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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 24, 2018
11:00 - 12:30

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11:00 - 11:15: / 330 B ASSESSMENT OF CONFIDENCE IN A MAUMEE RIVER WATERSHED SWAT MODEL

5/24/2018  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  

ASSESSMENT OF CONFIDENCE IN A MAUMEE RIVER WATERSHED SWAT MODEL The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement sets reducing phosphorus as a strategy for limiting occurrences of harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie, and assessing compliance with phosphorus reduction targets can be done using watershed models. This case study highlights performance upstream of the calibration site in a Soil & Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model of the Maumee River watershed – a watershed which accounts for half of the total phosphorus to the western Lake Erie basin. We compiled all available measurements for average daily flow and phosphorus concentration data in the watershed, and sorted this database based on appropriateness for comparison with SWAT outputs. We found consistent over- and under-prediction of sites within our model, but a greater number of sites with over-prediction. Using a semi-quantitative approach, we explored the influence of factors specific to the monitoring data that we hypothesized would influence model validation, such as accuracy of flow prediction, drainage area of the gauge, and the quality and type of measured data. Results highlight the importance for the appropriate use of model outputs upstream of the calibration site, and the potential for model improvement through multi-site calibration.

Margaret Kalcic (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, kalcic.4@osu.edu;


Jay Martin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, martin.1130@osu.edu;


Anna Apostel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, apostel.4@osu.edu;


Jeffrey Kast (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, kast.14@osu.edu;


Noel Aloysius (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Missouri, aloysiusn@missouri.edu;


Awoke Teshager (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan, awoke@umich.edu;


Yu-Chen Wang (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Michigan, yuchenw@umich.edu;


Rebecca Muenich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, rebecca.muenich@asu.edu;


Haley Kujawa (Primary Presenter/Author), The Ohio State University, kujawa.21@osu.edu;


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11:15 - 11:30: / 330 B TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF STREAM METABOLISM IN THREE STREAMS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT SOURCES OF ANTHROPOGENIC NUTRIENTS

5/24/2018  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  

TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF STREAM METABOLISM IN THREE STREAMS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT SOURCES OF ANTHROPOGENIC NUTRIENTS Stream metabolism is associated with nutrient availability. However, the quantity and timing of nutrient delivery can vary with the source of nutrients, which may lead to among stream differences in stream metabolism. We investigated the influence that common anthropogenic nutrient sources have on temporal patterns of stream metabolism by comparing three mid-order streams exposed to either mechanical wastewater effluent, lagoon wastewater effluent, or non-point agricultural runoff. Gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) were estimated daily from June to October of 2013. Time series analyses will be used to identify differences in the temporal patterns of GPP and ER in streams exposed to different nutrient sources. In addition, multivariate analyses will be used to determine the associations among proximal drivers of stream metabolism and GPP and ER at each study site. We predict that episodic inputs of nutrients in the agricultural stream will result in greater temporal variability in GPP and ER compared to continuous inputs of nutrients from wastewater effluent. Moreover, light and discharge will be the main proximal controls of stream metabolism. Results will generate knowledge on the stability of ecosystem processes in human altered streams.

Nolan J.T. Pearce (Primary Presenter/Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, npearce7@uwo.ca;


Jason J. Venkiteswaran (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wilfrid Laurier University, jvenkiteswaran@wlu.ca;


Patricia A. Chambers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington Ontario, Canada, L7R 4A6, patricia.chambers@canada.ca;


Adam G. Yates (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


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11:30 - 11:45: / 330 B RESPONSES OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN ROMANIAN STREAMS TO MULTIPLE AGRICULTURAL STRESSORS

5/24/2018  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  

RESPONSES OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN ROMANIAN STREAMS TO MULTIPLE AGRICULTURAL STRESSORS Multiple anthropogenic stressors, many of which are associated with agriculture, contribute to the decline in freshwater biodiversity. Differentiating pesticide effects from those of other agricultural stressors, e.g. excessive nutrient or sediment input, is complicated by their co-occurrence in landscapes with intensive agriculture. To quantify the contribution of pesticides, we studied streams in a landscape in Eastern Europe, where traditional extensive agriculture (e.g. relying on horses) has remained beside highly industrialized agriculture. We hypothesized that excessive nutrient and sediment input would largely be unrelated to agricultural intensity, whereas pesticide use would increase with agricultural intensity. Moreover, we conducted a comprehensive pesticide survey, whereas most previous studies captured only a fraction. We sampled 19 small streams along a gradient from extensive to intensive agriculture for macroinvertebrate communities, pesticides and other relevant physico-chemical and landscape variables that may influence macroinvertebrates. Pesticides were sampled using two passive sampling techniques and we analyzed 246 pesticides and their metabolites. The association of invertebrate community composition with different stressors and the relative importance of the stressors will be presented. We discuss the relative importance of stressors and particularly pesticides with respect to the results from previous studies.

Stefan Kunz (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, kunz2554@uni-landau.de;


Verena Schreiner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, schreiner-verena@uni-landau.de;


Eduard Szöcs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, eduardszoecs@gmail.com;


Moritz Link (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, link@uni-landau.de;


Karina Battes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Babes-Bolyai University, kbattes@yahoo.com;


Mirela Cimpean (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Babes-Bolyai University, mirela_cimpean@yahoo.com;


Ralf Schäfer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, schaefer-ralf@uni-landau.de;


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11:45 - 12:00: / 330 B INFLUENCE OF LAND COVER, DISCHARGE, AND SEASON ON SUSPENDED SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN SW OHIO STREAMS

5/24/2018  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  

INFLUENCE OF LAND COVER, DISCHARGE, AND SEASON ON SUSPENDED SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN SW OHIO STREAMS Excessive suspended sediment and nutrient concentrations often result in negative environmental impacts within rivers and on downstream water bodies. Understanding land use impacts on suspended sediment and nutrient concentrations is critical for developing management practices that improve water quality. Although it is widely known that urban and agricultural development tend to increase surface water pollutants, the relative impacts between urban and agricultural land cover are less understood. Additionally, land cover, discharge and seasonality can all influence sediment and nutrient dynamics in rivers, yet often these factors are not analyzed together. The purpose of this study is to determine the impacts of land cover, discharge, and season on suspended sediment and nutrient concentrations, across a large land cover gradient (8-92% urban), in eight SW Ohio streams. We collected weekly base flow samples from each stream for a one year period and determined total suspended sediment, total nitrogen, nitrate, total phosphorus, and phosphate concentrations along with N:P ratios. Preliminary results indicate that land use and season have significant impacts on sediment and nutrient concentrations. The presence of waste water treatment plants appears to increase phosphorus concentrations regardless of land use.

Jeff Lazar (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University, lazarj@miamioh.edu;


Bartosz Grudzinski (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Miami University, grudzibp@miamioh.edu;


Rachel Spahr (Primary Presenter/Author), Miami University, spahrre@miamioh.edu;


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12:00 - 12:15: / 330 B STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FOR SETTING TARGETS FOR AGRICULTURAL BMP RESTORATION.

5/24/2018  |   12:00 - 12:15   |  

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES FOR SETTING TARGETS FOR AGRICULTURAL BMP RESTORATION. Theories on stream ecosystem recovery trajectories require testing in specific regions relative to the restoration objectives. Large-scale Agricultural Best Management Practice (BMP) programs in multiple small (<10 km2) watersheds are designed to reduce nutrient, sediment and other inputs from runoff to streams. Our research addresses measuring the success of restoration with potential improvements in stream quality and aquatic biota. We sampled benthic macroinvertebrates near agricultural BMPs in the Delaware River Basin with agricultural land use ranging from 0-83%. We are examining baseline conditions in terms of macroinvertebrate community structure (taxa) and function (functional traits/metrics). Sites show different relationships with each other and with environmental variables based on either structure or abundance. We are translating these differences to ways to predict possible changes in these communities as a result of BMPs. Knowledge of specific macroinvertebrate responses to watershed conditions will provide a basis for predicting how improvements in water and habitat quality in these watersheds will be correlated with increased biotic integrity on a local scale.

Stefanie Kroll (Primary Presenter/Author), Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, sak345@drexel.edu;


Hayley Oakland (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, hco23@drexel.edu;


John Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, jkjackson@stroudcenter.org;


Bernard Sweeney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, sweeney@stroudcenter.org;


Juliann Battle (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, jbattle@stroudcenter.org;


Richard Horwitz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, rjh78@drexel.edu;


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