Monday, May 23, 2016
13:30 - 15:00

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13:30 - 13:45: / 306 USING TRAITS OF INVERTEBRATES TO QUANTIFY EFFECTS OF STRESSORS

5/23/2016  |   13:30 - 13:45   |  306

USING TRAITS OF INVERTEBRATES TO QUANTIFY EFFECTS OF STRESSORS Establishing a relationship between the invertebrate community status and a specific stressor is hampered by natural variation and co-occurring stressors. Species traits such as generation time or dispersal capacity may aid to detect and quantify effects of stressors. I will present results from field studies in streams from different global regions (Central and Northern Europe, Russia, South-East Australia), where combinations of traits of aquatic invertebrates were successfully used to detect effects of different stressors, i.e. pesticides, organic toxicants and salts, on stream invertebrate communities. In addition, I present results from a meta-analysis on the convergence of trait responses across organism groups and regions. Finally, I discuss the issue of discriminating the effects of a specific stressor in the face of multiple stressors. Overall, I suggest that trait-based approaches represent a promising tool to detect and quantify effects of stressors.

Ralf Schäfer (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, schaefer-ralf@uni-landau.de;


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13:45 - 14:00: / 306 GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF FRESHWATER FISH VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE

5/23/2016  |   13:45 - 14:00   |  306

GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF FRESHWATER FISH VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE Species vulnerability to climate change is expected to depend upon a combination of exposure to climate change, intrinsic sensitivity to that exposure, and capacity to buffer these climatic alterations. Yet a comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the distribution of this vulnerability among freshwater fish species is still lacking. Here we propose an integrative approach, including the investigation of species thermal tolerance, plasticity and evolutionary potential along with the projected geographical distribution of climate change for the next century to provide a first global assessment of freshwater fish vulnerability to the direct effects of climate warming. We found that the geographical areas for species with the highest sensitivity and lowest adaptive capacity do not necessarily coincide with the most exposed areas. However, our results also suggest that the plasticity and evolutionary potential in thermal tolerance are limited, putting many freshwater fish species at high potential threat under future climate change. By providing a multi-facetted assessment of species vulnerability to climate change, our approach can be used to prioritize mitigation strategies for species and areas deserving the most urgent attention.

Lise Comte (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Washington, lcomte@berkeley.edu;


Julian Olden ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, olden@uw.edu;


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14:00 - 14:15: / 306 THE USE OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE TRAITS TO ASSESS CLIMATE CHANGE RESPONSES AND VULNERABILITIES

5/23/2016  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  306

THE USE OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE TRAITS TO ASSESS CLIMATE CHANGE RESPONSES AND VULNERABILITIES Climate change effects on stream systems will produce complex responses involving dynamic temperature and flow changes. We performed traits-based analyses on routine biomonitoring data from the eastern US to explore the vulnerability of macroinvertebrates to climate change effects at a regional level, focusing on thermal tolerance and rheophily. We evaluated traits individually and in combination. We also performed a broad-scale classification analysis on the stream macroinvertebrate data, grouping communities into three classes based on traits responsive to temperature and streamflow conditions. The community groupings form the basis of a predictive model to project shifts in stream macroinvertebrate communities in the eastern US related to changing thermal and hydrologic conditions. This presentation highlights results from these analyses and knowledge gaps and limitations in traits-based analyses. We also discuss steps to address some of these shortcomings through Regional Monitoring Networks (RMNs) implemented in the eastern US. Disclaimer: Views expressed are the authors’ and not views or policies of the U.S.EPA.

Anna Hamilton (Primary Presenter/Author), Tetra Tech Center for Ecological Sciences, Anna.Hamilton@tetratech.com;


Britta Bierwagen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US EPA, bierwagen.britta@epa.gov;


Jen Stamp ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tetra Tech, jen.stamp@tetratech.com;


Jonathan Witt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Fairfax County Division of Stormwater Planning, jonathan.witt@fairfaxcounty.gov;


Lei Zheng ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tetra Tech, Inc., lei.zheng@tetratech.com;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 306 ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF RESTORATION OF INCISED STREAMS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES BASED ON TAXONOMIC- AND TRAIT-BASED INDICATORS

5/23/2016  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  306

ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF RESTORATION OF INCISED STREAMS ON MACROINVERTEBRATES BASED ON TAXONOMIC- AND TRAIT-BASED INDICATORS In many lowland streams the number and the magnitude of peak discharges increased due to land use changes and climate change. This often leads to channel incision and degradation of the stream ecosystem. One of those streams is the Leuvenumse beek in the Netherlands. Here, water managers and the local nature conservation agency are trying to restore the stream by artificially supplying sand to the stream, creating sand slugs which elevate the streambed and reconnect the stream with its original riparian zone. To assess the impact of this restoration measure on the macroinvertebrate community, we sampled macroinvertebrates in the area where the sand slug invaded the incised stream and where it has moved through. To determine changes in habitat availability, a number of hydromorphological parameters was recorded. Macroinvertebrate traits and habitat preferences were used to obtain more information on the environmental factors affecting the observed community changes. After recovery from the initial disturbance, an increase in microhabitat heterogeneity and current velocity was observed, which was especially reflected in the combinations of traits and habitat preferences present in the community.

Ralf C.M. Verdonschot (Primary Presenter/Author), Wageningen Environmental Research, ralf.verdonschot@wur.nl;


Piet F.M. Verdonschot ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Amsterdam / Wageningen Environmental Research , piet.verdonschot@wur.nl;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 306 RARITY CLASSIFICATIONS OF ECTOTHERMIC VERTEBRATES: APPLICATIONS FOR REGIONAL MULTISPECIES VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS

5/23/2016  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  306

RARITY CLASSIFICATIONS OF ECTOTHERMIC VERTEBRATES: APPLICATIONS FOR REGIONAL MULTISPECIES VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS Rarity classifications are recognized as promising multispecies frameworks for evaluating vulnerability of species to decline or extinction. Such frameworks are needed at a regional level where state or local agencies are often tasked with managing many species at once. We present rarity classifications for freshwater fishes, amphibians, and reptiles native to the state of Oregon. We calculated multiple measures of area-of-occupancy and evaluated climate and habitat niche breadth to inform species-level rarity classifications that encompassed a large spectrum of range sizes and climate sensitivity. We then evaluated species’ traits, such as life history and morphological attributes, as predictors of rarity and vulnerability – particularly for species with high uncertainty regarding range size or climate sensitivity. Preliminary results suggest the utility of rarity classifications as a foundation for regional multispecies conservation planning, particularly for poorly understood taxa.

Meryl Mims (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


Deanna Olson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Forest Service, dedeolson@fs.fed.us;


David Pilliod ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, dpilliod@usgs.gov;


Jason Dunham ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U. S. Geological Survey, jdunham@usgs.gov;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 306 CAN TRAIT COMPOSTIONS OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES DISTINGUISH BETWEEN TWO EVIRONEMENTAL STRESSORS AND ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION

5/23/2016  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  306

CAN TRAIT COMPOSTIONS OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES DISTINGUISH BETWEEN TWO EVIRONEMENTAL STRESSORS AND ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION Metal contamination from acid mine drainage and agricultural stress are 2 widespread causes of environmental stress in rivers and streams. This study aims to, 1) determine if the collection of traits displayed by benthic macroinvertebrate communities differ in the presence of 2 stressors, metal contamination and runoff from grazing pasture, both independently and combined and 2) assess ecosystem function and the ability of traits to infer causal relationships for changes in decomposition function, using dry mass and tensile strength loss, of cotton strips as an indicator. Macroinvertebrate, sediment and water samples and habitat information were collected from 16 sites, grouped into 4 categories (native woodland with metal contamination, grazing pasture with metal contamination, native woodland and grazing pasture). Regression analysis determined which traits correlated with the metal gradient. Correspondence analysis was used to determine the effects of habitat and agriculture on trait composition. Linear regression models were used to infer relationships between traits (e.g., shredder abundance) and decomposition rates. We present the results of the community trait composition differences, between site groups and the results of the linear regression models.

Jollene Reich (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Canberra, Australia, jollenereich@gmail.com;


Susan Nichols ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Canberra, Australia, Sue.Nichols@canberra.edu.au;


Bill Maher ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Canberra, Australia, Bill.Maher@canberra.edu.au;


Ben Kefford ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Canberra, ben.kefford@canberra.edu.au;


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