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SFS Annual Meeting

Tuesday, May 21, 2019
11:00 - 12:30

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11:00 - 11:15: / 151 DEF USING BIOLOGICAL CONDITION GRADIENT MODEL TO MONITOR ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND SUPPORT ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION IN THE UPPER TANA RIVER WATERSHED IN KENYA

5/21/2019  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  151 DEF

USING BIOLOGICAL CONDITION GRADIENT MODEL TO MONITOR ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND SUPPORT ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION IN THE UPPER TANA RIVER WATERSHED IN KENYA Abstract: The Biological Condition Gradient (BCG), a scientific framework that describes the change in ecosystem characteristics in response to induced levels of stressors was to used to characterise watershed habitats in Upper Tana, Kenya. The inbuilt utilities of BCG, including its simplicity, versatility and its robust nature allowed its use by six taxonomic groups of macroinvertebrates, fish, amphibians, birds, plants and diatoms to assess and monitor landscape conditions of both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. As expected all taxonomic groups complemented each other, with each taxonomic group reliably assessing ecological conditions to a certain degree. BCG indices developed for all taxonomic groups assisted in identification and selection of species indicating varying levels of landscape conditions. These species were referred to as flagship species and they assisted in simplifying the BCG model, hence possible for it to be used by parataxonomists or ordinary citizens. Further, the capability of BCG models to assess landscape conditions meant they can be used to identify high-quality habitats for conservation, direct investment for restoration, and track progress.

George Ndiritu (Primary Presenter/Author), Karatina University, Kenya, gatereg@yahoo.com;


Peter Njoroge (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya, pnjoroge@museums.or.ke;


Edward M. Njagi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya, enmukuru@gmail.com;


Taita Terer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya, taaita@yahoo.com;


Laban Njoroge (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Museums of Kenya, nnlaban@yahoo.com;


Peris W. Kamau (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Museums of Kenya, pkamau@museums.or.ke;


Patrick K. Malonzo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), pkamau@museums.or.ke, malonzapk@gmail.com;


Vernoich M. Muiruri (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Museums of Kenya, veronica.muiruri@yahoo.com;


David Courtemanch (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Nature Conservancy, Maine, USA, david.courtemanch@tnc.org;


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11:15 - 11:30: / 151 DEF VARIATION IN THERMAL TOLERANCE OF NATIVE FRESHWATER FISHES IN SOUTH AFRICA'S CAPE FOLD ECOREGION:EXAMINING THE EAST–WEST CLINE IN SENSITIVITY TO CLIMATE WARMING

5/21/2019  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  151 DEF

VARIATION IN THERMAL TOLERANCE OF NATIVE FRESHWATER FISHES IN SOUTH AFRICA'S CAPE FOLD ECOREGION:EXAMINING THE EAST–WEST CLINE IN SENSITIVITY TO CLIMATE WARMING The Cape Fold Ecoregion (CFE) is a biodiversity hotspot with high levels of endemism in its freshwater ichthyofauna. This study examined inter and intra-specific variation in critical thermal maxima (TCmax) for eight native species of freshwater fish from the CFE. Cape galaxias Galaxias zebratus, Breede River redfin Pseudobarbus burchelli, Berg River redfin Pseudobarbus burgi, Clanwilliam redfin Sedercypris calidus and fiery redfin Pseudobarbus phlegethon were the most thermally sensitive (TCmax = 29.8–32.8C). Clanwilliam rock-catfish Austroglanis gilli, Eastern Cape redfin Pseudobarbus afer and Cape kurper Sandelia capensis were moderately sensitive (TCmax = 33.0–36.8C). An increase in intra-specific thermal sensitivity of S. capensis was observed from east to west. The results were related to in situ water temperature, which influenced TCmax for all species, suggesting that thermal history is a major driver of variation in thermal tolerance amongst populations. These thermal tolerance data for freshwater fishes in the CFE demonstrate that resilience to climate warming follows a geographical cline and that the more sensitive western species and regions are conservation priorities.

Jody-Lee Reizenberg (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Cape Town, rznjod001@myuct.ac.za;


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11:30 - 11:45: / 151 DEF SEDIMENTS AND WATER QUALITY OF TWO OIL SPILL IMPACTED COMMUNITIES, FORECASTING FUTURE STATUS AND ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES IN THE NIGER DELTA WETLAND OF NIGERIA

5/21/2019  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  151 DEF

SEDIMENTS AND WATER QUALITY OF TWO OIL SPILL IMPACTED COMMUNITIES, FORECASTING FUTURE STATUS AND ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES IN THE NIGER DELTA WETLAND OF NIGERIA The Niger Delta region of Nigeria is constantly subjected to pollution occasioned by oil exploration and exploitation. It was against this backdrop that the present study was designed with the aim of investigating the effects of aquatic pollution in Ugborodo and Abiteye wetlands of the Niger Delta using selected physico-chemical variables and macroinvertebrate response. Historical samples (1996-1997) were compared with more recent samples (2013-2014). Predictions were also made to evaluate the potential future scenario given current trajectory. The study showed that at Ugborodo & Abiteye, respectively majority of the environmental variables were significantly between the past and recent sampling regimes in the two wetlands. The future forecast, done with the exponential smoothing curve, indicated that over the next six years, most of the sampled parameters would increase significantly indicating a potential further deterioration if current trajectory of activities is sustained. Overall, urgent management attention is needed to reverse the projected situation

Jude Uku (Primary Presenter/Author,Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria, ukudt@yahoo.com;


Francis Arimoro (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria, francisarimoro@gmail.com;


Oghenekaro Nelson Odume (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rhodes University, South Africa, odume.nelson@gmail.com;


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11:45 - 12:00: / 151 DEF STRENGTHENING CAPACITY IN RESEARCH AND TRAINING THROUGH COLLABORATIVE NETWORKS AND PARTNERSHIPS IN THE AFRICAN GREAT LAKES

5/21/2019  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  151 DEF

STRENGTHENING CAPACITY IN RESEARCH AND TRAINING THROUGH COLLABORATIVE NETWORKS AND PARTNERSHIPS IN THE AFRICAN GREAT LAKES The African Great Lakes (AGL) are known for their rich fisheries and biodiversity supporting livelihoods of over 50 million people in 11 countries. Despite the recognized importance of the AGL, these ecosystems face multiple stressors attributed to overexploitation of resources, habitat degradation and climate change. The African Center for Aquatic Research and Education (ACARE) is a long-term, highly collaborative organization dedicated to harmonizing research on the AGL and increasing local capacity of African’s next generation of freshwater experts through partnerships, collaboration, and experiential education. Building on a network of academic and research institutions in Africa, North America, Europe, and Asia, ACARE aims to bring together actors in research, academia, policy, and management to create a unified, multi-jurisdictional approach to maintaining the African Great Lakes for those who depend on them. In this paper, we will report on ACARE’s progress in three strategic areas: (1) Strengthening global and regional partnership and collaborative networks; (2) Establishing long-term transboundary and inter-jurisdictional lake advisory groups to harmonize and promote joint multi-lakes research projects; and, (3) Expanding and develop comprehensive education and training programs to produce the next generation of freshwater researchers, policymakers and practitioners.

Kevin Obiero (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Natural resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, kevobiero@gmail.com;


Ted Lawrence (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), African Center for Aquatic Research and Education, ted@agl-acare.org;


Jessica Ives (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), African Center for Aquatic Research and Education, jtimives@gmail.com;


Friday Njaya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Fisheries, Malawi, fnjaya@gmail.com;


Stephanie Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Alliance for the Great Lakes, stephanie@zephyrmangata.com;


Robert Kayanda (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization, rkayanda@lvfo.org ;


Robert Hecky (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Large Lakes Observatory, University of Minnesota, rehecky@gmail.com;


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12:00 - 12:15: / 151 DEF THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHALLENGES RESULTING FROM REHABILITATION OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS USING EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH

5/21/2019  |   12:00 - 12:15   |  151 DEF

THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHALLENGES RESULTING FROM REHABILITATION OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS USING EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH Ecosystems and human well-being are intimately connected. Our study was focussed on aquatic ecosystem services produced by urban river systems. These ecosystem services are relevant in developing countries where urbanisation is putting a significant pressure on scarce water resources. Africa has several economic development needs which results in migration to cities, which in turn haven't provide the adequate urban infrastructure for sustainable city development. The aims of the study were to review the real challenges about water resource and environmental management resulting from the impacts of environmental degradation on health and integrity of freshwater resources and aquatic ecosystem services they provide; Investigate the impacts of ecological degradation on livelihoods and well-being of communities, specifically rural and peri-urban communities, who benefit from water resources and associated aquatic ecosystem services they provide; and to draw the relationships between degraded water resources and socio-economic development. The study showed that ecological degradation in urban and peri-urban environments resulted from a set of large scale, and very complex cumulative effects. This study provided evidence of loss of crucial informal economy income by people living in peri-urban areas with degraded freshwater ecosystems.

Stanley Liphadzi (Primary Presenter/Author), Water Research Commission, STANLEYL@WRC.ORG.ZA;


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12:15 - 12:30: / 151 DEF THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL WATER ACT, SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER RESOURCES AND IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES.

5/21/2019  |   12:15 - 12:30   |  151 DEF

THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL WATER ACT, SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER RESOURCES AND IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES. The National Water Act (Act No 36 of 1998) is internationally acclaimed as forward looking and innovative, particularly in its legation recognition of aquatic ecosystem rights to water. The ecological and basic human Reserve are the only rights to water legally recognised as other water use access are secondary and administratively administered. The ecological Reserve (ER) describes the quantity, quality, and reliability of water supply needed for the ecosystem to maintain its basic function and structure, including riparian vegetation and all associated biota. The ER together with the basic human need Reserve have to be determined before the remaining water is administratively allocated. However, while methods have been developed to determine the Reserve, its implementation has proved to be very challenging. This paper presents an analysis of major implementation challenges of the ER, particularly given the imperative for historical redress of past injustices in South Africa and the urgent need for equitable and efficient distribution and allocation of water resources in a country that is grappling with water scarcity.

Oghenekaro Nelson Odume (Primary Presenter/Author), Rhodes University, South Africa, odume.nelson@gmail.com;


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