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SFS Annual Meeting

Tuesday, May 22, 2018
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 430 B UTILIZING OUTREACH TO REDUCE AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES FROM THE PET AND GARDEN TRADE

5/22/2018  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  430 B

UTILIZING OUTREACH TO REDUCE AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES FROM THE PET AND GARDEN TRADE Non-native aquatic plants and animals introduced through trade pose a significant ecological and economic threat. In response, we developed the Reduce Invasive Pet and PLant Escapes (RIPPLE) campaign in 2015 in collaboration with the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development. Our goal is to prevent the release of non-native aquatic organisms into the environment through education and engagement with aquarium and water garden retailers and hobbyists. Outreach materials were produced with input from retailers and include two short videos and print materials for retail display. Through discussion and trainings, retailers learn appropriate messaging and consumer recommendations. To inform our research-based outreach efforts, we distributed a survey to all independently owned pet and garden retailers in Michigan to assess their knowledge of aquatic invasive species, current behavior, and attitudes regarding their responsibility for prevention. Preliminary results indicate that while a majority of retailers believe that aquariums and water gardens pose an invasive species risk, not all actively educate their customers about the risk or how to prevent it, justifying the need for retailer engagement on proper containment and disposal methods.

Paige Filice (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, filicepa@msu.edu;


Jo A. Latimore (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, latimor1@msu.edu;


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09:15 - 09:30: / 430 B DIET AND REPRODUCTIVE INVESTMENT OF NATIVE BENTHIC STREAM FISH IN RESPONSE TO ROUND GOBY INVASION

5/22/2018  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  430 B

DIET AND REPRODUCTIVE INVESTMENT OF NATIVE BENTHIC STREAM FISH IN RESPONSE TO ROUND GOBY INVASION The abundance and persistence of the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) has often resulted in antagonistic interactions between the invasive and its native competitors. To quantify the consequences of these interactions on feeding strategies and reproductive timing of native fishes, we conducted surveys of fish communities over three years (2015-2017) in seven Michigan rivers. The native Johnny darter (Etheostoma nigrum) was used as a representative native competitor to compare to round goby in areas where the two species coexist. Gut contents and gonad masses were obtained through dissections and compared between species. Johnny darter individuals were further compared between sites where they do and do not co-occur with round goby to identify changes in feeding and reproductive strategies directly associated with round goby interaction. Although no differences in gut fullness were observed between species, gut content diversity was significantly greater in round goby than Johnny darter in all locations. Johnny darter also exhibited reproductive investment earlier in the year in populations coexisting with round goby as observed through gonad masses. These results indicate a shift in feeding strategy and reproductive timing by native competitors in the presence of round goby.

Corey Krabbenhoft (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, ckrab@wayne.edu;


Donna Kashian (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, dkashian@wayne.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 430 B A COMPARISON OF CYANOBACTERIA SENSITIVITY BETWEEN ASIAN CLAMS (CORBICULA FLUMINEA) AND QUAGGA MUSSELS (DREISSENA ROSTRIFORMIS BUGENSIS)

5/22/2018  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  430 B

A COMPARISON OF CYANOBACTERIA SENSITIVITY BETWEEN ASIAN CLAMS (CORBICULA FLUMINEA) AND QUAGGA MUSSELS (DREISSENA ROSTRIFORMIS BUGENSIS) For aquatic invasive species, the salinity of their originating habitat can affect their success in adapting to novel freshwater systems. Invaders from brackish waters, such as quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis), may have more physiological challenges than species from freshwaters, such as Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea). The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity of these two bivalves to the environmental stressors Microcystis aeruginosa and its associated toxin, microcystin. In laboratory assays, we measured oxygen consumption and filtration rate in both species to establish baseline differences and exposed them to Microcystis to compare the difference in the magnitude of response between species. Sensitivity to microcystin was evaluated through two oxidative stress biomarkers, catalase and lipid peroxidation. Quagga mussels consumed more oxygen in the cyanobacteria treatments and at a higher rate than Asian clams. Microcystis reduced filtration rates in both species, with quagga mussels filtering Microcystis at an overall higher rate. Quagga mussels also had higher levels of oxidative stress than Asian clams. These results indicate that quagga mussels may be more sensitive to Microcystis and microcystin than Asian clams, possibly due to physiological differences associated with salinity histories.

Anna Boegehold (Primary Presenter/Author), Wayne State University, az1079@wayne.edu;


Nicholas Johnson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Great Lakes Science Center, njohnson@usgs.gov;


Donna Kashian (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, dkashian@wayne.edu;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 430 B ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS OF INVASIVE FISH CONTROL: EVIDENCE FROM ZOOPLANKTON RESPONSE TO ASIAN CARP ARRIVAL AND SUPPRESSION IN A LARGE RIVER

5/22/2018  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  430 B

ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS OF INVASIVE FISH CONTROL: EVIDENCE FROM ZOOPLANKTON RESPONSE TO ASIAN CARP ARRIVAL AND SUPPRESSION IN A LARGE RIVER Commercial fishing across the invasion front on the Illinois River has been used since 2010 to stop the spread of Asian carp from the Mississippi River basin into Lake Michigan. The total annual harvest yield has steadily increased to over 300 tons (> 88,000 fish) removed and the upstream distribution has stalled less than 100 rkm from Lake Michigan. While the goal is carp control, this suppression has also produced some positive ecological responses for the native fish and plankton of this large floodplain river. Overall, while abundance and composition of fish and plankton are still altered there is evidence of ecosystem resilience including increases in rotifer numbers where harvest occurs and, subsequently, the rebounding body condition of important native planktivorous fishes. From a theoretical perspective, these results give further evidence of the importance of biotic mechanisms in ecosystems believed to be controlled by physical factors. From a more practical standpoint, we can conclude that ecosystems can be resilient to invaders (at least on a decadal scale) and that control efforts can be an effective management tool for conserving the structure and productivity.

Andrew Casper (Primary Presenter/Author), John G. Shedd Aquarium, acasper@sheddaquarium.org;


Jason DeBoer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, Illinois River Biological Station, jadeboer@illinois.edu;


Kristopher Maxson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, Illinois River Biological Station, kmax87@illinois.edu;


Alison Anderson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, Illinois River Biological Station, amander@illinois.edu;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 430 B DEPTH AND SEASON-SPECIFIC TRENDS IN INVASIVE QUAGGA MUSSEL GROWTH AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

5/22/2018  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  430 B

DEPTH AND SEASON-SPECIFIC TRENDS IN INVASIVE QUAGGA MUSSEL GROWTH AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS The introduction of invasive zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. rostriformis bugensis, respectively) has profoundly impacted freshwater ecosystems across North America. The NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory’s annual benthic survey of southern Lake Michigan reveals depth-specific population trajectories for quagga mussels, including declines in biomass at 30-50m and 50-90m and increases at depths >90m. To explore what is influencing these observed patterns, we conducted in situ field experiments to measure quagga mussel growth at multiple time-points over the course of one year and at two depths. The mussels were contained in cages at 45m and 90m in southeastern Lake Michigan. We discovered that a majority of mussel growth occurred during the fall and winter for mussels at 45m, and just the winter for mussels at 90m. Our finding that growth largely occurs following fall turnover suggests that mussels might be impacted by prolonged stratification resulting from warmer surface waters late in the season. Ultimately, the results from these studies will help to elucidate the population trajectories of quagga mussels in Lake Michigan, which can be used to anticipate future ecological impacts.

Paul Glyshaw (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, University of Michigan, pglyshaw@umich.edu;


Ashley Elgin (Primary Presenter/Author), NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, ashley.elgin@noaa.gov;


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10:15 - 10:30: / 430 B COMPARISON OF TRADITIONAL AND E DNA METABARCODING SAMPLING METHODS TO DETECT LOW ABUNDANCE SPECIES IN COMPLEX AQUATIC COMMUNITIES

5/22/2018  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  430 B

COMPARISON OF TRADITIONAL AND e DNA METABARCODING SAMPLING METHODS TO DETECT LOW ABUNDANCE SPECIES IN COMPLEX AQUATIC COMMUNITIES The detection of low abundance species, including aquatic invasive species (AIS), is critical for making informed management decisions. Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods have become a powerful tool for detecting an AIS by screening for species-specific barcodes. However, these assays may miss the detection of other AIS within eDNA samples due to their inherent specificity for a single species. Metabarcoding methods provide information on entire communities based on next-generation sequencing of all barcodes within an eDNA sample. To quantify species present at low abundance, we compared measures of fish community diversity and site occupancy based on eDNA metabarcoding to estimates based on traditional sampling methods used in fish community surveys. We collected 400 water samples from 8 lakes in Michigan. Extracted eDNAs from each water sample were used to amplify regions of the 16S and 12S rDNA loci using fish specific primers. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq. Fish species present within each lake were identified by comparing the eDNA sequence data to a database of sequences from Michigan fish species. Our results suggest metabarcoding provides added value to surveys of fish community diversity.

Seth Herbst (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Department of Natural Resources, HerbstS1@michigan.gov;


Genelle Uhrig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, genelleu@gmail.com;


Jeannette Kanefsky (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, kanefsk1@anr.msu.edu;


John Robinson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, jdrob@msu.edu;


Kim Scribner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, scribne3@msu.edu;


Nicholas Sard (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, nicksard@gmail.com;


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