Wednesday, May 25, 2016
13:30 - 15:00

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13:30 - 13:45: / 302-303 TRACKING FISH MOVEMENTS IN A LARGE RIVER USING STABLE SULFUR ISOTOPES

5/25/2016  |   13:30 - 13:45   |  302-303

TRACKING FISH MOVEMENTS IN A LARGE RIVER USING STABLE SULFUR ISOTOPES Stable sulfur isotopes (34S/32S) have proven useful in assessing migratory fish movements, most notably anadromous fishes returning from the ocean to freshwaters. Few studies have assessed if S isotopes can track fish movements in inland waters, despite likely biogeochemical differences between lentic and lotic environments that could confer distinct S isotope ratios to fish. Here we distinguish feeding origins of large fish captured in a northern lake-delta-river environment, the Slave River and Delta, NWT. Whitefish and inconnu caught in the delta were moving from Great Slave Lake into the Slave River to spawn and residing there only briefly, as evidenced by their elevated d34S (+0.2 to +5.8 permil) that matched prey in the lake (d34S = -0.1 to +5.8 permil) and was entirely distinct from prey in the delta (d34S = -9.4 to +0.1 permil), observations that were confirmed by local knowledge of their biology. This suggests that though contaminants derived from industrial activities upstream are deposited in the delta, they may pose limited risks to fishes because of their short period of residency there.

Tim Jardine (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Saskatchewan, tim.jardine@usask.ca;


Meghan Carr ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, meghan.carr@usask.ca;


Karl Lindenschmidt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, karl.lindenschmidt@usask.ca;


Lorne Doig ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, lorne.doig@usask.ca;


Paul Jones ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, pdj055@mail.usask.ca;


Lalita Bharadwaj ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, lalita.bharadwaj@usask.ca;


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13:45 - 14:00: / 302-303 EVALUATING FORAGING HABITS, AND ESTIMATING PREY CONSUMPTION AND GROWTH OF BROOK TROUT IN A COOLWATER MICHIGAN STREAM

5/25/2016  |   13:45 - 14:00   |  302-303

EVALUATING FORAGING HABITS, AND ESTIMATING PREY CONSUMPTION AND GROWTH OF BROOK TROUT IN A COOLWATER MICHIGAN STREAM Fish foraging patterns can provide insight into food web dynamics and the growth and bioenergetics of a particular species. For brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, diet contents play an important role when estimating consumption and predicting growth using bioenergetics models. We used gastric lavage to collect stomach contents of brook trout from June to August of 2015 in Cedar Creek, MI. We quantified the temporal energy contributions from specific taxa, assessed growth using Fulton’s condition factor, and modeled bioenergetics parameters using diet contents, weight, and temperature data. An increase in the contribution of energy from terrestrial taxa was observed over the study period and brook trout tended to consume fewer prey items from June to August. Condition of fish recaptured throughout the study significantly decreased (t=-2.80, d.f.=12, p<0.05), and our model estimates of the proportion of maximum consumption were slightly higher than typically reported in the literature. Additionally, our model suggests the average brook trout in Cedar Creek would lose approximately 11-14% of its body weight with a 1°C increase in average water temperature over the course of the study.

Graeme Zaparzynski (Primary Presenter/Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, zaparzyg@mail.gvsu.edu ;


Justin Wegner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, wegnerju@mail.gvsu.edu;


Mark Luttenton ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, luttentm@gvsu.edu;


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14:00 - 14:15: / 302-303 EARLIER ARRIVAL AND LARGER BODY SIZE INCREASE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN ALEWIFE

5/25/2016  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  302-303

EARLIER ARRIVAL AND LARGER BODY SIZE INCREASE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN ALEWIFE Over the last century, anadromous alewife populations (Alosa pseudoharengus) have declined drastically throughout their range from Newfoundland (Canada) to North Carolina (USA). Population reductions were accompanied by declines in mean body size of migrating adults and altered migration timing; however, no studies have examined how these alterations in demography may influence reproductive success. To elucidate reproductive patterns, we introduced adult alewives (421, 266, and 410 individuals in 2013, 2014, and 2015, respectively) into Pentucket Pond (Massachusetts, USA), a pond that historically had alewife, but migration barriers currently limit natural access. We collected lengths and fin clips from adult and juvenile fish, extracted DNA from fin clips, and used microsatellites to construct pedigrees. Genetic results provide new information indicating that individual alewife spawn multiple times from May to June. Earlier arrival and larger body size y were independent indicators of reproductive success for both males and female. By filling a gap in current understanding of alewife life history, these results contribute critical information the freshwater component of future population models that will inform management of this at-risk species.

Meghna Marjadi (Primary Presenter/Author), Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Program, University of Massachusetts Amherst, , mmarjadi@umass.edu;


Allison Roy ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Massachusetts Amherst, aroy@eco.umass.edu;


Adrian Jordaan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, ajordaan@eco.umass.ed;


Julianne Rosset ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst, , jrosset@eco.umass.edu;


Andrew Whiteley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College Of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, andrew.whiteley@mso.umt.edu;


Ben Gahagan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, ben.gahagan@state.ma.us;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 302-303 THE ROLE OF DISPERSAL IN RANGE EXPANSION: A STUDY OF SMALLMOUTH BASS INVASION AT ITS UPSTREAM EDGE

5/25/2016  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  302-303

THE ROLE OF DISPERSAL IN RANGE EXPANSION: A STUDY OF SMALLMOUTH BASS INVASION AT ITS UPSTREAM EDGE Studying the dynamics of species’ borders provides insight into the mechanisms limiting or promoting range expansion in response to environmental change. For instance, range boundaries offer a unique opportunity to explore demographic responses along a gradient of decreasing environmental suitability. In the John Day River, OR (Columbia River Basin), rising stream temperatures are facilitating the upstream expansion of invasive smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu). Here, where smallmouth bass occupy the upstream limit of its thermal tolerance, we explore the role of dispersal in range expansion. Our objectives were to characterize seasonal and inter-annual demographics along its range boundary in response to various environmental conditions and examine how dispersal contributes to population demography and ultimately future range potential. Reporting on a multi-year, spatially extensive riverscape survey, our results show dramatic ebbs and flows of seasonal occupancies due to movement. We demonstrate how these dispersal patterns alter birth and death rates along the range boundary, influencing colonization success, and identify environmental constraints that most likely govern range expansion. Taken together, our research emphasizes the importance of dispersal as a driver of range expansion.

Erika Sutherland (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Washington, esuther@uw.edu;


Julian Olden ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Washington, olden@uw.edu;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 302-303 POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS, CAPTURE SUCCESS, AND FEEDING ECOLOGY OF MUDPUPPIES (NECTURUS MACULOSUS) IN AN URBAN LAKE

5/25/2016  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  302-303

POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS, CAPTURE SUCCESS, AND FEEDING ECOLOGY OF MUDPUPPIES (NECTURUS MACULOSUS) IN AN URBAN LAKE Mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) populations appear to be declining throughout the Great Lakes region, yet their population dynamics, seasonal activity patterns, and diets are poorly studied. We captured 94 mudpuppies with minnow traps and 19 with hand nets in a southeast Chicago lake during nine trapping events of 3+ consecutive nights from January to May and October to December 2015. Mudpuppies in traps (mean=27.3 ± 5.7 cm) were larger than those caught using hand nets (mean=15.8 ± 3.7 cm TL), indicating potential gear bias. Highest trapping success was during February-early March, March-early April, November, and December. Trapping success in December and February-March was higher than in May (p<0.0001). Stomach contents, obtained through gastric lavage, included mollusks, leeches, insects, malacostracans, fishes, a frog, and a juvenile mudpuppy. Invasive species, including rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus), round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus), and zebra/quagga mussels (Dreissena spp.), were also present in guts. Juveniles (<20.0 cm) consumed fewer fish and no crayfish, but more leeches and amphipods than adults. Results suggest mudpuppies in lake ecosystems occupy a broad niche that changes through their life span.

Alicia Beattie (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern Illinois University, Carbondale , alicia.beattie@siu.edu;


Matt Whiles ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Florida, mwhiles@zoology.siu.edu;


Philip Willink ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Shedd Aquarium , pwillink@sheddaquarium.org;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 302-303 FACTORS REGULATING THE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF SICYDIUM (GOBIIDAE: PERCIFORMES) IN HEADWATER STREAMS WITHIN EL YUNQUE NATIONAL FOREST, PUERTO RICO.

5/25/2016  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  302-303

FACTORS REGULATING THE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF SICYDIUM (GOBIIDAE: PERCIFORMES) IN HEADWATER STREAMS WITHIN EL YUNQUE NATIONAL FOREST, PUERTO RICO. Caribbean island streams are characterized by their short drainage networks and steep gradients, making these habitats ideal for migratory biota. In Puerto Rico, amphidromous freshwater fishes have received little attention, and factors determining their distribution in headwater streams at the reach scale are unknown. The goal of this study was to explore variables regulating the distribution and abundance of Sicydium, a genus of freshwater gobies, in headwater streams draining El Yunque National Forest. We surveyed for Sicydium in 24 pools from three different streams within the Espiritu Santo River watershed, and collected data from 11 physic and biological variables. We used Multiple Regression Analysis and Binomial Logistic Regression to test for relationships between the variables measured. Sicydium distribution and abundance was found to be best explained by substrate and water velocity. Rock substrates are the best surface for algae grow and higher water velocity maintain them clean by sediment removal downstream. Interaction between these reach-scale factors it seems to explain an important part of establishment of Sicydium in headwaters streams, elucidating aspects of their habitat preference related to algae availability.

Guido A Herrera-R (Primary Presenter/Author), Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, guido.herrera@javeriana.edu.co;


Pedro J Torres ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, torresp@denison.edu;


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