Monday, May 23, 2016
10:30 - 12:00

<< Back to Schedule

10:30 - 10:45: / 304-305 MOVING GENETIC BIOMONITORING FROM A CONCEPT TO A TOOL

5/23/2016  |   10:30 - 10:45   |  304-305

MOVING GENETIC BIOMONITORING FROM A CONCEPT TO A TOOL Molecular genetic techniques like DNA barcoding and environmental DNA have been proposed as tools for aquatic biomonitoring for nearly a decade, but have yet to break through into widespread acceptance. The potential benefits of these methods, such as quicker, cheaper, more detailed measures of biodiversity, remain on the horizon, yet environmental managers continue to hesitate to move away from traditional techniques. This lack of adoption of genetic environmental methods suggests a continued disconnect between the researchers advancing them and the end users that stand to benefit from them. Without addressing this disconnect, the likelihood of adopting molecular genetic tools into environmental monitoring is slim. Here, we outline three areas for development of molecular methods from concepts to tools for environmental managers: 1) creating consensus between researchers in laboratory protocols and data standards; 2) addressing questions of reproducibility and standardized data analyses; 3) outlining how molecular genetics align and differ from standard techniques but also create opportunities beyond traditional tools. We would argue that advancement in these research topics will foster improved relationships with implementers of these genetic environmental tools.

Erik Pilgrim (Primary Presenter/Author), USEPA/NERL/SED, Cincinnati, OH, pilgrim.erik@epa.gov;


Eric Stein ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, erics@sccwrp.org;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

10:45 - 11:00: / 304-305 ADAPTIVE SAMPLING TO IMPROVE SPECIES DETECTION USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA

5/23/2016  |   10:45 - 11:00   |  304-305

ADAPTIVE SAMPLING TO IMPROVE SPECIES DETECTION USING ENVIRONMENTAL DNA Detection of rare and elusive species in aquatic systems presents a continuing challenge for effective resource management. Analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) found in water samples can be an efficient technique for detecting amphibians and their pathogens. However, detection rates of species with eDNA methods vary with environmental conditions; adaptive sampling designs can be used increase efficiency while maintaining sensitivity. We investigated covariates of detection for six amphibian species and two pathogens in wetlands at two study sites. In neutral and alkaline systems, we found that spatially distributing samples around wetlands and increasing sample volume improved detection probabilities for amphibians, but increasing pore size of filters may reduce the detection of ranavirus. At Florida wetlands, we found that increasing sample numbers and volume at more acidic wetlands (pH<5) produced high detection rates at all sites except for those that were acidic and large with few individuals. We are developing technical transition tools, including field sampling protocols, guidance for choosing a laboratory, and an outreach website with training videos and other resources to inform the application of eDNA techniques across systems.

Caren Goldberg (Primary Presenter/Author), Washington State University, caren.goldberg@wsu.edu;


Katherine Strickler ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University, k.strickler@wsu.edu;


Alexander Fremier ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Washington State University, Pullman, WA, alex.fremier@wsu.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:00 - 11:15: / 304-305 A TEST OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA FOR BENTHIC ARTHROPODS USING THE RECIPROCAL INVASIVE RANGES OF THE RUSTY (GREAT LAKES) AND SIGNAL CRAYFISHES (CALIFORNIA, NEVADA)

5/23/2016  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  304-305

A TEST OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA FOR BENTHIC ARTHROPODS USING THE RECIPROCAL INVASIVE RANGES OF THE RUSTY (GREAT LAKES) AND SIGNAL CRAYFISHES (CALIFORNIA, NEVADA) Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging tool for the early detection of aquatic invasive species, but its application across taxa and ecosystems requires ongoing testing and refinement. We evaluated the ability of eDNA to detect benthic arthropods in large freshwater lakes by using a reciprocal comparison of this method between the known, North American invasive ranges of both the rusty crayfish Orconectes rusticus (i.e., the Great Lakes) and the signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (i.e., California, Nevada). We developed species-specific qPCR assays for both crayfish species, and applied these assays to eDNA water samples collected at each of 14 sites throughout the Great Lakes basin, and at 11 lakes across California and Nevada. We detected rusty crayfish at six locations in the Great Lakes, but did not find this species from our sample sites in western North America. Similarly, we detected signal crayfish at six lakes in California and Nevada, but from no localities in the Great Lakes. Successful application of eDNA in detecting both invasive crayfishes demonstrates the promise of this approach for monitoring benthic arthropods in large lakes.

Eric Larson (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


Mark Renshaw ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, Mark.A.Renshaw.2@nd.edu;


Crysta Gantz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Portland State University, cgantz@pdx.edu;


John Umek ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada, johnumek@gmail.com ;


Sudeep Chandra ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada Reno, Global Water Center, limnosudeep@me.com;


Scott Egan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), scott.p.egan@rice.edu , Rice University;


David Lodge ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, lodge.1@nd.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:15 - 11:30: / 304-305 AN ENVIRONMENTAL DNA BASED METHOD FOR MONITORING SPAWNING ACTIVITY: A CASE STUDY USING THE ENDANGERED MACQUARIE PERCH (MACQUARIA AUSTRALASICA)

5/23/2016  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  304-305

AN ENVIRONMENTAL DNA BASED METHOD FOR MONITORING SPAWNING ACTIVITY: A CASE STUDY USING THE ENDANGERED MACQUARIE PERCH (MACQUARIA AUSTRALASICA) Determining the time and location of reproduction for threatened species is critical to design and evaluate management actions. The current available methods for monitoring reproduction in aquatic species are often biased, costly, time intensive and sometimes require lethal sampling. Here we present an environmental DNA (eDNA) based methodology for monitoring spawning activity, which can overcome these constraints. During spawning the mass release of spermatozoa, which contain few mitochondria and highly protected nuclear DNA, forms a major source of eDNA. Thus, we hypothesized that the relative abundance of mitochondrial and nuclear eDNA will change during reproductive events. Using the endangered Macquarie perch, we simulated spawning in experimental tanks and monitored the changes in mitochondrial and nuclear eDNA over time. Our results revealed that both target fragments are equally abundant outside of the reproductive period. However, after the release of spermatozoa a 100- and 1000-fold increase was observed for mitochondrial and nuclear eDNA, respectively. Hence, the ratio between both target fragments can be used to detect recent spawning activity for species relying on external fertilization.

Jonas Bylemans (Primary Presenter/Author), Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Jonas.Bylemans@canberra.edu.au;


Elise Furlan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Elise.Furlan@canberra.edu.au;


Christopher Hardy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), CSIRO Land and Water, Chris.Hardy@csiro.au;


Mark Lintermans ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Mark.Lintermans@canberra.edu.au;


Dianne Gleeson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Dianne.Gleeson@canberra.edu.au;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:30 - 11:45: / 304-305 EFFICACY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA TO DETECT AND QUANTIFY BROOK TROUT POPULATIONS IN STREAMS OF THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS, NEW YORK, USA

5/23/2016  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  304-305

EFFICACY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA TO DETECT AND QUANTIFY BROOK TROUT POPULATIONS IN STREAMS OF THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS, NEW YORK, USA Environmental DNA (eDNA) is a rapidly evolving tool for assessing the distribution of species. Detection of species in streams is problematic because the persistence time for intact DNA fragments is unknown, and eDNA is diluted and dispersed by dynamic hydrological processes. Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, eDNA was analyzed from 40 streams across the Adirondack Mountains where populations were recently quantified to evaluate sampling methods and the ability of eDNA to accurately predict the presence and abundance of their populations. Results from 3-pass electrofishing surveys indicate that Brook Trout were absent from 10 sites, and present in low (<100 fish/0.1 ha), moderate (100-300 fish/0.1 ha), and high (>300 fish/0.1 ha) densities at 9, 11, and 10 sites, respectively. The eDNA results correctly inferred the presence-or-absence of Brook Trout in 92.5% of the sites and explained 44% of the variability in density and 24% of the variability in biomass of their populations. The findings indicate that eDNA is an effective tool for characterizing the presence, absence, and relative abundance of Brook Trout populations in headwater streams across the Adirondack region and elsewhere.

Barry Baldigo (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, bbaldigo@usgs.gov;


Lee Ann Sporn ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Paul Smith's College, lsporn@paulsmiths.edu;


Scott George ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, sgeorge@usgs.gov;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:45 - 12:00: / 304-305 WHEN SHOULD YOU USE GENETIC DETECTION OF A SINGLE SPECIES VERSUS ENVIRONMENTAL DNA METABARCODING IN MANAGEMENT?

5/23/2016  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  304-305

WHEN SHOULD YOU USE GENETIC DETECTION OF A SINGLE SPECIES VERSUS ENVIRONMENTAL DNA METABARCODING IN MANAGEMENT? Managers of natural resources in many cases know the species list of interest (endangered, invasive, etc.) for which they need monitoring data. When presented with the two prevailing genetic tools for species detection, PCR detection of single species versus environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding, there is little known about how the two methods compare and what the trade-offs are relative to monitoring a list of known species. Additionally, little is known about what gains can be realized, such as new detections of an invasive species, through use of eDNA metabarcoding of whole metazoan communities. In this study we perform both methods side by side for several aquatic habitats for both endangered species or populations (i.e., Southern steelhead, Tidewater goby, Arroyo chub, Arroyo toad) and common invasive species (i.e., Common carp, American bullfrog) on the military base of Camp Pendleton, CA to ascertain the trade-offs such as financial considerations, accuracy and reliability. We will present these data in the context of key challenges managers may face when planning to implement a genetic monitoring plan for such species.

Kristy Deiner (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Notre Dame, alpinedna@gmail.com;


Yiyuan Li ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, yli19@nd.edu ;


Mark Renshaw ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hawai'i Pacific University, mrenshaw@hpu.edu;


Michael Pfrender ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, Michael.Pfrender.1@nd.edu ;


David Lodge ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, David.M.Lodge.1@nd.edu ;


Christopher Jerde ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nevada, Reno, cjerde@unr.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.