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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 24, 2018
14:00 - 15:30

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14:00 - 14:15: / 410 A ASSESSMENT OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND STRUCTURE AMONG POPULATIONS OF EPIOBLASMA TRIQUETRA (BIVALVIA: UNIONIDAE) IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES WATERSHED

5/24/2018  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  410 A

ASSESSMENT OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND STRUCTURE AMONG POPULATIONS OF EPIOBLASMA TRIQUETRA (BIVALVIA: UNIONIDAE) IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES WATERSHED The endangered freshwater mussel Epioblasma triquetra (Snuffbox) has the largest distribution of any other species in its critically imperiled genus. The Great Lakes populations of E. triquetra are among the most important remaining strongholds for this species. Using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci, this study examined the genetic diversity and structure of E. triquetra (n = 234) at twelve locations where they are known to be extant in the Great Lakes region. Genetic structure followed the geographic distribution of sampling locations in the three regions sampled: the Green Bay drainage; the Grand River drainage, Michigan; and the Huron-Erie corridor, USA and Canada. The genetic structure found is likely due to three separate post-glacial colonization events by E. triquetra into the Great Lakes. Only one of the twelve sampling locations (Embarrass River, WI) showed evidence of a recent bottleneck and no populations showed evidence of significant inbreeding. The strong large-scale pattern of genetic structure and diversity observed for E. triquetra in the Great Lakes region suggests that conservation efforts and management decisions should take genetic profiles into context before facilitating admixture among populations via translocations and/or hatchery propagation of juveniles.

Caitlin Beaver (Primary Presenter/Author), Central Michigan University, beave1c@cmich.edu;


Daelyn Woolnough (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Michigan University, wooln1d@cmich.edu;


David Zanatta (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Central Michigan University, zanat1d@cmich.edu;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 410 A GENETIC EVIDENCE SUGGESTS MULTIPLE INTRODUCTIONS OF THE INVASIVE FRESHWATER SNAIL, MELANOIDES TUBERCULATA, IN FLORIDA, USA.

5/24/2018  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  410 A

GENETIC EVIDENCE SUGGESTS MULTIPLE INTRODUCTIONS OF THE INVASIVE FRESHWATER SNAIL, MELANOIDES TUBERCULATA, IN FLORIDA, USA. Melanoides tuberculata is a popular freshwater aquarium snail that has invaded aquatic systems throughout the world. In these invaded systems, including Florida, it is known to disrupt ecosystems and spread exotic pathogens that can impair both wildlife and human health. Here, we evaluated the dispersal of M. tuberculata using the mitochondria gene cytochrome oxidase (CO1) to determine if established snail populations in Florida arose via random mechanisms (e.g. aquarium dumping) measured as genetically dissimilar populations, or natural spread mechanisms (e.g. movement among inter-connected waterways) measured as genetically similar populations. From 11 spatially discrete populations head tissues of individuals were removed for DNA extraction, amplification, and CO1 sequencing (n = 100). Results showed an overall high degree of dissimilar genetic structure among all populations. These findings strongly suggest that snails invaded locations in multiple, non-related events which we suspect could be linked to illegal aquarium dumping. As such, more effort to increase public awareness of the hazards of this snail to native fauna and prevention of aquarium dumplings into aquatic systems is paramount to prevent the further spread of this snail.

Lori Tolley-Jordan (Primary Presenter/Author), Jacksonville State University, ljordan@jsu.edu;


Jessica Wooten (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Piedmont College, jeagle@piedmont.edu;


Michael Chadwick (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), King's College London, michael.chadwick@kcl.ac.uk;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 410 A TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIATION IN PATTERNS OF BACTERIAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND RELATED METABOLIC FUNCTIONS IN SPRING WATER

5/24/2018  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  410 A

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIATION IN PATTERNS OF BACTERIAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND RELATED METABOLIC FUNCTIONS IN SPRING WATER Groundwater, which comprises 94 % of all usable freshwater, is one of the world's most extracted renewable resources for agricultural, industrial and domestic purposes. Springs are defined as the ecotone linking surface with groundwater, and have been used as drinking water resources since ancient times. Because of their small size, springs are thought to be sensitive to disturbances such as water abstraction and nutrient inputs. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of abiotic variables on the composition and diversity of bacterial communities in springs, as well as to test whether communities differ regarding metabolic functions. We isolated total DNA from water samples collected at five sampling sites at four time points, sequenced the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using high-throughput sequencing, and predicted the metabolic functions of the recovered operational taxonomic units. Of the fifteen abiotic variables that we measured, electric conductivity best explained variation in both microbial community patterns and metabolic functions. Furthermore, metabolic functions and microbial community composition differed according to temporal rather than spatial sampling, indicating a fast community turnover and supporting the idea that spring communities are potentially vulnerable to disturbance.

Karsten Karczewski (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Muenster, k.karczewski@gmx.de;


Elisabeth I. Meyer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Münster, Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, Department of Limnology, Hüfferstr. 1, D-48149 Münster, meyere@uni-muenster.de;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 410 A GENOMIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF NOVEL ESCHERICHIA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM FRESH WATER SOURCES

5/24/2018  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  410 A

GENOMIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF NOVEL ESCHERICHIA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM FRESH WATER SOURCES Escherichia coli is commonly viewed as a commensal of the animal gut, but “naturalized” populations of Escherichia found in non-host associated have been observed. Most Escherichia genome sequences come from host-associated isolates, not addressing the potential diversity of strains found in secondary environments, such as freshwater streams and lakes. We produced 104 genome sequences of Escherichia from freshwater sources as part of a longitudinal survey in the Macatawa Watershed, representing a significant increase of genomic information from non-clinical sources. Isolates were compared with available sequenced Escherichia strains using core genome phylogenetic inference. Only 3 strains are related to non-traditional environmental clades, whereas 101 watershed strains are related to traditional E. coli; 46% are members of phylogroup B1. We used in silico methods to identify virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. Watershed strains show significantly fewer virulence factors than related clinically derived strains. We determined protein families that distinguish among watershed and reference Escherichia strains within established phylogroups. Physiological experiments testing for metabolic activity of watershed strains revealed activity as low as 2°C. These data expand our knowledge of potentially naturalized E. coli strains found in freshwater environments.

Amy Olgers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, amy.olgers@hope.edu;


Jacob Peecher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, jacob.peecher@hope.edu;


Adam Slater (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, adam.slater@hope.edu;


Shannon Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, Shannon.smith@hope.edu;


Chelsea Payne (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, cepayne7@gmail.com;


Michael Pikaart (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, pikaart@hope.edu;


Aaron Best (Primary Presenter/Author), Hope College, best@hope.edu;


Sarah Brokus (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, brokus@hope.edu;


Francesco Moen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, moen@hope.edu;


Randall Wade (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hope College, wade@hope.edu;


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15:00 - 15:15: / 410 A THE RESPONSE OF LENTIC AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES TO SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE

5/24/2018  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  410 A

THE RESPONSE OF LENTIC AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES TO SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE Preliminary evidence suggests that emergence rates of freshwater invertebrates may indicate the environmental conditions of aquatic ecosystems. To better understand the consequences of climate change on aquatic invertebrates, we investigated severe drying on experimental pond ecosystems using invertebrate emergence and morphology as bioindicators of ecosystem quality. Furthermore, we explored the efficacy of using the metabolome of an apex invertebrate predator, dragonflies (Odonata, Aeshnidae), as a molecular bioindicator of sublethal environmental stress. Replicate ecosystems were established and divided among four treatments: control, gradual drying, drying and refilling, or gradual refilling to simulate environmental stress associated with climate change. Invertebrates that emerged from the mesocosms were collected, identified, and enumerated daily. After 42 days, remaining larval insects were preserved for identification and enumeration; however, the dragonfly predator was flash-frozen and retained for molecular analysis. Based on preliminary results, we observed greater insect emergence from the experimental treatments than from the controls. Thus, we demonstrate the altered emergence of resident organisms in response to thermal-environmental stress. We anticipate the metabolome of the apex predator will provide additional evidence of antecedent sub-lethal environmental stress.

Nicholas Bielski (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Wisconsin - Parkside, bielskin.v@gmail.com;


Jessica Orlofske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin-Parkside, orlofske@uwp.edu;


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15:15 - 15:30: / 410 A THE PREVALENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES IN US WATERWAYS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE INDICATORS

5/24/2018  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  410 A

THE PREVALENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES IN US WATERWAYS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE INDICATORS Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in freshwaters are an emerging contaminant of concern. We used 1,747 water samples from the USEPA’s 2013-2014 National Rivers and Streams Assessment and digital-droplet polymerase chain reaction techniques to quantify the concentrations (target molecules/ml) of several ARGs across the conterminous US. Median ARG concentrations ranged from ~7-22 molecules/ml (max=32,231 molecules/ml). Several ARGs were positively and significantly related to watershed urbanization and agriculture. For example, multiple regression showed a positive relationship between sul1 (associated with drug-resistant Salmonella) and watershed urbanization and agriculture (multiple-r2=0.34). Likewise, these watershed metrics explained 37% of the variation in intI1, a gene that facilitates acquisition of drug resistance in bacteria. ARG concentrations were also positively correlated with turbidity, total suspended solids, and chloride, ammonia, potassium, and nutrient concentrations, but these relationships were weaker (r2=0.04-0.2) than relationships with land use. Hotspot analysis confirmed that ARG concentrations are lower in western mountains and higher in portions of the Midwestern and Northeastern US with distinct spatial clustering, especially in areas with intensive agriculture. This study provides a baseline for ARG concentrations in the Nation’s streams that could be critical for future monitoring of these emerging contaminants.

Ryan Hill (Primary Presenter/Author), ORISE c/o US EPA, Western Ecology Division, Corvallis, OR, hill.ryan@epa.gov;


Scott Keely (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA Systems Exposure Division, Cincinnati, OH, keely.scott@epa.gov;


Nichole Brinkman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA, Systems Exposure Division, Cincinnati, OH, brinkman.nichole@epa.gov;


Emily Anneken (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA, Systems Exposure Division, Cincinnati, OH, anneken.emily@epa.gov;


Scott Leibowitz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA, Western Ecology Division, Corvallis, OR, leibowitz.scott@epa.gov;


Michael Jahne (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA, Systems Exposure Division, Cincinnati, OH, jahne.michael@epa.gov;


Roy Martin (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA, Systems Exposure Division, Cincinnati, OH, martin.roy@epa.gov;


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