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SFS Annual Meeting

2021 Detailed Schedule

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Empowered and inspired: Lessons from backcountry trips for underrepresented girls in science [Oral Presentation]

Jacqueline Gerson (Primary Presenter/Author)
Duke University, jgerson1@gmail.com;

Emily Levy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Duke University, ejl37@duke.edu;

Emily Ury (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Duke University, ury.emily@gmail.com;

Abstract: Girls on outdoor Adventure for Leadership and Science (GALS) is a free summer science program that integrates backpacking, hands-on learning, and science education. GALS’ driving goal is to reduce the gender, racial, and socio-economic gaps in science. Founded in 2016 by four women in science, GALS has been working to create learning opportunities outside the traditional classroom setting. During a two-week summer backpacking trip with follow-up activities throughout the year, students from underrepresented groups in STEM – women or nonbinary students, students of color, and students of low socioecomomic status – study ecology and earth science in the outdoors. The GALS curriculum focuses on three main learning objectives: (1) expanding students’ science literacy and content knowledge; (2) building students’ confidence and ability to pursue science studies and careers; and (3) increasing students’ self-awareness, teamwork, and leadership skills. The program’s leaders are scientists and educators who use inquiry-based exploration, place-based education, and scientific principles to build scientific literacy, competence, and confidence in its students. This talk will discuss GALS program components, success stories, lessons learned, and logistics for starting a similar program at other institutions.

Gender & Science AIL Group: Challenges and achievements to foster women research and visibility in freshwater sciences [Oral Presentation]

Anna Lupon (Primary Presenter/Author)
Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), anna.lupon@gmail.com;

María Mar Sánchez-Montoya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Department of Ecology and Hydrology, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100,Spain, marsanch@um.es;

Pablo Rodríguez-Lozano (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Department of Geography, University of the Balearic Islands, 07122 Palma, Spain, pablo.rodriguez@uib.es;

Núria Catalán (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l'Environnement (LSCE), CNRS, CEA, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette - France, ncatalangarcia@gmail.com;

Clara Mendoza-Lera (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
iES, University of Koblenz-Landau (Germany), clara.mendozalera@gmail.com;

Mireia Bartrons (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Vic, Spain, mireia.bartrons@uvic.cat;

María Anton-Pardo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Universitat de Girona, Spain, mariaantonpardo@gmail.com;

Xavier Benito (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), University of Maryland (USA), xavier.benito.granell@gmail.com;

Susana Bernal (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Spain, sbernal@ceab.csic.es;

Eliana Bohorquez Bedoya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Colombia, elibohorquezbed@unal.edu.co;

Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Barcelona, mcanedo.fem@gmail.com;

Isabel Fernandes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology (CBMA), University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal, isabelrodriguesfernandes@gmail.com;

Anna Freixa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Girona, Spain, afreixa@icra.cat;

Ana Genua-Olmedo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
CESAM, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal, ana.genua@ua.pt;

Elizabeth León-Palmero (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Departamento de Ecología, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain, eleonpalmero@ugr.es;

Sílvia Poblador (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Research Group of Plants and Ecosystems, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium, spoblador@gmail.com;

Aitziber Zufiaurre (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain, aitziber.zufiaurre@gmail.com;

Ada Pastor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Aarhus University, adapastor@bio.au.dk;

Abstract: Gender imbalance is pervasive in science, with women particularly underrepresented at senior academic positions. While the demographic inertia from past policies may partially explain this trend, gender biases areis still evident in some of the key achievements that ground academic career progression. In order to foster gender equity in freshwater sciences, we launched the Gender & Science Group of the Iberian Association of Limnology (AIL) in 2014. Since then, the group has acted as a gender observatory by analyzing the professional and personal causes that hinder the scientific career of female researchers. During this time, the group has also collaborated with other institutions to foster the role of female limnologists within and outside academia through multiple projects, including the exhibition “Women in Science'' (aimed at spotlighting the past and present situation of women limnologists) and the project “Gender LimnoEdu” (aimed at creating teaching resources materials). In this talk, we present the achievements of the group during the past years together with the challenges faced and the ideas for the future.

Gender LimnoEDU: Teaching resources to include women's scientific contributions in our lectures [Oral Presentation]

Clara Mendoza-Lera (Primary Presenter/Author)
iES, University of Koblenz-Landau (Germany), clara.mendozalera@gmail.com;

María Anton-Pardo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Universitat de Girona, Spain, mariaantonpardo@gmail.com;

Mireia Bartrons (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Vic, Spain, mireia.bartrons@uvic.cat;

Xavier Benito (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), University of Maryland (USA), xavier.benito.granell@gmail.com;

Susana Bernal (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Spain, sbernal@ceab.csic.es;

Eliana Bohorquez Bedoya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Colombia, elibohorquezbed@unal.edu.co;

Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Barcelona, mcanedo.fem@gmail.com;

Núria Catalán (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l'Environnement (LSCE), CNRS, CEA, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette - France, ncatalangarcia@gmail.com;

Isabel Fernandes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology (CBMA), University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal, isabelrodriguesfernandes@gmail.com;

Anna Freixa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Girona, Spain, afreixa@icra.cat;

Ana Genua-Olmedo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
CESAM, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal, ana.genua@ua.pt;

Elizabeth León-Palmero (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Departamento de Ecología, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain, eleonpalmero@ugr.es;

Anna Lupon (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Spain, alupon@ceab.csic.es;

Ada Pastor (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Aarhus University, adapastor@bio.au.dk;

Sílvia Poblador (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Research Group of Plants and Ecosystems, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium, spoblador@gmail.com;

Pablo Rodríguez-Lozano (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Department of Geography, University of the Balearic Islands, 07122 Palma, Spain, pablo.rodriguez@uib.es;

María Mar Sánchez-Montoya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Department of Ecology and Hydrology, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100,Spain, marsanch@um.es;

Aitziber Zufiaurre (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain, aitziber.zufiaurre@gmail.com;

Abstract: The study of inland waters -Limnology- is full of fascinating women who have vastly contributed to understanding these valuable ecosystems. Although women were largely absent during the early years of Limnology, their presence has increased over time. Nowadays, women represent half of the early-career limnologists. However, as in many other fields, their scientific contributions have been traditionally neglected from schools to universities (i.e. Matilda effect). The project Gender LimnoEdu aims to increase the visibility of women in Limnology and related subjects (e.g. history of Ecology, Hydrology, Geosciences) in University courses and lectures. We have generated a set of online ready-to-use resources: (1) Self-evaluation form to detect gender biases in Limnology courses and raise self-awareness (the form will be applicable to a wide range of courses), (2) teaching nutshells highlighting key female limnologists (and their history) to help lecturers to acknowledge the role of women in Limnology in their courses and, (3) a complete teaching unit about the past and present situation of women in the field of Limnology. In this talk, we will present this toolbox of resources and how to use them for your own teaching.

Herstory in the Making: Empowering Today’s Girls to Become Tomorrow’s Leaders Through Inclusive Girls-in-STEM Environmental Education [Oral Presentation]

Mandy Nix (Primary Presenter/Author)
Stroud Water Research Center, mnix@stroudcenter.org;

Abstract: Lifelong connections to fresh water often begin in childhood, when girls and marginalized youth first experience disproportionate access to and representation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Learn how Stroud Water Research Center’s award-winning outdoor environmental education program is bridging these barriers with freshwater-focused K-12 Girls-in-STEM learning experiences! This highly intentional and inclusive programming not only sparks girls’ interest and literacy in environmental STEM. It also creates critical socioeconomic pathways, cultivates awareness of green spaces essential to health/wellness, and sows the seeds of lifelong environmental agency for more climate-resilient communities. Join us to discover the success stories, interdisciplinary partnerships, and instructional methodologies empowering today’s girls to become tomorrow’s leaders. The future of fresh water begins here.

IMPROVING WORKPLACE CULTURE, INDOORS AND OUT: CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE THE GEOSCIENCES MORE INCLUSIVE AND WELCOMING [Oral Presentation]

Christine Bell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Wisconsin, Madison, christine.fabian@wisc.edu ;

Asmeret Asefaw Berhe (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of California, Merced, aaberhe@ucmerced.edu;

Meredith Hastings (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Brown University, meredith_hastings@brown.edu;

Allison Mattheis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
California State University, Los Angeles, aamatthe5@calstatela.edu ;

Julie Maertens (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Colorado, Boulder, jamaertens@gmail.com ;

Blair Schneider (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Kansas Geological Survey, blair.schneider@ku.edu;

Billy Williams (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
American Geophysical Union, BWilliams@agu.org;

Erika Marin-Spiotta (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of Wisconsin, Madison, marinspiotta@wisc.edu;

Rebecca Barnes (Primary Presenter/Author)
Colorado College, rebecca.barnes@coloradocollege.edu;

Abstract: Fields within freshwater sciences remain some of the least diverse areas in STEM. Bias, discrimination, and harassment present serious hurdles to making our field more diverse. These behaviors persist due to longstanding structures of exclusion, continued marginalization of non-majority groups, severe power imbalances in research training and funding models, and inadequate attitudes and policies against misconduct. In many ways, field settings strengthen these barriers due to cultural norms (e.g. “Vegas rules”), stereotypes about who is a successful scientist, isolation in remote settings, exposure to environmental hazards, exclusionary local behaviors, and unclear reporting structures when misconduct does occur. In response we created the ADVANCEGeo Partnership, to shift scientific cultural norms and to build a more welcoming and equitable climate. We have created a series of collaborative, evidence-based trainings, including components on field safety, developing codes of conduct, and bystander intervention education for geoscientists. We have run more than 75 workshops for academic departments, field campaigns, and professional society audiences. Data describing the effectiveness of this educational program and on the overall workplace climate for the geosciences will be presented, with recommendations specifically for improving safety, inclusivity, and accessibility in the field.

LISBRAN A LIVING LABORATORY [Oral Presentation]

Maria Isabel Castro-Rebolledo (Primary Presenter/Author)
Universidad de La Salle, micastro@unisalle.edu.co;

Abstract: I remember visiting this place in 2010 with my coworkers and some partners. Since then, I always believed that it was possible to change this micro basin into a model of Hubbard brook but in a Tropical forest. Our group has started to collect information on different research topics. Also, we have received support from stakeholders but in special partnership with the local drinking water supply company. But I am convinced of the potential of this place in building knowledge, not only in researchers but is also in citizens neighboring. In the last project, I engaged with actions to allow the environmental education processes that ended in the design and creation of trails for environmental interpretation. Today, this place is preferred for leaders' communities, teachers at schools, professionals, and group leader’s boy scouts as well as technical professionals of governmental institutions, who want to train in workshops of biomonitoring with a special interest in aquatic. For now, next to volunteers are router the action in the frame of citizen projects, while we achieve financial resources for to continue and achieved change the thought of a society head-on science.

THE POTENTIAL FOR MENTORING AS A TOOL TO INCREASE GENDER DIVERSITY IN THE FRESHWATER SCIENCES [Oral Presentation]

Sandra Clinton, PhD (Primary Presenter/Author)
University of North Carolina at Charlotte, sclinto1@uncc.edu;

Rebecca Barnes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Colorado College, rbarnes@coloradocollege.edu;

Amanda Adams (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of North Carolina Charlotte, Manda.Adams@uncc.edu;

Brittany Bloodhart (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
California State University San Bernardino, brittany.bloodhart@csusb.edu;

Melissa Burt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Colorado State University, Melissa.Burt@colostate.edu;

Elaine Godfrey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
University of North Carolina Charlotte, elaine.s.godfrey@gmail.com;

Paul Hernandez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Texas A&M University, prhernandez@tamu.edu;

Ilana B. Pollack (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Colorado State University, ipollack@rams.colostate.edu;

Emily V. Fischer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Colorado State University, evf@rams.colostate.edu;

Abstract: Geoscientists are engaged in globally critical research focused on climate change, flooding, water quality, and other issues associated with freshwater ecosystems. While we know having gender diverse teams lead to the creation of exceptional science, women represent only 25% of the geoscience workforce. Thus, it is important to encourage and retain women throughout their education, especially during undergraduate degrees. Our team with expertise in the geosciences, gender, and educational psychology developed PROGRES (PROmoting Geoscience Research, Education, and SuccesS), a role modeling and mentoring-based program, to quantify the role of mentorship on undergraduate retention. Women in PROGRESS attend a regional workshop where they are exposed to geoscience careers and female role models, provided access to a closed Facebook page for resources and peer-mentoring, and matched with a female mentor for professional mentoring. Our evidence-based program has shown that PROGRESS members are 5x more likely to be retained and that the critical elements of mentorship: inspiration, inoculation, and introduction, are necessary to increase retention in STEM degrees. Interventions like PROGRESS can increase the likelihood of women remaining in the geosciences and could be implemented to improve gender diversity in the freshwater sciences.

Motherhood and Field Science: Challenges, Strategies and Supports for Success [Poster Presentation]

Tara Pelletier (Primary Presenter/Author)
Radford University, tpelletier@radford.edu;

Anja Whittington (Co-Presenter/Co-Author)
Radford University, awhittington@radford.edu;

Abstract: Working women who are mothers face innumerable challenges. In the United States there are no federal mandates that provide supportive strategies for employees with dependents, making these challenges fall on the shoulders of women to overcome on their own. For female field scientists, the additional challenge of extensive travel, often in remote environments to collect data, adds another dynamic that women must navigate. The purpose of this study was to examine challenges women who are field scientists may face managing both work and parenthood, and the strategies and supports that help women to be successful. Results indicate that women face challenges conducting field work, biology of motherhood (timing, breastfeeding), feelings of guilt managing work-family balance, and childcare and household responsibilities. Strategies and supports that help working female field scientists include paid help, supportive partner/family, and financial resources. Unfortunately, many women have to rely on more individualized approaches to manage work-family balance such as accepting to change job responsibilities, reducing work performance, and changing expectations of career success.