Wednesday, May 25, 2016
13:30 - 15:00

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13:30 - 13:45: / 306 CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT IN MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE RIVERS: CONTRIBUTIONS BY PROFESSOR VINCENT H. RESH

5/25/2016  |   13:30 - 13:45   |  306

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT IN MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE RIVERS: CONTRIBUTIONS BY PROFESSOR VINCENT H. RESH Rivers in mediterranean-climate regions (med-rivers) are unique ecosystems because of their sequential and predictable winter flooding and summer drought regimes. These characteristics constrain aquatic and riparian organisms, and the ecosystem processes and services they provide. Med-rivers are hotspots of aquatic biodiversity, supporting species adapted to both floods and droughts or using them for part of their life histories. At the same time, flow seasonality drives fluxes of nutrients and organic matter, and consequently food web dynamics. Med-rivers often are subjected to multiple anthropogenic impacts, which put these ecosystems at high risk worldwide. As a consequence, river management requires innovative approaches to account for both natural and human disturbances. Throughout his research career, Professor Vincent H. Resh has addressed many of these basic and applied aspects of med-rivers. His pioneering contributions lead us to a comprehensive understanding of these ecosystems, particularly how biodiversity and ecological processes respond to flow seasonality, and how this synthesis can improve river management. His research inspires us and highlights the challenges and opportunities for conserving and protecting these valuable and vulnerable ecosystems.

Nuria Bonada (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Barcelona, bonada@ub.edu;


Stefano Amalfitano ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), amalfitano@irsa.cnr.it;


Joan Artigas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University Blaise Pascal, Joan.ARTIGAS_ALEJO@univ-bpclermont.fr;


Susana Bernal ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Integrated Freshwater Ecology Group, Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Blanes, Girona, Spain., sbernal@ceab.csic.es;


Scott D. Cooper ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Barbara, scott.cooper@lifesci.ucsb.edu;


Helen Dallas ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Freshwater Research Centre and Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, helen@frcsa.org.za;


Peter M. Davies ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Western Australia, peter.davies@uwa.edu.au;


Jenny A. Day ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Cape Town, Jenny.Day@uct.ac.za;


Ferdy C. de Moor ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Rhodes University, F.deMoor@ru.ac.za;


Tom Dudley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, C Santa Barbara, tdudley@msi.ucsb.edu;


Stefano Fazi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), fazi@irsa.cnr.it;


A. Filipa Filipa ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Porto, affilipe@gmail.com;


Ricardo Figueroa ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Concepción, rfiguero26@gmail.com;


Avital Gasith ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tel-Aviv University, avitalg@tauex.tau.ac.il;


Antoni Ginebreda ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), IDAEA-CSIC, antoni.ginebreda@cid.csic.es;


Yaron Hershkovitz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Tel-Aviv University, yaron.hershkovitz@uni-due.de;


G. Mathias Kondolf ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, kondolf.berkeley@gmail.com;


P. Sam Lake ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Monash University, Sam.Lake@monash.edu;


Julio López-Doval ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Sao Paulo, jclopezdoval@gmail.com;


Sean M. Marr ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Limpopo, erubescens@gmail.com;


John M. Melack ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Barbara, john.melack@lifesci.ucsb.edu;


Isabel Muñoz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Barcelona, imunoz@ub.edu;


Mira Petrovic ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), ICRA, mpetrovic@icra.cat;


Keith Bouma-Gregson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, kbg@berkeley.edu;
Dr. Mary E. Power is Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. She was awarded an honorary doctorate by Umea University, the Kempe Medal for distinguished ecologists, and the Hutchinson Award from the American Society of Limnologists and Oceanographers. She is a member of the California Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and National Academy of Sciences, USA. She has served on the Editorial Board of PNAS (2014 to present) and Science (2006-2009). Mary also served as President of the American Society of Naturalists, and of the Ecological Society of America. Since 1988, she has been the Faculty Director of the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, (one of the UC Natural Reserve System sites, a 3500 ha reserve protected for university teaching and research). She has studied food webs in temperate and tropical rivers, as well as linkages of rivers, watersheds and near-shore environments. Focal organisms include cyanobacteria, algae, invertebrates, fish, estuarine crustaceans and terrestrial grasshoppers, spiders, lizards, birds and bats. By studying how key ecological interactions depend on landscape and temporal contexts, her group hopes to learn how river-structured ecosystems will respond to changes over space and time in climate, land use, and biota. Her group also collaborates closely with Earth and atmospheric scientists in site-based research to investigate linkages among riverine, upland, and near-shore ocean ecosystems.

Narcis Prat ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Universitat de Barcelona, nprat@ub.edu;


Maria Rieradevall ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Barcelona, mrieradevall@ub.edu;


Belinda J. Robson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Murdoch University, b.robson@murdoch.edu.au;


Patricia M. Rodríguez-González ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Lisboa, patri@isa.ulisboa.pt;


Anna M. Romaní ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Girona, anna.romani@udg.edu;


Sergi Sabater ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Girona and ICRA, sergi.sabater@udg.es;


John Sabo ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Arizona State University, John.L.Sabo@asu.edu;


John C. Stella ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), State University of New York, stella@esf.edu;


J. Manuel Tierno de Figueroa ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Granada, jmtdef@ugr.es;


Xisca Timoner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), ICRA, xtimoner@icra.cat;


Iraima Verkaik ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Barcelona, iraima.verkaik@gmail.com;


Irene Ylla ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Girona, irene.ylla@gmail.com;


Annamaria Zoppini ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), zoppini@irsa.cnr.it;


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13:45 - 14:00: / 306 OVIPOSITION BEHAVIOR OF TRICHOPTERA: FROM CALIFORNIAN MEDITERRANEAN-TYPE STREAMS TO EUROPEAN CENTRAL MOUNTAIN STREAMS

5/25/2016  |   13:45 - 14:00   |  306

OVIPOSITION BEHAVIOR OF TRICHOPTERA: FROM CALIFORNIAN MEDITERRANEAN-TYPE STREAMS TO EUROPEAN CENTRAL MOUNTAIN STREAMS Eggs of aquatic insects are considered vulnerable life stages with a high susceptibility to adverse environmental conditions, like floods and droughts. Thus, females are under strong selection pressure to avoid exposure of their propagules to threats such as desiccation, detachment or being crushed. Studies of the oviposition behaviour of different caddisfly species in Mediterranean-type streams in the Californian Costal Range and in Central European mountain streams revealed that the species investigated are able to make clear choices where to oviposit in the heterogeneous stream environment. In several species, the female's decision-making process follows a hierarchical selection scheme using different cues at different spatial scales (stream, stream subunit, microhabitat, substratum) to choose oviposition sites. Examples are given how oviposition behavior and reproductive traits (e.g. choice of flood protected sites for egg mass attachment, long-lived adults, desiccation resistant egg masses, etc.) are related to habitat characteristics of different stream types.

Andreas Hoffmann (Primary Presenter/Author), Faculty of Environmental Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Weihenstephan-Triesdorf, Markgrafenstr. 16, D-91746 Weidenbach, Germany, andreas.hoffmann@hswt.de;


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14:00 - 14:15: / 306 CITIZEN V PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE IN BIOASSESSMENT OF AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS: CHALLENGING “VALUE-ADDED”, “GREENWASH”, AND OTHER TIRED GENERALITIES

5/25/2016  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  306

CITIZEN V PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE IN BIOASSESSMENT OF AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS: CHALLENGING “VALUE-ADDED”, “GREENWASH”, AND OTHER TIRED GENERALITIES Increasingly, agencies responsible for bioassessment of aquatic ecosystems include the public in some or all of the program rationale and definition; design; field work; data analyses; and interpretation and application of the results in management actions. An agency’s increased enthusiasm for “citizen science” may be at least partly fuelled by limited resources available for “professional science”. Very cynically, the enthusiasm may just be a form of “greenwashing”, where an agency is seen as being engaged with its community, but none of its management actions are determined by the work of the citizen scientists. I will discuss the perceived pros (e.g. increased community engagement) and cons (e.g. reduced data quality) of citizen science in a bioassessment context, and provide ample opportunity for the sharing of alternative views and experiences from the audience.

Robert Bailey (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Ontario Institute of Technology, robert.bailey@uoit.ca;


Sonja Teichert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Western University, steiche@uwo.ca;


Trefor Reynoldson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), GHOST Environmental Consulting, trefor.reynoldson@gmail.com;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 306 SEASONAL DRYING AND WETTING IN MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE REGIONS: LAKES LIKE STREAMS ARE SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACTED BY THIS MAJOR HYDROLOGIC DRIVER

5/25/2016  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  306

SEASONAL DRYING AND WETTING IN MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE REGIONS: LAKES LIKE STREAMS ARE SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACTED BY THIS MAJOR HYDROLOGIC DRIVER In Mediterranean-climate regions streams are flooded in winter and loose water in summer. Likewise, lacustrine ecosystems exhibit a hydrologic response in a way of water level fluctuations (WLFs). In both ecosystems the hydrologic change varies in frequency, intensity and duration having a significant impact on the structure and function of the ecosystem. The "story" of med-rivers became the focus of scientific attention following the review by Gasith and Resh (1999) and was recently re-visited in a series of publications compiled in Hydrobiologia (editors Bonda and Resh; 2013). This will be highlighted by others in this session. I would like to turn the attention to similarly important consequences of hydrologic variation in the Eastern Mediterranean region that lead to extensive WLFs. This is a clear demonstration how a climate change that modifies the hydrologic regime can affect people's well being by having a top-down cascading effect on lake resources, fish breeding success, water quality and ultimately the life of the lake communities. Finally, I'll point out how such changes lead to a conflict which required court intervention.

Avital Gasith (Primary Presenter/Author), Tel-Aviv University, avitalg@tauex.tau.ac.il;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 306 BALANCING UNCERTAINTIES: RIVER CORRIDOR CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION IN A MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE RIVER IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

5/25/2016  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  306

BALANCING UNCERTAINTIES: RIVER CORRIDOR CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION IN A MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE RIVER IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Conservation and restoration of California’s Mediterranean-climate river corridors is a daunting challenge, particularly given climate change and increasing human demands for water and land. The Santa Clara River (SCR) is the largest river system in Southern California remaining in a relatively natural state, including retaining much of its natural hydrology, and is recognized as a significant biodiversity hotspot. Nevertheless, similar to many Mediterranean-climate rivers, the naturally intermittent SCR has been significantly altered by levees, water diversions, agriculture, invasive plant species, and urbanization that have altered natural physical and ecological processes, causing riparian habitat loss or degradation. The SCR Parkway project seeks to ameliorate these impacts, conserve existing riparian habitats, and promote a more resilient ecosystem by acquiring and restoring a 35 mile-long floodplain corridor. We used a variety of analytical tools, including historical analysis, assessment of hydrogeomorphic processes, vegetation classification and mapping, analysis of channel and riparian habitat dynamics, habitat requirements of focal species, and conceptual models of potential reference conditions and physical process-habitat-biotic response linkages to inform conservation and restoration planning and implementation.

Bruce Orr (Primary Presenter/Author), Stillwater Sciences, bruce@stillwatersci.com;


Zooey Diggory ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stillwater Sciences, zooey@stillwatersci.com;


Peter Downs ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Plymouth University, peter.downs@plymouth.ac.uk;


Tom Dudley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, C Santa Barbara, tdudley@msi.ucsb.edu;


Adam Lambert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Barbara, lambert@msi.ucsb.edu;


Amy Merrill ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stillwater Sciences, amy@stillwatersci.com;


Erin Beller ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), San Francisco Estuary Institute, erin@sfei.org;


Robin Grossinger ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), San Francisco Estuary Institute, robin@sfei.org;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 306 FROM AFRICA TO SOUTH AMERICA – RECENT RESEARCH ON PESTICIDES AND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

5/25/2016  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  306

FROM AFRICA TO SOUTH AMERICA – RECENT RESEARCH ON PESTICIDES AND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS Since his early days at Berkeley when he spent 15 years working to eradicate river blindness in West Africa, Vince Resh has been involved in applied aquatic ecology research all over the world, including Australia, Asia, Europe, North America and more recently in South America. From 2011-2014, we collected data on insecticide concentrations, water quality, habitat, land use, and benthic invertebrate communities from 48 streams in soy production regions of Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil. A multiple regression analysis that included five landscape and habitat predictor variables indicated that buffer width was the most important variable in explaining total insecticide toxic unit values in Brazil. While Brazil and Paraguay have recently adopted regulations that require forested riparian buffers, there were no such regulations in the Argentine pampas, where buffer widths were smaller. In Argentina, insecticide toxic units were inversely correlated with the Species at Risk pesticide macroinvertebrate index, while the forested buffer zones in Paraguay and Brazil appeared to mitigate adverse effects in streams.

Lisa Hunt (POC,Primary Presenter), University of California, Berkeley, lisahunt@berkeley.edu;


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