Monday, June 5, 2017
14:00 - 15:45

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14:15 - 14:30: / 302A FROM GUTTER TO STREAM: CONTRIBUTIONS OF BUILT HEADWATERS TO DISSOLVED NITROGEN AND CARBON IN URBAN STORMWATER

6/05/2017  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  302A

FROM GUTTER TO STREAM: CONTRIBUTIONS OF BUILT HEADWATERS TO DISSOLVED NITROGEN AND CARBON IN URBAN STORMWATER Gutters and stormwater pipes are the engineered, ephemeral headwaters of urban stream networks. During baseflow conditions, these areas store and process organic matter (OM) which is then mobilized during storms. We hypothesized that roofs and catch basins are sources of readily mobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (TDN) that serve as control points for the flux of these constituents through urban streams. To test these hypotheses, we measured the output of DOC and TDN from downspouts of three single family homes and three stormwater outfalls in a 60 ha catchment Durham, NC. We then scaled these measurements to the total area of roofs and impervious surface cover drained by stormwater infrastructure, and calculated loads for storms from November 2015 through November 2016. The mean annual export of DOC from a single roof is 5.07 (0.056) kg C; roofs in this catchment contribute approximately 2028 kg C per year to the stream during stormflow. While roofs represent less than 10% of land cover, they contribute up to 50% of DOC and TDN load during storms.

Megan Fork (Primary Presenter/Author), Duke University - Nicholas School of the Environment, megan.fork@duke.edu;


Joanna Blaszczak ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University - University Program in Ecology, jrb78@duke.edu;


Jim Heffernan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, james.heffernan@duke.edu;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 302A PARTICIPATORY DESIGN, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF URBAN GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE TO PROMOTE ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

6/05/2017  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  302A

Participatory design, simulation and analysis of urban green infrastructure to promote ecosystem services Representation of watersheds as a fully connected, heterogeneous landscape ecological system is critical to assessing multi-scale dynamic response to climate, land use and built infrastructure. Human management of ecosystem heterogeneity through vegetation management, drainage, irrigation, fertilization, and stormwater controls modulate spatial and temporal ecosystem behavior, with feedbacks between hydrologic extremes, rates of carbon sequestration, biomass accumulation and nutrient retention. We develop and demonstrate a set of design, simulation and analysis tools that can be used seamlessly across unmanaged to urban landscapes to investigate both short to long term impacts of hydroclimate variability, land cover and infrastructure on coupled water, carbon and nutrient cycling in the Coweeta and Baltimore LTER sites. We further adapt these methods to promote participatory design of development and management approaches to promote ecosystem service goals, including the implementation of green infrastructure. The development of cloud based design tools to guide ecohydrologic simulation, facilitating participants to rapidly pose and test landscape management options, including forest management and urban green infrastructure will be demonstrated.

LAWRENCE BAND (Primary Presenter/Author), UNC CHAPEL HILL, lband@email.unc.edu;


Lorne Leonard ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Penn State University, lorne.leonard.psu@gmail.com;


Laurence Lin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, hrlauren@email.unc.edu;


Jon Duncan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, jmduncan@unc.edu;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 302A INTEGRATED SOCIAL AND HYDROLOGIC MODELS FOR ENHANCED RESILIENCY OF COASTAL COMMUNITIES UNDER EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS: A MULTI-METHODS STUDY

6/05/2017  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  302A

INTEGRATED SOCIAL AND HYDROLOGIC MODELS FOR ENHANCED RESILIENCY OF COASTAL COMMUNITIES UNDER EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS: A MULTI-METHODS STUDY Communities vary greatly in their capacity to prepare for increased frequency of flooding associated with climate change in urban streams. A multi-methods study was conducted in Duluth, Minnesota and surrounding communities to assess preparedness and evaluate scenarios representing different levels of flood risk. Hydrologic stormwater modeling identified impacts of current and projected future storms and adaptive strategies including current conditions, addition of green roofs to commercial buildings, and rain barrels to residential rooftops. The green roof scenarios led to reductions in peak flows of 11% for the 2” storm to 3% for the 4” storm. Rain barrels were less effective, with a 4% reduction in peak flows with a 2” storm and no effect with the larger storm. Focus groups and interviews with community leaders examined perspectives on climate change, as well as drivers of and constraints to preparedness. Though the communities appear to have high levels of awareness of climate impacts among leaders and a strong water ethic among members, key community decision makers diverge in perceptions of need and perceived capacity to adapt to climate change and extreme weather.

Lucinda Johnson (Primary Presenter/Author), Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth, ljohnson@d.umn.edu;


Vanessa Perry ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, perry497@umn.edu;


William Herb ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, herb003@umn.edu;


Holly Meier ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, hmeier@umn.edu;


Mae Davenport ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, mdaven@umn.edu;


George Host ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Natural Resources Research Institute – Univ. Minnesota Duluth, ghost@d.umn.edu;


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15:00 - 15:15: / 302A GREEN FIRST TO STREAMS FIRST: AN ALTERNATIVE VISION FOR PITTSBURGH’S CITY-WIDE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT

6/05/2017  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  302A

GREEN FIRST TO STREAMS FIRST: AN ALTERNATIVE VISION FOR PITTSBURGH’S CITY-WIDE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT Pittsburgh’s Green First Plan aims to reduce combined sewage overflows (CSOs) while accruing economic, social, and ecological benefits—green infrastructure’s (GI) “triple bottom line”. Historically, many of Pittsburgh’s stream systems were piped into or captured by sewers, creating the combined sanitary-stormwater sewer system. The Plan identifies which systems provide the greatest opportunity for CSO reductions using GI. Removing stormwater flows from sewers by re-establishing streams and floodplains would provide greatest CSO reductions and greatest improvement in other social and ecological benefits compared to alternative interventions. Yet while the triple bottom line touts ecological benefit, it receives the least consideration of the three GI objectives. Therefore, because ecologists were not at the planning table, these benefits were undervalued and stream restoration was under-prescribed compared to detention basins and rain gardens. Ecologists should be more involved in visioning and planning, so that benefits of streams for stormwater capture, conveyance, nutrient cycling, recreation opportunities, etc. can be better quantified and considered. We re-conceptualize Pittsburgh’s watersheds based on a fuller consideration of ecological and social benefits of stream restoration as an approach to GI.

Tim Nuttle (Primary Presenter/Author), Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc., tnuttle@cecinc.com;


Nate Ober ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil & Environmental Consultants, nober@cecinc.com;


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15:15 - 15:30: / 302A ASSESSING PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE ABOUT AND ATTITUDES TOWARD STORMWATER RUNOFF

6/05/2017  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  302A

ASSESSING PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE ABOUT AND ATTITUDES TOWARD STORMWATER RUNOFF While stormwater management technology continues to advance, there has been a dearth of attention focused on understanding public knowledge about runoff and attitudes toward managing it. This interdisciplinary research team applied stream monitoring data showing that thermal pollution and salt (from winter deicing) are key issues for streams in this region to develop a public survey about stormwater management. The survey general knowledge about stormwater, concerns about impacts from runoff, and attitudes toward specific stormwater management approaches. The survey also included an experiment to assess how detailed, science-based information specifically about temperature and salt, influences public response. The results show a majority of respondents know what stormwater runoff is, but there is not a high level of concern about runoff. Respondents who have implemented stormwater abatement measures on their property are more likely to support stormwater management programs. Providing more detailed science-based information had no influence on respondents’ general concern about stormwater runoff or their attitudes about its management.

Kristan Cockerill (Primary Presenter/Author), Appalachian State University, cockerillkm@appstate.edu;


Chuanhui Gu ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, guc@appstate.edu;


William P. Anderson, Jr. ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, andersonwp@appstate.edu;


Peter Groothuis ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, groothuispa@appstate.edu;


Tanga Mohr ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, mohrtm1@appstate.edu;


John Whitehead ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, whiteheadjc@appstate.edu;


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