Sunday, May 22, 2016
15:30 - 17:00

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15:30 - 15:45: / 308 DETERMINING LATITUDINAL DIFFERENCES IN EFFECTS OF SPACE FOR TIME SAMPLING TRADEOFFS USING DNA METABARCODING

5/22/2016  |   15:30 - 15:45   |  308

DETERMINING LATITUDINAL DIFFERENCES IN EFFECTS OF SPACE FOR TIME SAMPLING TRADEOFFS USING DNA METABARCODING Traditional processing of benthic samples from large numbers of streams is time consuming and expensive. Consequently, large-scale studies with the goal of characterizing the diversity and distributions of species must currently compromise between the spatial (number of sites) and temporal (number of times sites are sampled) extent of sampling. Yet, the value and amount of information lost when sacrificing temporal replication for spatial extent (“thin slicing”) remains unclear. New molecular tools, such as DNA metabarcoding, could increase the efficiency of sample processing such that sacrificing temporal replication for spatial extent, or vice versa, is not necessary. Metabarcoding is the simultaneous sequencing of DNA barcodes for entire benthic communities using Next-Generation Sequencing. Barcodes can then be used to determine the species composition of benthic samples. Here, we propose that the effects of “thin slicing” may vary geographically, because of latitudinal differences in species’ natural life histories. Furthermore, we detail plans for a study designed to assess latitudinal differences in the effects of “thin slicing” on efforts to characterize species diversity and distributions.

Brian Gill (Primary Presenter/Author), Colorado State University, Gillbriana@gmail.com;


Boris Kondratieff ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, Boris.Kondratieff@ColoState.edu;


Andrea C. Encalada ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Instituto BIOSFERA, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Cumbayá, Ecuador Biológicas y Ambientales, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Cumbaya, Ecuador, aencalada@usfq.edu.ec;


LeRoy Poff ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, n.poff@rams.colostate.edu;


Chris Funk ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Colorado State University, Chris.Funk@Colostate.edu;


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15:45 - 16:00: / 308 DETECTING SIGNATURES OF LOCAL ADAPTATION IN UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM POPULATIONS OF PARATYA AUSTRALIENSIS

5/22/2016  |   15:45 - 16:00   |  308

DETECTING SIGNATURES OF LOCAL ADAPTATION IN UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM POPULATIONS OF PARATYA AUSTRALIENSIS Paraya australiensis, an indigenous freshwater Atyid in eastern Australia, is considered as a model species for studying biology, behavior, ecology and genetics in Atyids. They form a major food source for stream dwelling fishes and feeds on algae, keeping the water body ecologically balanced and thus acting as a strongly-interacting ecosystem macroconsumer. Among the 9 highly divergent lineages (mtDNA), one lineage has been observed to favour upstream sites at higher altitudes, with cooler water temperature. This study aims to identify local adaptation in upstream and downstream populations of this lineage. Genetic markers were developed using double digest RAD sequencing and denovo assembly approaches. This produced 56,344 loci for 47 individuals, 39 individuals shared 5819 loci and these are being used to test local adaptation using Fst outlier tests and multilocus approaches in up and downstream populations of each stream. Adaptive genes identified in this study can be used for future studies to design primers and test for adaptation in related species.

Sharmeen Rahman (Primary Presenter/Author), Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, QLD-4111, Australia, sharmeen.rahman@griffithuni.edu.au;


Daniel J. Schmidt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, d.schmidt@griffith.edu.au;


Jane Hughes ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Griffith University, jane.hughes@griffith.edu.au;
Jane Hughes is a Professor in the Griffith School of Environment at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. She is also a Senior Fellow in the Australian Rivers Institute. Jane's undergraduate and Honours degrees are from the University of Western Australia and her PhD is from La Trobe University in Melbourne. She has been at Griffith University as an academic since 1978, when she began as a Junior Teaching Fellow. Her research is mainly focused on the use of molecular techniques to address questions in ecology and evolution and recently, much of her work has focused on connectivity among populations of aquatic animals in rivers and streams. She and her students have also published a lot of papers on the processes maintaining and producing biodiversity. When not working on freshwater fish and invertebrates, Jane works on the evolution of diversity in Australian birds. Jane is an editor for Freshwater Science, Marine and Freshwater Research, PeerJ and Heredity.

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16:00 - 16:15: / 308 UNDERSTANDING THE GENOMIC BASIS OF FRESHWATER ADAPTATION IN MACROBRACHIUM SPECIES

5/22/2016  |   16:00 - 16:15   |  308

UNDERSTANDING THE GENOMIC BASIS OF FRESHWATER ADAPTATION IN MACROBRACHIUM SPECIES Species in the Palaemonid genus Macrobrachium are all collectively referred to as ‘freshwater prawns’, numerous species still utilize either brackish and/or marine waters for part or all of their life cycle. All Macrobrachium species are believed to have evolved from a common marine ancestor and this genus is one of the most diverse crustacean genera, with 258 extant species worldwide. Species in this genus represent an attractive group for studies on the evolution of freshwater adaptation. Specifically from genomic perspective it is of interest whether similar or different molecular mechanisms are involved. Macrobrachium species show 3 different life history strategies: ALD (abbreviated larval development), Semi-ALD and ELD (extended larval development). To better understand the process, we used a comparative transcriptomic approach on 3 Macrobrachium species: M. koombooloomba (ALD), M. australiense (Semi-ALD) and M. tolmerum (ELD). Comparative transcriptomics revealed that 41 different candidate genes are involved in freshwater adaptation that involves the combination of a complex genic interaction between 6 different processes. This paper investigates whether the same or different molecular mechanisms control these processes in different species adapting to freshwater.

Md Lifat Rahi (Primary Presenter/Author), Queensland University of Technology, lifatrahi@gmail.com;


Peter B Mather ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Queensland University of Technology, p.mather@qut.edu.au;


David A Hurwood ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Queensland University of Technology, d.hurwood@qut.edu.au;


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16:15 - 16:30: / 308 MICROBIAL DIVERSITY IN DESERT STREAMS IS RELATED TO GEOCHEMISTRY AND SURFACE - SUBSURFACE INTERACTION

5/22/2016  |   16:15 - 16:30   |  308

MICROBIAL DIVERSITY IN DESERT STREAMS IS RELATED TO GEOCHEMISTRY AND SURFACE - SUBSURFACE INTERACTION Microbiota in stream waters drive ecosystem functions including respiration, nitrification and dentitrification, and their production fuels stream food webs. Yet, the extent to which differences in stream microbial composition and diversity are associated with differences in stream ecosystem function is not well understood. This study measured heterogeneity in surface and subsurface water bacterial community composition (BCC) within and among stream reaches, and evaluated the prediction that BCC was related to reach scale ecosystem function. To do this, we collected data on geochemistry, stream function, and BCC and diversity (using Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing) in six desert streams. Results show that salinity is the primary correlate with BCC, in that higher salinity and larger watershed size is associated with lower diversity and distinct composition of stream bacteria. This suggests that the longer, deeper groundwater flowpaths in larger watersheds impact stream water microbial community composition via selection and/or dispersal of certain types of bacteria. Surface and subsurface waters had distinct BCC, but links with stream reach function were less clear, suggesting that further work on microbial diversity may be illuminating.

Lydia Zeglin (Primary Presenter/Author), Kansas State University, lzeglin@ksu.edu;


Clifford Dahm ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, cdahm@sevilleta.unm.edu;


Chelsea Crenshaw ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, ccrensha@unm.edu;


Rich Sheibley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USGS Washington Water Science Center, Sheibley@usgs.gov;


Cristina Vesbach ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Mexico, cvesbach@unm.edu;


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16:30 - 16:45: / 308 METAGENOMIC PROFILING OF ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY REVEAL ENVIRONMENTAL THRESHOLD OF AMMONIA IN EUTROPHIC AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM: A CASE STUDY ON TAI LAKE, CHINA

5/22/2016  |   16:30 - 16:45   |  308

METAGENOMIC PROFILING OF ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY REVEAL ENVIRONMENTAL THRESHOLD OF AMMONIA IN EUTROPHIC AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM: A CASE STUDY ON TAI LAKE, CHINA The adverse effects of eutrophication will directly affect the composition of planktonic community. The community effect of ammonia that is the only toxic component of nitrogen species has been overlooked in previous studies. Here the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and DNA metabarcoding technology were used to study the species composition and intraspecific diversity of zooplankton in different levels of eutrophic water in an aquatic ecosystem scale. The number of zooplankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was significantly decreased following the increase of ammonia nitrogen. The species sensitive to eutrophication included Schmackeria forbesi, Synchaeta pectinata and Schmackeria sp in eutrophic lake and Bosmina sp, Sinocalanus dorrii, Mesocyclops sp, Keratella quadrala and Sinocalanus sp in eutrophic river. In lake ecosystem, with the aggravation of eutrophication, the proportion of copepods DNA was decreasing and the proportion of cladocerans DNA was increasing. Moreover, the proportions of dominant OTUs were higher in eutrophic water, which means the ecosystem become more simple and fragile. A quantitative model was developed to derive threshold of ammonia based on Metagenomics.

Xiaowei Zhang (Primary Presenter/Author), Nanjing University, zhangxw@nju.edu.cn;


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16:45 - 17:00: / 308 INFLUENCE OF MOSQUITO LARVAE GRAZING ON LEAF-ASSOCIATED MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE

5/22/2016  |   16:45 - 17:00   |  308

INFLUENCE OF MOSQUITO LARVAE GRAZING ON LEAF-ASSOCIATED MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE Conceptual models describing consumer effects on freshwater microbial communities are largely developed from herbivore-autotroph interactions. Applying these models to heterotrophic microbial communities has been challenging partly due to the difficulties in assessing the diversity and composition of these communities. However, recent advancements in next generation sequencing platforms and downstream analysis programs have made testing the relevance of these models to detrital-based systems more feasible. We asked how leaf-associated bacterial and fungal community structure changes over succession and how feeding pressure by mosquito larvae (Ochlerotatus triseriatus) alters successional outcomes. American beech leaves in early and late stages of microbial conditioning were exposed to varying intensities of larval feeding (0, 15, 20, 30, 40 larvae/g leaf). We used MiSeq Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the bacterial/archeal 16s gene and the V9 regions of the fungal 18s gene and ITS1 region to describe microbial community composition. Preliminarily, we found that changes in bacterial diversity were largely predicted by diversity-succession relationships developed for autotroph communities. Larval feeding did not appear to influence diversity indices, but may have influenced bacterial community composition.

Beth Norman (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan State University, bcheever@msu.edu;


Alexander Ruhs ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, ruhsalex@msu.edu;


Andrew Van Alst ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, vanalsta@msu.edu;


Edward Walker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan State University, walker@msu.edu;


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