarly, however, heating pads were placed underneath randomly selected microcosms producing a temperature increase of 5±1ºC. Metabolite levels will be assessed via extraction and LC-MS quantitation. We anticipate evidence of increased energy expenditure in adults against larvae. Additionally, thermal stress is expected to increase alternative energy metabolism resulting in observable responses in the target metabolites. Results from these studies could be used to develop approaches for assessing environmental stress in freshwater ecosystems before lethality is observed, which can improve conservation efforts.

Jason Kowalski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Marian University, jmkowalski06@marianuniversity.edu;


Jessica Orlofske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Parkside, orlofske@uwp.edu;


Nicholas Bielski (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - Parkside, bielskin.v@gmail.com;


140 - DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIES-SPECIFIC PRIMERS FOR DETECTION OF CAVE CRAYFISH USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA (EDNA)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIES-SPECIFIC PRIMERS FOR DETECTION OF CAVE CRAYFISH USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA (eDNA) The state of Alabama is a hotspot for crayfish biodiversity, with over ninety-seven species, including eight obligate cave-dwelling species. Seven of these cave species are recognized as being of high or highest conservation concern by the state of Alabama, two of which are of unknown status and possibly extinct. To advocate for and implement enhanced conservation measures, accurate accounts of location-specific presence/absence are necessary. Unfortunately, the nature of caves presents a number of obstacles for the attainment of accurate survey results. Species detection through collection and analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) may be a key part of the solution to this problem. To accomplish this task, seven species-specific and two genus-wide primers are in the process of being developed and verified using polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. These products will allow two environmental DNA sampling methods to be compared based on their ability to facilitate successful detection of crayfish species known to inhabit certain cave systems of Alabama. Additionally, the presence of crayfish in caves with unknown communities may be revealed.

Nathaniel D. Sturm (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama, ndsturm@crimson.ua.edu;


Kevin M. Kocot (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama, kmkocot@ua.edu;


Matthew L. Niemiller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama in Huntsville, matthew.niemiller@uah.edu;


Alexander D. Huryn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama, huryn@ua.edu;


141 - ASSESSING THE PATCH DYNAMICS OF ORGANIC MATTER DECOMPOSITION AND RESPIRATION USING COTTON STRIPS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING THE PATCH DYNAMICS OF ORGANIC MATTER DECOMPOSITION AND RESPIRATION USING COTTON STRIPS Stream ecosystems are complex systems where a range of process rates can be measured at multiple scales. Organic matter decomposition is a spatially variable process, and a patch dynamics perspective may provide an effective method of understanding variability in stream ecosystem function. Using a cotton-strip assay, decomposition and respiration rates were measured in diverse substrate and flow patches within a 100-meter reach of Breakneck Creek in Kent, Ohio. Cotton strips were placed at three depths in each of twelve sites representing silt to gravel substrate size. Strips were removed after 2-4 weeks and tensile strength and respiration rates were measured. Strips in coarse substrate decomposed faster when placed higher in the water column, but strips in patches of fine substrate decomposed at the same rate regardless of water column placement. These results show that differences in organic matter processing in different patches can be explained by substrate size and flow velocity. By understanding these mechanistic relationships between physical conditions and process rates, we gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between smaller scale environments to entire streams and watersheds.

David Costello (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kent State University, dcostel3@kent.edu;


Devan Mathie (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, dmathie20@gmail.com;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


142 - DECOMPOSITION AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COLONIZATION OF RIPARIAN LEAF SPECIES IN THE POMME DE TERRE RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DECOMPOSITION AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COLONIZATION OF RIPARIAN LEAF SPECIES IN THE POMME DE TERRE RIVER We studied the role of riparian plants as habitat and food for macroinvertebrates in the Pomme de Terre River, an agricultural stream in western Minnesota. We characterized riparian tree cover, decomposition of leaves of 4 common riparian species, and the macroinvertebrate community colonizing leaf packs. Leaf packs contained boxelder, cottonwood, buckthorn or cattail leaves. Fresh leaves were air dried prior to placing into individual mesh bags and deploying in the river. Leaf material (1.96 cm2) from each leaf pack was dried and weighed every 3-4 days for 3 weeks. Colonization leaf packs were undisturbed for 21 days. Riparian tree cover varied among counties and ranged from 17-65%. Cottonwood and cattail decomposed more slowly than boxelder and buckthorn leaves, which disintegrated by the end of the experiment. Macroinvertebrate abundance differed significantly among leaf species (ANOVA, p=0.0284), but taxon richness did not. Species with more robust leaves such as cottonwood and cattail provide stable habitat for more macroinvertebrates than delicate leaves such as buckthorn and boxelder make poor habitat. In agricultural streams both native and nonnative riparian species contribute organic matter to the stream.

Lillian Fulton (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota Morris, fulto072@morris.umn.edu;


Jennifer Peterson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota Morris, pete9823@morris.umn.edu;


Tracey Anderson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota Morris, anderstm@morris.umn.edu;


143 - TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF CONSUMPTION, GROWTH, AND RESPIRATION OF LARVAL CHIRONOMIDAE (DIPTERA)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF CONSUMPTION, GROWTH, AND RESPIRATION OF LARVAL CHIRONOMIDAE (DIPTERA) Predicting the effects of climate change on aquatic ecosystems requires an understanding of controls on energy flow through food webs, including the role of temperature in organic carbon processing by heterotrophs. Respiration, consumption, and instantaneous growth rates of consumers are all expected to increase across broad ranges in temperature. However, the relative temperature dependencies of these processes are less certain, hampering predictions related to how organismal energy budgets and the role of consumers in carbon processing (i.e., energetic efficiencies) will respond to higher temperature (T). We are studying the metabolic response of larval Chironomidae (Diptera), dominant processors of organic matter in many freshwater ecosystems, to temperature in Appalachian headwater streams. Gut passage time (GPT), a measure of consumption, is known to be faster with higher temperatures (GPT, min = 336.47*T^0.766). Length- and temperature-specific growth data describe negative and positive correlations with growth, respectively,: g = 0.0051 – 0.068*ln(L) + 0.006*T. Our results will be placed in the context of metabolic theory to understand how temperature scales with and affects aquatic ecosystem function.

Kyle Madoni (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alabama, kjmadoni@crimson.ua.edu;


Jonathan Benstead (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama, jbenstead@ua.edu;


Wyatt Cross (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, wyatt.cross@montana.edu ;


144 - A COMPARISON OF REAERATION RATES OF EIGHT U.S. STREAMS IN DECIDUOUS FORESTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A COMPARISON OF REAERATION RATES OF EIGHT U.S. STREAMS IN DECIDUOUS FORESTS Reaeration (or reaeration rate) refers to a stream’s ability to renew oxygen lost through biological or physical means, and is the primary predictor of a stream’s ability to cleanse itself of added pollutants. As land use changes over time, it becomes increasingly important to determine how much waste a stream can carry before it suffers detrimental effects. It can be difficult to ascertain which factors (physical or biological) play a key role in stream repurification. Physical controls of velocity, temperature, and depth have been recognized as key elements of reaeration rates, expanded reaeration models seek to account for biological contributors but all factors are widely variable based on the particular stream measured. Stream reaeration studies are also typically limited in scope to the local level and can vary significantly in their methodologies, thereby introducing error when compared. This investigation takes a step back with a simple comparison of reaeration studies based solely on land cover classification. Eight wadeable streams in deciduous forests in 6 states (and 6 ecological regions) throughout the U.S. were studied under identical protocols to ascertain if any significance in reaeration rates exists at a categorical level.

Elizabeth Johnston (Primary Presenter/Author), National Ecological Observatory Network, bjohnston@battelleecology.org;


145 - PREDICTING EFFECTS OF WARMING ON SECONDARY PRODUCTION IN STREAM FOOD WEBS WITH FIXED DETRITAL RESOURCE SUPPLY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PREDICTING EFFECTS OF WARMING ON SECONDARY PRODUCTION IN STREAM FOOD WEBS WITH FIXED DETRITAL RESOURCE SUPPLY We currently lack experimental tests or predictions of how food-web production will change in freshwater ecosystems due to increasing temperatures. Assuming constant resource supply, metabolic theory predicts a neutral net effect of warming on animal production (P) due to matched opposing effects on community biomass (B, decrease) and turnover (P:B, increase). Although a recent test in an algal-based stream food web confirmed the predicted neutral effect of warming on P, annual gross primary production increased by ~170%, violating assumptions of fixed resource supply. Ecosystems reliant on external supplies of detritus may respond differently, as warming can accelerate carbon loss. We are investigating the effects of temperature in two detritus-based streams in North Carolina, USA, by quantifying monthly invertebrate B, P, and P:B under ambient temperatures (1-yr) and warming (2-yr, ~4°C) of one stream. Under the assumption of a fixed resource supply and a 4°C temperature increase, B is expected to decrease by ~30% (~2.0 to 1.4 g AFDM/m2) while instantaneous P:B will increase 40%, maintaining P at ~10 g AFDM·m-2·y-1. We will test whether B and P:B actually change and/or whether they are further affected by a reduced resource base.

Phoenix Rogers (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Alabama, parogers@crimson.ua.edu;


Jonathan Benstead (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Alabama, jbenstead@ua.edu;


Amy Rosemond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, rosemond@uga.edu;


146 - SEASONAL AND INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY IN METABOLISM ALONG AN ARIDLAND RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SEASONAL AND INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY IN METABOLISM ALONG AN ARIDLAND RIVER Globally, aridland rivers are poorly studied ecosystems in the field of metabolism (gross primary production – GPP, ecosystem respiration – ER); yet, are the most vulnerable systems regarding changing climate. Aridland rivers are characterized by high turbidity, variable flow and overallocated water resources. Our research is focused on the question: how productive metabolically are aridland rivers? The objectives were to quantify the extent of temporal (seasonal and interannual) and spatial variability in metabolism and to identify physical and biological drivers of metabolism along a 160 km reach of the Rio Grande, a 7th order river in the southwestern U.S. Metabolism was estimated using Stream Metabolizer from five years of semi-continuous water quality data at four sites along the Rio Grande that differed in hydrogeomorphic characteristics (e.g. streambed sediment type). Preliminary results show that metabolism can be estimated in a highly turbid, aridland river with rates of daily GPP and ER comparable to other lowland rivers. Seasonal and interannual rates of GPP and ER differed within and across sites, but not as expected with turbidity. This research better documents patterns of metabolism in an aridland river, susceptible to water quality degradation.

Justin Reale (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), United States Army Corps of Engineers, justin.reale@gmail.com ;


David Van Horn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, vanhorn@unm.edu ;


Rebecca Bixby (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, bbixby@unm.edu;


Laura Crossey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, lcrossey@unm.edu;


Mark Stone (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, stone@unm.edu;


Betsy Summers (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Mexico, shaferbetsy@gmail.com;


147 - CHLOROPHYLL DISTRIBUTION IN LAKE KINNERET: FLUORESCENT LIDAR SENSING

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CHLOROPHYLL DISTRIBUTION IN LAKE KINNERET: FLUORESCENT LIDAR SENSING Measurements of chlorophyll depth distribution in Lake Kinneret (Israel) were carried out using a ship-borne fluorescent Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) operating in the frequency domain of 500-750 nm. Depth resolved remote laser sensing of chlorophyll in the upper 0-5.0 meters were carried out and heterogeneous distribution of this phytopigment was detected. Deep vertical profiles (down to 35 m depth) of chlorophyll were also investigated based on water samples collected with Niskin bottle. The chlorophyll concentrations measured in these samples with the LIDAR displayed vertical distribution of chlorophyll with high concentrations in the well-mixed upper 20-m stratum and low ones in the anoxic hypolimnion. The specific temporal variations of fluorescence spectra for collected algae samples were recorded automatically with LIDAR in an onboard container. Perspectives of a compact fluorescent LIDAR for express remote sensing of algal abundance from various carriers (boats, drones) are discussed.

Boris Katsnelson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Haifa, Israel, bkatsnels@univ.haifa.ac.il;


Ilia Ostrovsky (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Israel Oceanographic & Limnological Research, Kinneret Limnological Laboratory, ostrovsky@ocean.org.il;


Sergey Pershin (Primary Presenter/Author), Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Russia, pershin@kapella.gpi.ru;


Vasily Lednev (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Russia, vas_ist_das@mail.ru;


Michael Grishin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Russia, michail.grishin@phystech.edu;


148 - USING NEW MEASURES OF AQUATIC HABITAT TO ASSESS STREAM RESTORATION OUTCOMES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING NEW MEASURES OF AQUATIC HABITAT TO ASSESS STREAM RESTORATION OUTCOMES Stream restoration has become increasingly synonymous with physical channel modification on local scales, with the assumption that a certain range of local physical conditions will improve physical and ecological function. The projects are often targeted to improve measures of habitat captured in conventional field assessments, which rely on either low-resolution data over broad extents, or high-resolution data over fine scales extended to the sampling reach. Thus, the degree of habitat modification in the restoration process, and associated ecological relevance, may not be fully understood by traditional measures. Advances in drone-based aerial surveying methods allow for continuous, high-resolution measures of channel habitat over broader spatial extents. We compare field and aerial surveys of physical habitat within conventional sampling reaches (~100m), within and upstream/downstream of stream restorations in the Piedmont physiographic province. We look for correspondence in measures of physical aquatic habitat (depth, width, flow, and substrate), indicating what may be consistently captured or missed. Our research will be among the first to explore the ability of low-altitude surveys to capture fluvial landscapes, and bring new perspectives to physical habitat patterns and heterogeneity resulting from the restoration of stream ecosystems.

Matthew Baker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Maryland Baltimore County, mbaker@umbc.edu;


Stefanie Kroll (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, sak345@drexel.edu;


Hayley Oakland (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, oakland1@umbc.edu;


149 - CONFIDENT TAXONOMY: USING BAYESIAN PROBABILITIES TO SUPPORT GENUS AND SPECIES LEVEL IDENTIFICATIONS BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CONFIDENT TAXONOMY: USING BAYESIAN PROBABILITIES TO SUPPORT GENUS AND SPECIES LEVEL IDENTIFICATIONS BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS. The current biodiversity crisis requires innovative and accessible approaches for documenting diverse organisms. Dragonflies are among the target groups monitored to assess aquatic ecosystem health by parataxonomists involved with water quality monitoring programs. These observations could be facilitated by the collection of exuviae, the last exoskeleton of the nymph stage that is shed when the adult emerges. Exuviae are often more difficult to identify than adult dragonflies and the resources used for identification are more limited. We evaluated 26 morphological features to incorporate into a probabilistic key for continuous data. Dragonfly exuviae were collected in late-May through mid-June from 2015-2017 from nine Wisconsin rivers. A set of 320 specimens were used as training data for the probabilistic key. A second set of 100 specimens will be identified by undergraduate students using traditional taxonomic keys as well as the probabilistic key. Identifications will be confirmed by taxonomic experts and the accuracy of both identification methods will be evaluated using contingency tables. Our results and prototype key support the development of alternative identification tools that are accessible to experts and non-experts and include more continuous data.

Nicole Chapman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin Parkside, chapm015@rangers.uwp.edu;


Nora Willkomm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, willk035@umn.edu;


Christopher Tyrrell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Milwaukee Public Museum, tyrrell@mpm.edu;


Jessica Orlofske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Parkside, orlofske@uwp.edu;


150 - EVOLUTION OF SILK BIOSYNTHESIS AND ASSOCIATED BEHAVIOUR IN CADDISFLIES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EVOLUTION OF SILK BIOSYNTHESIS AND ASSOCIATED BEHAVIOUR IN CADDISFLIES Trichoptera exhibit high ecological and species diversity and serve as models for evolution of species and functional diversity. Caddisfly larvae are referred to as underwater architects. Silk secretion and diverse case-making behaviour allows them to exploit a wide variety of ecological niches. We present the draft genome sequence of Plectrocnemia conspersa. This species is of particular ecological interest because of its net-spinning behaviour, aggregation behaviour and its ability to persist in intermittent streams. We compare different de novo hybrid-assembly approaches using both Illumina and Oxford Nanopore reads. The wtdbg2 pipeline performed best concerning genome quality and computing time. The draft assembly comprises 1614 contigs with a cumulative length of 396 Mbp. It exhibits a contig N50 of 868980 and a GC content of 30.1%. The genome contains 94.2% of an Endopterygota core gene collection, indicating an almost complete coverage of the coding fraction. This draft genome will serve as starting point for deep and shallow phylogenomic studies to infer the evolution of silk usage, as well as for comparative genomics of the silk genes and gene expression at deep phylogenetic levels but also among sister taxa with differing silk use.

Jacqueline Heckenhauer (Primary Presenter/Author), LOEWE Centre for Translational Biodiversity Genomics; Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum, Frankfurt, Germany, jacqueline.heckenhauer@senckenberg.de;


Deepak Kumar Gupta (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LOEWE Centre for Translational Biodiversity Genomics (LOEWE-TBG); Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt, Germany, deepak.gupta@senckenberg.de;


Paul Frandsen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., USA, paulbfrandsen@gmail.com;


Stefan Prost (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LOEWE Centre for Translational Biodiversity Genomics (LOEWE-TBG), Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre,Frankfurt, Germany, stefan.prost@senckenberg.de;


Tilman Schell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LOEWE Centre for Translational Biodiversity Genomics (LOEWE-TBG); Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt, Germany, tilman.schell@senckenberg.de;


Julio Schneider (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum, Frankfurt, Germany, julio.schneider@senckenberg.de;


Steffen Pauls (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum, Frankfurt, Germany, steffen.pauls@senckenberg.de;


151 - PHARMACEUTICAL UPTAKE KINETICS IN RAINBOW TROUT FROM EAST CANYON CREEK, AN EFFLUENT-DOMINATED STREAM INFLUENCED BY SNOWMELT IN PARK CITY, UTAH, USA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PHARMACEUTICAL UPTAKE KINETICS IN RAINBOW TROUT FROM EAST CANYON CREEK, AN EFFLUENT-DOMINATED STREAM INFLUENCED BY SNOWMELT IN PARK CITY, UTAH, USA Whether seasonal instream flow dynamics influence uptake of select pharmaceuticals by fish is not well understood, specifically for urban lotic systems in semi-arid regions with flows influenced by snowmelt. We examined uptake of select pharmaceuticals in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) caged upstream and at incremental distances downstream (0.15, 1.4, 13 miles) from a municipal effluent discharge to East Canyon Creek in Park City, Utah, USA during summer and fall of 2018. Fish were sampled over 7-d to define uptake kinetics. Water and fish tissues were analyzed via isotope dilution LC-MSMS. Several pharmaceuticals were consistently detected in water, fish tissue and plasma, including diphenhydramine, carbamazepine, fluoxetine, and norfluoxetine. Pharmaceutical levels in water ranged up to 151 ng/L for carbamazepine, whereas the effluent tracer sucralose was consistently observed at low ug/L levels. During both summer and fall experiments at each of three downstream locations from effluent discharge, rainbow trout rapidly accumulated these pharmaceuticals; tissue levels reached steady state conditions within 24 – 96 hrs. Such observations are consistent with our recent laboratory bioconcentration studies, which collectively indicate inhalational exposure from water governs rapid pharmaceutical accumulation by fish in inland surface waters.

Jaylen Sims (Primary Presenter/Author), Baylor University, jaylen_sims1@baylor.edu;


S. Rebekah Burket (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, bekah_burket@baylor.edu;


Marco Franco (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, marco_franco1@baylor.edu;


Lea Lovin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, lea_lovin1@baylor.edu;


Kendall Scarlett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, kendall_scarlett1@baylor.edu;


Ruud Steenbeek (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, ruud_steenbeek@baylor.edu;


Craig Aschcroft (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Carollo Engineers, cashcroft@carollo.com;


Michael Luers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Snyderville Basin Water Reclamation District, mluers@sbwrd.org;


Ramon Lavado (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, ramon_lavado@baylor.edu;


Bryan Brooks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, bryan_brooks@baylor.edu;


152 - DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AUTOMATED CHANNEL EXTRACTION FROM LIDAR IN CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHEDS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AUTOMATED CHANNEL EXTRACTION FROM LIDAR IN CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHEDS Accurate stream maps are critical for a variety of applications, yet despite high-resolution terrain, objective extraction of accurate hydrography remains challenging. Existing approaches approximate channel–forming processes with thresholds of contributing area or detection methods involving either local curvature or topographic openness, followed by flow tracing. Process-based methods are easily implemented, but typically suffer from substantial error, especially where multiple channel-forming mechanisms operate. Direct detection relies upon quantitative thresholds to identify depressions and reduce omission, but generates substantial commission without subsequent filtering, especially in human-modified landscapes. We present a new method for automated channel extraction based on line-of-sight concepts from computer vision to classify discrete geomorphic features. This approach eliminates the need for topographic thresholds by interpreting surrounding patterns of relative elevation, integrating and analyzing terrain beyond local curvature to detect channel features. Unlike approaches that filter by downslope tracing to reduce commission, our approach maps broader river valleys as interpretive context, employing ancillary information to overcome common routing challenges (e.g., road crossings). We summarize case studies from throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed to compare delineation approaches across different physiographic and land-use contexts that demonstrate the efficiency of our approach.

Matthew Baker (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Maryland Baltimore County, mbaker@umbc.edu;


David Saavedra (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Chesapeake Concervancy, dsaavedra@chesapeakeconservancy.org;


153 - EFFECTS OF PARENT LITHOLOGY ON STREAM-GROUNDWATER EXCHANGE AND ORGANIC MATTER DECOMPOSITION IN HEADWATER STREAMS IN KYUSHU, JAPAN

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECTS OF PARENT LITHOLOGY ON STREAM-GROUNDWATER EXCHANGE AND ORGANIC MATTER DECOMPOSITION IN HEADWATER STREAMS IN KYUSHU, JAPAN Stream-groundwater exchange and organic matter decomposition in shallow streamed were studied in headwater streams flowing on 4 types of lithology; granite, pelitic schist, andesite, and welded tuff. Stream-groundwater exchange was estimated using mass loss from tracer injection. Parent lithology controls the types of substrate, as streams on pelitic schist and andesite had gravel-cobble bed, granite had gravel-sand bed, and welded tuff bedrock. As a result, the exchange rate was highest in streams flowing on pelitic schist, and lowest in streams on welded tuff. We used organic matter decomposition, as an ecological function, to examine the effects of stream-groundwater exchange. The decomposition rate was measured using the standardized cotton-strip assay method in summer of 2017. Similar to the exchange rate, the decomposition rates were highest in the streams on pelitic schist, and lowest in streams on welded tuff. Water temperature, nitrate, and DOC concentration were also measured. The decomposition rate was higher in streams with higher nitrate concentration, and the differences in decomposition rates between channel and streambed sediments became smaller as the stream-groundwater exchange increase. Thus, parent lithology controls stream-groundwater exchange, and consequently influence ecological function, such as decomposition.

Tamao Kasahara (Primary Presenter/Author), Kyusyu University, tamao.kasahara@forest.kyushu-u.ac.jp;


Peng Ruixin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kyushu University, shuisuxin@gmail.com ;


154 - MODELING SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN SEDIMENT BALANCE IN THE SANTA CLARA RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MODELING SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN SEDIMENT BALANCE IN THE SANTA CLARA RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA As river restoration shifts from reach level projects to more holistic, watershed scale efforts, an understanding of the spatial and temporal variation in the balance between sediment supply and transport capacity is crucial, as it creates the physical template which underpins river ecosystems. To understand this variation in sediment balance, we developed a spatially explicit sediment routing and balance model that incorporates the storage of sediment in, and recruitment from floodplains. Simulations highlight how sediment balance varies throughout rivers impacted by natural and anthropogenic disturbance. We ran the model in the Santa Clara River watershed of Southern California, where important riverine habitat is impacted by dams and agricultural land use, using a combination of field and remote sensing data for calibration. Six study reaches undergoing known forms of geomorphic change were compared to model results. We found that simulated sediment balance was correlated with floodplain-channel sediment exchange and resulting morphological change within study reaches. The information provided by the model can contextualize physical and ecological restoration efforts within the basin by predicting how upstream impacts may propagate downstream and influence the rest of the basin.

Andrew Wilcox (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Montana, andrew.wilcox@umontana.edu;


Jordan Gilbert (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, jordan1.gilbert@umontana.edu;


155 - PHYSICAL HABITAT VARIABILITY IN CIBOLO CREEK, TEXAS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PHYSICAL HABITAT VARIABILITY IN CIBOLO CREEK, TEXAS Preservation of the full range of physical habitat conditions is an important goal for conserving aquatic diversity in rapidly developing watersheds, such as those around San Antonio, Texas. As a step toward habitat conservation, I quantified physical habitat conditions over a 4 km section of Cibolo Creek, a relatively unimpacted stream in the San Antonio region. I measured width, depth, velocity, substrate, algal cover, organic matter presence, large wood, and canopy cover during baseflow conditions at three points on each of over 300 cross-stream transects. Riffle, pool, run, cascade, backwater, and side channel habitat units were identified visually during measurements. Backwater and side channel habitats, though sometimes isolated from the main channel, had depth and velocity variation within ranges seen in pools and riffles. Deep (>0.5 m) and fast (>0.5 m/s) habitats were rare, making them important targets for habitat management as upstream development expands. Most habitats had similar depth and velocity, indicating that habitat elements such as substrate, large wood, and algal cover may provide important habitat niches. Future work exploring fish habitat selection would provide additional insight into important habitat types to manage as development expands.

Brian Laub (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Texas at San Antonio, laubbriang@gmail.com;


156 - RELATIVE RAIN AND GROUNDWATER CONTRIBUTIONS TO STREAMFLOW ACROSS TWO FLOW REGIMES IN NORTHERN ARKANSAS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RELATIVE RAIN AND GROUNDWATER CONTRIBUTIONS TO STREAMFLOW ACROSS TWO FLOW REGIMES IN NORTHERN ARKANSAS Stream water sources play a key role in nutrient and water budgets. The relative amounts of precipitation and groundwater that comprise channel flow represent an important difference in the two dominant flow regimes in northern Arkansas, Runoff Flashy and Groundwater Flashy streams. However, groundwater contribution data in hydrologic models were generated using catchment-level density of springs as well as base flow and groundwater recharge indices at 1-kilometer scales. Direct measures of water chemistry of streams, groundwater, and precipitation would better estimate water sources in small headwater systems. We sampled three Groundwater and three Runoff streams from March to October 2018 and used end-member mixing analysis to apportion streamflow sources. While one Runoff stream was consistently precipitation-driven, all other systems exhibited temporal variation in dominant flow sources. Across Groundwater streams, groundwater contributions ranged from 42-44% (5th percentile), 80-82% (50th percentile), and 95-97% (95th percentile) of channel flow. In Runoff streams, mixing analysis revealed runoff contributions to be 33-81% (5th percentile), 79-91% (50th percentile), and 97-100% (95th percentile) of discharge. We compare our results to published flow source predictions and present a percentile-based approach for refining flow regime classifications in northern Arkansas.

Allyn Dodd (Primary Presenter/Author), Lyon College, allyn.dodd@lyon.edu;


Erik Pollock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, epolloc@uark.edu;


Samuel Dias (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, samuelatdias@gmail.com;


Brianna Hillebrand (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, briannahillebrand@gmail.com;


Michelle Evans-White (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


157 - APPLYING ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW ANALYSIS TO UNDERSTAND DRY SEASON HYDROLOGY ON THE CARMEL RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

APPLYING ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW ANALYSIS TO UNDERSTAND DRY SEASON HYDROLOGY ON THE CARMEL RIVER Portions of the Carmel River near Monterey, CA are currently being restored to improve salmonid migration and floodplain connections. The lower portion of the river is currently intermittent in most summers, but it is not clear to what extent this is caused by natural or anthropogenic factors. We informed stakeholders of the hydrology of this system expected under natural conditions during the dry season by applying an environmental flow (e-flow) analysis. This approach helped us identify how the lower Carmel River differed from hydrologically similar reference conditions systems during critical functional flow components (e.g., summer baseflows or spring recession). We found that although winter flows are not different from reference conditions, flow magnitudes during the dry season were lower and there were 125 more zero flow days than observed in similar rivers locally. These results indicate that previous and continuing groundwater pumping may be degrading the ecological health conditions of the river. The e-flow approach provided hydrologic baseline conditions which helped quantify changes in water resource management needed to return streams back to reference condition.

Jessie Doyle (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University - Monterey Bay, jdoyle@csumb.edu;


Arev Markarian (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University - Monterey Bay, amarkarian@csumb.edu;


John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


158 - COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TREATMENT EFFICIENCY OF PPCPS IN WASTEWATER AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PLANT IN NORTHEASTERN OHIO

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TREATMENT EFFICIENCY OF PPCPS IN WASTEWATER AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PLANT IN NORTHEASTERN OHIO Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are one group of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) that can impact water quality and human health. Currently, PPCP monitoring is not mandatory according to state or federal laws, and more often water treatment plants are not directed to remove PPCPs. This study monitored and compared treatment efficiencies of separate drinking water and wastewater treatment plants (DWTP and WWTP) of Northeastern Ohio in removing PPCPs; and also examined if environmental variables have a role in altering PPCP concentrations. Samples were collected from the Sandusky Water Treatment Facility and Kent wastewater plant in the summer of 2018. PPCPs were determined using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Screening for antibiotic-resistant bacteria from source water was conducted using LB agar plates. The concentration of nutrients and environmental variables were measured using standard methods. Chlorophyll-a and nitrate concentrations were comparatively higher at the point of discharge in the Kent WWTP compared to the source water at the DWTP in Sandusky. Future work will involve monitoring PPCP concentrations in DWTPs with different treatment processes to better understand the efficacy of filtration techniques in removing these contaminants from water systems.

Sayoni Dutta (Primary Presenter/Author), Kent State University, sdutta2@kent.edu;


159 - DECONVOLVING HUMAN AND NATURAL CONTROLS ON STREAMFLOW: AN APPROACH THAT LEVERAGES COMPLEMENTARY DATASETS AND MODELS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DECONVOLVING HUMAN AND NATURAL CONTROLS ON STREAMFLOW: AN APPROACH THAT LEVERAGES COMPLEMENTARY DATASETS AND MODELS Contemporary viewpoints on environmental flows call for mimicking natural flow regimes, implicitly assuming human and natural influences on streamflow are separable. However, even in managed systems, natural streamflow controls can persist. We use complementary datasets to deconvolve natural and human influences on streamflow in the Boise River, Idaho. The snowmelt-dominated upper basin is minimally influenced by humans before the river is impounded in a flood control and storage reservoir system. The lower basin is undergoing rapid urbanization but remains dissected by extensive canals and drains from legacies of irrigated agriculture. We quantify hydrologic variability in the Boise River Basin using output from the Probability of Streamflow Permanence (PROSPER) model and USGS gauges along this natural-human gradient. The convolution of attenuated variability downstream of the reservoir system with a responsive urban system creates a signal more closely resembling a natural hydrograph than would otherwise be expected. Results highlight the need for tools that provide more holistic views of the ways human modification can simultaneously attenuate and increase hydrologic variability, and the ways these activities can be managed towards the aim of improving environmental flow regimes.

Alejandro Flores (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Boise State University, lejoflores@boisestate.edu;


Kendra Kaiser (Primary Presenter/Author), Boise State University, kendrakaiser@boisestate.edu;


160 - DEVELOPMENT OF DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS IN SOUTH AFRICA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DEVELOPMENT OF DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS IN SOUTH AFRICA There exists an incorrect notion that non-perennial rivers have low ecological, social and economic significance. There is a dearth of information on the linkages between spatial and temporal variability of non-perennial rivers, the integrity of these ecosystems, and human well-being. As a result, most of these non-perennial river systems are susceptible to anthropogenic influences and therefore require effective management policies and implementation to safeguard them. There are few existing methods on the management of non-perennial rivers in Africa. Most of the methods currently used to manage these river systems may not be appropriate since they were developed assuming perennial river systems. Water resources managers thus have difficulties in enforcing and/or estimating appropriate allocations of water for non-perennial rivers. The current study intends to develop decision-support tools that complement the process of monitoring of non-perennial river systems and enable evaluation of competing flow scenarios and other variables on instream habitat. The ongoing study has adopted a systems approach to the development of the understanding of the functioning of elements of non-perennial river systems, the nature of linkages between these elements, and how human modifications of river flows affect these systems.

James Machingura (Primary Presenter/Author), University of the Western Cape, 3879081@myuwc.ac.za;


162 - MACRO- INVERTEBRATES STATUS OF OLUWA RIVER IN ONDO STATE, SOUTHWEST, NIGERIA.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MACRO- INVERTEBRATES STATUS OF OLUWA RIVER IN ONDO STATE, SOUTHWEST, NIGERIA. MACRO- INVERTEBRATES STATUS OF OLUWA RIVER IN ONDO STATE, SOUTHWEST, NIGERIA. The macro-invertebrate fauna of Oluwa River, Ilaje Local Government Area,Ondo State, Nigeria were investigated for eighteen months (June, 2014 – November,2015) covering both the rainy and dry seasons. The major objective of the study was to provide baseline information on aspects of the biology (taxonomic composition, occurrence, distribution and abundance) of the benthic macro-invertebrates. The benthic macro-invertebrates made up of seventeen species belonging to three phyla; Arthropoda, Annelida and Mollusca. They consisted of five classes: Crustacea, Gastropoda, Insecta, Oligochaetae and Polychaetae Altogether a total abundance of 2,264 individual macro-invertebrates species were collected from the bottom sediment. The gastropoda were the most abundant and constituted 50% of the total benthic macro-invertebrates organisms encountered in Oluwa River. Pachymelanin aurita had the highest percentage (12.9%). The least amongst this group was Lanistes varicus (5.1%). Polychaetae accounted for 27% of the total benthic macro-invertebrates organisms in Oluwa River. In conclusion, on the basis of benthic macro-invertebrate taxa composition and abundance, Oluwa River can be inferred to be rich in fauna composition and therefore fairly polluted. Keywords: Benthic macro invertebrates, abundance, Oluwa River, Ondo State

Francis Olaniyan (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Ibadan,Oyo state,Nigeria, olaniyan4real_06@yahoo.com;


Alex Ugwumba (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), university of Ibadan, alexugwumba@yahoo.com;


163 - A RAPID FIELD ASSESSMENT METHOD TO IDENTIFY PERENNIAL, INTERMITTENT AND EPHEMERAL STREAMS OF THE ARID SOUTHWEST

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A RAPID FIELD ASSESSMENT METHOD TO IDENTIFY PERENNIAL, INTERMITTENT AND EPHEMERAL STREAMS OF THE ARID SOUTHWEST Streamflow duration (FD) must be characterized to inform watershed management decisions and implement water policy. Models that predict stream discharge have informed databases that designate FD across the United States. However, validation of FD predictions remains difficult without standardized field protocols to determine FD. Our goal was to inform development of a rapid field assessment method that could identify streams as perennial, intermittent or ephemeral in the arid southwest. We visited 36 streams with FD characterized by local experts and USGS gages in New Mexico, Arizona and California. Assessments were conducted with two protocols developed in the pacific northwest (PNW) and New Mexico (NM) which produced the same designation at 58% of sites. The PNW method correctly determined FD at 81% of sites versus 67% by the NM method and was less likely to designate a site as perennial (17%), than the NM method (42%). FD was underestimated at eutrophic, perennial sites that lacked ephemeroptera and was overestimated at ephemeral sites with hydrophytes and where slope was low compared to the PNW. This study highlights challenges of FD assessment across regions with variable geomorphology and degree of human impact.

Julie Kelso (Primary Presenter/Author), ORISE Environmental Protection Agency, julia.kelso@gmail.com;


Raphael Mazor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, raphaelm@sccwrp.org;


164 - ASSESSING PATTERNS IN TAXONOMIC STRUCTURE OF INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS AND STREAMS IN THE ARID SOUTHWESTERN U.S.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING PATTERNS IN TAXONOMIC STRUCTURE OF INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS AND STREAMS IN THE ARID SOUTHWESTERN U.S. Non-perennial rivers and streams (NPRS) are considered waters of the United States, and therefore must be managed by the States. Perennial systems are expected to become more non-perennial as anthropogenic climate change increases, and therefore assessment methods are needed to support effective management. Methodologies to assess the ecological integrity on NPRS when dry are only beginning to be developed, but literature from the past decade suggests that terrestrial macroinvertebrates can be collected from NPRS and used to create ecological integrity metrics. As the first step of developing an Observed to Expected (O/E) index, we examined the biological structure of terrestrial invertebrate assemblages in NPRS. This examination will inform our decisions regarding which geographic areas can be included in O/E models in the near future. We created ordinations showing how structure of the invertebrate assemblages varied across 120 sample sites ranging from San Diego, California to Phoenix, Arizona. We then explored how taxonomic similarity among the major orders Formicidae, Araneae, and Coleoptera differed and how structure was related to important environmental gradients. These gradients can serve as predictors for defining the E in O/E indices in the future.

Andrew Caudillo (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University, Monterey Bay, ancaudillo@csumb.edu;


Matthew Robinson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University Monterey Bay, marobinson@csumb.edu;


John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


165 - ASSESSING TEMPORARY STREAMS IN CALIFORNIA: ARE BRYOPHYTES STABLE INDICATORS OF DRY STREAM HEALTH?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING TEMPORARY STREAMS IN CALIFORNIA: ARE BRYOPHYTES STABLE INDICATORS OF DRY STREAM HEALTH? Climate change is making dry streams more common worldwide. It has become increasingly important to develop an accurate method of assessing the ecological health of dry streams in regions experiencing prolonged periods of drought. Our research aims to determine if terrestrial bryophytes can be used as a stable indicator of stream health for intermittent streams in Southern California. Bryophytes are sensitive to human activity and have been used in previous studies as biological indicators of stream health, changes in hydrology and changes in stability. They also commonly occur in non-perennial streams. For these reasons, we incorporated bryophytes into a bioassessment method we developed for use in dry streams. But the temporal stability of bryophytes as bioindicators is unknown. To test the stability of bryophytes as indicators we collected and identified samples from 10 sites during a dry year (2016) and a wet year (2017). We then evaluated if the metrics used to assess human disturbance were affected by this inter-annual variability by comparing how much metric scores changed between years. This study is an important step toward adapting bioassessment methods for use in increasingly common dry streams.

Megan Rodenbeck (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University Monterey Bay, mrodenbeck@csumb.edu;


Matthew Robinson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University Monterey Bay, marobinson@csumb.edu;


John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


166 - CONTRIBUTION OF THE DISCONNECTED POOLS AS REFUGE AND CONSERVANCY IN IRES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CONTRIBUTION OF THE DISCONNECTED POOLS AS REFUGE AND CONSERVANCY IN IRES Mosaics of lotic, lentic and terrestrial habitats in IRES have been recognized as a complex and dynamic system that vary in time and space. These conditions provoke perturbations in the flow regime reducing the availability of mesohabitats and a drastic loss of biodiversity. In case of the lentic condition (disconnected pools) in IRES, limited attention is focus in conservancy program. Here we present a study in a Mediterranean Intermittent River of south-central Chile focused to examine the lotic taxa present in pools when the river was fragmented or completed dry. Statistical variations were observed in richness, abundance and diversity (alpha and beta) in isolated pools, in contrast to the perennial and intermittent condition. Similarly, the physicochemical variables were distinguished to dissolved oxygen, suspended solids and conductivity. Instead, high abundance of gastropods, annelids, ostracods, copepods, and branchiopods with exclusive presence of decapods and bivalves were recognized in isolated pools. Hence, the ponding phase in IRES contributes as refuge and provides habitat for newly colonizing and dispersing taxa, serving as an important habitat for conservancy of aquatic invertebrates with low capability to migrate under harsh climate conditions.

Isis Yelena Montes (Primary Presenter/Author), National Autonomous University of Honduras, imontes@udec.cl;


167 - CREATING A DRYNEES INDEX FOR NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CREATING A DRYNEES INDEX FOR NON-PERENNIAL RIVERS Non-perennial rivers and streams (NPRS) are found globally and are becoming more prevalent due to human land use and climate change. NPRS play a key role in overall watershed health and serve as habitat for many organisms. One important aspect for NPRS is the level of dryness that ranges from flowing most of the time to seldom flowing. The current classification is characterized into two groups, “intermittent” and “ephemeral”, which is a rudimentary distinction. Developing a continuous index of dryness should better characterize this important aspect. We analyzed a ten-year data set consisting of annual maps of dry and wet stream segments and gage data from the Santa Lucia Conservancy in Carmel, California. We calculated the proportion of dry and wet segments. We compared the amount of spatial drying occurring in each stream to temporal gage data to determine if they are related. We ultimately would like to produce a dryness index that reflects both spatial and temporal aspects of dry streams. If this index proves generally applicable, it will help the scientific community to better understand and evaluate how the amount of dryness in these systems affects ecosystem processes.

John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


Emma Haines (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University Monterey Bay, ehaines@csumb.edu;


168 - NUTRIENT EXPORT PATTERNS TO GROUNDWATER ACROSS LAND USE AND PRECIPITATION GRADIENTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NUTRIENT EXPORT PATTERNS TO GROUNDWATER ACROSS LAND USE AND PRECIPITATION GRADIENTS Groundwater inputs to streams are important to intermittent stream function, and can be a source of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. The amount of nutrients within groundwater can affect downstream processes, including eutrophication. Field observations across Kansas indicate meaningful impacts of agricultural land use practices on nitrate and phosphate concentrations near the surface of the water table, but these data do not include non-agricultural land uses, and large spatial and temporal variation make it difficult to distinguish the effects of precipitation and land use. We asked whether land use and precipitation affect nutrient export patterns to groundwater, and designed a mesocosm experiment to address this knowledge gap. Soil columns (75 cm long and 30 cm wide) were collected from sites across a precipitation gradient in Kansas with three land uses: agriculture, native prairie, and restored prairie. By analyzing the relative concentrations of inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus in the water after leaching the soil samples in mesocosms with enough rainfall to yield one half the mesocosm volume, we can tell how water quality is affected by land use and precipitation patterns, especially in intermittent streams.

Terrance Loecke (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, loecke.terry@ku.edu;


Anatole Telegin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, anatole.telegin@ku.edu;


Benjamin Sikes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, ben.sikes@ku.edu;


Amy Burgin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, burginam@ku.edu;


Madison Foster (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Kansas, madisonjfoster@gmail.com;


169 - PARSING HYDROLOGIC AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL CONNECTIVITY IN A COMPLEX MONTANE FLOODPLAIN

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PARSING HYDROLOGIC AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL CONNECTIVITY IN A COMPLEX MONTANE FLOODPLAIN In undisturbed mountain valleys, interactions between streams and riparian areas generate physically complex floodplains with substantial variation in the magnitude, timing and directionally of hydrologic connectivity. These lateral exchanges of water and solutes regulate biogeochemical functioning within floodplain habitats and alter downstream solute concentrations. Recent advances have suggested that time series analyses of high frequency sensors measuring water levels and water chemistry can improve our ability to quantify variable connectivity states within a landscape. Here, we propose that concurrent analysis of both water level and chemical signals not only improves quantification of binary connectivity metrics (eg: connected/disconnected) but also helps identify the form of lateral hydrologic connectivity (surface/subsurface) in systems where connectivity states can shift as a function of both seasonal hydrologic regimes and dynamic geomorphic processes. We further explore how differing physio-chemical time series (temperature, colored dissolved organic matter, conductivity and dissolved oxygen) within floodplain habitats are impacted by these shifts in connectivity to the stream. Disentangling connectivity information contained within these different chemical signals is crucial to the establishment of a robust quantitative connectivity framework that can account for both hydrologic and biogeochemical dynamics.

Tim Covino (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, Tim.Covino@ColoState.EDU;


Alexander Brooks (Primary Presenter/Author), Colorado State University, alex.brooks@colostate.edu;


171 - TRANSITION OF FLOW RECESSION TO RESUMPTION IN A MEDITERRANEAN INTERMITTENT RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TRANSITION OF FLOW RECESSION TO RESUMPTION IN A MEDITERRANEAN INTERMITTENT RIVER In recent years, the study of IRES is growing for the importance of these ecosystems such as the biological conservancy, biogeochemical processes and ecosystem services. Similarly, more recognition has been developed in some countries of North America, Europe and Oceania. In contrary, other regions have not been recognized at all. This study was aimed to assess the variability from the flow recession to the resumption and was carried out in a Mediterranean Intermittent River of South-central of Chile. The hydrological, environmental and taxonomical conditions in response to the transition of flow recession to resumption were tested using the TREHS Tool to characterize the various aquatic states of a temporary river. Significant variations were observed in the Lonquén River specifically in the hydrological (reduction in streamflow and increase of zero flow days), physico-chemical (velocity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity) and taxonomical (abundance, richness, Shannon and Beta diversity) in the different aquatic states identified. Future reductions in water permanence due to the anthropogenic and future climate scenarios may lead to further contraction of habitat heterogeneity with loss of aquatic biodiversity in IRES.

Andy Banegas Medina (Primary Presenter/Author), National Autonomous University of Honduras, bbanegas@udec.cl;


172 - VARIATION IN NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN STREAMS ACROSS THE KANSAS PRECIPITATION GRADIENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

VARIATION IN NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN STREAMS ACROSS THE KANSAS PRECIPITATION GRADIENT The water quality of streams and reservoirs is impacted by the amount of precipitation and land-use in the surrounding area. Kansas has a precipitation gradient with the most arid climate in the West, and most mesic in the East. This precipitation gradient also manifests as a gradient of intermittent stream flow in the west and perennial flow in the east. Layered on the precipitation gradient is also a land-use gradient. We asked: How does land use and stream position within the precipitation gradient affect nutrient concentrations in streams? We collected water chemistry samples from 46 streams across eastern and central Kansas. These samples ranged from second-order streams to eighth-order rivers, thus also spanning a range of intermittent to permanent flow. We measured phosphorus (SRP), ammonia, and nitrate, as well as in-stream chemical parameters. Our preliminary data indicates that less mesic, lower order (i.e., more intermittent) streams in central KS are more likely to have higher conductivity than their eastern KS counterparts. Further analysis will focus on the interaction between land use, stream size and precipitation on nutrients and microbial communities.

Abagael Pruitt (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Kansas, abagaelpruitt@ku.edu;


Janaye Hanschu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, janayeh@ku.edu;


Emma Overstreet (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, evover@live.com;


Amy Burgin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kansas, burginam@ku.edu;


Lydia Zeglin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, lzeglin@ksu.edu;


Samantha Thomas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, sgthomas@ku.edu;


173 - VARIATION IN STREAM MICROBIOME ACROSS THE KANSAS PRECIPITATION AND LAND USE GRADIENTS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

VARIATION IN STREAM MICROBIOME ACROSS THE KANSAS PRECIPITATION AND LAND USE GRADIENTS Across Kansas, there is a large precipitation gradient, with less precipitation in the west (510 mm/yr) than in the east (1010 mm/yr). Thus, more western streams are likely to be intermittent whereas eastern streams flow perennially. Embedded within this precipitation gradient is also variation in land-use, ranging from native prairie to row-crop agriculture. Both terrestrial-aquatic connectivity (e.g., via precipitation) and land-use affect stream water microbiome and water quality. We measured the bacterioplankton community and chloroplast abundance in streams across these gradients, expecting to see greater community turnover and decrease in diversity from low- to high-order streams in more arid watersheds, due to longer water residence time in streams with less precipitation. Preliminary findings showed change in microbial community composition from second- to eighth-order waters, with a precipitation region interaction. Chloroplasts, Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes had higher relative abundance downstream. In drier watersheds, low-order streams had more Bacteroidetes, while mesic low-order streams had more Verrucomicrobia. The different microbes in lower order streams may reflect differential inputs of soil microorganisms, which have a higher potential to be leached into smaller streams. Weak patterns with land-use exist; more work is needed to resolve relationships.

Janaye Hanschu (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Kansas, janayeh@ku.edu;


174 - WIND AND WATER TRANSPORT OF CARBON AND NUTRIENTS FOLLOWING WILDFIRE AT THE REYNOLDS CREEK CRITICAL ZONE OBSERVATORY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

WIND AND WATER TRANSPORT OF CARBON AND NUTRIENTS FOLLOWING WILDFIRE AT THE REYNOLDS CREEK CRITICAL ZONE OBSERVATORY Wildfire is increasing in the western United States under changing climate regimes and resulting in large episodic nutrient and carbon export as wind and water. We monitored wind and water exports of nutrients and carbon in Murphy Creek following the 2015 Soda fire in the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory, ID. Immediately following the fire, aeolian mass flux of both sediment and organic material increased by two to three-fold within and proximal to the burned area; average dust flux rates were 11.0 ± 4.9 g/m2/year (mean ± SD) across the watershed for 2016-2017. Water exports far exceeded aeolian losses but greatly facilitated by wind deposition in swales followed by water evacuation. Surface water export as particulate organic carbon (POC) in the first two years after fire was 1000 g C/m2/yr as POC compared 1-4 g/m2/yr for other subcatchments). Dissolved C forms varied with discharge and snowmelt but were not substantially elevated following fire. In contrast, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) increased substantially following fire and declined during the growing season and stream drying. Wind and water exports in the 2 years following fire represent up to 1000 years of material export.

Kayla Glossner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, gloskayl@isu.edu;


Ruth MacNeille (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, macnruth@isu.edu;


Sarah Godsey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, godsey@isu.edu;


Jennifer Pierce (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Boise State University, jenpierce@boisestate.edu;


Clay Roehner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Boise State University, clayroehner@u.boisestate.edu;


Fred Pierson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA ARS Northwest Watershed Research Center, fred.pierson@ars.usda.gov ;


Kathleen Lohse (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, klohse@isu.edu;


175 - EVALUATING CATCHMENT AND ATMOSPHERIC DRIVERS OF PHOSPHORUS INCREASES IN MOUNTAIN LAKES OF NORTHEASTERN UTAH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EVALUATING CATCHMENT AND ATMOSPHERIC DRIVERS OF PHOSPHORUS INCREASES IN MOUNTAIN LAKES OF NORTHEASTERN UTAH Increasing phosphorus concentrations in many remote, high-elevation waterbodies across the western United States can alter historically low-nutrient aquatic ecosystems. In these remote locations, typical anthropogenic P inputs (e.g. agricultural runoff or waste) are implausible. Here, we investigate alternative mechanisms involving catchment-soil and dust-P inputs to explain increases in P to high-elevation waterbodies. We conducted leaching experiments on soils collected from the Uinta, Wasatch, and Bear River Mountains to quantify the amount of P leached at different pH and temperature treatments. We also collected atmospheric dust from 6 areas spanning northern Utah to determine atmospheric-P deposition rates. We used chemical extraction to determine the proportion of bioavailable-P deposited in dust. Our results reveal minor increases in P leached with increasing soil pH, but potentially significant increases in P with elevated soil temperatures and extended growing seasons projected locally with climate change. These results demonstrate that rising temperatures and prolonged growing seasons due to climate change may alter the nutrient status in remote high-elevation water bodies.

Jessica Scholz (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, jessica.scholz@aggiemail.usu.edu;


176 - INFLUENCE OF EARTHWORMS (OLIGOCHAETA: SPARGANOPHILIDAE) ON DECOMPOSITION OF RIPARIAN LEAF LITTER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

INFLUENCE OF EARTHWORMS (OLIGOCHAETA: SPARGANOPHILIDAE) ON DECOMPOSITION OF RIPARIAN LEAF LITTER Earthworms are known to have important impacts on leaf litter decomposition in terrestrial systems. However, their ecological roles in semiaquatic habitats have not been previously addressed. In North America, this semiaquatic habitat is dominated by earthworms of the family Sparganophilidae. These earthworms have been essentially ignored, and their basic biology and taxonomic relationships are not well known (although recent advances have been made). We designed an experiment to determine the effects of sparganophilid earthworms on decomposition of riparian litter. In this experiment, we manipulated earthworms (presence or absence), and position of litter (surface or buried) in a fully factorial mesocosm study. Earthworms, sediments and leaf litter used in the study originated from Scull Shoals Experimental Forest in central Georgia, USA. Mesocosms were constructed to closely simulate stream shore conditions, consisting of saturated and unsaturated sediment. A mixture of hickory (40%), red oak (18%), loblolly pine (22%) and white oak (18%), litter was placed into mesh bags for use in the decomposition assay. Mass loss data were collected, along with water chemistry data (alkalinity, pH, NO3 and NH4) to evaluate the influence of earthworms on these important ecosystem variables.

Roberto Carrera-Martinez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, rcarrmart@gmail.com;


Melanie Taylor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, melanie.k.taylor@usda.gov;


Daniel Markewitz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, dmarke@uga.edu;


Lori Sutter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, lsutter@uga.edu;


Mac Callaham (Primary Presenter/Author), USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, mac.a.callaham@usda.gov;


177 - CHARACTERISTICS OF INVASIVE PLANTS IN STORMWATER PONDS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CHARACTERISTICS OF INVASIVE PLANTS IN STORMWATER PONDS Stormwater ponds are proliferating urban hydrological management features that could also harbor invasive plants. Identifying the characteristics of plants that invade stormwater ponds is crucial for predicting invaders, improving management efforts, and determining the potential for these ponds to spread invasives to nearby uninvaded habitats. We have compiled a database of 70 functional traits of 28 invasive plant species we observed in Florida stormwater ponds. Most plants are perennials that were, or currently are, sold commercially for ornamental or agricultural purposes. Additionally, most can reproduce asexually, grow quickly, and prefer disturbed habitats, all of which are common traits associated with successful plant invaders. These results suggest that stormwater ponds are readily invaded by plants introduced for human use, which are also likely capable of quickly invading and spreading throughout newly built ponds. Invasive pond plants also exhibited a wide diversity of growth forms (i.e. trees, shrubs, vines, herbs, and ferns) dispersed primarily via animal or water vectors. This diversity of traits indicates that many types of invasive plants could establish in stormwater ponds, and invaders likely arrive and spread through hydrological connections and via animals that visit the ponds.

James Sinclair (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, james.sinclair@ufl.edu;


Allyson Holmes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, aholmes93@ufl.edu ;


Basil Iannone (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, biannone@ufl.edu;


178 - CLIMATE STRESSORS AND THE TOLERANCE OF FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES ALONG AN ELEVATIONAL GRADIENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CLIMATE STRESSORS AND THE TOLERANCE OF FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES ALONG AN ELEVATIONAL GRADIENT As climate change alters the availability and quality of aquatic habitats, aquatic invertebrates may be an important indicator of vulnerability to stressors like temperature and drying. Across the Southwest, a network of semi-natural ephemeral and permanent ponds support numerous species of aquatic invertebrates, but little is known about current or future community composition. We sampled invertebrates in permanent and ephemeral ponds across an elevational gradient to determine how diversity varies with environmental stress. Additionally, we used temperature trials in the lab to test how local populations of mayflies and water boatmen vary in their ability to survive in warmer water. We found that survival time in warmer waters (>25oC) was more strongly reduced for mayflies regardless of pond source. This may be because mayflies are more susceptible to lowered oxygen concentrations due to their subsurface breathing mechanisms.

Morgan Andrews (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern Arizona University , mia57@nau.edu;


179 - DISTRIBUTION OF ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER: MONITORING METHODS AND CONNECTIONS TO BIOTIC INDICATORS OF STREAM HEALTH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DISTRIBUTION OF ANTHROPOGENIC LITTER: MONITORING METHODS AND CONNECTIONS TO BIOTIC INDICATORS OF STREAM HEALTH Anthropogenic litter (i.e., trash; AL) is increasing in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Rivers are both retention sites and conduits for AL. California was the first state to adopt regulations to categorize streams as 'impaired' for AL. Because AL contains a diversity of materials, with variable sources, degradation rates, and mobility, developing methods to measure AL assemblage is a major challenge. Our objective was to compare 3 AL measurement methods 1) qualitative rapid assessment, 2) quantitative visual assessment, and 3) manual collection. Methods 1 and 2 are in development for use in California. Using all 3 methods, we measured AL in 12, 30-m reaches of the North Branch Chicago River. Reaches were associated with 4 features which contribute or accumulate AL: bridges, debris dams, combined sewer outflows, and 'control' (N=3/feature). We will repeat this assessment in streams across Illinois that span a gradient of biotic indexes. Results will illustrate how well management indices perform, how stream features drive AL composition, and if AL density is related to other common assessments. The study will directly improve measurement methods for AL as a newly regulated pollutant, and policies for stream ecosystem management.

Lauren Wisbrock (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, lreynolds1@luc.edu;


Timothy Hoellein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, thoellein@luc.edu;


Shelly Moore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, shellym@sccwrp.org;


180 - INFLUENCE OF RIPARIAN HABITAT ON TERRESTRIAL INVERTEBRATE INPUT INTO A SUB-ANTARCTIC MAGELLANIC REGION STREAM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

INFLUENCE OF RIPARIAN HABITAT ON TERRESTRIAL INVERTEBRATE INPUT INTO A SUB-ANTARCTIC MAGELLANIC REGION STREAM The Sub-Antarctic Magellanic ecoregion is recognized as one of the 24 wilderness areas remaining in the world. This under-studied region is being increasingly threatened by nonnative salmon farming industry. Terrestrial insect input into streams provides important energy subsidies for fish. Terrestrial input of insects into the Robolo river in Puerto, Williams Chile was studied using floating pan traps. At ten transects, three pan traps containing water and surfactant were placed at the left bank, right bank, and center stream and left out for three days. At each pan trap, the overhanging vegetation species, densiometer reading, and the bank angle were recorded. The relationship between insect composition in the pan traps and these factors will be evaluated. In 2017, terrestrial insects in the riparian zone of this river were studied using pit fall traps placed at five, ten, and fifteen meters away from the stream. These methods for studying riparian insects will be compared to assess which method is best for understanding terrestrial input in this region. This data will help increase understanding of the food webs of native and invasive fish in this region and their impact on the ecosystem.

Katherine Cline (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, katherinecline@my.unt.edu;


Tamara Contador (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidad de Magallanes, tamara.contador@umag.cl;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, james.kennedy@unt.edu;


Sabrina Moore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, sabrinamoore2@my.unt.edu;


Taylor Gillum (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, taylorgillum@my.unt.edu;


181 - LANDSCAPE PATTERNS DRIVE VARIABILITY IN WATER CHEMISTRY ACROSS SUB-TROPICAL URBAN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

LANDSCAPE PATTERNS DRIVE VARIABILITY IN WATER CHEMISTRY ACROSS SUB-TROPICAL URBAN STREAMS As more people move into densely populated urban areas, anthropogenic pressures on urban ecosystems continue to rise. Our understanding of how urbanization affects stream ecosystems has grown considerably over the past 20 years, but the long-term effects of geomorphology and surrounding landscape practices on urban stream nutrient dynamics remain unclear. Through regular monitoring of six sub-tropical streams spanning an urban gradient encompassing variability in land-use, stream bed compositions, and nutrient sources, we hope to gain a broader understanding of how landscapes shape urban stream nutrient fluxes. We hypothesize that streams with more urbanized watersheds will exhibit higher mean nutrient concentrations and greater temporal variability due to altered hydrology and nutrient sources. Preliminary results suggest that nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations are increased in urban streams relative to a reference stream. However, a concrete-lined stream draining the most urbanized watershed consistently has lower nutrient concentrations than other sites. Our regular monitoring will capture short- and long-term effects of the variety of stormwater, land, and wastewater management strategies employed in our sub-tropical study region. Results of our study will provide a better understanding of how landscape practices affect water quality in urban streams.

Alexander Reisinger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, reisingera@ufl.edu;


Emily Taylor (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, etaylor21@ufl.edu;


182 - NUTRIENT SUBSIDIES RESULT IN LARGER BODY SIZE, NOT ALTERED STOICHIOMETRY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NUTRIENT SUBSIDIES RESULT IN LARGER BODY SIZE, NOT ALTERED STOICHIOMETRY Human activities create novel nutrient gradients in freshwater ecosystems. These streams represent a gradient of phosphorus and nitrogen enrichment which results in a subsidy gradient in basal resources. Mature nymphs of Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and adult Coleoptera (beetles) and Hemiptera were sampled from streams in central Texas. Organisms did not respond to the subsidy gradient by altering their body stoichiometry, but rather by increasing body size across the gradient. Overall, females showed the greatest increase in body size relative to males of the same species. The positive correlation between body size and fecundity in insects is strong. The increase in egg production may be influencing community structure at enriched sites. Phylogenetic patterns in body stoichiometry are evident (especially in mayflies) and are related to life history characteristics.

Jeffrey A. Back (Primary Presenter/Author), Baylor University, Jeff_Back@baylor.edu;


183 - QUANTIFYING MECHANISMS DRIVING NUTRIENT DYNAMICS IN STORMWATER PONDS ACROSS AN AGE GRADIENT

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

QUANTIFYING MECHANISMS DRIVING NUTRIENT DYNAMICS IN STORMWATER PONDS ACROSS AN AGE GRADIENT Stormwater ponds (SWPs) provide valuable ecosystem functions like flood mitigation and pollutant removal from stormwater runoff. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are commonly targeted for removal by these engineered ecosystems. Denitrification is a particularly important N cycling mechanism as it converts bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Studies quantifying N and P dynamics are common in SWPs, but research on the biogeochemical mechanisms driving nutrient flux in SWPs is lacking. To better understand drivers of SWP nutrient cycling, we collected sediment cores from residential stormwater ponds ranging from 10 to 30 years old in North-Central and South Florida. We performed continuous flow core incubations, where sediments were exposed to both ambient and elevated water column nitrate levels. We quantified net N2 fluxes (via membrane-inlet mass spectrometry) and dissolved inorganic nutrient uptake. We hypothesized that denitrification and nutrient removal will increase along the age gradient due to increased organic matter availability, and that denitrification will increase across sites under elevated nitrate levels. Results of this research will provide a mechanistic understanding of nutrient dynamics within stormwater ponds, allowing for development of targeted management actions for enhanced nutrient removal.

Ashley Smyth (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, ashley.smyth@ufl.edu;


Alexander Reisinger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, reisingera@ufl.edu;


Steven Hohman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, hohmans@ufl.edu;


184 - QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL HUMAN EXPOSURE TO CYANOTOXINS FROM LETTUCE GROWN WITH CONTAMINATED WATER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL HUMAN EXPOSURE TO CYANOTOXINS FROM LETTUCE GROWN WITH CONTAMINATED WATER The prevalence of harmful algae blooms and their associated cyanotoxins in lakes near urban centers is an increasing global issue that poses an environmental and human health hazard. Exposure to cyanotoxins via consumption can result in acute and chronic neuro- and hepatoxic effects. Microcystin, Nodularin, and B-methylamino-L-alanine are common cyanotoxins that pose a threat to humans who use contaminated water for crop and garden irrigation. Experimental data is lacking on the fate of these toxins in the environment, the capacity for bioaccumulation in food crops, and standard methods for cyanotoxin extraction from soil and plants. To fill these knowledge gaps, we will create an efficient extraction procedure from soil and vegetation and quantify uptake in lettuce crops irrigated with contaminated water. Three environmentally relevant concentrations of cyanotoxins will be applied to lettuce grown in a random block design in a greenhouse. Cyanotoxin concentrations in roots and shoots of lettuce and the accommodating soil medium will be quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis kit. Lettuce bioaccumulation of cyanotoxins exceeding human consumption limits will require advice on safe consumption and irrigation regimes.

Austin Bartos (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, bartosaustin@gmail.com;


185 - SPATIOTEMPORAL IMPLICATIONS OF URBAN STREETSIDE VEGETATION TO NUTRIENT AND CARBON LOADS IN STORMWATER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SPATIOTEMPORAL IMPLICATIONS OF URBAN STREETSIDE VEGETATION TO NUTRIENT AND CARBON LOADS IN STORMWATER Vegetative litter from street trees can be a significant source of nutrients and carbon to urban runoff. Most work done to analyze these nutrients has been done in mesic environments, but climate can cause differences in nutrient concentrations and leaching potential. Therefore, nutrient impacts of trees may vary across cities, even for the same species. We sought to identify the impacts of climate on leachate concentrations from litter from street trees common to both Pocatello, ID and Minneapolis, MN. We found leaf leachates of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), total nitrogen (TN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were species-dependent with particularly high variation in phosphorus concentrations. We are conducting preliminary work to assess additional small-volume litter inputs from street-side vegetation throughout the growing season when nutrient uptake via primary production is highest. This information is essential and timely as many major cities face restrictions on nutrients and carbon in runoff. Ultimately, this produces actionable results for city planners on temporal variation in street-side vegetation’s role in nutrient inputs to stormwater allowing for informed practices in development of sustainable cities.

Sophie Hill (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, hillsoph@isu.edu;


186 - CHANGES IN STREAM HABITAT QUALITY FOLLOWING CULVERT RESTORATION PROJECTS IN NORTHERN GREAT LAKES STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CHANGES IN STREAM HABITAT QUALITY FOLLOWING CULVERT RESTORATION PROJECTS IN NORTHERN GREAT LAKES STREAMS Changes in Stream Habitat Quality Following Culvert Restoration Projects in Northern Great Lakes Streams

Coleson Wrege (POC,Primary Presenter), University of Minnesota, cwrege@umn.edu;


187 - RETHINKING FOUNDATION SPECIES IN A CHANGING WORLD: THE CASE FOR RHODODENDRON MAXIMUM AS AN EMERGING FOUNDATION SPECIES IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RETHINKING FOUNDATION SPECIES IN A CHANGING WORLD: THE CASE FOR RHODODENDRON MAXIMUM AS AN EMERGING FOUNDATION SPECIES IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS “Foundation species” are widespread, abundant species that play critical roles in structuring, stabilizing ecosystems and modulating ecological processes. Sometimes foundation species are only recognized in retrospect, after they have declined due to anthropogenic activity; similarly, scientists may be slow to recognize newly emerging foundation species in changing ecosystems. Here, we present rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum) as an example of an emerging foundation species in riparian forest and headwater stream ecosystems of the southern Appalachian Mountains. In areas where it is dominant, rhododendron structures, stabilizes, and modulates functions within both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Studies of forest ecosystem response to a variety of environmental conditions indicate that rhododendron may increase the resistance and resilience of riparian and stream ecosystems to predicted future anthropogenic stress. A more dynamic approach to foundation species as transient and dependent on ecosystem states will also help ecologists to focus on restoration strategies that target ecosystem processes and services, rather than on historically dominant species.

Maura Dudley (Primary Presenter/Author), Oglethorpe University, maurapdudley@gmail.com;


Mary Freeman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, mcfreeman@usgs.gov;


Seth Wenger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, swenger@uga.edu;


C. Rhett Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, RJACKSON@warnell.uga.edu;


Catherine Pringle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, cpringle@uga.edu;


188 - BIOLOGICAL AND ECOSYSTEM LEVEL CHANGES IN DAMMED HEADWATER STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

BIOLOGICAL AND ECOSYSTEM LEVEL CHANGES IN DAMMED HEADWATER STREAMS Small dams may convert intermittent streams to perennial for water extraction. In Arkansas, 700 streams were dammed for high-volume-hydraulic fracturing water withdrawal. Increases in dam constructions may affect macroinvertebrate communities and consequently alter decomposition rates. We predicted that once intermittent headwaters would be continuous changes in dissolved oxygen, temperature, and conductivity would occur. Abiotic changes were predicted to change macroinvertebrate diversity and leaf decomposition rates. We predicted that dammed streams would have greater macroinvertebrate diversity and faster rates of leaf litter decomposition from increased macroinvertebrate processing. We deployed leaf-litter decomposition bags at three dammed and three free-flowing streams. Six benthic macroinvertebrate samples (N=24) and associated water characteristics were collected at each site. We found no significant differences in water characteristics; temperature was slightly higher in dammed (7.9?) than free-flowing streams (6.4?). Although there were no differences in macroinvertebrate richness and density, decomposition rates were faster upstream in free-flowing streams (k=0.038), but greater downstream in dammed streams (k=0.025). Hydrology shifting from intermittent to perennial may extend detritus conditioning to improve palatability. Small dams may alter decomposition in currently unidentified pathways.

Brian Staley (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Central Arkansas, bstaley2@cub.uca.edu;


Danielle Braund (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Central Arkansas, dbraund1@cub.uca.edu;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, sallye@vt.edu;


Margaret Young (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hendrix College, YoungMM2@hendrix.edu;


Krishna Patel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hendrix College, PatelKK@hendrix.onmicrosoft.com;


Maureen McClung (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hendrix College, mcclung@hendrix.edu;


Matt Moran (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hendrix College, Moran@hendrix.edu;


189 - DO STREAM INVERTEBRATE FUNCTIONAL FEEDING GROUPS REFLECT MACROSCALE VARIATION IN TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DO STREAM INVERTEBRATE FUNCTIONAL FEEDING GROUPS REFLECT MACROSCALE VARIATION IN TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION? A central tenet of the River Continuum Concept is that functional traits of benthic invertebrates will covary with the longitudinal gradient of physical factors formed along the drainage network. For example, a shift from shredder- and collector-dominated invertebrate assemblages to assemblages composed primarily of collectors and grazers is predicted as one transitions from small headwater streams to larger mid-reaches. This change should occur because headwater streams with extensive tree canopies depend on allochthonous (leaf litter) resources while mid-reach streams are more likely to have open canopies and higher instream primary production (algae); shredders utilize leaf litter while grazers feed on algae. Using similar logic, it may also be possible to predict functional feeding group responses to terrestrial vegetation at macroscales. We collected benthic macroinvertebrate samples from six small North American streams, distributed across a broad latitudinal and longitudinal gradient. Satellite-derived indicators of terrestrial vegetation (e.g., the normalized difference vegetation index, or NDVI) are now being compared with functional feeding group data at each site to test the hypothesis that NDVI covaries with shredder biomass (positive relationship) and grazer biomass (negative relationship).

Adriana Diaz (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, adridiaz96@yahoo.com;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


Frank Dirrigl (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Frank.dirrigl@utrgv.edu;


190 - ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON DIDYMO BLOOM FORMATION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON DIDYMO BLOOM FORMATION Overgrowth or “blooms” of Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) have increased across North America in recent decades and the cause still unknown. Blooms can wreak havoc on water infrastructure and have ecological consequences for stream ecosystems. Didymo overgrowth is linked to conditions of low phosphorus, low turbidity, and low streamflow. Because glacier meltwaters are richer in particulates and phosphorus, the loss of glaciers in the mountain west could be a driving factor in the increase in Didymo blooms. Here, we examine the relationship between declining glacial cover and Didymo blooms in the Mountain West. We will assess the relationship between glaciated streams and the presence of Didymo to assess if declining glacial cover is leading to increased Didymo presence. We will accomplish this by pairing field observations with a controlled experiment wherein we will manipulate physical conditions to simulate degrees of glacierization. By understanding the cause of Didymo overgrowth we are better able to manage valuable aquatic resources.

Lindsay Capito (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University , marleymom24@gmail.com;


191 - ESTIMATING RIVER CHLOROPHYLL A CONCENTRATIONS FROM LANDSAT IMAGERY USING A MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ESTIMATING RIVER CHLOROPHYLL A CONCENTRATIONS FROM LANDSAT IMAGERY USING A MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH While controls on phytoplankton abundance have been long studied in lakes and oceans, we currently lack a mechanistic understanding of how these drivers combine as water traverses the more physically complex settings of river networks. Testing hypotheses of these controls will require broad-scale measurement of the timing and distribution of water column chlorophyl-a (chl-a) in rivers. Estimating chl-a concentrations with satellite remote sensed imagery has the potential to create such near-continuous measurements. Rivers, however, carry high loads of additional optically active constituents, including colored dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and inorganic sediment. They are also comparatively shallow, creating spectral signatures from bottom reflectance. Therefore remote chl-a measurement is an inherently difficult task in rivers, producing greater measurement error than in other aquatic systems. In this poster I assess the performance of flexible machine learning (ML) algorithms for predicting chl-a concentrations on river reaches >60 m in width using Landsat imagery and historic in-situ measurements of chl-a from the National Water Quality Portal. These ML techniques automate complex non-linear regression, and may provide the flexibility necessary for robust remote chl-a measurement.

Nicholas Bruns (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, neb8@duke.edu;


Matthew Ross (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, mrvr@rams.colostate.edu;


John Gardner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, john.r.gardner@duke.edu;


Jim Heffernan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, james.heffernan@duke.edu;


192 - HOW DO MULTIPLE STRESSORS INFLUENCE RIVERINE ALGAL COMMUNITIES AND TOXIN PRODUCTION?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

HOW DO MULTIPLE STRESSORS INFLUENCE RIVERINE ALGAL COMMUNITIES AND TOXIN PRODUCTION? Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasing in prevalence and severity worldwide; however, there has been less research on algal communities and HABs in lotic compared to lentic ecosystems, and the interactions between multiple environmental stressors as drivers of community structure and cyanotoxin production are not well understood. In this study, we characterize community composition of algal assemblages in lotic ecosystems of the upper Ohio River basin and examine extracellular toxin release using Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) samplers. We aim to examine how communities of phytoplankton and benthic algae vary and investigate the relationships between algal communities, cyanotoxin release, and the interaction of multiple stressors such as nutrient concentrations, physical channel alterations, and temperature regimes. We anticipate that algal community composition will be dependent on algal traits related to physiological tolerance to environmental conditions, that cyanotoxin production will be greater where there is high biomass of toxin-producing genera, and that cyanotoxin release will be related to temperature-mediated oxidative stress. Our research will provide insight into the spatial and temporal dynamics of stream and river nutrient enrichment and will inform agencies about nutrient-reduction strategies.

Nayeli K. Sanchez (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, sanchez.1104@buckeyemail.osu.edu;


S. Mažeika P. Sullivan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, sullivan.191@osu.edu;


Carlos Cáceres (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, caceres.30@osu.edu;


Kay C. Stefanik (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, stefanik.13@osu.edu;


Lauren M. Pintor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, pintor.6@osu.edu;


194 - USING REMOTE SENSING OF VEGETATION STRESS TO TRACK SALTWATER INTRUSION THROUGH HIGHLY CHANNELIZED COASTAL LANDSCAPES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING REMOTE SENSING OF VEGETATION STRESS TO TRACK SALTWATER INTRUSION THROUGH HIGHLY CHANNELIZED COASTAL LANDSCAPES In flat coastal landscapes, freshwater flows typically protect vegetation along channels from the landward encroachment of saltwater. However, during extreme drought, vegetation adjacent to channels may be more vulnerable to saltwater intrusion. On the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, intensive canal and ditch networks throughout the landscape make freshwater wetlands more vulnerable to salinization. We seek to understand the role of channels in conveying saltwater into freshwater landscapes through observation of riparian vegetation using satellite remote sensing. We assessed vegetation health using indices such as NDVI, EVI, and an estimation of leaf-off date, derived from the Landsat 5 record. We then used elevation, distance to channel, and distance to coast to explain observed spatial patterns of vegetation stress. Our findings suggest that elevation, proximity to coast, and distance to channel are the most significant predictors of vegetation stress. Drought records help us to infer whether salinity or inundation is the primary driver of observed vegetation stress for a particular year. We also find that certain forest types and soil characteristics may confer more protection against salinization; these relationships should be explored further to inform wetland protection and restoration.

Justin Wright (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, justin.wright@duke.edu;


Emily Bernhardt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, emily.bernhardt@duke.edu;


Emily Ury (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University, ury.emily@gmail.com;


195 - BEAVER ACTIVITY ALTERS ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN A DEGRADED STREAM ECOSYSTEM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

BEAVER ACTIVITY ALTERS ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION AND MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN A DEGRADED STREAM ECOSYSTEM Beavers can shape freshwater ecosystems by creating dams which raise the water table, decrease stream velocity, and form ponds that widen the riparian zone. Even though their role as an ecosystem engineer is widely accepted, there are still major gaps in terms of how beavers affect ecosystem functions such as temperature, primary production, and decomposition, especially in various ecosystems. Furthermore, it is unclear how changes to these ecosystem functions influence macroinvertebrate community structure, which may have cascading ecological effects. Understanding how beaver activity affects ecosystem function and community structure is important to evaluate their effectiveness as agents of restoration. We hypothesized that beaver activity would increase primary production and decrease leaf litter decomposition, altering available energy sources and subsequently causing shifts in biomass and diversity of the macroinvertebrate community. We sampled Kimball Creek, a degraded stream in western Colorado, using paired samples in beaver ponds and riffle habitats, and using standard methods to sample water temperature and chemistry, algal production, decomposition, and macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity, biomass, and emergence. Although analyses are ongoing, thus far our results suggest that beaver ponds increase aquatic habitat and create areas of cold water refugia.

Melody Feden (Primary Presenter/Author), Murray State University, melody.feden@gmail.com;


Howard Whiteman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Watershed Studies Institute, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Murray State University, hwhiteman@murraystate.edu;


196 - THE EFFECTS OF BEAVER DAMS ON BIOAVAILABLE DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON IN URBAN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE EFFECTS OF BEAVER DAMS ON BIOAVAILABLE DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON IN URBAN STREAMS Many urban streams suffer from high inputs of highly labile bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) from human waste from failing infrastructure and combined sewer overflows, which can fuel ongoing problems with microbial growth in urban streams, including human pathogens. Beaver populations are rebounding throughout the US and seem well adapted to living in urban streams. Beaver-created ponds and wetlands provide ideal sites for microbial processes that could process or remove this labile organic carbon from urban streams. We collected replicates of filtered stream water upstream and downstream of beaver dams in three urban streams in Atlanta, GA, USA and inoculated and incubated them to determine BDOC concentration. We saw consistently high BDOC in the upstream samples, consistent with patterns seen in other urban streams, and a decrease of BDOC in the downstream samples, suggesting removal of labile organic carbon can occur in beaver ponds or wetlands. These patterns demonstrate the potential for beaver activity to help restore water quality in urban streams and suggest that urban watershed managers should consider allowing beavers to remain in these systems or even fostering their colonization of impacted streams.

Elizabeth Sudduth (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Gwinnett College, esudduth@ggc.edu;


197 - ASSESSING CHANGES IN STREAM FISH DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE HUBBARD BROOK WATERSHED AFTER 11 YEARS OF RECOVERY FROM ACID DEPOSITION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ASSESSING CHANGES IN STREAM FISH DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE HUBBARD BROOK WATERSHED AFTER 11 YEARS OF RECOVERY FROM ACID DEPOSITION Acid deposition has been a major anthropogenic disturbance to aquatic ecosystems. Since the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act, there has been slow and steady recovery in surface water chemistry, but there is less information on biotic recovery. Fish were bellwether taxa in studies of acid deposition impacts on aquatic ecosystems and therefore are valuable focal taxa as we quantify biotic recovery. In rivers and streams acid deposition in poorly buffered landscapes led to the loss of fish from the upper reaches of many headwater tributaries. We explored potential recovery of fish distributions in the Hubbard Brook stream network over the past 11 years. In 2007, we quantified the extent of fish in tributaries throughout the Hubbard Brook valley. Returning to these tributaries in summer 2018, we documented substantial (>100 m) increases in the upstream distribution of fish in two sites. In the other 11 sites, fish distributions were comparable to 2007. This study demonstrates the potential for fish distributions to expand as acid deposition decreases but also highlights physical barriers as the primary limitation to the redistribution of fish following recovery of stream surface waters.

Dana Warren (Primary Presenter/Author), Oregon State University, dana.warren@oregonstate.edu;


Keith Nislow (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Research Station, U.S.D.A. Forest Service, University of Massachusetts Amherst, knislow@fs.fed.us;


John Magee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, john.magee@wildlife.nh.gov;


Emily Bernhardt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


Kerry Yurewicz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Plymouth State University, klyurewicz@plymouth.edu;


Emma Rosi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, rosie@caryinstitute.org;


198 - INFLUENCES OF DISCHARGE, PH, AND DOC ON RARE EARTH ELEMENT CONCENTRATIONS DURING RECOVERY FROM ACID RAIN AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE (BBWM) USA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

INFLUENCES OF DISCHARGE, pH, AND DOC ON RARE EARTH ELEMENT CONCENTRATIONS DURING RECOVERY FROM ACID RAIN AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE (BBWM) USA BBWM is a paired forested watershed experiment. One watershed (EB) has experienced a constant decline in atmospheric SO4 and NO3 deposition from 1987 to 2018, and is recovering from acid rain. Base cations in EB runoff declined faster than (SO4+NO3), causing further acidification (lower alkalinity and pH; higher Al+n) until 2005. Alkalinity and pH then increased slowly, as base cations reached a minimum about 2015 and then slowly increased. We sampled high discharge episodes in 2017 and 2018 from base flow through high discharge and the falling limb. Al and REEs were speciated in the field for total, dissolved, and organically-bound forms. We calculated particulate and ionic species. ?mol Al/L ? 103 times ?mol REEs/L; the five species of Al are generally in the same proportion as the REE species. Peak concentrations of Al and REEs co-occur at peak flow, corresponding to lower pH and higher DOC. The close correspondence between Al and REEs in acid soluble particulates suggests adsorption of REEs on precipitated Al(OH)3. ISCO samplers are unsuitable for such studies because of precipitation of Al(OH)3, caused by CO2 degassing in the vessels, and subsequent adsorption of REEs.

Stephen Norton (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Maine, Norton@maine.edu;


Ivan Fernandez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Maine, Ivanjf@Maine.edu;


Sarah Nelson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Forest Resources and Senator George J. Mitchell Center, University of Maine, Orono, ME, sarah.j.nelson@maine.edu;


Kaizad Patel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Kaizad.Patel@Maine.edu;


199 - MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE DIVERSITY INCREASED IN ATMOSPHERICALLY ACIDIFIED STREAMS OVER A 26 YEAR PERIOD (1984-2009)

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE DIVERSITY INCREASED IN ATMOSPHERICALLY ACIDIFIED STREAMS OVER A 26 YEAR PERIOD (1984-2009) Acidification inhibits macroinvertebrate ion balance resulting in decreased taxa richness and density. Despite historical declines in macroinvertebrate diversity in acidified streams within Shenandoah National Park (SNP), observed air quality improvements could indicate biotic recovery. Yet, our understanding of macroinvertebrate response and ecosystem impacts to acidification is limited. We used macroinvertebrate traits to inform temporal and spatial functional changes within SNP streams. Functional traits were compared for 24 sites over three geologic classes with differing acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) (9 siliciclastic, 9 granitic, and 6 basaltic). We predicted that shredder and scraper density and richness within functional groups (response diversity) would increase across a gradient of pH recovery. We also predicted these increases would be greater in high ANC streams. We found no trends in overall densities. Response diversity increased over time for both shredders (1-12 taxa) and scrapers (1-11 taxa), with greatest increases at moderately acidified (granitic) streams. Taxa richness recovery was least pronounced in more acidified (silicicilastic) streams where dominant shredders (Amphinemura and Pteronarcys) and scrapers (Blepharicera and Drunella) remained absent. Further analysis will identify traits that predict changes in secondary production to inform how acidification impacts stream function.

Craig Snyder (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), csnyder@usgs.gov , cdsnyder02@gmail.com ;


Kelly Maloney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, kmaloney@usgs.gov;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, sallye@vt.edu;


Kelly McIntyre (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, mcintyrek@vt.edu;


200 - DIVERSE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH ICE, BIOFILMS, AND SEDIMENTS IN THE HIGH TETON RANGE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DIVERSE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH ICE, BIOFILMS, AND SEDIMENTS IN THE HIGH TETON RANGE Glaciers and ice caps are important freshwater reservoirs and cover ~11% of Earth’s surface. These ice-dominated ecosystems play key roles in hydrological and carbon cycling; however, rising global temperatures are altering the biogeochemical processes associated with them. Increased glacial melt releases organic carbon into downstream ecosystems as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Supraglacial OC is likely derived from algal communities growing on source snow and ice that enters meltwater-fed streams and may influence stream microbial biofilm and sediment diversity. In this study, we characterized the microbial, eukaryotic, and fungal diversity of glacial ice, stream biofilms, and sediments using amplicon sequencing. Samples were collected from six sites in the Teton Range, Wyoming. Study sites included a range of hydrological inputs including surface glaciers, rock glaciers, and perennial snowfields. Our results suggest that snow and proglacial streams host diverse assemblages of primary producers with different algal taxa dominating proglacial streams compared to snow taxa. Understanding the local and global contributions of these microbial communities within glacier ecosystems is critical to assess impacts of changing meltwater regimes on alpine stream trophic ecology and associated carbon cycling.

Trinity Hamilton (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, trinityh@umn.edu;


Taylor Price (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Southern Mississippi, taylor.l.price@usm.edu;


Scott Hotaling (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University, scott.hotaling@uky.edu;


Lusha Tronstad (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wyoming, Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, tronstad@uwyo.edu;


Debra Finn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Missouri State University, dfinn@missouristate.edu;


Lydia Zeglin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kansas State University, lzeglin@ksu.edu;


201 - EFFECTS OF CATCHMENT AND LAND COVER ON WATER CHEMISTRY IN HIGH ELEVATION LAKES IN SIERRA NEVADA, CALIFORNIA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EFFECTS OF CATCHMENT AND LAND COVER ON WATER CHEMISTRY IN HIGH ELEVATION LAKES IN SIERRA NEVADA, CALIFORNIA A clear pattern of how variation in land cover impacts lake chemistry has yet to be extensively explored, especially in high elevation lakes. To assess the way different terrestrial inputs effect high elevation lake water composition, we analyzed the impact of land cover on water chemistry within 23 different lakes. These lakes were all located in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. The watershed area of each lake was delineated using ArcGIS and the corresponding land cover types characterized using the National land Cover Dataset (NLCD 2011). Specifically, we wanted to examine how each lake’s catchment land cover affects chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, and the ratio of particulate carbon to particulate nitrogen compositions. We expect to see a positive relationship between the ratio of particulate carbon to particulate nitrogen as the percentage of terrestrial vegetative cover increases among the 23 lake sites. Consistent relationships between lake chemistry and land cover types would allow us to predict chemical attributes of other high elevation lakes in the Sierra Nevada, and thus develop a predictive landscape model for the thousands of lakes in the Sierra Nevada that lack sampling data.

Kelly Neal (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Davis, kaneal@ucdavis.edu;


Adrianne Smits (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Davis, asmits@ucdavis.edu;


Steve Sadro (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Davis, ssadro@ucdavis.edu;


203 - GUT CONTENT MASS VS. INDIVIDUAL BODY MASS: IS THERE A PREDICTABLE RELATIONSHIP IN PREDATORY STREAM FISHES?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

GUT CONTENT MASS VS. INDIVIDUAL BODY MASS: IS THERE A PREDICTABLE RELATIONSHIP IN PREDATORY STREAM FISHES? Gut contents have been used to understand feeding behavior and to predict trophic position across fish populations. Gut fullness has received less attention but may be an important indicator of bottom-up regulation. Metabolic theory predicts that the rate of consumption of energetic resources is a power-law function of body mass. Larger individuals have lower mass-specific metabolic rates that may allow them to eat less frequently or otherwise utilize energetic resources more efficiently. This fundamental relationship provides a potential mechanism to link the sizes of individual fishes and, by extension, population size to the availability of energetic resources. Using predatory fishes from three different streams located in Washington, Oregon, and California, we tested the hypothesis that gut fullness is a predictable function of body mass. Sampled fishes were frozen and returned to the lab, where gut contents were surgically extracted and weighed. Linear regression will be used to determine whether a power-law relationship exists between gut content mass and body mass, as predicted by metabolic theory. This relationship will also be compared across study sites to assess whether local environmental conditions influence this relationship.

Vanessa Czeszynski (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin La Crosse, vanessa.czeszynski@gmail.com;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


204 - A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF INFERENTIAL MODELLING TOOLS THAT USE BOTH DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND INORGANIC CARBON MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE WHOLE-STREAM METABOLISM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF INFERENTIAL MODELLING TOOLS THAT USE BOTH DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND INORGANIC CARBON MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE WHOLE-STREAM METABOLISM Aquatic ecosystem primary production, aerobic respiration, and gas exchange with the atmosphere are often inferred from temporal variation in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. New sensor technologies continue to increase the number of metabolite concentrations that can be measured concurrently in streams. Our objective is to design and test inferential modelling tools that use dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) time-series measurements to provide additional information about stream metabolic rates. Using Monte Carlo analyses with these modeling tools, we demonstrate how DIC data may help differentiate between the effects of respiration and gas exchange on DO dynamics. Furthermore, we use multivariate Bayesian algorithms to understand how multiple metabolites (i.e. DO and DIC) are weighted in their contribution to estimates of metabolic rates. This work contributes to the modeling tool kit necessary to use new metabolite sensors for inference of stream ecosystem metabolism and demonstrates the analyses necessary to build confidence in the inferential integrity of those tools. Ultimately, the goal is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness with which we can use new and future data streams to better understand the controls on stream metabolic regimes.

Elfrida Isaksen-Swensen (Primary Presenter/Author), Montana State University, frida.e.swensen@gmail.com;


Robert Payn (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, Montana Institute on Ecosystems, rpayn@montana.edu;


Meryl Storb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, meryl.storb@gmail.com;


Todd Schlotfeldt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, toddschlotfeldt@gmail.com;


205 - NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE CO2 DYNAMICS OF STREAMS FROM NDIR SENSORS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE CO2 DYNAMICS OF STREAMS FROM NDIR SENSORS Nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzers are becoming a common method of measuring CO2 concentrations in streams and are providing high temporal resolution CO2 data. NDIR sensors can provide insight into how differences in the stream channel or riparian characteristics affect CO2 patterns on a reach scale. This was tested by placing six sensors 100m apart and rotating them through five streams over spring, summer, and fall. Preliminary data suggests that consistent characteristics along a stream channel, such as slope or groundwater influx, allows for sustained patterns of pCO2. On the other hand, transitions in and out of wetlands cause fluctuations in pCO2 patterns. Additional deployments have given further insight into potential pitfalls of using sensors such as biofouling. Large rivers or stream reaches with open canopies, as well as warmer water conditions, result in a higher susceptibility to biofouling. The proper placement of sensors and reach characterization is therefore a critical step in the efficient use of these sensors.

Brian Saccardi (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Hampshire, bek36@wildcats.unh.edu;


William H. McDowell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, bill.mcdowell@unh.edu;


Adam Wymore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, adam.wymore@unh.edu;


Wilfred Wollheim (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Hampshire, wil.wollheim@unh.edu;


208 - BEAVERS TO BIRDS: THE INFLUENCE OF BEAVER RECOLONIZATION ON RIPARIAN BIRD COMMUNITIES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

BEAVERS TO BIRDS: THE INFLUENCE OF BEAVER RECOLONIZATION ON RIPARIAN BIRD COMMUNITIES Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by flows of materials known as resource subsidies. Habitat alterations in one ecosystem can alter the magnitude, timing, or form of these subsidies and cause cascading effects in recipient systems. Beaver populations are recovering in North America and recolonization of these ecosystem engineers can alter channel geomorphology by converting stream channels into complexes of ponds and wetlands. These changes in the physical characteristics of the aquatic habitat can cause shifts in aquatic insect communities from lotic to lentic communities. Changes in aquatic insect community structure can lead to changes in aquatic insect emergence and potentially influence riparian bird communities. We examined how beaver recolonization influenced stream habitat type (pool vs riffle), aquatic insect emergence, and riparian bird communities in Kimball Creek, CO from 2012-2015. We quantified aquatic insect emergence using floating emergence traps and assessed riparian bird communities using bird point counts. We predicted sites with beaver ponds would have higher aquatic insect emergence biomass and abundance, and consequently higher riparian bird species richness. This study elucidates how beaver recolonization may reconnect aquatic and terrestrial food webs previously severed by beaver extirpation.

Kelley Fritz (Primary Presenter/Author), Murray State University, k.a.fritz24@gmail.com;


Melanie Torres (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wyoming, melanie.l.torres@gmail.com;


Thomas Anderson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, anderstl@gmail.com;


Morgan Geile (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, morgan.geile@gmail.com;


Ann Gilmore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, annfrancesgilmore@gmail.com;


Jon Ames (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murray State University, AMESJF@uwec.edu;


Quintin Bergman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Purdue University Fort Wayne, quintinbergman@gmail.com;


Howard Whiteman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Watershed Studies Institute, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Murray State University, hwhiteman@murraystate.edu;


209 - PHENOTYPES UNDERPIN CONTRASTING ECOLOGICAL IMPACT OF PREDATOR INDIVIDUALS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PHENOTYPES UNDERPIN CONTRASTING ECOLOGICAL IMPACT OF PREDATOR INDIVIDUALS Top-predators classically drive ecosystem processes through effects on prey populations, indirectly top downing to plant standing stocks, a coarse picture called trophic cascade. In the past decades, we learned that trophic cascades intensity varies across ecosystems and top-predator species. In taking the picture of trophic cascades at the population level, we assume implicitly that all the top-predator individuals of the population contribute equally to the trophic cascade. As a result, we still do not know if a part of variation in trophic cascades owes to individual phenotypic variability among top-predators, and which type of phenotypic traits may explain this variation. We addressed both issues by quantifying individual top-predator trophic cascades on litter standing stocks and associated fungal biomasses in a forested stream. We provide unpresented evidence that phenotypically opposite top-predator individuals alters trophic cascades in different directions, and that phenotypic traits do not equally contribute to individual trophic cascades. Capturing individual trait variation of top-predators should help future research in ecology to take a sharp picture of the natural trophic cascade variability.

Thibaut Rota (Primary Presenter/Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, thibaut.rota@univ-tlse3.fr;


Jérémy Jabiol (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), LIEC, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, France, jeremy.jabiol@univ-lorraine.fr;


Sylvain Lamothe (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, sylvain.lamothe@univ-tlse3.fr;


Didier Lambrigot (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, didier.lambrigot@univ-tlse3.fr;


Eric Chauvet (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, eric.chauvet@univ-tlse3.fr;


Antoine Lecerf (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, France, antoine.lecerf@univ-tlse3.fr;


210 - TEMPERATURE AND LEAF LITTER SPECIES AFFECT FLUXES TO MICROBES AND INSECTS.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TEMPERATURE AND LEAF LITTER SPECIES AFFECT FLUXES TO MICROBES AND INSECTS. Many litter studies focus on decomposition rate but pathways of element flow from decomposing litter are at least equally important. Temperature increases decomposition both microbial and macroinvertebrate mediated decomposition. Here we test how temperature affects element flow from leaves to insect across litter types. Using artificial streams with three temperature treatments (ambient, 2.5 ºC above ambient and 5° C above ambient) and four litter types labeled with 15N and 13C) we calculated element fluxes. The four leaf species used in the experiment were, two slow decomposing (gamble oak and sycamore) and two fast decomposing (ash and freemont). Both temperature and litter species affect fluxes to microbes and insects. These results will be used to predict how stream ecosystems will respond to global warming.

Alisyn Martinez (Primary Presenter/Author), ECOSS, abm3@nau.edu;


Steven Thomas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, sthomas5@unl.edu;


Alexander Flecker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA, asf3@cornell.edu;


Benjamin Koch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, ben.koch@nau.edu;


Zasha Welsh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, zkw3@nau.edu;


Jane Marks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Northern Arizona University, jane.marks@nau.edu;


211 - USE OF ADULT ANURAN COMMUNITIES AND DIETS TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON AQUATIC TO TERRESTRIAL FOOD WEB SUBSIDIES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USE OF ADULT ANURAN COMMUNITIES AND DIETS TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON AQUATIC TO TERRESTRIAL FOOD WEB SUBSIDIES Stream restoration projects are increasingly common, but studies of ecological responses remain scarce. The Cache River, in southernmost Illinois, was separated by a canal project in 1916, disconnecting the upper and lower sections. Consequently, the upper section has suffered severe bank erosion and channel incision. To stabilize the channel, 25 Newbury weirs were added from 2001-2004. These restored riffles have higher abundance of large bodied insects that emerge from them, but it is not clear how this subsidy affects riparian communities. We are examining community structure of anurans at weir and non-weir sites along the upper Cache River, as well as collecting gut contents for fatty acid analyses to assess the degree of aquatic-derived prey in diets. Preliminary results indicate anuran diversity is marginally higher at non-weir sites (p= 0.056), and abundance showed no difference between site types (p= 0.7). Results thus far suggest that weirs are not influencing anuran communities. Gut content analyses will reveal if food quantity and quality differ with site type. Considering global amphibian declines, understanding sources and nutritional value of prey is critical for management and conservation of these at-risk species.

Kelsey Bowe (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Illinois University Carbondale, kelsey.bowe@siu.edu;


Matt Whiles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


212 - SOURCE-SPECIFIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON UPTAKE BY STREAM MICROBES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

SOURCE-SPECIFIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON UPTAKE BY STREAM MICROBES Streams play a major role in the global carbon cycle, through mineralizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and transporting DOC downstream. Yet, DOC is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds and our knowledge of how different carbon sources are cycled within streams is limited. Bioassays were conducted using water collected from two streams and amended with DOC sources: beet sugar, malted barley, and roasted barley. We predicted DOC uptake would differ as a function of DOC source. Ambient DOC uptake rates (kDOC) in each stream were 0.012/day and 0.037/day. In both streams, kDOC for all DOC amendments was significantly greater than ambient kDOC (p<0.001). Roasted barley kDOC was lower than sugar and malted barley (p<0.001) and closest to ambient kDOC. We tested the extent to which other nutrients limited carbon metabolism. Adding PO4 with roasted barley led to higher kDOC than with roasted barley alone (p=0.021). While carbon is most limited, PO4 also limits metabolism in these streams. Ongoing work compares bioassay DOC uptake with rates of carbon metabolism calculated from diel oxygen to better understand the fate of DOC in streams.

Melissa Castillo (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech Hotchkiss Lab, melissatheclimber@gmail.com;


Erin Hotchkiss (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, ehotchkiss@vt.edu;


Stephen Plont (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, plontste@vt.edu;


213 - TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL TRENDS IN MICROBIAL ABUNDANCE AND VIRAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN A LOTIC ECOSYSTEM

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL TRENDS IN MICROBIAL ABUNDANCE AND VIRAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN A LOTIC ECOSYSTEM While the ecological roles and impacts of viruses are relatively well understood in marine ecosystems, the same cannot be said for freshwater lotic ecosystems. This study characterized temporal and spatial changes in viral and bacterial abundance and viral community composition in a freshwater stream in southeastern Virginia over one annual cycle. Monthly samples were collected from three stream reaches for water chemistry and microbiological analysis. Epifluorescence microscopy was used to analyze bacterial and viral abundance, and RAPD-PCR was used to characterize differences in viral community composition between samples based on time and location. Although no clear spatial trends were found, seasonal trends were observed in both viral and bacterial abundances, and viral abundance typically exceeded bacterial abundance by a factor of 10, as observed in other aquatic systems. Analysis of viral community composition suggested a stochastic assembly that may depend on multiple seasonal and environmental factors.

Abigail Davidson (Primary Presenter/Author), College of William and Mary, ajdavidson@email.wm.edu;


Alexandra Payne (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College of William and Mary, atpayne@email.wm.edu;


Kurt Williamson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College of William and Mary, kewilliamson@wm.edu;


214 - IT’S A TRAP! AN EVALUATION OF 12 PASSIVE TRAP TYPES TO EFFECTIVELY CATCH AND CONTROL THE INVASIVE RED SWAMP CRAYFISH IN STREAMS OF THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

IT’S A TRAP! AN EVALUATION OF 12 PASSIVE TRAP TYPES TO EFFECTIVELY CATCH AND CONTROL THE INVASIVE RED SWAMP CRAYFISH IN STREAMS OF THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS The invasive red swamp crayfish poses a significant threat to habitat quality and community diversity in streams systems of the Santa Monica Mountains. With no natural predators or competitors, crayfish can consume adult, juvenile and egg forms of native fish, amphibians, and benthic macroinvertebrates. Mountain Restoration Trust has managed crayfish populations in the Santa Monica Mountains for almost a decade, yet evaluation of trap type effectiveness has remained a constant source of uncertainty. In this two-week field experiment, we compared effectiveness across 12 standard and modified trap designs in catching the most crayfish while catching the least bycatch. There were differences observed across the traps tested in the number of caught crayfish(X2 =257.67, p-value <0.001), chub (X2 =354.39, p-value <0.001), and tadpoles (X2 =57.31, p-value <0.001). Specifically, the most effective trap for catching total crayfish was the black cylindrical mesh trap, followed by the red mesh trap, and both the standard and modified black minnow traps. When managing for crayfish in arid-environment streams, we recommend deploying a combination of trap types in order to maximize crayfish catch efficiency and limit negative impacts on native fish and tadpole bycatch.

Joseph Curti (Primary Presenter/Author), Mountains Restoration Trust, jcurti@mountainstrust.org;


Angela De Palma-Dow (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lake County Water Resources Department, Adepalmadow@gmail.com;


C. Emi Fergus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The National Research Council, emifergus@gmail.com;


215 - PREDICTING THE EFFECTS OF DENSITY-DEPENDENT RESOURCE LIMITATION ON BODY SIZE OF CRAYFISH POPULATIONS USING INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELING

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PREDICTING THE EFFECTS OF DENSITY-DEPENDENT RESOURCE LIMITATION ON BODY SIZE OF CRAYFISH POPULATIONS USING INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELING Resource availability is a key feature of an animal’s environment that can have important consequences on population dynamics. With increasing environmental unpredictability, there is strong selective pressure on size adaptation (Nevo 1976). As a result, body size is under direct control of competitive ability, age of maturation, and reproductive effort (Skogland 1983). The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate an individual-based model of crayfish response to environmental conditions, and whether we can predict how population body size changes overtime in response to population density and dynamic food availability. I intend to model the foraging behavior of virile crayfish (Orconectes virilis), an opportunistic omnivorous crustacean and an invasive species in the state of Utah that is readily found throughout major watersheds. The model will address the following questions: 1) How does variation in population density affect the distribution of body size? and 2) What role does resource availability have on predicting body size overtime? Ultimately, this model could have important management implications for controlling the spread of this invasive species.

Doreen Cabrera (Primary Presenter/Author), Brigham Young Univeristy , doreencabrera1@gmail.com;


216 - RED SWAMP IN THE REDWOODS: AN INTRODUCED POPULATION OF THE REDSWAMP CRAYFISH (PROCAMBARUS CLARKII) HAS ESTABLISHED IN SANTA CRUZ, CA.

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

RED SWAMP IN THE REDWOODS: AN INTRODUCED POPULATION OF THE REDSWAMP CRAYFISH (PROCAMBARUS CLARKII) HAS ESTABLISHED IN SANTA CRUZ, CA. The red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852), is a decapod crustacean originating in the South-eastern United States, and can negatively influence more than one level of freshwater processes while simultaneously representing a significant part of the benthic biomass available for assimilation into higher trophic levels. As an invasive species, P. clarkii poses a significant threat to native biological diversity. The introduction of P. clarkii outside of their native range into redwood ecosystems can have far-reaching ecological consequences on local communities. P. clarkii has not yet been documented in Santa Cruz, California, but are found to have successfully colonized an urban pond; Westlake Park. A total of 137 crayfish were caught with a 1:1.25 male to female sex ratio. Preliminary results found total length (mm) averaged 86.3 + 8.3 SD for males (N=61) and 87.9 + 9.5 SD for females (N=76). We are examining sex ratios and differences in morphological characteristics of this population of red swamp crayfish to estimate the risk of possible further range expansion of P.clarkii into local habitats of Santa Cruz, CA. Authors: Schuyler P. McMahan, Nicholas A. Macias, and Eric Palkovacs

Schuyler McMahan (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Santa Cruz, spmcmaha@ucsc.edu;


Nicholas Macias (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Cruz, niamacia@ucsc.edu;


217 - FORECASTING THE GLOBAL CONSERVATION STATUS OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

FORECASTING THE GLOBAL CONSERVATION STATUS OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS Unionid mussels are globally threatened, but data are lacking on species’ status for many countries. We used country-level ecological, economic, and social data from the UN and World Bank, and IUCN species’ conservation status to develop a statistical model predicting the percentage of threatened species for 102 countries. Using best subsets regression, we found fisheries exploitation, freshwater quantity and quality, percentage of urban population, forest cover loss, and income level explained the proportion of a country’s mussel fauna that was likely threatened (R2=0.67, p<0.05). On average 22% of mussel species in any given country are likely threatened. Countries with a predicted number of threatened species lower than observed tended to have implemented habitat and water quality policies, which may indicate improving conditions and opportunities for restoration. Countries with a higher predicted number of threatened species than observed tended to be characterized by ongoing environmental degradation, indicating worsening conditions and need for further assessment of species status or protective actions. Importantly, for countries where reliable conservation data do not exist, our model offers predictions for the number of species that may be endangered and where research efforts may be needed.

Caryn C. Vaughn (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Oklahoma, cvaughn@ou.edu;


Noé Ferreira-Rodriguez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidade de Vigo, noeferreira@uvigo.edu;


Thomas Parr (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Oklahoma, Thomas.parr@ou.edu;


218 - A SNAIL OUT OF WATER: HITTING THE TARGET ON PRIMER OPTIMIZATION FOR APPLE SNAIL DETECTION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

A SNAIL OUT OF WATER: HITTING THE TARGET ON PRIMER OPTIMIZATION FOR APPLE SNAIL DETECTION Conservation efforts increasingly rely on environmental DNA (eDNA) detection to sound an alarm for non-native invasive species. However, successful invaders often include morphologically similar species. Detecting species with eDNA relies on understanding how amplification success varies across temperatures and how barcoding uses specific targets to identify species. To test for eDNA in water samples (250 mL), we developed primers designed to amplify a non-native apple snail, Pomacea maculata. We used known sequences [Folmer region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] as the primer template to identify four candidate assays of varied amplicon length and location. All four initially worked on P. maculata, so we sought to confirm their specificity through experiments with tissue-derived DNA from other Pomacea species and other non-native aquatic snails. We optimized our qPCR process by increasing annealing temperature in 2° increments so that our primers only amplified P. maculata at higher temperatures, but other non-native snails at lower temperatures. Our work provides the first successful eDNA detection of apple snails and could help confirm presence of one species (P. maculata) that often gets confused for a better known invader that co-occurs across Asia (P. canaliculata).

Madison Granier (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southwestern University, granierm@southwestern.edu;


Romi Burks (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Biology, Southwestern University, Georgetown, TX, USA, burksr@southwestern.edu;


Matthew Barnes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas Tech University, matthew.a.barnes@ttu.edu;


Lauren Muskara (Primary Presenter/Author), Southwestern University, muskaral@southwestern.edu;


Shellsea Miller (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southwestern University, miller14@southwestern.edu;


219 - CHARACTERIZING LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH HABITAT IN AN AGRICULTURALLY DOMINATED LANDSCAPE

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CHARACTERIZING LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH HABITAT IN AN AGRICULTURALLY DOMINATED LANDSCAPE The Louisiana Waterthrush (Parulidae: Parkesia motacilla), a Neotropical migrant songbird, breeds in the eastern United States to southern Canada, occupying breeding territories along streams where adults feed themselves and nestlings both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates. It has been proposed as a bioindicator because of its requirement for high-quality stream and forested riparian habitat to persist and successfully reproduce. Within the agriculture-dominated Western Pennyroyal Karst Plain (USEPA Ecoregion 71e) of northern Tennessee and southcentral Kentucky, the waterthrush is met by sparse streams (much water flows underground through karstic bedrock) with reduced riparian zones, and macroinvertebrate communities subject to agricultural pollution. This study aims to investigate correlations between features of stream and riparian habitat as measured by Tennessee’s standard protocols for macroinvertebrate surveys to waterthrush occupancy in Western Pennyroyal Karst Plain streams experiencing various degrees of habitat degradation. Forested buffer width was also analyzed. Streams where waterthrush presence was visually or aurally determined were compared to those where presence was not confirmed. While results are pending, we predict that waterthrush presence will be positively associated with relatively high macroinvertebrate taxa richness and largely unimpacted habitat conditions.

Steven W. Hamilton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Austin Peay State University, hamiltonsw@apsu.edu;


Nicole Santoyo (Primary Presenter/Author), Austin Peay State University, nsantoyo@my.apsu.edu;


220 - EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ALTERATIONS OF THE NATURAL FLOW REGIME DUE TO URBANIZATION AND BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ALTERATIONS OF THE NATURAL FLOW REGIME DUE TO URBANIZATION AND BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION We investigated the relationship between alterations of the natural flow regime due to urbanization and benthic macroinvertebrate biodiversity and function by evaluating 3 streams in the Piedmont, North Carolina spanning a gradient of low to high % Impervious Cover. We used the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) metrics to assess changes in stream hydrology over a 20 year period using flow data from USGS Gage stations in each stream. We sampled the benthic macroinvertebrate community in these streams using the North Carolina Standard Bioassessment Sampling Method (NCDWR). We found that EPT and Total Taxa Richness decline with increasing %IC. Shredders declined as herbivores increased in richness with increasing %IC. We expect that the IHA metrics will show that the 1-, 3- and 7-day maximum and minimum flow conditions increase with %IC. We also expect that the declines in biodiversity and changes in functional feeding group trait abundance will be correlated to the IHA metrics. By correlating biodiversity and taxa traits with changes in hydrology associated with urbanization, we can better understand the role of managing storm water as one component in restoring stream function and stimulating benthic macroinvertebrate community recovery.

Anthony Roux (Primary Presenter/Author), Mecklenburg County Storm Water Services, Water Quality Program, Charlotte, NC; William States Lee College of Engineering, University of North Carolina Charlotte, Tony.Roux@MecklenburgCountync.gov;


Sandra Clinton, PhD (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;


221 - PREDICTING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND RICHNESS OF FISH ACROSS THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PREDICTING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND RICHNESS OF FISH ACROSS THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA Knowledge of species distributions are necessary to help balance conservation and development. This data can be used to minimize development in high richness areas and protect biodiversity hotspots. However, some remote areas such as the North Slope of Alaska are undergoing rapid development but are difficult to access, and so species distribution data is lacking. Therefore, we combined remotely sensed data (e.g., MODIS Land Surface Temperature or Landsat derived vegetation cover) with observed fish presences in species distribution models, and mapped the distribution of 19 commercially and culturally important fish in the North Slope of Alaska. The predicted probabilities of detection of each species were based on upstream environmental characteristics calculated for every stream segment. We then spatially joined detection probabilities of each species to the corresponding stream segment in the study area, and analyzed the resulting maps for patterns. The model-derived detection probabilities were combined into a species richness value to portray each streams’ relative importance for biodiversity. These distribution and richness maps can help inform fish conservation and the development of future management plans in this and other rapidly developing areas.

John Olson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Sciences, California State University Monterey Bay, CA, USA, joolson@csumb.edu;


Arev Markarian (Primary Presenter/Author), California State University - Monterey Bay, amarkarian@csumb.edu;


Jessie Doyle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University - Monterey Bay, jdoyle@csumb.edu;


222 - TO CONTROL OR NOT TO CONTROL: WHEN THE ECOLOGICAL COSTS OF MANAGEMENT-DRIVEN PHENOTYPIC CHANGES COUNTERBALANCE THE BENEFITS OF INVASIVE SPECIES REMOVAL

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

TO CONTROL OR NOT TO CONTROL: WHEN THE ECOLOGICAL COSTS OF MANAGEMENT-DRIVEN PHENOTYPIC CHANGES COUNTERBALANCE THE BENEFITS OF INVASIVE SPECIES REMOVAL Across the globe, large-scale eradication programs aiming at controlling invasive species are implemented and they represent a unique opportunity to assess the effects of harvest-driven trait changes on ecosystem functioning. Indeed, intraspecific variability is now widely recognised as a key driver of ecological dynamics and, by inducing a non-random removal of individuals from targeted populations, control programs might modify trait distribution in managed populations and, subsequently, ecosystem functioning. Harvest-driven trait changes in invasive species might induce unexpected and potentially counterproductive results that are not explicitly considered by scientists and managers. Using invasive freshwater fish and crayfish as model organisms, the present study aimed at assessing the efficiency of control programs by quantifying managed-induced phenotypic trait changes in invasive species along a gradient of management practices and comparing the effects of population size reduction versus harvest-driven trait changes. Field observations first revealed the existence of significant changes in a suite of phenotypic traits of functional importance between populations. We then demonstrated using experimental mesocosms that the ecological gains achieved by removal (i.e. reduction in invasive species density) could be substantially reduced by management-induced phenotypic changes.

Libor Zavorka (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Toulouse Univeristy, France, Libor.Zavorka@glasgow.ac.uk;


Iris Lang (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Toulouse Univeristy, France, iris.lang@univ-tlse3.fr;


Bastien Jorigne (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Toulouse University, France, jorigne.bastien@gmail.com;


Remy Lassus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Toulouse University, France, remylassus@yahoo.com;


Julien Cucherousset (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), CNRS, Toulouse University, Dept EDB, France, julien.cucherousset@univ-tlse3.fr;


223 - THE WATERSHED LEARNING NETWORK: ENGAGING COMMUNITIES IN FRESHWATER SCIENCE THROUGH COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS AND SERVICE LEARNING

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE WATERSHED LEARNING NETWORK: ENGAGING COMMUNITIES IN FRESHWATER SCIENCE THROUGH COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS AND SERVICE LEARNING Urban watershed management is critical to support the structure and function of freshwater systems and well-being of human populations throughout the globe. The aging and obsolete water infrastructure of urban watersheds are prone to flooding, potentially exposing both the watershed ecosystems and the people living in affected neighborhoods to pollution and pathogens. To effectively engage in efforts to manage urban watersheds, monitor water quality, and mitigate the effects of flooding and/or failing water infrastructure, community members need new educational resources to bolster their understanding of watershed ecology and the environmental impacts of urbanization. Here, we will describe the Watershed Learning Network (WLN), a project developed as a collaboration between Environmental Community Action (ECO-Action), American Rivers, and a service-learning class in urban ecology at the University of Georgia. The purpose of the WLN was to take the lessons and tools developed through the Atlanta Watershed Learning Network and develop an online resource for communities living in urban watersheds throughout the world. We are excited to continue enhancing the WLN and will also share ways in which SFS participants can contribute to the network through original research, writing, and class assignments.

Rebecca Parsons (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, beccap97@gmail.com;


Yomi Noibi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environmental Community Action, asnoibi@gmail.com;


Jenny Hoffner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American Rivers, jhoffner@americanrivers.org;


Krista Capps (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, kcapps@uga.edu;


Emily Monroe (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, maddiemonroe98@gmail.com;


224 - USING A SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN TO BOOST THE VISIBILITY OF ENDANGERED TOAD CONSERVATION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

USING A SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN TO BOOST THE VISIBILITY OF ENDANGERED TOAD CONSERVATION The Houston toad (Anaxryus houstonensis) was one the first amphibians federally listed as endangered. In 2017, Texas established a Safe Harbor Program (SHP) to encourage private landowners to voluntarily conserve the few remaining endemic toads. The toad’s two-phase life history requires that landowners restore, create, or improve aquatic and terrestrial habitat on their properties. Unfortunately, a lack of awareness about this new SHP has limited participation and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is seeking novel ways to engage landowners. The purpose of this study was to identify how social media could build awareness about the Houston toad SHP. We used a science communication perspective to explore how interested parties shared SHP details with potential members. The project team began a social media campaign (#TeamHoPPS) across three popular platforms posting content related to the SHP, species conservation, and associated research projects. We tracked each post to identify the number of people reached and demographics for engaged individuals. We compared our findings on who was reached versus the targeted SHP population to measure direct and indirect visibility impacts of our campaign. This project provides insights into likely outcomes of future campaign efforts.

Gabrielle Payne (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas State University, gcp9@txstate.edu;


Jared Messick (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas State University, jam929@txstate.edu;


Christopher Serenari (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas State University, c_s754@txstate.edu;


Brittney Covington (Primary Presenter/Author), Texas State University, bmc82@txstate.edu;


Kristy Daniel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Texas State University, kristydaniel@txstate.edu;


225 - CAN SOCIAL MEDIA AID IN PARK MANAGEMENT? DEVELOPING AND TESTING TOOLS TO COLLECT AND ANALYZE TWITTER AND FLICKR POSTS FOR WISCONSIN STATE PARKS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

CAN SOCIAL MEDIA AID IN PARK MANAGEMENT? DEVELOPING AND TESTING TOOLS TO COLLECT AND ANALYZE TWITTER AND FLICKR POSTS FOR WISCONSIN STATE PARKS Wisconsin’s state parks provide public access to lakes and rivers for a variety of recreational activities. Visitation statistics can be collected at parks with gates or centralized entrances, but detailed information about how people use park features can be costly or even impossible to obtain using traditional survey methods. Many of these visitors freely share their park experiences on social media sites, providing a potentially rich source of usage data not readily available through other methods. The goals of this study were to 1) develop a methodology for extracting and analyzing publicly available social media data for State parks, and 2) evaluate whether social media platforms could be used as a reliable, free survey system for park managers. We automated a process that scraped publicly available geographic and textual information from Twitter and Flickr, cleaned text to remove unwanted material (e.g., advertisements), and categorized statements as positive, negative or neutral using sentiment analysis. The results of this study indicate that our methodology can enable park managers to efficiently quantify travel distances to their parks, the timing and duration of visits, and opinions about park features for use in management decisions.

Bradley Johnson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, johnson.bradley@uwlax.edu;


Chanae Ottley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Florida A&M University, ckottley97@gmail.com;


226 - PEDAGOGY IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: A GRADUATE COURSE TO PREPARE FUTURE SCIENCE FACULTY

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PEDAGOGY IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: A GRADUATE COURSE TO PREPARE FUTURE SCIENCE FACULTY Graduate students are increasingly interested in teaching-focused academic positions, yet, support, training, and/or continuous mentoring for teaching is often not a priority due to institutional, programmatic, or time constraints. Graduate teaching assistant (GTA) teaching professional development (TPD) can improve the overall quality of undergraduate biology education, however, biology GTAs are provided little TPD to support their teaching. While many programs focus on faculty professional development, few programs focus on GTAs, a group that represents some of the most influential instructors of students in introductory science courses. We solicited feedback from graduate student members of the Society for Freshwater Science (SFS) to assess their current knowledge and beliefs about teaching. Additionally, we wanted to know if SFS GTAs have participated in TPD and if they would be interested in participating in TPD opportunities through SFS. The quality of current and future university teaching can be improved via TPD for future faculty such as GTAs. This project is part of an NSF-funded Research Coordination Network, the Biology Teaching Assistant Project (BioTAP). We hope our findings can be used to inform and promote GTA professional development opportunities within SFS.

Kaleb Heinrich (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Alabama, kheinrich@ua.edu;


227 - DO COLLEGE STUDENTS CONSERVE WATER?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

DO COLLEGE STUDENTS CONSERVE WATER? Human behavior is a key determinant of the state of the environment, and the accumulated effects of many individual and household decisions have significant impacts on the natural resources. Freshwater is one resource most susceptible to human influences. Although 70% of Earth is covered by water, <3% of it is freshwater, and very little of this water is easily accessible for human use. Large universities operate much like small cities and therefore may help in understanding human behaviors and perceptions as related to water conservation. Our research aimed to investigate a few questions. What motivated students at the U.S.’s fourth largest university conserve water in their household or dorm room? What obstacles do students run into that prevent them from conserving water? And, what measures and policies has the university taken or implemented to conserve water in contrast to other universities around the nation? We surveyed >1000 students with a set of questions related to these overarching themes. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior and/or MINDSPACE framework to analyze our results. We plan to share our results with administrators and the sustainability office at FIU and other universities.

Elizabeth P Anderson (Primary Presenter/Author), Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, eanderson8@gmail.com;


Melissa Lau (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Florida International University, mlau006@fiu.edu;


228 - POTENTIAL LINKS BETWEEN STREAM/RIVER HEALTH AND HUMAN HEALTH INDICATORS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

POTENTIAL LINKS BETWEEN STREAM/RIVER HEALTH AND HUMAN HEALTH INDICATORS Streams and rivers throughout the United States continue to be degraded by unsustainable human activities (e.g. land use change). One potential consequence of this anthropogenic degradation that has received relatively little attention is a corresponding decline in human health. Polluted or physically degraded streams and rivers can present a host of risks to human health, yet the consequences of environmental degradation are rarely considered in research on human well-being, particularly at regional to national scales. The objective of this study is to compare an array of stream health indicators with spatially congruent human health indicators throughout the conterminous United States (CONUS). Stream health metrics were obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Stream-Catchment (StreamCat) dataset. StreamCat includes natural and anthropogenic watershed characteristics for 2.65 million stream and river segments within the CONUS. Human health metrics were obtained from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research (CDC WONDER) database. Simple correlations are now being analyzed to identify potential links between stream/river health and human health. In future research, statistical models will be used to explore potentially causal pathways between human health and the environment.

Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


Felisha Walls (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, wallsfn@mymail.vcu.edu;


26 - LAND USE EFFECTS ON A TEMPORAL COMPARISON OF THE PRESENCE AND ABUNDANCE OF MICROPLASTICS IN RIVERINE SYSTEMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

LAND USE EFFECTS ON A TEMPORAL COMPARISON OF THE PRESENCE AND ABUNDANCE OF MICROPLASTICS IN RIVERINE SYSTEMS The environmental contamination of microplastics (MPs) in marine and freshwater ecosystems is of increasing concern due to their capacity to adsorb persistent organic pollutants, persist long-term in the environment, and cause gut irritation in aquatic organisms. Microplastics are plastic particles <5mm in diameter, originate from industrial production and degradation of large plastic debris. The purpose of this research is to share preliminary findings on a collaborative project with Stroud Water Research Center and UC/Bakersfield where we are assessing the effect of land-use on the presence and concentration of MP within aquatic invertebrate gut tissues from headwater and abundance of MPs. Streams did not present statistical differences in MP concentration between land- systems in the Schuylkill Watershed, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, USA. Macroinvertebrates collected from streams within forested, agricultural and urban land-use are processed for the presence use. Dipteran, Coleopteran and Trichopteran taxa contained the highest concentration of MP across streams from all land-uses. We did not find a significant difference in MP concentration between feeding groups. Understanding the abundance and distribution of MP in aquatic systems will allow us to comprehend the role of land-use in microplastic contamination aquatic food webs.

Rachel McNeish (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University Bakersfield, rachel.e.mcneish@gmail.com;


John Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, jkjackson@stroudcenter.org;


John Wallace (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Millersville University, john.wallace@millersville.edu;


Marisa Macchia (Primary Presenter/Author), Millersville University of Pennsylvania, mdmacchi@millersville.edu;


Austin Harrison (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Millersville University of Pennsylvania, atharris@millersville.edu;


56 - THE IMPORTANCE OF INTRASPECIFIC GENETIC DIVERSITY FOR FUNCTIONAL TRAITS OF SCHOENOPLECTUS AMERICANUS IN THE CONTEXT OF WETLAND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE IMPORTANCE OF INTRASPECIFIC GENETIC DIVERSITY FOR FUNCTIONAL TRAITS OF SCHOENOPLECTUS AMERICANUS IN THE CONTEXT OF WETLAND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION Intraspecific genetic variation of plant traits is hypothesized to be a driver of the high levels of multifunctionality in wetlands. Schoenoplectus americanus, a plant native to Great Salt Lake wetlands is crucial for the maintenance of ecosystem functions that support carbon sequestration and storage, primary production, and habitat and food provisioning for migratory birds. Our study examined the effect of intraspecific genetic diversity in the production of traits that promote multifunctionality in wetland ecosystems. We used a common garden experiment to measure trait variation (stem height, stem density, below ground biomass, fine branching root growth, and above and below ground carbon and nitrogen storage) within and among five genotypes of S. americanus collected from various locations throughout the Intermountain West. With the exception of the number of inflorescences, we found no significant difference among genotypes. Our results thus far conclude that intraspecific variation in S. americanus is not an important determinate of functional traits. Our results also do not support the hypothesis that intraspecific diversity could be a main driver of the high levels of multifunctionality in wetland ecosystems.

Rachel Chamberlain (Primary Presenter/Author), Utah State University, rachelchamberlain2@gmail.com;


Audree Provard (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, audreejoy.van@aggiemail.usu.edu;


Karin Kettenring (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University , karin.kettenring@usu.edu;


Trisha Atwood (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Utah State University, trisha.atwood@usu.edu;


68 - GREENHOUSE GAS EBULLITION IN STREAMS OF VARYING WATERSHED LAND USE AND SEDIMENT COMPOSITION

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

GREENHOUSE GAS EBULLITION IN STREAMS OF VARYING WATERSHED LAND USE AND SEDIMENT COMPOSITION Streams are significant contributors to global carbon and nitrogen cycles, and major sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This study quantified ebullitive (bubble) emissions in two streams of contrasting land use (urban and forest) and sediment composition in Northeastern Massachusetts. Twelve inverted funnel-style bubble traps were installed at each study site to capture gas from ebullition and obtain CO2, CH4, and N2O concentrations and flux rates. Sediment composition was characterized using organic content and particle size analyses. Findings indicate significant ebullitive CH4 flux rates (0.01-13.77 mmol C/day) and high CH4 concentrations in gas bubbles (1-53%), especially in the urban stream, that are similar to findings of previous ebullition studies in wetland streams in other regions (Crawford et. al, 2014). These results suggest that GHG emissions via ebullition must be considered in highly impacted urban streams as well as in streams draining more natural areas. Although there was no significant correlation in the measured bubble rates and sediment composition, data suggest that major disturbances, such as storm flow events, or rapid air pressure or temperature changes are more likely to cause ebullition, suggesting short-term temporal variability may be important.

Bonnie Turek (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Hampshire, brt1004@wildcats.unh.edu;


91 - MICROPLASTIC PREVALENCE IN THE WATER, MACROINVERTEBRATES, AND TROUT OF THE KINNICKINNIC RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

MICROPLASTIC PREVALENCE IN THE WATER, MACROINVERTEBRATES, AND TROUT OF THE KINNICKINNIC RIVER This study utilized a novel method of quantification to assess the prevalence of microplastics in the Kinnickinnic River, a prized trout stream in Western Wisconsin. Flowing through the city of River Falls, the Kinnickinnic receives discharge from >24 stormwater outfalls and the local wastewater treatment plant. Trout, macroinvertebrates, and water samples were collected upstream, within, and downstream of River Falls. Samples were digested using wet peroxide oxidation, filtered onto 0.4µm membrane filters and stained with dilute Nile Red dye, which caused them to fluoresce when viewed under a fluorescence microscope. ImageJ software was subsequently used to quantify the microplastics on the filters. Although no differences were detected among water samples, trout collected upstream of the city had significantly lower levels of plastic particles than trout collected within and downstream of the city and macroinvertebrates collected in the city had significantly higher microplastic burdens than those collected upstream or downstream.

Claire Simmerman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - River Falls, claire.simmerman@my.uwrf.edu;


124 - COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL AND GRAZING AND NON-GRAZING MACROINVERTEBRATES

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL AND GRAZING AND NON-GRAZING MACROINVERTEBRATES New Zealand mud snails (NZMS) (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) are an aquatic invasive gastropod across the globe, originating from the lotic and lentic systems of New Zealand and surrounding islands. NZMS have been detected in the Laurentian Great Lakes since 1991, and have recently begun to invade streams and rivers. Due to their ability of achieving extremely high densities in invaded ranges, populations can potentially monopolize periphyton resources and outcompete native macroinvertebrates. To investigate the effects of this regionally new invasive species on native macroinvertebrates, we examined benthic samples in the Au Sable River (Michigan, USA), collected over a two-year time span, at two invaded and two uninvaded sites. Preliminary results indicate NZMS are rapidly increasing in abundance at invaded sites, with current mean (+/- SD) population densities ranging from 32,069 individuals per

m2

(+/- 3,070) to 49,546 per

m2

(+/- 5,518). Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the degree to which NZMS impact a native grazing-scraping caddisfly (Helicopysche borealis), and non-grazing caddisfly families (Brachycentridae, Limnephilidae, Hydrophychidae).

Morgan Morin (Primary Presenter/Author), Oakland University, morganmmorin@gmail.com;


Jeremy Geist (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


161 - EVALUATING EFFECTS OF LOW STREAMFLOW ON BIOTA IN THE UPPER FLINT RIVER

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

EVALUATING EFFECTS OF LOW STREAMFLOW ON BIOTA IN THE UPPER FLINT RIVER Prolonged and more frequent droughts result in low flow conditions that can reduce the health and function of river systems and impact water availability for municipalities that rely on rivers for water supply. The Upper Flint River Basin in Georgia provides an important water source for multiple municipalities and supports a diverse aquatic ecosystem that offers multiple services, including recreation and biodiversity. Though droughts occurred historically in the system, low flow events appear to be increasing in severity with climate change and increasing urban pressures and water demand in the headwaters. Conservationists and water managers within the basin seek to better understand drought effects on the ecology of the system. We reviewed published literature on drought effects and reduced flows on rivers and stream biota, focusing on aquatic organisms characteristic of the Upper Flint, to help quantify consequences of alternative water management options. This synthesis will help to identify the types of data collection that could most effectively reduce uncertainty regarding low-flow effects and potential mechanisms of ecological resilience or recovery from prolonged drought.

Mary Freeman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, mcfreeman@usgs.gov;


Seth Wenger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sethwenger@fastmail.fm;


Laura S. Craig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American Rivers, lcraig@americanrivers.org;


Ben Emanuel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American Rivers, bemanuel@americanrivers.org;


Laura Rack (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Georgia, laura.rack@uga.edu;


S09 Freshwater Salinization: Science for Solutions 193 - ARE FRESHWATER BENTHIC PERIPHYTON SODIUM AND CHLORIDE CONTENTS HOMEOSTATIC WHEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVEL INCREASES IN DISSOLVED SODIUM CHLORIDE?

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

ARE FRESHWATER BENTHIC PERIPHYTON SODIUM AND CHLORIDE CONTENTS HOMEOSTATIC WHEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVEL INCREASES IN DISSOLVED SODIUM CHLORIDE? Sodium, chloride, and other ion concentrations are increasing in fresh waters due to anthropogenic activities. Salts can be nutritional subsidy, but may also cause stress at high levels; we know little about how freshwater enrichment can affect biota. Terrestrial autotroph ion concentrations can relate positively to environmental ion concentrations; this same pattern may occur for freshwater autotrophs. We conducted a greenhouse experiment where we exposed periphyton on cobbles collected from a local, low-level salt stream in recirculating streams with increasing concentrations of sodium chloride added (ambient, 6, 32, and 64 mg/L, N=3 per treatment). After 26-d, we harvested all periphyton and examined the elemental and ionic content of the dried material. We found no evidence that periphyton sodium contents were positively related to water concentrations at these low concentrations; chloride and other elemental analysis is still in process. Periphyton sodium concentration appears to be homeostatic (i.e., no positive relationship between cell and environmental concentrations) at the concentrations examined, which may exert a metabolic cost of osmoregulation with increasing concentrations. The potential metabolic cost of this homeostasis should be examined in future studies.

Michelle Evans-White (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, mevanswh@uark.edu;


Sally Entrekin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, sallye@vt.edu;


Natalie Clay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Louisiana Tech University, nclay@latech.edu;


Samuel Dias (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Arkansas, samuelatdias@gmail.com;


S12 Climate Change in High-Gradient Mountain Streams 85 - INCORPORATING THE GENETIC LEVEL OF BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY INTO ASSESSMENTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON MOUNTAIN STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

INCORPORATING THE GENETIC LEVEL OF BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY INTO ASSESSMENTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON MOUNTAIN STREAMS Mountain streams and their biological diversity are likely sentinels of climate change impacts. Expected changes include range shifts and local extirpation, which will in turn lead to changes in mountain stream communities. There is a need to understand the current status of mountain stream biodiversity at all levels from genes to communities to better assess any future changes and identify potential refuges for mountain stream biodiversity. While most work linking climate change and mountain stream biodiversity has focussed on the species or community level, few studies have analysed the genetic level of diversity in these systems. I will outline the need for incorporating genetic diversity into our biodiversity assessment in mountain streams and present cases studies and ongoing projects that exemplify how this integration can be achieved.

Steffen Pauls (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum, Frankfurt, Germany, steffen.pauls@senckenberg.de;


Jacqueline Heckenhauer (Primary Presenter/Author), LOEWE Centre for Translational Biodiversity Genomics; Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum, Frankfurt, Germany, jacqueline.heckenhauer@senckenberg.de;


S14 Heterotrophic Regimes in Rivers: Technical and Conceptual Advances 206 - THE RESPIRATORY QUOTIENT OF RIVERS AND STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

THE RESPIRATORY QUOTIENT OF RIVERS AND STREAMS Ecosystem metabolism is almost always calculated from changes in oxygen concentrations, but determining the equivalent carbon flux necessitates a stoichiometric conversion factor. For respiration, this conversion factor, or respiratory quotient (RQ = moles CO2 produced/moles O2 consumed), is often assumed to be 1 based on the complete oxidation of glucose. However, empirical studies of RQ are few and far between: Marine studies suggest an RQ <1 while a pelagic lakes study found RQ converges >1 due to organic matter substrate control of RQ. We hypothesize that in lotic systems with much greater benthic influence, the prevalence of anaerobic respiration in sediments also controls RQ. We present the results of a benthic chamber experiment designed to determine the relative contribution of anaerobic respiration versus organic matter quality to ecosystem RQ. We also interrogate nighttime paired CO2 and O2 data to determine the variation in RQ found in lotic systems over space and time. Even slight RQ deviations from 1 can have large consequences for calculated carbon fluxes.

Lily Kirk (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, lily33@ufl.edu;


Matthew Cohen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, mjc@ufl.edu;


S15 Towards a Predictive Understanding of Metacommunity Dynamics in Freshwater Ecosystems 207 - PROJECTED CHANGES IN SNOWMELT TIMING ARE POISED TO ALTER MACROINVERTEBRATE STRUCTURE IN SIERRA NEVADA STREAMS

5/22/2019  |   13:30 - 16:00   |  Ballroom ABCD

PROJECTED CHANGES IN SNOWMELT TIMING ARE POISED TO ALTER MACROINVERTEBRATE STRUCTURE IN SIERRA NEVADA STREAMS Climate change is projected to advance median snowmelt runoff in the Sierra Nevada up to two months by 2080. Changes in peak-flow timing could impact stream biodiversity by filtering non-adaptive life histories, but research on the topic is scarce. Here, we assessed whether snowmelt-timing controls stream macroinvertebrate communities by analyzing data from the SWAMP program. We first calculated abundance and rarefaction-based taxa richness in 30 sites mostly within the Owens Valley Watershed near Mammoth Lakes, California. We then created Spatial Stream Networks (SSN) to test whether snowmelt-associated parameters (day of year, slope, average stream temperature, and groundwater influence) explained variation in macroinvertebrate abundance or taxa richness across the river network. Stream Temperature negatively influenced both abundance and taxa richness, while day of the year (DOY) and groundwater had positive and negative effects on abundance, respectively. Our results suggest that increases in summer stream temperature due to earlier snowmelt could alter macroinvertebrate abundance and richness in the area, with timing having additional effects relative to temperature change alone. Experimentation is needed to confirm our SSN model results and identify the mechanisms that control macroinvertebrate community responses to altered snowmelt timing.

Kyle Leathers (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California Berkeley, kyle_leathers@berkeley.edu;


Albert Ruhi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California Berkeley, albert.ruhi@berkeley.edu;