Wednesday, May 25, 2016
15:30 - 17:00

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15:30 - 15:45: / 306 FROM VINCE TO BEYOND

5/25/2016  |   15:30 - 15:45   |  306

FROM VINCE TO BEYOND The curious remainder between different histories of any event told by their inventors may be the truth. So maybe I don’t know what I’m talking about. Here’s what I remember: the question will evolve before you answer it; you can’t step in the same river once; that everything is connected to everything else is not an operational principle; any two things are different if you look at them hard enough; focus on differences that make a difference to someone in charge who cares. The rest is just science. Data are. Vince was the youngest mentor I’ve ever had. The others were the age he is now when I met them. They looked askance at him. He was my first encounter with a young academic rising on his own ideas. The lessons for me were not about ecology. They were about creating an energetic working world of invention and discovery no matter what for. I flew from his lab to lead a disruptive startup institute before disruption and startup were fashionable business ploys. And I was well prepared. Thanks Vince.

Joshua Collins (POC,Primary Presenter), Aquatic Science Center, josh@sfei.org;


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15:45 - 16:00: / 306 THE LEGACY OF VINCE RESH IN SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION: A VISIONARY SCIENTIST WITH BROAD SOCIETAL IMPACTS

5/25/2016  |   15:45 - 16:00   |  306

THE LEGACY OF VINCE RESH IN SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION: A VISIONARY SCIENTIST WITH BROAD SOCIETAL IMPACTS Effective scientific communication is one of Professor Vince Resh’s longstanding passions. He is a visionary leader committed to helping scientists communicate their work to other scientists and the public. At UC Berkeley, he taught >20,000 undergraduates over the past 40 years, and 40 students have finished doctoral dissertations in his laboratory. Out of his 360+ scientific publications, Vince authored 20 publications on trends in scientific literature, editing, and the publishing process with collaborators including librarians and students. He was Editor of the award-winning “Encyclopedia of Insects” and a popular book “A World of Insects.” Vince spent several months per year on local capacity-building assignments with international organizations, working on river blindness (onchocerciasis) in Africa for 15 years and developing biomonitoring for the Mekong River in Southeast Asia for 10 years. Vince’s innovative outreach efforts include lecturing on >40 trips with UC Berkeley alumni on all continents of the world. These pioneering efforts have informed influential individuals about science and natural history, and resulted in increased public appreciation of science and private support for research and education.

Alison O'Dowd (Primary Presenter/Author), Humboldt State University, ap73@humboldt.edu;


Matthew Cover ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University, Stanislaus, mcover@csustan.edu;


Justin Lawrence ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Science Foundation, jlawrenc@nsf.gov;


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16:00 - 16:15: / 306 CADDISFLIES, DRAGONFLIES, FISHFLIES & MITTEN CRABS: WHAT DO WE NOW KNOW ABOUT LIFE HISTORY, TAXONOMY, AND FAUNAL PATTERNS?

5/25/2016  |   16:00 - 16:15   |  306

CADDISFLIES, DRAGONFLIES, FISHFLIES & MITTEN CRABS: WHAT DO WE NOW KNOW ABOUT LIFE HISTORY, TAXONOMY, AND FAUNAL PATTERNS? Life history and the understanding of species distributions is the cornerstone of all ecological research questions. Information about life cycle timing, larval behavior and development, feeding, and emergence are critical for planning and interpreting ecological projects. However basic life history research is often underemphasized in research programs. Caddisflies are one of the most ecologically important groups of aquatic taxa with incredibly interesting case and retreat-building behaviors, larval movement in response to flow regimes, and adaptation to environmental conditions. Research on eggs and adults is often ignored because most freshwater research relates to larval stages, but we discuss what we now know about adult behavior, emergence, mating and distribution patterns and its implications for ecological studies. The Vincent Resh laboratory research in California has observed unique life history patterns resulting from the Mediterranean climate regime and these patterns represent adaptations especially in response to flood and drought extremes. In this talk we highlight life history research especially as it relates overwhelmingly to Trichoptera, but also include discussion about Odonata, Megaloptera, and Chinese Mitten Crabs.

Patina Mendez (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Berkeley, patina.mendez@berkeley.edu;


Marilyn Myers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Marilyn Myers Consulting, abqancmyers@live.com;


John Wood ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The King's University, john.wood@kingsu.ca;


John Jackson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Stroud Water Research Center, jkjackson@stroudcenter.org;


Andreas Hoffmann ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Faculty of Environmental Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Weihenstephan-Triesdorf, Markgrafenstr. 16, D-91746 Weidenbach, Germany, andreas.hoffmann@hswt.de;


Alison O'Dowd ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Humboldt State University, alison.odowd@humboldt.edu;


Leah Bêche ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Electricité de France, leah.beche@gmail.com;


Deborah Rudnick ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Bainbridge Island School District, debrudnick@gmail.com;


Joan Damerow ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), WRA Environmental Consultants and UC Berkeley, joandamerow@gmail.com;


Matthew Cover ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), California State University, Stanislaus, mcover@csustan.edu;


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16:15 - 16:30: / 306 RESEARCH AND EDUCATION LAY THE GROUNDWORK FOR A PARADIGM SHIFT IN STREAM MANAGEMENT

5/25/2016  |   16:15 - 16:30   |  306

RESEARCH AND EDUCATION LAY THE GROUNDWORK FOR A PARADIGM SHIFT IN STREAM MANAGEMENT Bioassessment is rapidly becoming an indispensable element of a stream manager’s toolkit, particularly in states like California. Regulators and regulated entities alike increasingly recognize the value of biological data to support decisions, like prioritizing streams for restoration or protection. This is due in part to the scientific contributions of Vince Resh on developing indices, evaluating long-term variability, and exploring the influence of hydrology on benthic macroinvertebrate communities. But notwithstanding its contributions to the scientific field, his body of research alone does not account for the adoption of bioassessment. Rather, Vince’s role as a teacher has played a crucial part in creating a community of stream managers who understood the importance of biological data in environmental decision-making. Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than in California, where Berkeley alumni fill the ranks of staff at regulatory agencies, timber harvesters, wastewater dischargers, and advocacy groups. Whether by lecturing about aquatic insects in Bio 101, or by advising them on a thesis, Vince’s influence changed the way they make decisions, and set the stage for a new paradigm of stream management in California.

Raphael Mazor (Primary Presenter/Author), Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, raphaelm@sccwrp.org;


Kevin Lunde ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), San Francisco Bay Area Regional Water Quality Control Board, Kevin.Lunde@waterboards.ca.gov;


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16:30 - 16:45: / 306 DEFINING POPULATION AND SPECIES BOUNDARIES – WHY THE RESH LAB ENDED UP LOOKING AT GENETICS, DISPERSAL, AND MATING BEHAVIOR

5/25/2016  |   16:30 - 16:45   |  306

DEFINING POPULATION AND SPECIES BOUNDARIES – WHY THE RESH LAB ENDED UP LOOKING AT GENETICS, DISPERSAL, AND MATING BEHAVIOR The need to define aquatic insect species and assess intra- and interspecific variation played an important role in the early career of Professor Vincent H. Resh. Some of his earliest studies attempted to inventory the aquatic insect or fish species at a site, identified problems with what was present versus what was known taxonomically, and resulted in preliminary species lists and new species descriptions. These findings led him to emphasize the importance of species identifications in ecological and pollution studies by showing that closely related species can function quite differently (Resh and Unzicker 1975, Resh 1976), a consistent message thoughout his career (Lenat and Resh 2001). The need to further understand ecological and evolutionary boundaries is fundamental, and led to studies on sex pheromones, adult and larval dispersal, and temporal population genetic structuring, which found physiological mechanisms for species separation, measured dispersal capacity, and confirmed the presence of gene flow and cryptic species. Technological advances have made recent genetic studies more accurate and less expensive, making it possible to expand the studies to larger scales and wider temporal windows.

John Jackson (Primary Presenter/Author), Stroud Water Research Center, jkjackson@stroudcenter.org;


Michael Peterson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, petersmg@berkeley.edu;


Natalie Stauffer-Olsen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trout Unlimited, Natalie.Stauffer-Olsen@tu.org;


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