Back to top

SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 24, 2018
14:00 - 15:30

<< Back to Schedule

14:00 - 14:15: / 330 B AN ECOLOGICAL CAUSAL ASSESSMENT OF TRIBUTARIES IN THE RED RIVER VALLEY, MANITOBA: IMPACTS OF AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

5/24/2018  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  330 B

AN ECOLOGICAL CAUSAL ASSESSMENT OF TRIBUTARIES IN THE RED RIVER VALLEY, MANITOBA: IMPACTS OF AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN SETTLEMENTS Water resources on the Canadian Prairies have become increasingly imperilled due to growing human populations, agricultural intensification, and climate change. The Red River Valley (RRV) in southern Manitoba, Canada represents a nexus of these cumulative stressors – here, loss of the protective function of wetlands and streams associated with land use change over the past century, combined with intensifying precipitation and runoff, has resulted in the rapid eutrophication of Lake Winnipeg. A concerted research effort over the past decade has greatly improved the availability of data. However, a full synthesis of this data and associated knowledge remains lacking. We conducted a status assessment to identify and compare contemporary and historical land use, climatic, hydrologic, and water quality conditions within the RRV. Then, using current knowledge of the ecological condition of tributaries in the RRV, we will complete an ecological causal assessment to identify linkages and knowledge gaps between anthropogenic drivers and ecological endpoints. Our findings will direct future research thereby aiding in the prediction of responses to future changes within the RRV. Furthermore, this synthesis will help direct policy and management decisions needed to protect Lake Winnipeg.

Kristin J. Painter (Primary Presenter/Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, kpainte3@uwo.ca;


Robert B. Brua (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 3H5, bob.brua@canada.ca;


Patricia A. Chambers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington Ontario, Canada, L7R 4A6, patricia.chambers@canada.ca;


Joseph M. Culp (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada and Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3C5, joseph.culp@canada.ca;


Kim J. Rattan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada , kim.rattan@canada.ca;


Adam G. Yates (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

14:15 - 14:30: / 330 B ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT ON HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA STREAMS

5/24/2018  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  330 B

ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT ON HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA STREAMS Urban development in watersheds can impact streams in a number of ways: decreased baseflow, flashier flow, increased erosion, increases in nutrient and pollutant concentrations, and changes in stream chemistry. This study investigated three streams in Meadowood Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA), in Northern Virginia, with varying levels of urban development in their watersheds. The streams were monitored weekly for two years, and discharge, specific conductance, turbidity, nutrient concentrations, and radon (a groundwater indicator) were measured. Significant differences in water quality were observed among the three streams. Radon levels were highest in the least urbanized stream, supporting the idea of a higher baseflow index. Specific conductance was positively correlated with watershed urban development and winter road salting. Concentrations of nitrate, phosphate and ammonium also reflected the influence of land use. A groundwater survey was conducted to assess variability in the quality and influx rate of groundwater throughout the stream system. This study characterizes temporal variation over two years of sampling as well as spatial variation in water quality related to urbanization and provides insights about how streams within protected areas are influenced by development outside the boundaries of those areas.

Jacob Melone (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, jacob.c.melone@gmail.com;


Melanie Friedel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, mf0040a@student.american.edu;


Jesse Weinstein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, jw8874a@student.american.edu;


Harrison Hyde (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, hh7062a@student.american.edu;


Nikita Mukherjee (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, nm6674a@student.american.edu;


Keeli Howard (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American University, kh5325a@student.american.edu;


Karen Knee (Primary Presenter/Author), American University, knee@american.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

14:30 - 14:45: / 330 B YESTERDAY IS HISTORY, TOMORROW IS A MYSTERY: QUANTIFICATION OF LONG-TERM NUTRIENT LEGACIES IN HUMAN-IMPACTED WATERSHEDS

5/24/2018  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  330 B

YESTERDAY IS HISTORY, TOMORROW IS A MYSTERY: QUANTIFICATION OF LONG-TERM NUTRIENT LEGACIES IN HUMAN-IMPACTED WATERSHEDS Nutrient inputs to human-impacted watersheds have more than doubled over the last century in response to population growth and intensive agricultural practices. Although mass balance studies consistently show N and P inputs exceeding outputs in human-impacted areas, the forms and relative magnitudes of legacy N and P accumulation are still not well understood. In the present work, we have developed a parsimonious, process-based model, ELEMeNT, that brings together soil N and P dynamics, erosion processes for simulation of surface P transport and a travel time-based approach for simulation of transport and retention along subsurface pathways. Using more than 100-year trajectories of nutrient inputs to watersheds across the US and Canada, we have not only reconstructed total nutrient yields at watershed outlets, but also estimate magnitudes of N and P accumulation along surface and subsurface pathways. As both inland and coastal waters continue to be impacted by eutrophication events, even after significant improvements in nutrient management practices, such estimates of legacy nutrient accumulation are crucial to setting realistic targets for reducing nutrient loading.

Nandita Basu (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Waterloo, nandita.basu@uwaterloo.ca;


Kimberly Van Meter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Waterloo, kvanmeter@uwaterloo.ca;


Philippe Van Cappellen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Waterloo, pvc@uwaterloo.ca;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

14:45 - 15:00: / 330 B BIOGEOCHEMICAL ASYNCHRONY: ECOSYSTEM DRIVERS OF CONCENTRATION-DISCHARGE DYNAMICS ACROSS TEMPORAL SCALES

5/24/2018  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  330 B

BIOGEOCHEMICAL ASYNCHRONY: ECOSYSTEM DRIVERS OF CONCENTRATION-DISCHARGE DYNAMICS ACROSS TEMPORAL SCALES Watersheds exhibit tremendous heterogeneity in response to climatic and landscape controls.  Understanding this heterogeneity and identifying processes underlying the complexities of watershed response remains a central task of watershed modelers.  Accordingly, researchers have become increasingly interested in identifying key hydrologic and biogeochemical signatures of watershed functionality, and in linking these signatures to dominant controls on watershed processes.  Recently, there has been particular interest in identifying signatures or key metrics of event-scale relationships between solute concentrations and river discharge. Such metrics provide a means of understanding the export dynamics of nutrients and other stream constituents under varying discharge regimes, and also serve as an indicator of the spatial and temporal availability of these constituents within the landscape.  Herein, we characterize concentration-discharge relationships for nitrogen and phosphorus across more than 200 Great Lakes watersheds.  Based on this analysis, we demonstrate a diversity of watershed behavior spanning a significant gradient of climate and land use.  Most importantly, our results show strong correlations between event-scale nutrient dynamics and seasonal concentration regimes, with these regimes being significantly impacted by agricultural and urban land use.

Kimberly Van Meter (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Waterloo, kvanmeter@uwaterloo.ca;


Nandita Basu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Waterloo, nandita.basu@uwaterloo.ca;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

15:00 - 15:15: / 330 B MANAGEMENT OPTIONS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN THE MINNESOTA RIVER BASIN

5/24/2018  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  330 B

MANAGEMENT OPTIONS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN THE MINNESOTA RIVER BASIN Nutrient enrichment from agricultural activities drives widespread eutrophication of freshwater ecosystems. Despite substantial efforts to increase nitrogen and phosphorus retention in managed landscapes of the Midwest, little progress has been made in reversing eutrophication. This talk describes research to define sources of nutrient losses from agricultural watersheds in southern Minnesota to identify management actions that will be effective for achieving local water quality improvement via reduction in nutrient concentrations and loads. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses were linked primarily to fertilizer inputs to watersheds, but their transport pathways to rivers diverged. Tile drainage was the dominant source of N loss, but near channel sources were the major sources of particulate and dissolved from erosion and diffuse non point sources. Remnant wetlands and shallow lakes were strong sinks for N, and did not appear to contribute strongly to P losses. Due to their role in reducing N loads and controlling downstream erosion, expansion of wetland cover could help efficiently control both N and P losses. Synthesizing recent information, we examine potential restoration and management changes that will be most effective for comprehensive water quality improvement in this watershed.

Jacques Finlay (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, jfinlay@umn.edu;


Christy Dolph (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota , dolph008@umn.edu;


Amy Hansen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, hanse782@umn.edu;


Anna Baker (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS, bake0871@umn.edu;


Brent Dalzell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), univerisity of minnesota, bdalzell@umn.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

15:15 - 15:30: / 330 B COMMUNITY AND STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT FOR NATURE BASED SOLUTIONS PLANNING TO REDUCE NUTRIENT EXPORT TO COASTAL WATERS

5/24/2018  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  330 B

COMMUNITY AND STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT FOR NATURE BASED SOLUTIONS PLANNING TO REDUCE NUTRIENT EXPORT TO COASTAL WATERS The Massachusetts Chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) received an EPA grant to work on a project associated with section 208 of the Clean Water Act. TNC hosted community workshops to develop a plan of nature based solutions to reduce stormwater and wastewater pollution and nutrient loading. TNC engaged stakeholders in Central Falls, RI and Middleborough, MA in a series of community workshops. The planning process incorporated local knowledge, GIS mapping technology, and environmental engineering expertise. The two resulting map based plans approximated current nutrient loading, developed nutrient pollution reduction goals, and proposed effective project locations. Nutrient reduction calculators were used to calculate the expected reduction from each proposed solution to reach target nutrient export rates. In the absence of a TMDL for both locations, nutrient reduction goals were developed using waste water treatment discharge permits and EPA gold book standards. A qualitative analysis of water retention and potential impacts to CSO events were also discussed.

Sara Burns (Primary Presenter/Author), The Nature Conservancy, sara.burns@tnc.org;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.