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SFS Annual Meeting

Tuesday, June 4, 2024
15:00 - 16:30

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C36 Water Resource Management

15:30 - 15:45 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | DEVELOPING A STANDARDIZED DEFINTION OF RAPID EVIDENCE ASSESSMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS

6/04/2024  |   15:30 - 15:45   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

DEVELOPING A STANDARDIZED DEFINTION OF RAPID EVIDENCE ASSESSMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS Evidence assessment—the identification, evaluation, and synthesis of data and findings from previous studies—is important to inform environmental decision-making but can be slow and resource intensive. Users seeking faster results have developed a wide range of definitions and methods for Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA), raising concerns about consistency and rigor. To improve confidence in REA, we convened an international group of evidence users and researchers. Through five workshops we, iteratively developed a consensus definition of REA for environmental applications. "We define REA as a structured review process that aims to maximize rigor and objectivity given assessment needs and resource constraints (e.g., time). REA aims to address requirements for timely and cost-efficient decision-making while maintaining confidence in conclusions. REA is typically more rigorous than less formalized practices such as traditional narrative literature reviews, but effort is reduced relative to comprehensive evidence assessment approaches such as systematic review. REA is transparent, well-documented, and the details of the specific methods used at each step are justified. Those who commission, conduct, and use REAs should be cognizant of the achievable level of confidence in the conclusions that accompanies the rapid application of different steps in the REA process." This definition is supported by several ‘critical concepts’, which provide additional detail and context. We have also established a Community of Practice to enhance collaboration and provide guidance. Those who commission, carry out, and use REAs will benefit from having a standardized definition of REA to improve transparency and facilitate decisions about the appropriate levels of rigor.

Angus Webb (Primary Presenter/Author), The University of Melbourne, angus.webb@unimelb.edu.au;

Kate Schofield (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, schofield.kate@epa.gov;

Carly Cook (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Monash University, carly.cook@monash.edu;

Jon Fisher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Pew Charitable Trusts, jfisher@pewtrusts.org;

Rebecca Aicher (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, raicher@aaas.org;

Samantha Cheng (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), World Wide Fund for Nature, samantha.cheng@wwfus.org;

Natalie Dubois (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environmental Incentives, natalie.s.dubois@gmail.com;

Sara Mason (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Nicholas Institute for Energy, Environment & Sustainability, Duke University, sara.mason@duke.edu;

Caroline Ridley (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ridley.caroline@epa.gov;

15:45 - 16:00 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | ONE STEP AT A TIME: A WORKFLOW FOR VALIDATING INVEST WATER PURIFICATION MODEL FOR WATERSHEDS OF THE UNITED STATES

6/04/2024  |   15:45 - 16:00   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

One Step at a Time: A Workflow for Validating InVEST Water Purification Model for Watersheds of the United States Tools for modeling the spatial extent of ecosystem services have increased over the last few decades, improving our ability to inform environmental management. These models are sensitive to different contexts and parameters and must be validated against reliable observed data for their trust as decision-support instruments. However, many researchers applying these tools fail to undertake systematic validation processes, limiting our ability to make comparisons across case studies to develop generalizable management recommendations. This study proposes a workflow for systematically validating one of such tools, the InVEST Water Purification model for nutrient retention estimates (NDR). We work with the NDR model in the United States (US) context, where the widespread availability of water quality monitoring stations facilitates model calibration and validation across jurisdictions. The workflow is divided into three stages: 1) running the NDR model inputs, processes, and outputs; 2) building a long-term reference dataset from water quality observations; and 3) using the reference data for model calibration and validation. We illustrate the implementation of this workflow for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The results proved the NDR estimates appropriate for relative nutrient comparisons and provided insights into how the model accuracy can vary among watersheds and flow conditions. The workflow described provides a replicable method to link the vast network of open-source monitoring stations across the US to the calibration and validation of open-source water purification models, improving our ability to inform the systematic management of ecosystem services for watershed conservation.

Mariam Valladares-Castellanos (Primary Presenter/Author), Louisiana State University, mvalla3@lsu.edu;

Rebeca de Jesus Crespo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Louisiana State University, rdejesuscrespo1@lsu.edu;

Thomas Douthat (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Louisiana State University, tdouthat1@lsu.edu;

16:00 - 16:15 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | WATER QUALITY DEGRADATION IN THE SAGARMATHA NATIONAL PARK, NEPAL

6/04/2024  |   16:00 - 16:15   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

WATER QUALITY DEGRADATION IN THE SAGARMATHA NATIONAL PARK, NEPAL Sagarmatha National Park (SNP) is one of the world’s premier trekking destinations, where both tourists and local inhabitants depend upon local water sources for various domestic purposes, including drinking. This study aimed to assess the quality of drinking water along the trekking routes within SNP. A total of 24 water samples were collected from springs, tea house taps, and rivers in November 2022. Physico-chemical and biological parameters and major ions were analyzed in the laboratory, following the standard methods. Results revealed the presence of total coliform in all the samples. Furthermore, the fluoride concentration was below the recommended limit. However, lead and cadmium levels exceeded the national standard in the majority of the samples. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed significant contribution of pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, potassium, and total hardness on the water quality. Further, hydro-geochemical analysis revealed carbonate weathering as the major source of ions with the dominance of Ca2+ and HCO3-, characterizing the Ca-Mg-HCO3 water type. This study revealed the deteriorating quality of water in SNP and raising concerns about its suitability for drinking purposes. The continuous monitoring of water bodies and supply systems in the area to ensure that the water quality meets the requisite standards is recommended.

Suman Prakash Pradhan (Primary Presenter/Author), Kathmandu University, suman.pradhan2053@gmail.com;

Ishan Subedi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kathmandu University, ishansubedi91@gmail.com;

Simon Baniya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, baniyasimon23@gmail.com ;

Smritee Subedi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kathmandu University, subedismritee@gmail.com ;

Kirsten N. Nicholson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, knichols@bsu.edu ;

Bangshuai Han (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ball State University, bhan@bsu.edu ;

Subodh Sharma (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Kathmandu University, subodh.sharma@ku.edu.np;

16:15 - 16:30 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | SPATIOTEMPORAL AND WATER QUALITY INDICATORS OF CYANOBACTERIAL BLOOMS ACROSS A LAKE-STREAM NETWORK IN NEW JERSEY, USA

6/04/2024  |   16:15 - 16:30   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

Spatiotemporal and water quality indicators of cyanobacterial blooms across a lake-stream network in New Jersey, USA Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (cHABs) are an increasingly common occurrence in inland waters and carry ecological, economic, and public health consequences. We studied indicators of primary production (chlorophyll and phycocyanin) in a lake-stream network that is prone to cHABs in southern New Jersey, during bloom and non-bloom years. Our goal was to develop cyanobacterial bloom indicators. Primary productivity was lake-dependent, differing seasonally and across the two (bloom and non-bloom) years among the lakes we sampled. The lake with recurrent cHABs could be identified with water quality metrics in both bloom and non-bloom years, but the sampling location within this lake had a large influence on detection capability. Productivity differences among lakes were greater in the bloom year compared to the non-bloom year. The bloom year was characterized by a strong correlation between conductivity and nitrate readings, suggesting that cHABs in our study system are associated with nutrient-laden run-off.

Jordyn Brown (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, brownj33@students.rowan.edu;

Aaron Krivchenia (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Lousiana State University, akrivc1@lsu.edu;

Matthew Pierce (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, Matthew.pierce@uga.edu;

Courtney Richmond (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rowan University, Richmond@rowan.edu;

Nathan Ruhl (Primary Presenter/Author), Rowan University, Ruhl@rowan.edu;

16:30 - 16:45 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | COMMUNITY PRIORITIES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN FRESHWATER SYSTEMS

6/04/2024  |   16:30 - 16:45   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

Community Priorities for Climate Change Adaptation in Freshwater Systems Freshwater management must adapt to uncertain water availability under climate change while balancing competing demands from different human communities. These efforts are hampered by disconnects between the actions and objectives of managers, scientists, policymakers, and community members. To better connect these parties and inform management decisions, there has been a history of studying the diversity and plurality of community values. However, this research has focused on assessing value systems rather than explicit choices people would make under resource scarcity. We examine how community members prioritise values under water scarcity and how these priorities relate to value systems through semi-structured interviews with community members from different backgrounds and industries in the Goulburn-Broken River Catchment. We examined policy documents from state, regional, local, and indigenous sources to determine a list of values identified through those policy processes. We used open ended questions to determine broad values and a valuation exercise to determine trade-offs for the policy values in the context of water scarcity. We then implemented a Q-method to distinguish patterns in community member’s priorities and compared all three outputs. Community members held a wide variety values and priorities for the Goulburn-Broken. We expect patterns in values, unconstrained priorities and priorities chosen under resource constraints will be related. This project aims to improve the process of eliciting information on community values and priorities to inform decisions regarding declining water resources in the context of climate change. By doing so, it may enhance social resilience and promote a more resilient water management approach.

Madeline Grupper (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Melbourne, mgrupper@student.unimelb.edu.au;

Avril Horne (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Melbourne, avril.horne@unimelb.edu.au;

Julian Olden (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, olden@uw.edu;

Angus Webb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Melbourne, angus.webb@unimelb.edu.au;

16:45 - 17:00 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | MOVING THE AQUATIC SCIENCES TO THE NEXT MULTICULTURAL STAGE BY STEPPING OUTSIDE OF ACADEMIA AND STEM

6/04/2024  |   16:45 - 17:00   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

Moving the aquatic sciences to the next multicultural stage by stepping outside of academia and STEM The aquatic sciences field is still in the beginning stages of creating a thriving multicultural field. When considering the Multicultural Organizational Development Stage Model the aquatic sciences field can vary from Stage 1 to Stage 3 (out of 6 stages total). In this presentation I argue that to move to the next stages a cultural shift needs to occur, one that involves stepping outside the gates of academia and even outside of the gates of STEM. Many themes and multicultural efforts we see today in academia and STEM originate from grassroots community efforts. Involvement in grassroots communities, whether attending events or being actively involved, will allow individuals to learn, listen, and sharpen their analysis on what diversity, equity, and inclusion can look like; and thus bring these concepts to their respective workplace tables. In this presentation I share the skills and tools I brought from my grassroots community to help me survive and succeed in a primarily white institution as a brown woman, and how you too can thrive (or survive) in a primarily white field. I also share advice on how people from positions of privilege can contribute to a more equitable and diverse aquatic sciences field.

Ariana Dionisio (Primary Presenter/Author), King County, WA, abdionisio27@gmail.com;