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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 23, 2019
14:00 - 15:30

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14:00 - 14:15: / 250 CF TRANSLATING COMMUNITY DYNAMICS INTO METRICS USEFUL FOR WATER MANAGERS

5/23/2019  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  250 CF

TRANSLATING COMMUNITY DYNAMICS INTO METRICS USEFUL FOR WATER MANAGERS Ideally, we should be able to advance environmental flow management by quantifying effects of streamflow variation on the mechanisms that shape aquatic communities. However, models of flow effects on rates of organism survival or dispersal may intersect only indirectly with broadly stated management objectives (e.g., minimizing loss of biological integrity). We are exploring ways to translate rates of community turnover (i.e., species persistence and colonization) and individual survival in stream fishes in the southeast United States, estimated in relation to flow regime attributes, into management-relevant metrics. A motivating application is management of flows in the Flint River, GA , as part of a collaboration between water-utility managers and conservationists concerned with meeting human and environmental needs during low flow periods. We are using measured effects of low-flow magnitude and duration on fish survival and dispersal to identify flow regime conditions that could signal a need for management actions. This application highlights the potential relevance of rate-based models to flow-management questions, particularly if monitoring data can be collected and used to improve ecological understanding and refine management options.

Mary Freeman (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, mcfreeman78@gmail.com;


Kit Wheeler (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), TN Tech University, kitwheeler@gmail.com;


Laura Rack (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, laura.rack@uga.edu;


Ben Emanuel (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American Rivers, bemanuel@americanrivers.org;


Laura S. Craig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American Rivers, lcraig@americanrivers.org;


Seth Wenger (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, sethwenger@fastmail.fm;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 250 CF A TOOL TO EVALUATE INSTREAM FLOW NEEDS AT COARSE BED CHANNELS IN THE STATE OF COLORADO

5/23/2019  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  250 CF

A TOOL TO EVALUATE INSTREAM FLOW NEEDS AT COARSE BED CHANNELS IN THE STATE OF COLORADO The Colorado Water Conservation Board is responsible for determining instream flow rights in natural river systems throughout the State of Colorado. Assessing how much water to leave in a water body to meet ecological instream needs for a reasonably healthy ecosystem is not trivial, and the state currently uses the R2Cross model to determine the streamflow requirements for habitat protection. The R2Cross model calculates in stream hydraulic parameters (one-dimensional geometric and hydraulic data) collected in riffle habitat types for estimating discharge at different stream stages. We have updated the R2Cross model to incorporate a variety of hydraulic equations (Manning, Jarrett, Thorne-Zevenbergen, Ferguson, and Rickenmann-Recking equations) to assess the range of minimum instream discharges under different hydraulic. In addition, new tool functionalities include a stream discharge calculator and particle size distribution calculator. It is believed that a multi-method approach to evaluate minimum flows under different hydraulic conditions could reveal the effect of these methods on instream flow recommendations. Such a tool could assist State authorities and stakeholders to make informed decisions about ecological water needs in mountainous streams.

Panagiotis Oikonomou (Primary Presenter/Author), Colorado State University, panagiotis.oikonomou@colostate.edu;


Rumpal Sidhu (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, rumpal.sidhu@colostate.edu;


Tyler Wible (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, tyler.wible@colostate.edu;


Ryan Morrison (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, ryan.morrison@colostate.edu;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 250 CF UNDERSTANDING RIVERS AND THEIR SOCIAL RELATIONS: A CRITICAL STEP FOR ADVANCING ENVIRONMENTAL WATER MANAGEMENT

5/23/2019  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  250 CF

UNDERSTANDING RIVERS AND THEIR SOCIAL RELATIONS: A CRITICAL STEP FOR ADVANCING ENVIRONMENTAL WATER MANAGEMENT River flows connect people, places, and other forms of life, inspiring and sustaining human cultures, values, and livelihoods worldwide. The concept of environmental flows provides a framework for improving understanding of and supporting relationships between river flows and people. The newly revised Brisbane Declaration and Global Action Agenda on Environmental Flows (2018) represents a new phase in environmental flow science and an opportunity to better consider the co-constitution of river flows, ecosystems, and society in river management. Here, we present results from a SESYNC workshop to synthesize understanding of relationships between people and rivers as conceived under the renewed definition of environmental flows. We use case studies to illustrate multi-disciplinary, collaborative efforts where recognizing the diverse flow needs of human populations was central to establishing environmental flow recommendations. We highlight examples of the diversity and interdependencies of human-flow relationships—such as human wellbeing, spiritual needs, cultural identity, and sense of place—that are typically overlooked when environmental flows are negotiated. Finally, we call for scientists and water managers to recognize the diversity of ways of relating to rivers, and to place this recognition at the center of future environmental flow assessments.

Elizabeth P Anderson (Primary Presenter/Author), Florida International University, epanders@fiu.edu;


Sue Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Australian Rivers Institute and Griffith University, sue.jackson@griffith.edu.au;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 250 CF USING STREAM FOOD WEB PRODUCTIVITY AND FISH BIOENERGETICS TO INFORM INSTREAM FLOW NEEDS

5/23/2019  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  250 CF

USING STREAM FOOD WEB PRODUCTIVITY AND FISH BIOENERGETICS TO INFORM INSTREAM FLOW NEEDS Stream flow is a master variable in stream ecosystems. In streams with altered flow regimes and the potential to improve stream flows, there is a need for a mechanistic understanding of how stream flows build food webs to maintain fish in good condition, as a supplement to the historical focus on physical habitat (e.g. PHABSIM). Bioenergetic models have recently been adapted to incorporate food supply into flow recommendations but most applications assume static concentrations of food across space and time. Our ongoing research in the upper Shasta River, California examines productivity of benthic macroinvertebrates and flux rates of drifting invertebrates in different habitat types (riffles and pools) and seasons (year-round) above and below a major stream flow diversion. We are linking these variables in a spatially and temporally explicit bioenergetics model to better understand how stream flows influence the availability of macroinvertebrates and fish foraging modes (specifically drift vs search foraging), creating energetically favorable or unfavorable conditions for salmonid fish throughout the year and across different habitats. Incorporating seasonal and spatial food availability into the bioenergetics model will improve our ability to inform instream flow and habitat restoration recommendations.

Suzanne Kelson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Nevada, Reno, skelson@unr.edu;


Timothy Caldwell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), McBain Associates, timothycaldwell@unr.edu;


Natalie Stauffer-Olsen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, Natalie.Stauffer-Olsen@tu.org;


Scott McBain (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), McBain Associates, scott@mcbainassociates.com ;


Rene Henery (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, Rene.Henery@tu.org;


Sudeep Chandra (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, Global Water Center, sudeep@unr.edu;


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15:00 - 15:15: / 250 CF USING A MULTI-MODELING APPROACH TO DISENTANGLE THE EFFECTS OF HUMAN-DRIVEN FLOW ALTERATIONS ON BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN RIVERS OF THE NORTH AND SOUTHEAST US

5/23/2019  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  250 CF

USING A MULTI-MODELING APPROACH TO DISENTANGLE THE EFFECTS OF HUMAN-DRIVEN FLOW ALTERATIONS ON BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN RIVERS OF THE NORTH AND SOUTHEAST US Quantifying the effects of changes in streamflow on aquatic community response is central to understanding the role humans play in shaping the aquatic environment. These changes represent a level of complexity that often impedes the identification of quantitative links between flow drivers and biological responses. Addressing complex relations, that occur at differing spatiotemporal scales, requires a multi-modeling approach that empowers the establishment of scientifically defensible relations. CART, BRT, LASSO, and Bayesian network models (BNMs) were used to provide multiple lines of evidence for identifying important links between flow and assemblage responses in the Delaware, Yadkin-Pee Dee, and Cape Fear basins. Basin-scale analyses revealed that links between invertebrate responses and flow-alteration metrics were often obscured, however, analyses in homogeneous sub-basins (Level III ecoregions) were better able to discern relations with flow. BRT and LASSO analyses indicate that some ecoregions could be combined into smaller subgroups for analysis. Trait-based metrics showed the same effects of regionalization that were observed for taxa metrics. Change scenarios are being tested in BNMs and findings will be incorporated into Decision Support Systems to provide water managers with the tools necessary to address 21st-century water resource challenges.

Jonathan Kennen (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, New Jersey Water Science Center, 3450 Princeton Pike, Suite 110, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648, jgkennen@usgs.gov;


Thomas Cuffney (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, South Atlantic Water Science Center, 3916 Sunset Ridge Rd., Raleigh, NC 27607, tcuffney@usgs.gov;


Song Qian (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Toledo, song.qian@utoledo.edu;


Jason May (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science Center, jasonmay@usgs.gov;


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15:15 - 15:30: / 250 CF COLORADO RIVER ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO THE 2018 BUG FLOW EXPERIMENT FROM GLEN CANYON DAM

5/23/2019  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  250 CF

COLORADO RIVER ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO THE 2018 BUG FLOW EXPERIMENT FROM GLEN CANYON DAM Research by our group has demonstrated that EPT (Ephemeroptera-Plectopera-Trichoptera) taxa are absent from the Colorado River in Grand Canyon in part due to acute mortality of aquatic insect eggs caused by sub-daily flow fluctuations from dam releases to generate hydropower. In summer 2018, Glen Canyon Dam releases were experimentally modified to benefit aquatic insect populations in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon (USA). These “Bug Flows” involved standard flow fluctuations (from ~280–480 m3/s) for hydropower generation during weekdays, coupled with steady, low flows on weekends to reduce aquatic insect egg desiccation and mortality. This flow strategy, unprecedented in scope as an aquatic invertebrate environmental flow experiment, was the outcome of direct collaboration between energy distributors, dam operators, and ecologists, and its final design was essentially revenue neutral for hydropower. In this presentation, we will report on the large-scale ecosystem responses of Bug Flows, including their spatial and temporal effects on aquatic insect drift and emergence throughout 400 km of the Colorado River. We will also highlight some unexpected changes to insect emergence timing and sport fish behavior resulting from Bug Flows that yielded unanticipated benefits to recreational fishing.

Jeffrey Muehlbauer (Primary Presenter/Author), USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, jmuehlbauer@usgs.gov;


Ted Kennedy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Southwest Biological Science Center, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, tkennedy@usgs.gov;


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