Thursday, June 8, 2017
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 301A THE UNIVERSE IN A NUTSHELL — TEST_SYSTEMS AND REALITY

6/08/2017  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  301A

THE UNIVERSE IN A NUTSHELL — TEST_SYSTEMS AND REALITY Understanding and predicting the ecological effects of environmental factors on natural communities requires the knowledge of the relevant ecological processes and their interaction. These processes act, and interact, on various levels of biological organization - from the molecule to the ecosystem level. Accordingly, their investigation needs to include the respective level of test-systems. In the presentation I suggest a framework on how to select/design the appropriate system and make use of its results in order to understand the behavior of natural communities.

Matthias Liess (Primary Presenter/Author), UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, matthias.liess@ufz.de;


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09:15 - 09:30: / 301A THE SWEET SPOT BETWEEN CONTROL AND CHAOS: MEETING IN THE MIDDLE WITH MESOCOSMS

6/08/2017  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  301A

THE SWEET SPOT BETWEEN CONTROL AND CHAOS: MEETING IN THE MIDDLE WITH MESOCOSMS In the field of ecotoxicology, the molecular methods revolution and the mechanistic insights they can provide have shifted the focus toward lab studies at the gene-level of the genes to ecosystems continuum. However, focusing on a single species ignores the profound long-term interactions between contaminants, the environment, and organisms which ultimately drive patterns of bioaccumulation and toxicity. Mesocosm studies allow for research with contaminants at both a spatial and temporal scale that can capture the complex interactions between contaminants and the various biotic and abiotic compartments that define the ecosystem of interest. In this talk, several examples will be given from wetland mesocosm experiments used for examining the fate, transformation, and impacts of engineered nanomaterials. This work has: revealed the transformations of relevance to this new class of contaminants; identified unexpected but repeatable methane emissions due to toxic effects on plants stimulating microbes; and have allowed broad patterns of bioaccumulation and trophic transfer to be elucidated. Finally, we will also identify the importance of looking across scales by complimenting mesocosm-scale work with single organism and microcosm scale approaches.

Ben Colman (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Montana, ben.colman@umontana.edu;


Leanne Baker ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Waterloo, bakerleannef@gmail.com;


Cole Matson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Cole_Matson@baylor.edu;


Ryan S. King ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Baylor University, Ryan_S_King@baylor.edu;


Jason Unrine ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Kentucky, jason.unrine@uky.edu;


Emily Bernhardt ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Duke University, ebernhar@duke.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 301A USING RECIRCULATING EXPERIMENTAL STREAMS TO QUANTIFY THE EFFECTS OF WATER VELOCITY AND BIOFILM COLONIZATION ON EDNA DETECTION AND DEGRADATION

6/08/2017  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  301A

USING RECIRCULATING EXPERIMENTAL STREAMS TO QUANTIFY THE EFFECTS OF WATER VELOCITY AND BIOFILM COLONIZATION ON EDNA DETECTION AND DEGRADATION The application of environmental DNA (eDNA) to infer species presence in aquatic ecosystems has become a valuable tool in ecology. However, we are just beginning to understand how environmental conditions influence eDNA detection and persistence in natural systems. We built on results from previous research in microcosms, exploring eDNA dynamics in replicated array of recirculating experimental streams. To assess how biophysical conditions influenced eDNA persistence, we introduced eDNA into streams with a range of water velocities (0.1-0.8m/s) and biofilm coverage (0-100%), and monitored eDNA concentration declines over time (~10d). We compared degradation rates across the recirculating streams using biphasic decay models, suggesting that some eDNA material is labile and degrades quickly, while the remaining eDNA is resistant to decay. We found that the general presence of flow, regardless of velocity, significantly increased initial decay rates (4-12 day-1) relative to previous studies conducted in microcosms. We also found that the presence of biofilms significantly increased eDNA degradation. Understanding environmental factors controlling eDNA degradation is key to improving sampling strategies when using this tool for stream monitoring.

Arial Shogren (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Notre Dame, ashogren@nd.edu;


Jennifer L. Tank ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, tank.1@nd.edu;


Emma Rosi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, rosie@caryinstitute.org;


Olivia August ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), The University of Notre Dame, oaugust@nd.edu;


Micah Bennett ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. EPA, lee.sylvia@epa.gov;


Brittany Hanrahan ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, bhanrah3@nd.edu;


Mark Renshaw ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Hawai'i Pacific University, mrenshaw@hpu.edu;


Crysta Gantz ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Portland State University, cgantz@pdx.edu;


Diogo Bolster ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Notre Dame, diogo.bolster.5@nd.edu;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 301A A CITIZEN SCIENCE PROGRAM FOR FILLING IN THE GAPS FOR AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM CONSERVATION IN MEGHALAYA, INDIA

6/08/2017  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  301A

A CITIZEN SCIENCE PROGRAM FOR FILLING IN THE GAPS FOR AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM CONSERVATION IN MEGHALAYA, INDIA This study describes a stream biomonitoring program that builds capacity in undergraduate college students in the field of freshwater ecology and conservation and presents data collected entirely by members of Biomonitoring Network as a part of Citizen Science program in Indian Northeast. The program involves sampling of aquatic macroinvertebrates and hydrological parameters in streams. Several colleges initiated short-term, one-year and long-term biomonitoring of streams in East Khasi Hills and Ri-Bhoi districts of Meghalaya, India. Nine stream locations sampled over October-December in 2014 provided a snapshot of physical and biotic conditions, enabling the examination of spatial trends in water quality parameters and aquatic biota. A year-long sampling study from 2014-2015 provided seasonal view of stream parameters at Lwai (clean) and Umkaliar (moderately polluted) streams. Results from both sampling sets suggest that turbidity negatively affected the richness of pollution sensitive taxa. Dissolved Oxygen was lower in polluted streams and were non-significantly lower in summer than in winter. Data obtained on macroinvertebrates adds to the sparse information available on stream ecosystems in the biodiversity-rich northeast Indian region. We hope to provide a template for monitoring of vital ecosystems in Meghalaya and similar regions.

Sonali Saha (Primary Presenter/Author), Miami Dade College, bamboohydraulics@gmail.com;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 301A CITIZENS MONITOR LAKE LEVEL AND STREAMFLOW FOR RESEARCH, MANAGEMENT, AND POLICY

6/08/2017  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  301A

CITIZENS MONITOR LAKE LEVEL AND STREAMFLOW FOR RESEARCH, MANAGEMENT, AND POLICY Managing water quantity is of growing concern due to climate change and groundwater withdrawals. The US Geological Survey collects most water quantity records, but monitors few primary streams and lakes. Meanwhile, high capacity wells dried up some streams and lakes, drought caused lake levels to recede, and heavy precipitation caused flooding and in an extreme case, one lake to break its banks. To satisfy the need for more water quantity data, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources started a water quantity citizen monitoring program. This talk will cover the details and challenges of citizen-based water quantity monitoring. It will end by describing how citizen water quantity data is being used for management, research, and policy. Citizens provide critical data to aid permitting decisions for high capacity wells. Long-term data show that water levels fluctuate synchronously on a 13 year cycle and that lake water clarity responds oppositely to drought in deep versus shallow lakes. Our ultimate goal is to create new water quantity policy based on the spatial coherence and drivers of water level fluctuations.

Catherine Hein (Primary Presenter/Author), Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, catherine.hein@wisconsin.gov;


Lindsey Albright ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, albrightlindsey@gmail.com;


Joshua Wied ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, joshua.wied@wisconsin.gov;


Justin Chenevert ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, justin.chenevert@wisconsin.gov;


George Kraft ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UW Stevens Point, gkraft@uwsp.edu;


Jessica Haucke ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UW Stevens Point, Jessica.Haucke@uwsp.edu;


Peter J. Lisi ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin, peter.j.lisi@gmail.com;


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10:15 - 10:30: / 301A OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS FOR VOLUNTEER FRESHWATER MONITORING IN NEW ZEALAND

6/08/2017  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  301A

OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS FOR VOLUNTEER FRESHWATER MONITORING IN NEW ZEALAND As government-led “Freshwater Reforms” provide new opportunities for volunteers to contribute their knowledge and values to freshwater management in New Zealand, the public is becoming increasingly proactive in freshwater monitoring. In an 18-month study, we showed that volunteers participating in stream monitoring increased awareness and understanding of local freshwaters, and attentiveness to local and national freshwater issues. Most volunteers shared their knowledge with their community, and developed relationships with their regional government (the main water management agencies), while some became more interested in engaging in freshwater decision-making. Regional government staff recognised and welcomed these benefits, and also the value of volunteer monitoring to fill gaps in government monitoring. However, they perceived significant barriers to supporting volunteer monitoring (limited staff time and resources) and using volunteer data (data reliability). Our research confirmed the need for investing time in volunteers, but also addressed data concerns, showing good agreement between volunteer and professional data for key water quality and biological variables. Our current work aims to improve resources and systems for volunteers to contribute high quality data to freshwater management, and demonstrate volunteers’ ability to contribute data to research on stream restoration success.

Richard Storey (Primary Presenter/Author), National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand, richard.storey@niwa.co.nz;


Aslan Wright-Stow ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Aslan.Wright-Stow@niwa.co.nz ;


Elsemieke Kin ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wageningen University, elsemieke_kin@hotmail.com;


Samira van Hunen ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Wageningen University, samira.hunen@gmail.com;


Rob Daveies-Colley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), National Institute of Water and Atmopsheric Research, rob.davies-colley@niwa.co.nz;


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