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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 23, 2019
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 253 AB INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL SESSION: CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CRAYFISH IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA

5/23/2019  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  253 AB

INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL SESSION: CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CRAYFISH IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA Western North America is home to relatively few native crayfish species, yet these organisms remain in near complete obscurity with respect to management and conservation actions. For example, one native western crayfish species has been declared extinct, a second is listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, two are almost entirely unstudied, and one is a major invasive species in both western North America and globally. Further, a number of non-native crayfish species introduced from eastern North America to western North America are manifesting impacts as invasive species, including displacement of native crayfishes. What is the fate of native crayfish in this region, and what conservation challenges lie ahead? Will invasive crayfish continue to spread unabated, and how can the resulting ecological impacts be prevented or minimized? This introduction talk will kick-off our special session seeks to address these and many other questions by bringing together researchers, managers, and policy makers concerned with native and non-native crayfish in western North America.

Julian Olden (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, olden@uw.edu;


Eric Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


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09:15 - 09:30: / 253 AB DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT ASSOCIATONS, AND CONSERVATION STATUS UPDATES FOR TWO CRAYFISHES ENDEMIC TO THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

5/23/2019  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  253 AB

DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT ASSOCIATONS, AND CONSERVATION STATUS UPDATES FOR TWO CRAYFISHES ENDEMIC TO THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Our study evaluates the distribution, habitat associations, and current conservation status of the pilose crayfishes Pacifastacus connectens and Pacifastacus gambelii, two data-deficient species endemic to the western United States. We first developed a species distribution model for the pilose crayfishes based on their historic occurrence records, then sampled 163 sites in the summers of 2016 and 2017 within the distribution of these crayfishes, including 50 where these species were observed historically. Our SDM predicted 73 sites (45%) we sampled as suitable for the pilose crayfishes, with a moderate AUC value of 0.824. We found the pilose crayfishes at only 20 (12%) of the 163 total sites we sampled, 14 (20%) of the 73 sites predicted as suitable for them by our SDM, and 12 (24%) of 50 historical sites that we sampled. We found that the pilose crayfishes have seemingly experienced substantial range declines, attributable to apparent displacement by invasive crayfishes and impairment or change to stream communities and habitat. We recommend increased conservation and management attention to P. connectens and P. gambelii in response to these findings.

Eric Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


Rachel Egly (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago, regly@luc.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 253 AB MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR COMPARISONS OF ENDEMIC WESTERN CRAYFISHES TO INFORM CONSERVATION PRIORITIES

5/23/2019  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  253 AB

MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR COMPARISONS OF ENDEMIC WESTERN CRAYFISHES TO INFORM CONSERVATION PRIORITIES Crayfishes of the subgenus Hobbsastacus endemic to the western United States have experienced severe population declines that require increased management attention. Conservation priorities for these crayfishes, however, are complicated by taxonomic ambiguities within this subgenus. For example, the Snake River pilose crayfish Pacifastacus connectens was split from the pilose crayfish Pacifastacus gambelii, first as a subspecies and subsequently as a species, on the basis of morphological characteristics. We sought here to investigate the species status of these two pilose crayfishes using both mtDNA phylogenetics and morphological comparisons. We found genetic distance between populations of P. connectens and P. gambelii to be low relative to similar studies within the related subgenus Pacifastacus, and P. connectens in particular was not monophyletic in our trees. Genetic diversity within P. gambelii populations was uniquely low relative to other crayfish species, consisting of a single COI haplotype over the vast majority of its range and between two major watersheds (upper Snake River, Bonneville Basin). Rostrum morphology, however, did reliably differentiate P. gambelii populations from P. connectens. Higher genetic distance and evolutionary diversity between P. connectens populations should be conservation priorities for populations within this subgenus.

Eric Larson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


Nicole Principe (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, nikkiprince3@gmail.com;


Kurt Ash (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, ktashou@gmail.com;


Rachel Egly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, regly@luc.edu;


Chris Taylor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Illinois Natural History Survey, cataylor@illinois.edu;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 253 AB INVASION OF NON-NATIVE CRAYFISH FAXONIUS VIRILIS IN THE LOWER HENRYS FORK DRAINAGE, IDAHO

5/23/2019  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  253 AB

INVASION OF NON-NATIVE CRAYFISH FAXONIUS VIRILIS IN THE LOWER HENRYS FORK DRAINAGE, IDAHO The objective of this study was to determine the presence and distribution of Faxonius virilis in the Henrys Fork drainage of the Snake River. Sampling was conducted at 30 total sites located in Henrys Fork River, Teton River, North Fork Teton River, South Fork Teton River and Moody Creek. We used baited minnow traps and kick nets to determine presence of virile crayfish. Absence was only reported if we unsuccessfully captured crayfish using kick nets because this technique is more effective. Virile crayfish were detected in all five streams; we did not collect any native crayfish in this study. Sites at the upstream extent of the sampling distribution did not have virile crayfish. This pattern suggest that virile crayfish are invading the drainage in an upstream direction. Presence of species of conservation concern (e.g. Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout, Bluehead Sucker, Western Pearlshell), as well as native crayfish, warrant additional research to determine the effect of virile crayfish on these species.

Eric Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


Eric Billman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University - Idaho, billmane@byui.edu;


Peyton Shaw (Primary Presenter/Author), Brigham Young Univeristy - Idaho, peytoncshaw@gmail.com;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 253 AB ONTOGENETIC AND SEX-SPECIFIC TROPHIC PLASTICITY OF FAXONIUS VIRILIS IN THE SASKATCHEWAN RIVER SYSTEM

5/23/2019  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  253 AB

ONTOGENETIC AND SEX-SPECIFIC TROPHIC PLASTICITY OF FAXONIUS VIRILIS IN THE SASKATCHEWAN RIVER SYSTEM Crayfish act as key predators at multiple trophic levels and provide a critical food source to higher order predators in many aquatic ecosystems. Understanding their habitat and dietary selection are thus important considerations for long-term management of systems containing crayfish. We investigated the relative trophic position and habitat use of the crayfish Faxonius virilis in the Saskatchewan River, Canada, based on carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Juvenile F. virilis had significantly higher ?13C and lower ?15N when compared to adults. We propose this signifies an ontogenetic shift from slower flowing waters and a more herbivorous diet in juveniles, to a fast flowing environment and a more predatory lifestyle in adults. Female F. virilis adults had significantly higher ?13C compared to adult males. Due to the timing of sampling (post egg carrying period) and the cryptic nature of females during rearing, this difference may be associated with a shift to slower moving waters when rearing young. We conclude that habitat requirements of F. virilis differ between age classes and sexes. Therefore, considering the requirements of individual life stages is essential for efficient management.

Iain Phillips (Primary Presenter/Author), Troutreach Saskatchewan/ Water Security Agency of Saskatchewan, iain.phillips@wsask.ca;


Joel Houston (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troutreach Saskatchewan, houstonj@uleth.ca;


Natasha Kreitals (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troutreach Saskatchewan, natasha.kreitals@graduate.uwa.edu.au;


Douglas Chivers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, doug.chivers@usasak.ca;


Bjoern Wissel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Regina, bjoern.wissel@uregina.ca;


Michael Pollock (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Water Security Agency, michael.pollock@wsask.ca;


Tim Jardine (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, tim.jardine@usask.ca;


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10:15 - 10:30: / 253 AB THE RIVER MILE NETWORK CRAYFISH PROJECT

5/23/2019  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  253 AB

THE RIVER MILE NETWORK CRAYFISH PROJECT Learn about a citizen science project exploring crayfish species distribution in the Columbia River Watershed. The project engages formal and informal educators and k-12 students in real world crayfish studies and water quality monitoring. Teachers and their students collect species data in and around their local watershed and share the data with the National Park Service and other partners. Crayfish Project participants learn the methods used to collect, submit and analyze data regarding native and non-native/invasive crayfish in the Columbia River Watershed and a variety of factors which impact water quality, while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Groups participating in The River Mile's project helps biologists and wildlife managers understand the distribution of native and non-native species. Project participants will be submitting data to the University of Illinois for their continuing work on the status of crayfish in the Columbia River Watershed. Presenters include: Janice Elvidge, Education Specialist, from the National Park Service will team up with Debra Berg, veteran teacher from Columbia High School and Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student.

Janice Elvidge (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Park Service Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area, janice_elvidge@nps.gov;


Rick Reynolds (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Engaging Every Student, rick@engagingeverystudent.com;


Deborah Berg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Columbia School District - retired, dberg7@yahoo.com;


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