Monday, May 23, 2016
10:30 - 12:00

<< Back to Schedule

10:30 - 10:45: / 313 DEVELOPING NUMERIC NUTRIENT CRITERIA TO PROTECT LAKES AND RESERVOIRS IN MISSISSIPPI

5/23/2016  |   10:30 - 10:45   |  313

DEVELOPING NUMERIC NUTRIENT CRITERIA TO PROTECT LAKES AND RESERVOIRS IN MISSISSIPPI Numeric nutrient criteria are being developed to protect the designated uses of surfaces waters, including lakes and reservoirs. This typically involves linking nutrient values to assessment endpoints, typically algal biomass, in lakes; but the difficulty is identifying algal levels that are linked to desired management goals, especially in artificial systems like reservoirs. Mississippi focused on dissolved oxygen protection and developed models that linked chlorophyll values to violations of their dissolved oxygen criteria. DO minima were modeled using empirical predictive models of DO sags and were significantly linked to surface chlorophyll. These values were verified by linking to hypolimnetic and water column DO deficits. Separate models were investigated for oxbows (natural lakes) and reservoirs. The resulting chlorophyll mean seasonal values of 20 ug/L, selected to protect the dissolved oxygen condition, were then linked to nutrient concentrations using empirical models. The final proposed criteria are being implemented using a range concept, which incorporates uncertainty from the models and decision agreement, into the final implementation.

Michael Paul (Primary Presenter/Author), Tetra Tech, Inc., Michael.Paul@tetratech.com;


Kim Caviness-Reardon ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Kim_Caviness-Reardon@deq.state.ms.us;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

10:45 - 11:00: / 313 THE EFFECT OF TWO MACROPHYTE SPECIES USED FOR RIVER RESTORATION ON THE REDUCTION OF NUTRIENT LOADS. A STUDY IN FLOW-THROUGH STREAM MESOCOSMS

5/23/2016  |   10:45 - 11:00   |  313

THE EFFECT OF TWO MACROPHYTE SPECIES USED FOR RIVER RESTORATION ON THE REDUCTION OF NUTRIENT LOADS. A STUDY IN FLOW-THROUGH STREAM MESOCOSMS River restoration, among other techniques, involves the use of macrophytes mainly aiming to landscape improvement. In this study we investigated the effect of two macrophyte species on hydrologically and biogeochemically mediated nutrient mitigation processes along subsurface flow paths. We used combined additions of phosphate, ammonium and chloride in 9 stream mesocosms fed with treated waste water, and submitted to three different treatments: absence of macrophytes (control), presence of Scirpus holoschoenus L., and presence of Phragmites australis L. Solute concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon compounds, as well as hydrologic transport parameters were measured during the additions, and were further linked to plants’ root system morphological properties. The capacity for nutrient removal along subsurface flow paths varied among the different treatments. Phragmites was the most retentive (90-92% ammonium retention and 50-61% phosphate retention), followed by Scirpus (84-90% ammonium retention and 33-58% phosphate retention) and the control (70-79% ammonium retention and 14-33% phosphate retention), showing that the type of vegetation affects the nutrient removal capacity of the hyporheic zone.

Myrto Nikolakopoulou (Primary Presenter/Author), Dep. Ecology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, mnikolakopo@gmail.com;


Alba Argerich ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Missouri, alba.argerich@oregonstate.edu;


Susana Bernal ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Integrated Freshwater Ecology Group, Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Girona, Spain., sbernal@ceab.csic.es;


Esperança Gacia ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Integrated Freshwater Ecology Group, Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Girona, Spain, gacia@ceab.csic.es;


Miquel Ribot ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Integrated Freshwater Ecology Group, Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Girona, Spain, mribot@ceab.csic.es;


Timothy Vaessen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Integrated Freshwater Ecology Group, Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Girona, Spain, t.n.vaessen@ceab.csic.es;


Eugènia Martí ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Integrated Freshwater Ecology Group, Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Girona, Spain, eugenia@ceab.csic.es;


Albert Sorolla ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Naturalea, Barcelona, Spain, albertsorolla@naturalea.eu;


Francesc Sabater ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Dep. Ecology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, fsabater@ub.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:00 - 11:15: / 313 EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVEST METHODS ON ALGAL BIOFILMS IN HEADWATER STREAMS

5/23/2016  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  313

EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVEST METHODS ON ALGAL BIOFILMS IN HEADWATER STREAMS In low-order streams, general assumption is that reduction in riparian cover results in higher light and temperatures and subsequent increased algal biomass and shifting assemblages. In headwater streams in the Trask River watershed, western Oregon, ongoing research is examining impacts of forest harvest practices on whole watershed parameters. This study focused on diatom responses to different harvest treatments (reduction/removal of riparian cover). Data were collected pre-harvest and post-harvest from five sub-watersheds with three harvest treatments. Chlorophyll a and diatom assemblages and biovolume were analyzed. Chlorophyll a was not significantly different among treatments when comparing pre- and post-harvest, which may reflect pigment response to changes in available light. In comparison, all sub-watersheds had surprisingly different baseline diatom communities (p = 0.0306), despite spatial proximity. NMDS showed diatom response to treatment impact reflected along a gradient of community change. These wide-ranging results, with non-significant chlorophyll measures among treatments but varied diatom community change, illustrate the complex response of algae to riparian removal and emphasizes necessity for stream buffers to protect stream ecosystems during timber harvest.

Rebecca Bixby (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Mexico, bbixby@unm.edu;


Sherri Johnson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, sherrijohnson@fs.fed.us;


Linda Ashkenas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Oregon State University, linda.ashkenas@oregonstate.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:15 - 11:30: / 313 FACTORS INFLUENCING INDIVIDUALS’ OUTDOOR RESIDENTIAL WATER USE DECISIONS IN SUBURBAN BOSTON (USA)

5/23/2016  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  313

FACTORS INFLUENCING INDIVIDUALS’ OUTDOOR RESIDENTIAL WATER USE DECISIONS IN SUBURBAN BOSTON (USA) Outdoor residential water use has been identified as a large contributor to water use during the summer months. Many studies have sought to understand what factors contribute to high outdoor water use and to evaluate the effectiveness of water restriction and conservation programs. However, there is limited empirical data on factors that influence daily decisions regarding how much water to use, when, and for water purpose. Drawing on data collected from a written survey, semi-structured interviews, and water use metering, we examine how an individual’s belief in the need for water conservation, physical landscape features, and an individual’s knowledge of water use (from meters) influence outdoor water use decisions. Although many participants believe water conservation is necessary, none believe they need to reduce their individual use. While lawn watering was the highest water use type (74 gallons/event), gardens were watered twice as often as lawns, and many participants explained their timing and amount of water use with respect to plants. Information on water use decision-making will be used to identify effective approaches to encourage outdoor water conservation.

Emily Argo (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Massachusetts, Amherst, eargo@umass.edu;


Allison Roy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Massachusetts Amherst, aroy@eco.umass.edu;


Robert Ryan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, rlryan@larp.umass.edu ;


Anita Milman ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, amilman@eco.umass.edu;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:30 - 11:45: / 313 EFFECTS OF A HYDROPEAKING DAM ON DOWNSTREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES AND RIVER HEALTH

5/23/2016  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  313

EFFECTS OF A HYDROPEAKING DAM ON DOWNSTREAM MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES AND RIVER HEALTH Fluctuations in discharge and water level that are common downstream from hydropeaking operations present biota with environmental challenges. Taxa that are intolerant to changes in discharge may be replaced by tolerant species, leading to altered community structures that may affect river health. We investigated benthic macroinvertebrate communities in a ~300 km reach of the Saskatchewan River, Canada at areas both above and below the hydropeaking E.B. Campbell Dam, as well as its spillway channel. Sites upstream of the dam had similar community assemblages that included sensitive taxa (EPT). In spring, sites below the dam had much lower abundance and diversity, although both parameters increased with increasing distance from the dam. Samples from late summer showed an increase in both abundance and diversity in pools in the spillway channel, which corresponded with decreased discharge from the reservoir. However, areas further downstream had decreased abundance and diversity that improved only at the furthest site from the dam. The results suggest that hydropeaking operations can change the benthic community assemblage by affecting substrate composition, influencing overall river health.

Jordan Mihalicz (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Saskatchewan, jem539@mail.usask.ca;


Tim Jardine ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, tim.jardine@usask.ca;


Helen Baulch ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, helen.baulch@usask.ca;


Iain Phillips ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troutreach Saskatchewan/ Water Security Agency of Saskatchewan, iain.phillips@wsask.ca;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.

11:45 - 12:00: / 313 OVEREXPLOITATION: THREAT TO FISH DIVERSITY IN INDIAN NORTHEAST

5/23/2016  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  313

OVEREXPLOITATION: THREAT TO FISH DIVERSITY IN INDIAN NORTHEAST Indian northeast is a biodiversity hotspot and forms the catchment area of the third largest river system in the world (Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna). Meghalaya being the wettest place on earth has many streams and rivers that harbor extremely diverse fish taxa. In this study, I outline the threats to fish diversity in the rivers and streams of Meghalaya, specifically focusing on Rymben-Borhill river system in East Khasi Hills, bordering with plains of Bangladesh. While the system harbors unique set of fishes including freshwater puffer fish, sucker fish, cat fish, mahseer, glass fish, and many more, their status is threatened and abundances are on decline. As the human population increases, the demand for food and pressure on rivers and streams increases. This is heightened by the practices used by the local communities where undue waste goes unchecked. Climate change has played a role too. The area that used to receive a huge amount of rainfall, exhibited less water due to less and unpredictable rain. A conservation approach is required to build capacity and make people realize the importance of sustainable resource use.

Bashida Massar (Primary Presenter/Author), St.Anthony's College, Shillong, Meghalaya, India, mbashida74@gmail.com;


Presentation:
This presentation has not yet been uploaded.