Monday, May 23, 2016
13:30 - 15:00

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13:30 - 13:45: / 314 SEEING THE FOREST AND THE TREES: EMERGING TOOLS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR MANAGING RIPARIAN FORESTS AND THEIR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

5/23/2016  |   13:30 - 13:45   |  314

SEEING THE FOREST AND THE TREES: EMERGING TOOLS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR MANAGING RIPARIAN FORESTS AND THEIR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES Studies across many decades have yielded a strong understanding of the intimate linkage between anthropogenic and natural disturbance regimes in riparian and upland forests and responses in aquatic ecosystems. As new tools and novel approaches to forest management continue to be developed, new perspectives on the causal relationships across terrestrial-aquatic ecotones have emerged with corresponding implications for the sustainable management of riparian ecosystems and the services they provide. Drawing on examples from several current and proposed research projects across Canada, I discuss new tools that have been developed to better understand disturbance-response relationships across aquatic-riparian ecotones and how these can be (or are being) effectively applied in the management of riparian ecosystems. Topics addressed will include: cumulative responses of individual and co-occurring stressors along the upstream-downstream axis (propagation or attenuation?); the application of LiDAR in the development of enhanced terrain analyses to improve identification of variable source areas (localized, streamside hydrological/biogeochemical hotspots); the application of trophic (food web) analyses in understanding aquatic-terrestrial linkages; and the application of END (emulation of natural disturbance) in the management of riparian forests

Paul Sibley (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Guelph, psibley@uoguelph.ca ;


David Kreutzweiser ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, dave.kreutzweiser@canada.ca;


Karen Kidd ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), McMaster University, karenkidd@mcmaster.ca;


John Richardson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of British Columbia, John.Richardson@ubc.ca;


Alex Yeung ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada, yeungcheeyu@gmail.com;


Jordan Musetta-Lambert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Guelph, jmusetta@uoguelph.ca;


Maitane Erdozain ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Brunswick, maitane.erdozain@gmail.com;


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13:45 - 14:00: / 314 SEEING THE FOREST AND THE TREES: EMERGING TOOLS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR MANAGING RIPARIAN FORESTS AND THEIR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

5/23/2016  |   13:45 - 14:00   |  314

SEEING THE FOREST AND THE TREES: EMERGING TOOLS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR MANAGING RIPARIAN FORESTS AND THEIR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES Studies across many decades have yielded a strong understanding of the intimate linkage between anthropogenic and natural disturbance regimes in riparian and upland forests and responses in aquatic ecosystems. As new tools and novel approaches to forest management continue to be developed, new perspectives on the causal relationships across terrestrial-aquatic ecotones have emerged with corresponding implications for the sustainable management of riparian ecosystems and the services they provide. Drawing on examples from several current and proposed research projects across Canada, I discuss new tools that have been developed to better understand disturbance-response relationships across aquatic-riparian ecotones and how these can be (or are being) effectively applied in the management of riparian ecosystems. Topics addressed will include: cumulative responses of individual and co-occurring stressors along the upstream-downstream axis (propagation or attenuation?); the application of LiDAR in the development of enhanced terrain analyses to improve identification of variable source areas (localized, streamside hydrological/biogeochemical hotspots); the application of trophic (food web) analyses in understanding aquatic-terrestrial linkages; and the application of END (emulation of natural disturbance) in the management of riparian forests

Paul Sibley (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Guelph, psibley@uoguelph.ca ;


David Kreutzweiser ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, dave.kreutzweiser@canada.ca;


Karen Kidd ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), McMaster University, karenkidd@mcmaster.ca;


John Richardson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of British Columbia, John.Richardson@ubc.ca;


Alex Yeung ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada, yeungcheeyu@gmail.com;


Jordan Musetta-Lambert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Guelph, jmusetta@uoguelph.ca;


Maitane Erdozain ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of New Brunswick, maitane.erdozain@gmail.com;


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14:00 - 14:15: / 314 ALTERNATE TRAJECTORIES OF STAND DEVELOPMENT IN THE RIPARIAN FOREST AFFECT LONG-TERM STREAM LIGHT DYNAMICS, AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION IN TEMPERATE HEADWATERS

5/23/2016  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  314

ALTERNATE TRAJECTORIES OF STAND DEVELOPMENT IN THE RIPARIAN FOREST AFFECT LONG-TERM STREAM LIGHT DYNAMICS, AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION IN TEMPERATE HEADWATERS Light availability influences temperature, primary production, nutrient dynamics and secondary production in streams. Indeed, in forested headwaters, riparian forest controls on stream light represent important interactions at the aquatic-terrestrial interface. Changes in forest structure often occur over longer time scales than are typically considered in many stream ecology studies, but these changes can have important implications for long-term dynamics of stream function. We present a set of conceptual models for how changes in stream light over time in association with development of complex canopy structure are likely to affect stream ecosystem processes. Tree density, degree of understory growth, patterns of tree mortality, and small-scale disturbances on the landscape interact to create multiple pathways of forest structural development. Changes in canopy structure will in-turn influence stream light, which will impact primary production, and stream nutrient dynamics as well as the amount of autochthonous carbon supporting aquatic food webs. Ultimately, these models stress the importance of recovery from historic forest disturbances and future forest change in influencing the long-term trajectories of ecosystem processes in headwaters.

Dana Warren (Primary Presenter/Author), Oregon State University, dana.warren@oregonstate.edu;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 314 RESPONSE OF BOREAL CATCHMENTS TO FOREST DISTURBANCE: FROM NUTRIENT MOBILIZATION AT THE SOIL-STREAM INTERFACE TO LANDSCAPE SCALE IMPLICATIONS ON WATER QUALITY

5/23/2016  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  314

RESPONSE OF BOREAL CATCHMENTS TO FOREST DISTURBANCE: FROM NUTRIENT MOBILIZATION AT THE SOIL-STREAM INTERFACE TO LANDSCAPE SCALE IMPLICATIONS ON WATER QUALITY Forest disturbance by clear-cutting has been identified as an important factor for increasing nutrient mobilization into boreal streams. Here we summarize work performed in an paired-catchment experiment located in the boreal forest of northern Sweden. We investigated the mechanisms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), as well as organic and inorganic nitrogen (DON and DIN) mobilization into first-order streams and the downstream fate of these solutes. Results show that increased DOC mobilization after disturbance is caused by higher GW-levels leading to increased water fluxes in riparian soils and increased soil temperature facilitating higher DOC availability in soils during summer. Similarly, DIN fluxes strongly increased as a result of disturbance. The downstream fate of the solutes in the network was dependent on biological demand; seasonally dependent removal was totaling ~65% of DIN during transport in the network, whereas the downstream transfer of DOC and DON was nearly conservative. Overall this presentation will aim at portraying the work performed at the Balsjö experimental-watershed over the past decade, and to describe current gaps of knowledge regarding the responses of stream ecosystems to forest disturbance.

Jakob Schelker (Primary Presenter/Author), Dept. of Limnology and Bio-Oceanography; University of Vienna, jakob.schelker@univie.ac.at;


Karin Eklöf ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, karin.eklof@slu.se;


Ryan Sponseller ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden, ryan.sponseller@emg.umu.se;


Kevin Bishop ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Uppsala University, Kevin.Bishop@geo.uu.se;


Hjalmar Laudon ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, hjalmar.laudon@slu.se;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 314 WILDFIRE IN BOREAL FOREST CATCHMENTS INFLUENCES LEAF LITTER SUBSIDIES AND CONSUMER COMMUNITIES IN STREAMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

5/23/2016  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  314

WILDFIRE IN BOREAL FOREST CATCHMENTS INFLUENCES LEAF LITTER SUBSIDIES AND CONSUMER COMMUNITIES IN STREAMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Applying the emerging paradigm of emulation of natural disturbances to forest management requires understanding of how the riparian-aquatic interface responds to forest disturbances. A comparison of riparian forest condition and stream function was conducted across boreal, headwater streams within fire-disturbed, harvested with minimum 30 m riparian buffers, and reference forested catchments. We assessed riparian vegetation characteristics, leaf-litter inputs to streams, in-stream leaf-litter decomposition rates, and associated aquatic macroinvertebrate communities. Shrub and juvenile woody-stem community structure was significantly different at fire-disturbed than harvested and reference sites while mature tree densities at reference sites were 1.7x and 4x higher than at harvested and fire sites, respectively. Riparian derived leaf litter subsidies to streams were significantly greater and compositionally dissimilar at fire sites compared to harvested and reference sites. Invertebrate communities associated with leaf-packs at fire-disturbed sites were characterized by significantly higher taxa richness and unique shredder taxa. Detectable differences in riparian forest condition and in-stream processes suggest that riparian management under the END paradigm could sustain ecosystem services by inducing forest succession, enhancing biodiversity and organic matter processing, and promoting habitat complexity.

Jordan Musetta-Lambert (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Guelph, jmusetta@uoguelph.ca;


Elisa Muto ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Canadian Forest Service, emuto@shaw.ca;


Paul Sibley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Guelph, psibley@uoguelph.ca ;


David Kreutzweiser ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, dave.kreutzweiser@canada.ca;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 314 RESPONSE OF AQUATIC INDICATORS OF STREAM INTEGRITY TO DIFFERENT FOREST CONDITIONS RESULTING FROM FORESTRY

5/23/2016  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  314

RESPONSE OF AQUATIC INDICATORS OF STREAM INTEGRITY TO DIFFERENT FOREST CONDITIONS RESULTING FROM FORESTRY Harvesting changes forest condition, and this may compromise the integrity of stream ecosystems. Many studies have measured indicators of stream integrity in relation to forest harvesting, but there is still some debate about which factors (e.g. area vs. proximity of harvesting) drive changes and which indicators are most informative for forest management. To address this, we are studying 15 headwater streams ranging in harvesting intensity in New Brunswick, Canada. Indicators linked to food web structure (stable isotope analysis), benthic macroinvertebrate communities, leaf decomposition, fine sediment deposition, biofilm growth, and water and DOM quality have been measured. Early results suggest that leaf decomposition (R2=0.81, p=0.002) and sediment deposition (R2=0.62, p=0.005) are good indicators, since best fit models for these endpoints explain a large proportion of the observed variability. Number of roads and forest structure are the best predictors in these models, whereas percent area harvested is not. Although results from other indicators remain to be analyzed, preliminary results suggest that other factors rather than the commonly used percent area harvested have more of an impact on the health of these streams.

Maitane Erdozain (Primary Presenter/Author), University of New Brunswick, maitane.erdozain@gmail.com;


Karen Kidd ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), McMaster University, karenkidd@mcmaster.ca;


David Kreutzweiser ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, dave.kreutzweiser@canada.ca;


Paul Sibley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Guelph, psibley@uoguelph.ca ;


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