Sunday, May 22, 2016
15:30 - 17:00

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15:30 - 15:45: / 315 HYDROLOGIC FILTERING OF FISH LIFE HISTORIES: EFFECTS OF DOWNSCALING ON THE GENERALITY OF PATTERNS IN LOUISIANA FISH COMMUNITIES

5/22/2016  |   15:30 - 15:45   |  315

HYDROLOGIC FILTERING OF FISH LIFE HISTORIES: EFFECTS OF DOWNSCALING ON THE GENERALITY OF PATTERNS IN LOUISIANA FISH COMMUNITIES Despite considerable support for hydrologic filtering of species traits, there is still limited understanding of the effects of scale, geographic variability, and sampling on relationships. Yet such information is critical for predicting effects of widespread hydrologic alteration in the Anthropocene. We used hydrologic metrics from a daily flow model (WaterFALL®) and long-term fish sampling data to evaluate the effects of watershed scale (HUC12/HUC8), geographic location, and sampling gear on flow-life history trait relationships in three large watersheds in Louisiana, using the well-established trilateral life history model (TLHM) for fishes. Predicted relationships between life history strategies and flow in HUC12 watersheds were supported with several datasets based on quantile regression, especially negative relationships between equilibrium and periodic strategists and flow variability and a positive relationship between periodic strategists and flow seasonality; however, many other predictions were not supported. There were few significant relationships at the HUC8 watershed scale. Our results suggest that, due to collinearity of hydrologic variables, effects of sampling gear, and scale of analysis, applying and operationalizing predictions of the TLHM in terms of hydrology may not be straightforward.

Micah Bennett (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, bennett.micah@epa.gov;


Bryan Piazza ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Nature Conservancy - Louisiana, bpiazza@tnc.org;


David Harlan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Nature Conservancy - Louisiana, dharlan@tnc.org;


James Bergan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Nature Conservancy - Louisiana, jbergan@tnc.org;


Gregory Whitledge ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern Illinois University Carbondale, gwhit@siu.edu;


Matt Whiles ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


Michele Eddy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), RTI International, mceddy@rti.org;


Jessie Allen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), RTI International, jallen@rti.org;


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15:45 - 16:00: / 315 LINKING WATER SOURCE SIGNATURES WITH NATIVE AMPHIBIAN BREEDING TIMING IN A NORTHERN SIERRA NEVADA WATERSHED

5/22/2016  |   15:45 - 16:00   |  315

LINKING WATER SOURCE SIGNATURES WITH NATIVE AMPHIBIAN BREEDING TIMING IN A NORTHERN SIERRA NEVADA WATERSHED Storm hydrograph separation using stable water isotope tracers (?18O and ?D) is a powerful tool to decipher water sources such as rainfall or snowmelt to streamflow. We used isotope-based hydrograph separation (IHS) to estimate contributions of event and pre-event water components (groundwater and precipitation) of stream flow from spatiotemporally variable source components at study sites in the North Yuba watershed in California. Land use/cover and elevation differences were observed in relation to snowmelt contributions to streamflow. These contributions are often associated with drastic changes in streamflow chemistry (e.g. changes in water temperature, pH, DO) which can influence migration and breeding events in fish and amphibians. We tested the hypothesis that a native aquatic river breeding frog species (Rana boylii) uses water quality conditions to determine when snowmelt is receding and hydrologic habitat conditions are most appropriate for successful reproduction (timing of spawning). In light of the increasing climate uncertainty, consideration of both physical and chemical conditions of a stream is increasingly important in order to estimate and predict trajectories of aquatic communities in the Sierra Nevada.

Ryan Peek (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Davis, rapeek@ucdavis.edu;


Helen Dahlke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UC Davis, hdahlke@ucdavis.edu ;


Sarah Yarnell ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Davis, smyarnell@ucdavis.edu;


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16:00 - 16:15: / 315 EFFECT OF HYDRODYNAMICS ON MICROBIAL BIOFILM COMMUNITIES REVEALED BY IN-SITU MEASUREMENTS IN MOUNTAINEOUS STREAMS

5/22/2016  |   16:00 - 16:15   |  315

EFFECT OF HYDRODYNAMICS ON MICROBIAL BIOFILM COMMUNITIES REVEALED BY IN-SITU MEASUREMENTS IN MOUNTAINEOUS STREAMS Microbial biofilms constitute an integral part of lotic aquatic ecosystems and are controlled by factors such as light, grazing, resources and hydrodynamics. Mountainous streams are characterized by a high spatio-temporal variability of the flow field that shapes microbial biofilms through drag forces and control nutrient supply through mass transfer processes. Previous studies have been restricted to flume experiments. In a novel approach we are aiming at linking detailed investigations on stream bed heterogeneity and associated development of flow fields to biofilm attributes. In-situ measurements in two mountainous streams (Harz region, Germany) comparable in bed morphology but differing in trophy revealed that TKE seems to be an important factor shaping the pigment composition and microbial community structure of stream biofilms. In addition, TKE influenced the biofilm architecture in the way that filamentous, porous structures were common at lower TKE and compact, coccoidal mats dominated at higher TKE. Our results indicate that TKE differentially affected microbial biofilms at contrasting trophic conditions of the stream water due to the interplay of nutrient supply and hydrodynamics.

Ute Risse-Buhl (Primary Presenter/Author), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Magdeburg, Germany, ute.risse-buhl@ufz.de;


Christine Anlanger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University Koblenz-Landau, Landau, Germany, christine.anlanger@uni-landau.de;


Katalin Kalla ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Magdeburg, Germany, katalin.kalla@ufz.de;


Thomas R. Neu ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Magdeburg, Germany, thomas.neu@ufz.de;


Christian Noss ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University Koblenz-Landau, Landau, Germany, christian.noss@uni-landau.de;


Antonis Chatzinotas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany, antonis.chatzinotas@ufz.de;


Andreas Lorke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University Koblenz-Landau, Landau, Germany, andreas.lorke@uni-landau.de;


Markus Weitere ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Magdeburg, Germany, markus.weitere@ufz.de;


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16:15 - 16:30: / 315 TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL CHANGES IN MACROINVERTEBRATE ABUNDANCE AND DIVERSITY IN STREAMS OF VARYING STABILITY IN NORTHEAST GREENLAND

5/22/2016  |   16:15 - 16:30   |  315

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL CHANGES IN MACROINVERTEBRATE ABUNDANCE AND DIVERSITY IN STREAMS OF VARYING STABILITY IN NORTHEAST GREENLAND In high Arctic regions, snowmelt, permafrost, glacier and groundwater contributions to river flow are expected to change in response to a warming climate with a shift from predominantly meltwater dominated systems to systems more dominated by groundwater. These shifts will influence the physicochemical habitat template from one characterised by low water temperature and high turbidity in low stability systems, to more stable systems with higher temperature and lower turbidity, affecting stream biodiversity. This project was the first hydroecology project in East Greenland. Macroinvertebrates were collected in July from streams of varying channel stability in 2013, 2014 and 2015. Chironomidae were the dominant taxa in all streams. Streams with higher channel stability supported a higher macroinvertebrate abundance and diversity with the Shannon Index reaching 2.37 compared to 1.04 in a low stability stream. Inter-annual variation over the three years was marked, with macroinvertebrate community assemblages being strongly influenced by precipitation fluctuations. For example, Diamesa abundance at one site was 13/m2 in 2013 but increased to 591/m2 in 2014. In the future, cold-adapted species could be at risk of local extinction.

Catherine Docherty (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Birmingham, cld327@bham.ac.uk;


David Hannah ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, UK, D.M.HANNAH@bham.ac.uk;


Victoria Milner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Worcester, v.milner@worc.ac.uk;


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16:30 - 16:45: / 315 MINIMAL EFFECTS OF FLOW PERMANENCY ON BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY COMPOSITION ALONG THE LONGITUDINAL PROFILE OF A PRAIRIE STREAM

5/22/2016  |   16:30 - 16:45   |  315

MINIMAL EFFECTS OF FLOW PERMANENCY ON BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY COMPOSITION ALONG THE LONGITUDINAL PROFILE OF A PRAIRIE STREAM We examined interannual and intraannual patterns of variation in benthic macroinvertebrate communities sampled at sites along the longitudinal profile of Tobacco Creek, a prairie stream in southern Manitoba, Canada. Tobacco Creek has permanent flow in the headwaters but frequently exhibits intermittent flow in middle to lower reaches during the summer under dry conditions. Ordination and ANOSIM analyses revealed that benthic community structure was primarily associated with the hydrogeomorphic template of the river’s longitudinal profile. Assessment of compositional differences among hydrogeomorphic zones suggested that the presence of large numbers of wetland associated taxa in the lower reaches were the main driver of among zone dissimilarity among seasons and years. However, assessment of the effects of interannual flow differences indicated that patterns of compositional dissimilarity were largely conserved across years regardless of flow status in the lower reaches. We hypothesize that a series of lowhead dams in the lower reaches are maintaining wetland-like hydrologic conditions in summers when flow is continuous reducing the importance of flow status as a driver of community composition.

Daniel M. Baldassarre ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University, dbaldass@uwo.ca;


Robert B. Brua ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment and Climate Change Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 3H5, bob.brua@canada.ca;


Joseph M. Culp ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Environment Canada & Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunwsick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3, jculp@unb.ca;


Adam G. Yates (Primary Presenter/Author), Western University & Canadian Rivers Institute, adam.yates@uwo.ca;


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16:45 - 17:00: / 315 MULTI-SCALE CONTROLS ON SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN RIVER BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING

5/22/2016  |   16:45 - 17:00   |  315

MULTI-SCALE CONTROLS ON SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN RIVER BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING Excessive river nutrient concentrations are common in agricultural catchments. Increasing geomorphological heterogeneity in river channels may help attenuate nutrient pollution by facilitating water exchange with the hyporheic zone where biogeochemical cycling rates can be high. However, the controls on spatial variability in biogeochemical cycling are largely unknown. We aimed to assess how differences in geomorphological heterogeneity control solute transport and biogeochemical cycling at sub-reach scales, and the relative magnitude of these versus those relating to reach scale substrate variability. We used the reactive tracer resazurin as a proxy to assess biogeochemical cycling in a lowland river. Tracer tests were conducted in two reaches with contrasting substrates (sand-dominated vs gravel-dominated) and with sub-reaches that varied in geomorphic complexity. Tracer injections were conducted during baseflow conditions and monitored using in-situ fluorometers. Preliminary results indicate resazurin transformation rates in the gravel-dominated reach were more than 50% higher than the sand-dominated reach. However, high sub-reach variability in resazurin transformation and solute transport parameters suggests small-scale interventions to alter geomorphic heterogeneity may be effective in creating hotspots of river biogeochemical cycling and nutrient load attenuation.

Phillip Blaen (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Birmingham, p.j.blaen@bham.ac.uk;


Marie Kurz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, mk3483@drexel.edu;


Julia Knapp ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, julia.knapp@student.uni-tuebingen.de;


Clara Mendoza-Lera ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, Lyon, France, clara.mendozalera@gmail.com;


Joseph Lee-Cullin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, cullinjo@msu.edu;


Megan Klaar ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Leeds, UK, M.J.Klaar@leeds.ac.uk;


Jen Drummond ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), CEAB-CSIC, Blanes, Spain, J-Drummond@u.northwestern.edu;


Anna Jaeger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany, anna.jaeger@igb-berlin.de ;


Jay Zarnetske ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Joerg Lewandowski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany, lewe@igb-berlin.de ;


Stefan Krause ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, U.K. , S.Krause@bham.ac.uk;


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