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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 24, 2018
14:00 - 15:30

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14:00 - 14:15: / 420 B POPULATION GENETICS OF FRESHWATER SPONGES (PORIFERA: SPONGILLIDAE) AND SISYRIDAE (INSECTA: NEUROPTERA) OF THE UPPER-SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN

5/24/2018  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  420 B

POPULATION GENETICS OF FRESHWATER SPONGES (PORIFERA: SPONGILLIDAE) AND SISYRIDAE (INSECTA: NEUROPTERA) OF THE UPPER-SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN Otsego Lake and the upper-Susquehanna River basin, located in central New York, have been found to support populations of freshwater sponges (Porifera: Spongillidae) and members of the neuropteran family Sisyridae. Little is known about which species are present in this area, or even the population structures of these organisms, and there are few distribution records available for the region. This study provided some insight into the species of sponges and sisyrids present in the upper-Susquehanna River basin and around Otsego Lake, and created distribution records for each. Molecular markers cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and wingless (wnt) were then used to identify any gene flow that may exist between populations of the sisyrid Climacia areolaris (Hagen), and if there are any dispersal biases in this species.

Jeffrey Heilveil (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), SUNY College at Oneonta, heilvejs@oneonta.edu;


Alyssa Rothfuss (Primary Presenter/Author), SUNY College at Oneonta, rothah84@oneonta.edu;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 420 B MUTUALISM IN FRESHWATERS: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS

5/24/2018  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  420 B

MUTUALISM IN FRESHWATERS: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS Positive interspecific interactions (mutualism, commensalism, and facilitation) are ubiquitous in nature, but understudied in freshwater ecosystems. This review assesses the state-of-the-knowledge of positive interactions in freshwaters, and provides direction for future research. A few mutualistic relationships have received some research attention, namely seed-dispersing fishes, crayfishes and their branchiobdellidan symbionts, and communal-spawning stream fishes. Facilitative effects of a few habitat-modifying species have also been identified, as well as positive indirect trophic interactions. However, less is known about interactions in which participants directly exchange nutrients or protection. Most studies in freshwaters have been conducted using observations or experiments at small spatial scales. However, a cross-scale approach is necessary for a full understanding of how positive interactions operate. Likewise, research must seek to understand context dependency in positive interactions—how biotic (e.g. species or traits) and abiotic factors determine outcomes of positive interactions. Lastly, research on positive interactions must progress from a perspective of pairwise interactions, to a broader community context. A firm understanding of positive interactions will yield better predictions for managing freshwater ecosystems.

Sam Silknetter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Clemson University, samsilknetter@gmail.com;


Bryan Brown (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, stonefly@vt.edu;


Robert Creed (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State Universtiy, creedrp@appstate.edu;


Emmanuel Frimpong (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, frimp@vt.edu;


James Skelton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, skelto3@gmail.com;


Brandon Peoples (Primary Presenter/Author), Clemson University, peoples@clemson.edu;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 420 B UNCOVERING THE LIFE HISTORY AND PHENOLOGY OF PHYLLOICUS PULCHRUS, A CADDISFLY (TRICHOPTERA) IN TROPICAL RAINFOREST STREAMS

5/24/2018  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  420 B

UNCOVERING THE LIFE HISTORY AND PHENOLOGY OF PHYLLOICUS PULCHRUS, A CADDISFLY (TRICHOPTERA) IN TROPICAL RAINFOREST STREAMS Despite their abundance, diversity, and importance in freshwater ecosystems, knowledge of caddisfly life history is incomplete. The objectives of this study were to determine the life history and phenology of Phylloicus pulchrus in a stream of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Egg and larvae were reared in the laboratory until adult emergence. Larvae and adults were collected monthly for a year (2016-2017), classified by instars and sex. Environmental data was related to P. pulchrus abundance. Phylloicus pulchrus has five larval stages, slightly greater development times than other Phylloicus species, and has an asynchronous multivoltine life cycle. Rainfall had a significant negative effect on first to third larval instar abundance, especially rainfall from the previous month or two previous months. Rainfall seasonality had a significant negative effect on second instar larvae abundance. Temperature had a significant negative effect on second instar larvae. This study provides essential ecological information that improves our understanding of the species role and function in tropical freshwater ecosystems. This research can serve as a base for following studies involving P. pulchrus and contributes to filling the gap of knowledge on Neotropical caddisfly life history and phenology.

Limarie Reyes-Torres (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Southern Mississippi, limarie.reyestorres@usm.edu;


Alonso Ramirez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, aramirez@ramirezlab.net;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 420 B SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL TRENDS OF PREY FISH GROWTH AND CONDITION IN LAKE HURON

5/24/2018  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  420 B

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL TRENDS OF PREY FISH GROWTH AND CONDITION IN LAKE HURON In the 1930s, alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax became important components of the Lake Huron prey fish community. The expansion of alewife resulted in negative impacts to native prey fish species and led to major changes in food webs. Thus, understanding alewife and rainbow smelt life history traits are necessary to manage the fish community. Our objective is to describe spatial and temporal trends in growth and condition of alewife and rainbow smelt in the main basin of Lake Huron. We use time-varying hierarchical models to describe changes in mean length-at-age and condition of both species. Alewife length-at-age exhibited a trend towards smaller sizes from 1980 to 2000 for ages 4 and older while mean length at age 1-3 increased after 2000. Alewife have also exhibited a trend towards “plumper” fish over the time series. No clear spatial or temporal patterns were observed for rainbow smelt. Our results will be used to inform future stock-assessment models in the main basin of Lake Huron.

Jason Doll (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, dolljas1@msu.edu;


James Bence (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, bence@msu.edu;


Stephen Riley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center, 1451 Green Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 United States, sriley@usgs.gov;


Edward Roseman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center, 1451 Green Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 United States, eroseman@usgs.gov;


Timothy O'Brien (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center, 1451 Green Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 United States, tiobrien@usgs.gov;


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15:00 - 15:15: / 420 B WHY ADULT MAYFLIES GET SMALLER AS TEMPERATURE WARMS

5/24/2018  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  420 B

WHY ADULT MAYFLIES GET SMALLER AS TEMPERATURE WARMS We reared three species of mayflies from egg hatch to adult at 10 constant temperatures ranging from ~12–34C. For each species, male and female adult size and development time declined significantly with warming as per the Temperature Size Rule (TSR). Analysis of these and other life history traits across this experimental temperature gradient support several hypotheses (H’s) regarding TSR in mayflies. H1 – that the TSR response is due to the rate of larval development increasing faster per degree C than the rate of larval growth. H2 and H3 - that the accelerated development is caused by either development starting at a smaller larval size warm (H2) and/or warming temperature stimulating the expression of genes associated with juvenile hormone degradation and ecdysone production (H3). H4 - that female adults get proportionately smaller than males with a rise in temperature because females cannot ingest/process sufficient energy to simultaneously produce both body and reproductive tissue. H5 - that fecundity decreases more than female mass in response to warming because reduced egg production allows more energy to be directed to the structural growth needed for successful metamorphosis, flight, mating, and oviposition.

Bernard Sweeney (Primary Presenter/Author), Stroud Water Research Center, sweeney@stroudcenter.org;


David Funk (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Centrer, dfunk@stoudcenter.org;


David Buchwalter (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), North Carolina State University, david_buchwalter@ncsu.edu;


John Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, jkjackson@stroudcenter.org;


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15:15 - 15:30: / 420 B POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION OF THE ROUND ROCKSNAIL (LEPTOXIS AMPLA) A FEDERALLY THREATENED SPECIES IN THE CAHABA RIVER OF AL, USA.

5/24/2018  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  420 B

POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION OF THE ROUND ROCKSNAIL (LEPTOXIS AMPLA) A FEDERALLY THREATENED SPECIES IN THE CAHABA RIVER OF AL, USA. Over 75% of freshwater snails in the U.S. and Canada are considered imperiled. Yet, freshwater gastropods are critically understudied, particularly those in the family Pleuroceridae. Population genetics of pleurocerids is almost completely unknown, limiting our understanding of pleurocerid biology and hindering management efforts. Here, we examined the population genomics and associated morphological variation of Leptoxis ampla, a federally listed snail endemic to the Cahaba River in Alabama. From eight populations across the range of L. ampla, we used a 2bRAD-seq approach and geometric morphometrics to sequence 2,000 loci, assess population connectivity, estimate genetic diversity, and compare shape variation. Effective population size estimates varied widely with the majority of genetic variation explained among sites. Analyses suggested 8-9 genetic clusters in our dataset, with limited shared ancestry. Variation in body shape followed similar patterns as those found with population genetics. Gene flow among populations appears to follow a downstream pattern where any given site has more shared ancestry and genetic similarity with populations upstream than those downstream. This natural pattern likely makes headwater populations more susceptible to extirpation thus conservation efforts should prioritize upstream populations.

Brian Helms (Primary Presenter/Author), Troy University, helmsb@troy.edu;


Nathan Whelan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Fish and Wildlife Service, nathan_whelan@fws.gov;


Breana Sipley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, breana.sipley@gmail.com;


Jennifer Weber (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, jmw0030@auburn.edu;


Lori Tolley-Jordan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Jacksonville State University, ljordan@jsu.edu;


Kenneth Halanych (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Auburn University, ken@auburn.edu;


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