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SFS Annual Meeting

Wednesday, May 22, 2019
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 251 AB RIVER BREATHING: CONNECTING RESEARCH TO EDUCATION THROUGH AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE CURRICULUM

5/22/2019  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  251 AB

RIVER BREATHING: CONNECTING RESEARCH TO EDUCATION THROUGH AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE CURRICULUM Metabolism is a fairly advanced concept in ecology. How can grade school students learn the fundamental concepts behind stream metabolism? A collaboration between an EdD (science education) and a PhD student (ecology and environmental science) resulted in the development of a curriculum that translated concepts from a local hydrological research project into elementary education. The curriculum was based on the idea that rivers breathe in CO2 and respire O2; this breathing is the foundation for a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Researchers collaborated with an elementary school to teach standards – based, hands-on science curriculum to 4th grade students. The curriculum included classroom and field-based lessons where students explored metabolism in their nearby stream, mimicking the larger study occurring in their watershed. Students measured dissolved oxygen in light/dark bags to build understanding of the role of photosynthesis in producing oxygen; they studied aquatic macroinvertebrates and phytoplankton, and measured stream canopy cover for photosynthesis potential. The collaborative effort supported education and outreach efforts for a research grant and contributed to science curriculum development and implementation. This curriculum has also been taught in middle school. Examples of the curriculum will be available.

Rose Vallor (Primary Presenter/Author), Montana State University, rvallor@gmail.com;


Meryl Storb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Montana State University, meryl.storb@gmail.com;


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09:15 - 09:30: / 251 AB STRIVING TOWARDS A MORE DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY: PROGRESS MADE IN THE SOCIETY FOR FRESHWATER SCIENCE AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT

5/22/2019  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  251 AB

STRIVING TOWARDS A MORE DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY: PROGRESS MADE IN THE SOCIETY FOR FRESHWATER SCIENCE AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Discussions about diversity and inclusivity are becoming more common within scientific societies. However, concerted effort is needed to increase diversity and minimize discrimination, thus providing minoritized and marginalized scientists the space to benefit from and contribute to scientific societies as fully as their colleagues from the demographic majority. Here, we evaluate the strengths and opportunities to improve diversity and inclusivity efforts within the Society for Freshwater Science (SFS) as a model for how scientific societies can make progress towards a more inclusive environment. In 2017, demographic information, (e.g., age, gender, race, and sexuality) was collected from members of SFS. Survey respondents were also offered the opportunity to anonymously share comments regarding diversity and inclusivity within SFS. Using this information, we developed a guide for SFS and similar scientific societies to aid efforts to create a more welcoming space for all scientists. We argue that scientific societies should strive to maximize recruitment and retention of minoritized and marginalized scholars to better represent the communities they serve and to generate higher impact and more innovative science.

Erin Abernethy (Primary Presenter/Author), Oregon State University, efabernethy@gmail.com;


Ivan Arismendi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries & Wildlife, ivan.arismendi@oregonstate.edu;


Anna Boegehold (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wayne State University, az1079@wayne.edu;


Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


Matthew Cover (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University, Stanislaus, mcover@csustan.edu;


Erin Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cornell University, ern.larson@gmail.com;


Eric Moody (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Iowa State University, erickmoody@gmail.com;


Brooke Penaluna (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), PNW Research Station, US Forest Service, brooke.penaluna@oregonstate.edu;


Arial Shogren (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, shogrena@msu.edu;


Alex Webster (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California Davis, ajwebster@ucdavis.edu;


Megan Woller-Skar (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Grand Valley State University, wollerm@gvsu.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 251 AB IN SITU TURBIDITY SENSORS: THE PROBLEM, THE SOLUTION, AND BEYOND

5/22/2019  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  251 AB

IN SITU TURBIDITY SENSORS: THE PROBLEM, THE SOLUTION, AND BEYOND Lake Macatawa, a drowned river mouth system located in southwest Michigan, is the receiving waterbody for a highly degraded watershed. Extremely high nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations, excessive turbidity, low dissolved oxygen, and a high rate of sediment deposition make it one of the most hypereutrophic lakes in Michigan. Through a multimillion dollar public-private partnership, projects such as wetland restoration, in-stream remediation, and best management practices (BMPs) are expected to have many economic, social, and ecological benefits, while achieving the ultimate goal of improved water quality in Lake Macatawa. In order to better monitor turbidity within the watershed, two in-situ YSI 600OMS turbidity sensors were placed up- and downstream of a wetland restoration area; continuous data have been logged every 30 minutes during April-November since 2015. Previously, data would be collected monthly and reported annually. Now, a simple host micro-controller has been created to communicate with the turbidity sensors. Data is transmitted to a nearby SigFox base station and passed on to a Microsoft Auzure IoT Cloud Platform for real-time data accessibility to anyone at a fraction of the cost of other systems.

Michael Hassett (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute - Grand Valley State University, hassetmi@gvsu.edu;


Alan Steinman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute-Grand Valley State University, steinmaa@gvsu.edu;


Dan Callam (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Outdoor Discovery Center, danc@outdoordiscovery.org;


Ryan Truer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), twisthink, ryant@twisthink.com;


Maggie Oudsema (Primary Presenter/Author), Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute, oudsemam@gvsu.edu;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 251 AB EXPLORING LEECH MICROBIOMES IN A COURSE-BASED UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

5/22/2019  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  251 AB

EXPLORING LEECH MICROBIOMES IN A COURSE-BASED UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Student retention, graduation rates, and motivation to pursue careers and advanced degrees in STEM fields is enhanced when students engage in undergraduate research experiences and inquiry-based projects. A majors undergraduate general microbiology lab curriculum was designed to encourage students to explore freshwater biology and learn about community relationships by examining the ecological roles played by leeches and by isolating, characterizing, and identifying gut-associated bacteria that are thought to aid the host in digestion, vitamin synthesis, and protection against pathogens. Students perform literature reviews, engage in experimental design, collect leeches from the field, and practice proper aseptic technique, all while learning to perform morphological, biochemical, and genetic characterizations aimed at exploring the leech microbiome. An overview of the curriculum and its effects on student learning are explored.

Roger Gold (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Utah University, rogergold@suu.edu;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 251 AB SOUTHERN STREAM FISH: COMMUNICATING SCIENCE VIA AUDIO AND WEB MEDIA

5/22/2019  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  251 AB

SOUTHERN STREAM FISH: COMMUNICATING SCIENCE VIA AUDIO AND WEB MEDIA Science is routinely communicated using complicated language and concepts that are difficult for nonscientists to understand. Additionally, the research process often is not transparent, which may contribute to the public’s distrust or disinterest. As scientists, we must confront both of these problems by communicating complicated scientific theories and concepts in plain language and illuminating the actual research process. I have designed a scientific communication project that aims to do just that. Southern Stream Fish is an audio documentary and webpage that will pull back the curtains on a real-world scientific research project and allow the general public to follow along as I investigate how streams, fish, and humans fit together in southern Appalachia. However, before my research begins in earnest, it is important that I receive feedback on this project so that its full potential may be realized.

Bryan Bozeman (Primary Presenter/Author), Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, bryanbozeman@uga.edu;


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