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SFS Annual Meeting

Tuesday, May 22, 2018
11:00 - 12:30

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11:00 - 11:15: / 430 B INFECTION OF INVASIVE RUSTY CRAYFISH WITH NATIVE PARASITES IN THE GREAT LAKES REGION

5/22/2018  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  430 B

INFECTION OF INVASIVE RUSTY CRAYFISH WITH NATIVE PARASITES IN THE GREAT LAKES REGION Parasites may be transmitted between native and invasive species during invasions; however, the importance of this transmission for most invasions is unknown. In the Great Lakes region, a trematode parasite (Microphallus sp.) reduces invasive rusty crayfish (Faxonius rusticus) population growth, alters its behavior, and reduces its per-capita impacts on lower trophic levels. We were interested in whether Microphallus was introduced to the Great Lakes region with rusty crayfish, or if it was transmitted to rusty crayfish from a native congener (F. virilis or F. propinquus). We collected all three congeners from 25 lakes in the Great Lakes region and rusty crayfish from 38 streams in the native range. We sequenced an ~800 bp region of the mitochondrial COI gene for 182 trematode parasites from collected crayfish. Parasite genotypes were similar among crayfish in the Great Lakes region, and diverged significantly between the Great Lakes region and native range of rusty crayfish, suggesting that the species of Microphallus present in the Great Lakes was transmitted to rusty crayfish after the crayfish was introduced. These results provide new evidence that parasites in an invaded range can be important for invasive species impacts.

Lindsey Reisinger (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, lreisinger1@ufl.edu;


Erin Collins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Michigan University, eecollin1@gmail.com;


Mael Glon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio State University, glon.1@osu.edu;


Andrew Mahon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Michigan University, mahon2a@cmich.edu;


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11:15 - 11:30: / 430 B EVALUATING EARLY DETECTION MONITORING PROTOCOLS OF NEW ZEALAND MUDSNAILS USING QUALITATIVE SURVEYS

5/22/2018  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  430 B

EVALUATING EARLY DETECTION MONITORING PROTOCOLS OF NEW ZEALAND MUDSNAILS USING QUALITATIVE SURVEYS New Zealand mudsnails are a recent invader to the state of Michigan, initially detected in non-targeted surveys in the Pere Marquette River in 2015, and have since been found in the Au Sable, Boardman, Manistee and Pine Rivers. Our first goal was to design and implement targeted qualitative surveys across rivers that were preserved to be at risk of invasion. 227 qualitative surveys were conducted across 14 different rivers in 2017. In implementing these surveys, a natural question is how efficient are qualitative searches in detecting mudsnails when present. As such, our second goal was to estimate the detection probability for qualitative surveys. We implemented a split-plot type of sampling design, and found that when mudsnails were found in one sub-plot, they were also generally found in the other sub-plot. Time until first detection was recorded for each searcher and then was compared to a qualitative level of density recorded for each searcher. A shorter time to first detection was correlated with a higher level of qualitative abundance. The targeted qualitative survey was determined to be a highly effective early detection tool.

Seth Herbst (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Department of Natural Resources, HerbstS1@michigan.gov;


William Keiper (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, keiperw@michigan.gov;


Daniel Hayes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University , hayesdan@msu.edu;


Samantha Stanton (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University , tanksama@msu.edu;


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11:30 - 11:45: / 430 B EFFECTS OF INVASIVE MACROPHYTES ON LITTORAL PRIMARY PRODUCERS IN NORTH-TEMPERATE LAKES

5/22/2018  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  430 B

EFFECTS OF INVASIVE MACROPHYTES ON LITTORAL PRIMARY PRODUCERS IN NORTH-TEMPERATE LAKES The invasive macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum can increase physical structure of littoral habitats, while also competing for nutrients with and shading macrophytes, periphyton, and phytoplankton below. We conducted a field study in 6 lakes across Michigan to test the hypothesis that presence of M. spicatum could alter standing crop and production rates of littoral primary producers. We measured open water metabolism in paired invaded and uninvaded plots in each lake, while simultaneously measuring standing crops, primary production and respiration rates of epiphytes, periphyton and phytoplankton using light-dark chambers. We found that invaded and uninvaded plots had similar rates of primary production (4.52 ± 0.83 vs 3.73 ± 1.09 g O2 m-2 d-1, respectively) and respiration (-5.48 ± 1.62 vs -3.92 ± 1.68 g O2 m-2 d-1). Yet macrophyte biomass and epiphytic ash free dry mass was 2.5 and 4-fold higher in invaded vs. uninvaded plots. These differences in standing crops could lead to differences in production rates among these different primary producers in invaded plots. Changes in the distribution of primary production due to M. spicatum invasion may be key for predicting how this invasive plant alters littoral food webs.

Amy Marcarelli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


Casey Huckins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, cjhuckin@mtu.edu;


Ryan Van Goethem (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Technological University, rrvangoe@mtu.edu;


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11:45 - 12:00: / 430 B POPULATION DYNAMICS OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS IN A NORTHERN MICHIGAN STREAM

5/22/2018  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  430 B

POPULATION DYNAMICS OF NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAILS IN A NORTHERN MICHIGAN STREAM New Zealand mud snails (NZMS) were identified from samples collected from the East Branch Au Sable River in May 2015 during routine macroinvertebrate surveys. Consequently, we conducted two (May and August) macroinvertebrate surveys during 2016 and three surveys (February, May, and August) during 2017 to quantify NZMS abundance and track macroinvertebrate communities. Results indicate that NZMS density in the lower East Branch Au Sable River has increased relatively rapidly, reaching over 30,000 m2 in three years. When comparing just May samples or August samples, NZMS densities have increased each year. Populations persisted through the winter at 15,000 m2, primarily as juveniles. NZMS have spread downstream to the Main Branch of the Au Sable where densities have increased more slowly. In the Main Branch above the East Branch confluence, densities have remained very low. Non-NZMS invertebrate densities in the lower East Branch Au Sable initially increased (May 2016) then decreased (May 2017) to near 2015 densities. At current NZMS densities, non-NZMA invertebrate densities appear to be stable, but nutrient discharge from an aquaculture facility has increased algal production and may moderate their response.

Mark Luttenton (Primary Presenter/Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, luttentm@gvsu.edu;


Justin Wegner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, wegnerju@mail.gvsu.edu;


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12:00 - 12:15: / 430 B THE NEW ZEALAND MUDSNAIL: STATE OF THE SCIENCE AND CURRENT STUDIES OF AN EARLY INVASION IN A MICHIGAN RIVER

5/22/2018  |   12:00 - 12:15   |  430 B

THE NEW ZEALAND MUDSNAIL: STATE OF THE SCIENCE AND CURRENT STUDIES OF AN EARLY INVASION IN A MICHIGAN RIVER New Zealand mudsnails (NZMS) Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a world-wide invader, are expanding their range throughout North America. In the Laurentian Great Lakes, NZMS populations have been documented since 1991. Secondary invasion of streams and rivers has occurred very recently, where the mechanisms of range expansion and potential impacts are poorly understood. Here we provide a synthesis of the global invasion, and present results from field studies in a high-profile trout stream, the Au Sable River (Michigan, USA). Here NZMS continue to increase their range and densities. Nearly half of trout sampled in a diet analysis contained NZMS, and made up as much as 50% of the gut contents. In a lab experiment NZMS growth is influenced by leaf-litter type, though NZMS do not influence organic matter processing at current densities. A common household cleaner, Formula 409, was found to be highly effective at decontaminating fishing gear during laboratory trials, holding promise as a means of preventing spread. Through research and outreach, we hope to improve understanding of the NZMS invasion, increase public awareness, and help maintain the integrity of freshwaters in the Great Lakes region and elsewhere.

Jeremy Geist (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, jageist@oakland.edu;


Mark Luttenton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, luttentm@gvsu.edu;


Justin Wegner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, wegnerju@mail.gvsu.edu;


Scott Tiegs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dept. of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, tiegs@oakland.edu;


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12:15 - 12:30: / 430 B ANALYZING EURASIAN WATERMILFOIL EXTENT AND TREATMENT EFFICACY USING UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM (UAS) MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY

5/22/2018  |   12:15 - 12:30   |  430 B

ANALYZING EURASIAN WATERMILFOIL EXTENT AND TREATMENT EFFICACY USING UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM (UAS) MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum or “EWM”) is an invasive submerged aquatic plant that can form thick stands and tangled mats of vegetation near the water surface, interfering with navigation, recreation, and native plants. Environmental and natural resource agencies have spent millions of dollars to manage EWM, but it is challenging to quickly and accurately track the extent of EWM infestations and document the efficacy of management methods. We have used unmanned aerial systems (UAS or “drones”) to collect natural color and multispectral images of treatment and control sites to map the extent of EWM establishment and responses to management in nearshore areas of Lake Huron and Lake Superior in Michigan. Results show that with visible and near infrared (NIR) multispectral wavelengths and relatively clear water conditions, UAS-enabled imaging is effective for monitoring EWM extent following management efforts such as treatment with a native fungus to reduce EWM growth, mechanical harvesting, and Diver Assisted Suction Harvesting (DASH). UAS-enabled imaging provides another tool to study the management and ecology of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Great Lakes and beyond.

Amy Marcarelli (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


Amanda Grimm (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Tech Research Institute, aggrimm@mtu.edu;


Richard Dobson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Tech Research Institute, rjdobson@mtu.edu;


Casey Huckins (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, cjhuckin@mtu.edu;


Ryan Van Goethem (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, rrvangoe@mtu.edu;


Robert Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Les Cheneaux Watershed Council, rob1518smith@gmail.com ;


Mark Clymer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Les Cheneaux Watershed Council, markclymer@cedarville.net ;


Nicholas Marion (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Tech Research Institute, npmarion@mtu.edu;


Colin Brooks (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Tech Research Institute, cnbrooks@mtu.edu;


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