Back to top

SFS Annual Meeting

Tuesday, May 21, 2019
09:00 - 10:30

<< Back to Schedule

09:00 - 09:15: / 251 AB STORM WATER RETENTION PONDS; AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY IN A SEMI-ARID URBAN LANDSCAPE

5/21/2019  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  251 AB

STORM WATER RETENTION PONDS; AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY IN A SEMI-ARID URBAN LANDSCAPE Denton, Texas which is located in a semi-arid region has over 200 constructed ponds. Many of these ponds, function to control stormwater runoff. The value of these waters to regional biodiversity and as greenspaces is important but generally undervalued. This study monitors habitat variables and macroinvertebrate diversity in ponds selected to represent a gradient of urban influences to their water quality and habitats. The objective of the project is to identify factors controlling aquatic invertebrate diversity. Taxa richness was similar between the ponds but composition differed. Submerged vegetation had the most underwater complex leaf structure and the highest abundance, exceeding 1000 individuals per m3 and the greatest diversity of Diptera and Trichoptera. Emergent vegetation averaged approximately 800 individuals and Typha averaged 500 individuals per m3. Ponds with more open water had a significant decrease in odonatan diversity. Study results will be used to develop a conservation plan to increase the ecological health of the ponds. If managed correctly, these systems can be incorporated into a sustainable development that provides cleaner water and beautiful green spaces for the citizens of the City of Denton.

Sabrina Moore (Primary Presenter/Author), University of North Texas, sabrinamoore2@my.unt.edu;


James Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Texas, james.kennedy@unt.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

09:15 - 09:30: / 251 AB STORMWATER PONDS: PROLIFERATING VECTORS OF INVASIVE SPECIES IN URBAN WATERSHEDS

5/21/2019  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  251 AB

STORMWATER PONDS: PROLIFERATING VECTORS OF INVASIVE SPECIES IN URBAN WATERSHEDS Over the last few decades, stormwater ponds have become increasingly utilized to manage runoff from urban landscapes, fulfilling similar roles in urban watersheds as those originally played by headwater streams or riparian zones. Additionally, the characteristics of stormwater ponds (i.e. association with human activities, nutrient-rich, often disturbed) are common drivers of species invasion. Despite the likely widespread and increasing usage of stormwater ponds, we currently do not know their quantity or distribution, their degree of invasion, nor what pond characteristics affect invasion. For example, ponds are often landscaped for aesthetic purposes by businesses and homeowner associations, which could affect opportunities for invader establishment. This talk will outline the broad- and fine-scale analyses we conducted to investigate stormwater pond distribution and degree of invasion using the state of Florida as a study system. Our results highlight how urbanization can drive the widespread replacement of natural waterbodies with engineered ecosystems, and the high variability in invasive species these systems can harbor. The next steps of our research will examine pond benthic invertebrate communities, and the traits of the invasive plants we found.

James Sinclair (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Florida, james.sinclair@ufl.edu;


Alexander Reisinger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, reisingera@ufl.edu;


Eban Bean (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, ezbean@ufl.edu;


Carrie Adams (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, rein0050@ufl.edu;


Lindsey Reisinger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, lreisinger1@ufl.edu;


Basil Iannone (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, biannone@ufl.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

09:30 - 09:45: / 251 AB MULTIPLE STRESSORS INTERACTING ON ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN DUTCH DRAINAGE DITCHES

5/21/2019  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  251 AB

MULTIPLE STRESSORS INTERACTING ON ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN DUTCH DRAINAGE DITCHES Drainage ditches are man-made water bodies, originally dug to reclaim wetland areas. They can be regarded as one of the most extensive aquatic habitats in the urban environment. For example, in the Netherlands alone their combined length is estimated at 300 000 km. As the land surrounding drainage ditches is used for various anthropogenic activities, they are impacted by multiple interacting stressors. We aimed to assess the impact of three pollution sources, including waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), tulip fields, and metal industry wastewater, on the ecological processes in drainage ditches, compared to ditches with low pollution pressure. We measured nutrient concentrations and toxic pressure in the water column and sediment, alongside ecological processes, such as microbial and invertebrate decomposition rates, sediment oxygen demand, and oxygen dynamics in twenty Dutch drainage ditches. Our results showed that high nutrient input from bulb fields and even higher inputs from the WWTPs related to enhanced microbial and invertebrate decomposition rates compared to unimpacted ditches, despite the observed toxic pressure. We stress the importance of assessing all the joint effects of interacting stressors to identify how ecological processes are impacted in the urban environment.

Nienke Wieringa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Amsterdam, N.Wieringa@uva.nl;


Milo de Baat (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Amsterdam, m.l.debaat@uva.nl;


Ralf C.M. Verdonschot (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wageningen Environmental Research, ralf.verdonschot@wur.nl;


Michiel Kraak (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, M.H.S.Kraak@uva.nl;


Piet F.M. Verdonschot (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Amsterdam / Wageningen Environmental Research , piet.verdonschot@wur.nl;


Gea van der Lee (Primary Presenter/Author), Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, g.h.vanderlee@uva.nl;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

09:45 - 10:00: / 251 AB MICROBIAL COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO SHIFTING WATER QUALITY AND QUANTITY IN AN ARID URBAN ECOSYSTEM

5/21/2019  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  251 AB

MICROBIAL COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO SHIFTING WATER QUALITY AND QUANTITY IN AN ARID URBAN ECOSYSTEM Hydrologic complexity in urban rivers presents challenges for mitigating impairments on water quality. We conducted synoptic surveys at 18 sites over three seasons in one year within an episodically hypoxic urban river. We quantified the relative contribution of ‘natural’ (lake, groundwater, tributary) and ‘urban’ (effluent, canals) sources of water to the river using a Bayesian mixing model analysis of water isotopes (18O and 2H) combined with a hydrologic mass balance model. Major contributors to streamflow varied both spatially and seasonally. Patterns of dissolved oxygen, nutrient (NO3-N, PO4-P) concentrations, and microbial ecoenzyme expression associated with carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) acquisition reflected shifts in dominant water sources. Ratios of dissolved organic and inorganic C, N, and P in the water column indicated C and P co-limitation, based on thresholds required to sustain microbial biomass. Paradoxically, ecoenzyme activity rate ratios indicated microbial communities were N limited, despite high N loads. These results suggest planktonic microbes are reliant on particulate substrates rich in N, such as protein and chitin found in algae and effluent-derived organic matter. Actions to reduce algal production combined with tertiary treatment of effluent might thus alleviate hypoxia.

Samantha Weintraub (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Ecological Observatory Network, Battelle, samanthaweintraub@gmail.com;


Rose Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Utah, rose.smith@utah.edu;


Yusuf Jameel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, yusuf8ysf@gmail.com;


Rachel Gabor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Ohio State University, gabor.40@osu.edu;


Jennifer Follstad Shah (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Utah, jennifer.shah@envst.utah.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

10:00 - 10:15: / 251 AB URBAN BASEFLOW: A BOON AND A CURSE FOR ACCIDENTAL WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS?

5/21/2019  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  251 AB

URBAN BASEFLOW: A BOON AND A CURSE FOR ACCIDENTAL WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS? Unintentionally created wetlands in urban areas demonstrate significant capacity to provide ecosystem services, particularly when connected (or reconnected) with water sources. A common water source is dry weather flows, i.e., urban baseflow, where wastewater inadvertently creates surface water inputs to abandoned areas of the urban landscape, in turn creating wetland ecosystems that can be sustained during dry periods. In this sense, urban baseflow is an asset to accidental wetlands, in that it creates and sustains them hydrologically, and delivers substrates (e.g., nitrate and organic matter) that support important ecosystem functions (e.g., nitrate removal). However, my research also suggests that the composition and availability of urban baseflow can negatively affect the persistence and function of accidental wetland ecosystems. For example, excess water from flood-irrigated golf courses can create accidental wetlands, but also overload those wetlands with nutrient and salt inputs in excess of their processing ability. Additionally, accidental wetlands may not have hydrologic regimes optimal for pollutant processing or plant growth, depending on wastewater input frequency. I will discuss data from the northeastern and southwestern US demonstrating patterns and tradeoffs in the relationship between urban baseflow and accidental wetland ecosystem function.

Monica Palta (Primary Presenter/Author), Pace University, monicapalta.pace@gmail.com;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

10:15 - 10:30: / 251 AB FROM LAWNS TO THE STREAM: HOTSPOTS OF NITROGEN TRANSPORT IN RESIDENTIAL LAWNS IN BALTIMORE, MD

5/21/2019  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  251 AB

FROM LAWNS TO THE STREAM: HOTSPOTS OF NITROGEN TRANSPORT IN RESIDENTIAL LAWNS IN BALTIMORE, MD Residential landscapes are typically considered exporters of nitrogen into urban streams. Consequently, these landscapes have been targets of various mitigation strategies, such as reducing fertilizer use or disconnecting downspouts, to minimize their impact on urban streams. However, watershed scale studies have found that some residential areas retain more nitrogen than expected, but it is unclear why. Nitrogen transport in lawns is affected by many factors, such as its hydrology, biogeochemistry, topography, and homeowner management. For this study, we examined if simple measures of hydrology (saturated infiltration rates) and biogeochemistry (denitrification rates) would predict where hotspots of nitrogen transport occur within lawns with different fertilizer regimes. Further, we examined if the spatial arrangement of hotspots of nitrogen transport within lawns could contribute to export of nitrogen off lawns and onto impervious surfaces. Nitrogen transport was quantified using experimental rainfalls at 48 locations in 11 lawns, in which we measured nitrate and ammonium in runoff and leachate. We found that fertilizer use is the best predictor of nitrate in runoff. We also found locations adjacent to impervious surfaces had lower saturated infiltration rates, making these potential hotspots for nitrogen transport off lawns.

Amanda Suchy (Primary Presenter/Author), City University of New York, suchya@caryinstitute.org;


Peter Groffman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), City University of New York, Peter.Groffman@asrc.cuny.edu ;


Lawrence Band (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Virginia, leb3t@virginia.edu;


Jon Duncan (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Penn State University, jmduncan@psu.edu;


Arthur Gold (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Rhode Island, agold@uri.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.