Monday, June 5, 2017
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 302A FROM GHOST STEAMS TO STORMWATER ECOHYDROLOGY AND THE YING-YANG OF DESIGN

6/05/2017  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  302A

FROM GHOST STEAMS TO STORMWATER ECOHYDROLOGY AND THE YING-YANG OF DESIGN Urban Ecology has advanced by incorporating people into ecological theory and research, and urban eco-socio-hydrological approaches offer new opportunities in engineered green infrastructure (GSI) networks. The time is right to co-advance urban aquatic science along with our ability to design nature-based, sustainable landscapes because of the attention and funding related to mandated urban runoff control programs (e.g., TMDLs, MS4, etc.). The well of fundamental ecohydrological process knowledge needed to guide the design of “more natural” GSI is potentially deep, but resides mostly outside the engineering/regulatory communities. Sustained discussion and collaboration between fields like aquatic ecology and environmental engineering is needed to broaden our understanding of a multidisciplinary, multi-objective ecology “of and for” the city. Collaborating ecologists could use GSI systems for urban eco-socio-hydrologic research, and GSI engineers/practitioners could access a rich diversity of ecohydrological knowledge and methods. We discuss ways in which both ecologists and engineers could mutually benefit by adapting ecohydrological processes to the unique connectivity and gray infrastructure of the urban hydrosphere, including the unexplored groundwater/piped systems of the urban watershed continuum.

Kenneth Belt (Primary Presenter/Author), USDA Forest Service, kbelt@fs.fed.us;


Sujay Kaushal ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Maryland, skaushal@umd.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 302A RECENT INNOVATIONS IN URBAN STORMWATER TECHNIQUES-CASE STUDY OF REGENERATIVE STORMWATER CONVEYANCES AND DISCUSSION OF OTHERS

6/05/2017  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  302A

RECENT INNOVATIONS IN URBAN STORMWATER TECHNIQUES-CASE STUDY OF REGENERATIVE STORMWATER CONVEYANCES AND DISCUSSION OF OTHERS Stormwater control and pollution load reduction techniques in the urban setting have seen some notable advances in recent years. One example now receiving stormwater credit in the Chesapeake Bay area, is the regenerative stormwater conveyance (RSC), which merges stormwater management with wetland and stream restoration and ecohydrologic principles. Applicable in urban areas under new development, retrofit, and restoration scenarios, RSC’s use sand-bedded channels, wide parabolic grade control weirs, and shallow pools to detain and cleanse stormwater runoff flows. A typical RSC site is a highly eroded stormwater outfall, draining a highly impervious area. Details of RSC design will be presented, as an example of how stormwater attenuation and cleansing functions can be approached by acknowledging and relying on ecological and restoration principles. The discussion will expand in space and scale geographically from the water flowpaths themselves to the holistic consideration of the surrounding urban channel natural areas such as floodplains, riparian zones and forested and open space, pervious areas that contribute to urban stormwater attenuation. How approaches such as biomimicry can inform new stormwater techniques will also be explored.

Kevin Nunnery (POC,Primary Presenter), , knunnery@biohabitats.com;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 302A CONTROLLING THE EXPORT OF URBAN PHOSPHORUS: DO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PONDS RETAIN DISSOLVED ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS?

6/05/2017  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  302A

CONTROLLING THE EXPORT OF URBAN PHOSPHORUS: DO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PONDS RETAIN DISSOLVED ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS? Urban stormwater ponds are commonly used for mitigating non-point source phosphorus (P) loading into aquatic ecosystems. While stormwater ponds are often designed to reduce export of particulate P through sedimentation, their ability to retain other forms of P such as dissolved organic P (DOP) remains largely unassessed. To this end, we characterized sediment and water P fractions in 6 stormwater ponds in southern Ontario, examined soluble reactive P (SRP) and DOP sediment fluxes, and compared their effects on in situ algal production and P-uptake. Sediment P was mostly bound to inorganic calcium and organic P fractions. Water column P was largely in dissolved forms, consisting mostly of DOP in the form of phosphodiesters. Sediment SRP fluxes increased sharply under low oxygen whereas DOP fluxes were relatively steady regardless of oxygen conditions. While SRP and DOP additions did not strongly affect algal production in several ponds, SRP was more readily incorporated into algal biomass. Our results help to explain high DOP concentrations in urban stormwater ponds and indicate that this P fraction is likely to be poorly retained in these systems.

Clay Prater (Primary Presenter/Author), Trent University, prater.clay@gmail.com;


Paul C. Frost ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, paulfrost@trentu.ca;


Ty Gehrke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trent University, tygerke@trentu.ca;


Sarah S. S. King ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trent University, sarahking@trentu.ca;


Andrew B. Scott ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trent University, andrewscott@trentu.ca;


Keunyea Song ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nebraska, keunyeasong@trentu.ca;


Marguerite A. Xenopoulos ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Trent University, mxenopoulos@trentu.ca;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 302A IT’S NOT EASY BEING GREEN: ASSESSING IMPACTS OF URBAN VEGETATION ON DOWNSTREAM NUTRIENT POLLUTION

6/05/2017  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  302A

IT’S NOT EASY BEING GREEN: ASSESSING IMPACTS OF URBAN VEGETATION ON DOWNSTREAM NUTRIENT POLLUTION Increasing the presence of vegetation in cities could both improve living conditions for residents and mitigate negative impacts of urban runoff on aquatic ecosystems. However, the potential impact of increasing tree canopy cover and other green infrastructure on water quality are not well understood. We evaluated sources of nutrients to storm water using a combination of intensive data collection in a small watershed, elemental tracers and cross watershed comparisons in the Twin Cities of Minnesota. Time series analyses showed peaks in nitrogen and phosphorus corresponding to pulsed inputs from street trees. Tree inputs maintained high levels of organic nutrients on streets following municipal street sweeping and large rain events. Comparisons of storm water nutrient concentrations across varying levels of urban vegetation cover showed strong correlations between street canopy cover and nutrient concentration. The strong influence of urban vegetation on nutrient runoff presents challenges and opportunities to alter urban management to reduce nutrient losses to storm water. Such changes would provide the clear benefits associated with expansion of green infrastructure in cities, without increased eutrophication of downstream waters.

Jacques Finlay (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, jfinlay@umn.edu;


Benjamin Janke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, janke024@umn.edu;


Sarah Hobbie ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, shobbie@umn.edu;


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10:15 - 10:30: / 302A SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION AND BIOACCUMULATION HAVE NO OBVIOUS EFFECT ON CUMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN URBAN DETENTION PONDS

6/05/2017  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  302A

Sediment accumulation and bioaccumulation have no obvious effect on cummunity structure in urban detention ponds The invertebrate diversity in nine stormwater wet detention ponds (SWDPs) and eleven semi-natural small shallow lakes covering a large environmental gradient was compared to elucidate differences arising from anthropogenic substance loadings to the ponds. The invertebrates and the sediments of the ponds and shallow lakes were analyzed for copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, chromium, lead, aluminum, nickel and arsenic. Multivariate analyses showed that invertebrates in SWDPs and lakes differed with respect to bioaccumulation of these elements, as did the sediments, albeit to a lesser degree. However, the Detrended Correspondence Analysis and the TWINSPAN showed that the invertebrate populations of the ponds and lakes could not be distinguished, with the possible exception of highway ponds presenting a distinct sub-group of wet detention ponds. The SWDPs and shallow lakes studied seemed to constitute aquatic ecosystems of similar taxon richness and composition as did the 11 small and shallow lakes. This indicates that SWDPs, originally constructed for treatment and flood protection purposes, become aquatic environments in built-up areas which play a potentially important role for local biodiversity similar to that of natural small and shallow lakes

Morten Lauge Pedersen (Primary Presenter/Author), Aalborg University, mlp@civil.aau.dk;


Diana Agnete Stephansen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Aalborg University, das@civil.aau.dk;


Asbjørn Haaning Nielsen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Aalborg University, Denmark, ahn@civil.aau.dk;


Jes Vollertsen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Aalborg University, jes@civil.aau.dk;


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