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SFS Annual Meeting

Tuesday, May 22, 2018
14:00 - 15:30

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14:00 - 14:15: / 410 B THE APPLICATION OF WEB-BASED DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS AND THE VALUE OF LOCAL INFORMATION IN PRIORITIZING BARRIER REMOVAL IN NORTHWEST LOWER MICHIGAN, USA

5/22/2018  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  410 B

THE APPLICATION OF WEB-BASED DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS AND THE VALUE OF LOCAL INFORMATION IN PRIORITIZING BARRIER REMOVAL IN NORTHWEST LOWER MICHIGAN, USA Connectivity loss in freshwater ecosystems has threatened both biodiversity and ecosystem services worldwide, but restoration projects are usually costly, time-consuming, and require the consideration of trade-offs among multiple objectives. Web-based decision support tools (DSTs) have been developed to facilitate decision-making processes in watershed management by providing ecological and socio-economic data, spatial analysis models, and visualizing the result. However, DSTs are underutilized by decision makers, regardless of the usefulness of these tools. In this study, we reviewed eight web-based DSTs, evaluated their performance under limited data, and revealed the complementarity among DSTs to address some key concerns from managers and stakeholders. Restoring habitat connectivity in rivers of northwest lower Michigan, USA, was used as a case study due to the abundance of both DSTs and local inventory data. The results suggested that while some DSTs could produce outcomes insensitive to local data availability, the trade-offs among users’ objectives might influence the cost and effectiveness of DSTs’ outcomes. Improving DSTs’ ability to incorporate objectives consistent with policy and from multiple stakeholders across management scales can mitigate the gap between DSTs and management decisions while making the process transparent and efficient.

Hsien-Yung Lin (Primary Presenter/Author), Quantitative Fisheries Center, Michigan State University, linyungh@msu.edu;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 410 B BEAVER HABITAT SELECTION AND IMPACTS ON SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN A SOUTHWESTERN OHIO STREAM

5/22/2018  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  410 B

BEAVER HABITAT SELECTION AND IMPACTS ON SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN A SOUTHWESTERN OHIO STREAM Beavers (Castor Canadensis) cause significant ecologic change within stream systems by building dams. Recently beaver introductions have become increasingly sought after as alternative management strategies to restore streams. In this study we: 1) Determine the spatial distribution of beaver impacts around a man-made reservoir within a state park, and 2) to quantify the impact of a beaver dam on sediment and nutrient dynamics. The spatial distribution of beaver impacts appears to be highly influenced by the presence of a man-made reservoir. Sediment and nutrient concentrations are significantly impacted by the beaver dam. This study highlights the importance and effectiveness of beaver within protected lands in order to improve water quality.

Bartosz Grudzinski (Primary Presenter/Author), Miami University, grudzibp@miamioh.edu;


Marvin Jojola (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), New Mexico State University, mejojola@nmsu.edu;


David Kist (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University, kistdm2@miamioh.edu;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 410 B GUIDING DESERT RIVER RESTORATION: MONITORING RESULTS FROM AN EXPERIMENTAL HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE SAN RAFAEL RIVER, UTAH

5/22/2018  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  410 B

GUIDING DESERT RIVER RESTORATION: MONITORING RESULTS FROM AN EXPERIMENTAL HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE SAN RAFAEL RIVER, UTAH Development of river restoration activities that maintain and enhance essential habitat within constraints imposed by water development and climate change are essential for native fish conservation. However, such restoration is challenging in desert river systems, because water is limited and desert rivers are naturally extremely dynamic. The complexities necessitate an experimental restoration approach. Based on several years of biological and geomorphic research, we designed and implemented an experimental and adaptive restoration plan for the San Rafael River, a desert river in southeastern Utah. Activities included systematic removal of non-native tamarisk trees, planting of native cottonwood trees, placement of gravel in the river channel, and installation of beaver-dam mimicking structures. Here, we report results of two years of monitoring data, use the information to identify effective techniques, and provide recommendations for future restoration efforts. Recommendations include alternative hypotheses about river response to restoration that can be further tested in subsequent restoration phases. Evaluating these alternative hypotheses will help improve restoration on the San Rafael River and inform the science and practice of river restoration in desert rivers in general.

Justin Jimenez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bureau of Land Management, jjimenez@blm.gov;


Phaedra Budy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Utah Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Utah State University, phaedra.budy@usu.edu;


Brian Laub (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Texas at San Antonio, laubbriang@gmail.com;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 410 B EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL FOR PRE-ZYGOTIC ISOLATION AND HYBRIDIZATION BETWEEN LANDLOCKED AND ANADROMOUS FISH POPULATIONS FOLLOWING SECONDARY CONTACT

5/22/2018  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  410 B

EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL FOR PRE-ZYGOTIC ISOLATION AND HYBRIDIZATION BETWEEN LANDLOCKED AND ANADROMOUS FISH POPULATIONS FOLLOWING SECONDARY CONTACT Fish passage projects are altering habitat connectivity for many anadromous fish species, increasing the chance that previously isolated populations will come into contact. Many anadromous fish species have isolated and ecologically divergent freshwater resident populations. The outcome of secondary contact between divergent life histories may be complex and difficult to predict. To understand the complex ecological and evolutionary processes of secondary contact, we examined the potential for life history forms of several fish species to hybridize by synthesizing data on spawning time distributions. We use anadromous and landlocked alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) as a case study, since they are currently undergoing secondary contact as a result of a fishway installation in Connecticut. We detected low levels (less than 15%) of overlap in spawning time between alewife life histories, with anadromous alewife spawning earlier and over a shorter duration than landlocked alewife. Overlap in spawning time was variable and driven by variation in the initiation of spawning by landlocked alewife. We discovered similar patterns in spawning behavior for other anadromous species. Hybridization between life histories after secondary contact may have significant and complex implications for the successful management of threatened fish populations.

Katherine Littrell (Primary Presenter/Author), Yale University, katherine.littrell@yale.edu;


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15:00 - 15:15: / 410 B THE ROLE OF FOREST REMNANTS IN MAINTAINING STREAM ECOSYSTEM INTEGRITY: THE PENETRANCE EFFECT.

5/22/2018  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  410 B

THE ROLE OF FOREST REMNANTS IN MAINTAINING STREAM ECOSYSTEM INTEGRITY: THE PENETRANCE EFFECT. Riparian corridors in contemporary landscapes are characterized by a mosaic of vegetation patches resulting from a variety of human activities. Forest fragmentation is known to cause edge responses that are key to understanding the influence of landscape structure on habitat quality. Since streams are transport-dominated ecosystems, it is unlikely that changes in instream conditions map synchronously with the spatial pattern of riparian fragmentation. Local riparian influences are likely to be propagated some distance downstream, creating a downstream 'shadow' of upstream riparian conditions. Here we present a method to estimate these penetrance effects on a suite of environmental variables and invertebrate communities from 4 sampled transitions (2 in SE Brazil, 2 in Colorado, USA). We employed a threshold modelling approach based on alternative nonlinear models. Inverse estimation was applied to determine the distance in which the variables started to shift from upstream stable conditions and how far the buffering effects of the upstream riparian condition could be detected. We find that the method is suited for detecting downstream effects of riparian vegetation, and evidence riparian vegetation potential on both restoring upstream degraded conditions and maintaining downstream conditions through abrupt riparian discontinuities.

Rafael Feijó de Lima (Primary Presenter/Author), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, rafael.feijo.bio.uerj@gmail.com;


Eduardo F. Silva-Júnior (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, eduardobioadventure@gmail.com ;


Steven Thomas (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, sthomas5@unl.edu;


Leonardo Kleba Lisboa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, leokleba@yahoo.com.br;


Timothy P. Moulton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, moulton.timothy@gmail.com;


Scott Mcleay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alabama, smcleay27@gmail.com;


Eugenia Zandona (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, eugenia.zandona@gmail.com;


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15:15 - 15:30: / 410 B COLLECTIVE IMPACT IN THE BI-NATIONAL ST. CLAIR-DETROIT RIVER SYSTEM

5/22/2018  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  410 B

COLLECTIVE IMPACT IN THE BI-NATIONAL ST. CLAIR-DETROIT RIVER SYSTEM A 2011 paper by John Kania and Mark Kramer outlined five elements of effective collaborations tackling complex, difficult social and environmental problems now known as “Collective Impact.” Many of these elements, such as “continuous communication,” “backbone organization,” and developing a “common agenda,” have been key components of the St. Clair-Detroit River System Initiative (SCDRS). SCDRS is a bi-national environmental initiative in southeast Michigan and southwest Ontario that brings together more than 30 organizations, including U.S. and Canadian natural resource-related agencies, Tribes/First Nations, units of local government, industry and university partners, non-profits, and interested citizens to develop a common vision: the restoration of portions of southern Lake Huron, the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, the Detroit River, and western Lake Erie to a thriving ecosystem with science-based management and broad social support that provides environmental services for the region and the Great Lakes basin. This presentation will explore the five Collective Impact elements, their current application within SCDRS, and their potential application elsewhere. Kania, J. and M. Kramer. 2011. Stanford Social Innovation Review. Accessed at: https://ssir.org/articles/entry/collective_impact

Michelle Selzer (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Office of the Great Lakes, selzerm@michigan.gov;


Mary Bohling (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Sea Grant, bohling@anr.msu.edu;


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