Thursday, June 8, 2017
11:00 - 12:30

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11:00 - 11:15: / 302C OPPORTUNISTIC DATA REVEAL WIDESPREAD SPECIES TURNOVER IN A DAMSELFLY GENUS

6/08/2017  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  302C

OPPORTUNISTIC DATA REVEAL WIDESPREAD SPECIES TURNOVER IN A DAMSELFLY GENUS A quality vs. quantity trade-off exists among experiments, standardized observational studies, and purely opportunistic datasets. Opportunistic species occurrence data may be of relatively limited quality, but it typically involves a large number of observations and species. Given the trade-off, how useful are opportunistic data in understanding patterns of spatial diversity structure? Here we explore opportunistic data in describing patterns of species composition among localities, using over 4,600 occurrence records of bluet damselflies in the United States. We tested phylogenetic scale (genus level, bluet major clades, bluet subclades) and spatial extent (US vs. watershed regions), hypothesizing that nonrandom structure is more likely at larger extent, and used several environmental and spatial gradients and matrix information scenarios. Null model analysis of matrix coherence and species replacements showed many cases of nonrandom structure and widespread species turnover. Findings did not support the spatial hypothesis, except for a prevalence of random outcomes in one watershed with limited longitudinal extent. Level of phylogeny did not appear to have any effect. Our study suggests that extensive opportunistic data can be used to identify nonrandom spatial diversity structure and species turnover at biogeographical scales.

Jason Bried (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Arkansas, bried@uark.edu;


Adam Siepielski ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Arkansas, amsiepie@uark.edu;


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11:15 - 11:30: / 302C QUANTIFYING COMMUNITY-LEVEL RESISTANCE AND RESILIENCE TO DISTURBANCE: AN EXAMPLE FROM ONTARIO ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES EXPERIENCING ACIDIFICATION

6/08/2017  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  302C

QUANTIFYING COMMUNITY-LEVEL RESISTANCE AND RESILIENCE TO DISTURBANCE: AN EXAMPLE FROM ONTARIO ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES EXPERIENCING ACIDIFICATION Freshwater ecosystems are experiencing altered frequencies and magnitudes of disturbance events, and thus a continued focus for aquatic ecologists is to quantify the resilience of these systems to disturbance. Here, we investigated the applicability of multivariate distance-based metrics for characterizing community-level resilience using gradient simulations, and subsequently present a case study on the relative resilience of freshwater crustacean zooplankton to acidification in Ontario. We found variability among zooplankton communities in their resistance and resilience to the effects of acidification. Inconsistent with our expectations, most minimally-impacted reference communities showed directional trajectories over time. Crustacean zooplankton communities in experimentally acidified lakes displayed patterns consistent with resilient communities able to recover from disturbance. Finally, communities within atmospherically acidified lakes showed varying patterns of resistance and resilience. Changes in environmental conditions have likely influenced the composition of zooplankton communities over the past three decades, explaining some of the variance observed. Overall, our approach of using multivariate distance measures on ordinations provides an effective visual framework to quantify the relative resistance and resilience of communities to disturbance.

Karl Lamothe (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Toronto, karl.lamothe@mail.utoronto.ca;


Donald Jackson ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Toronto, don.jackson@utoronto.ca;


Keith Somers ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Toronto, keith.somers@utoronto.ca;


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11:30 - 11:45: / 302C PHENOLOGY OF A BEAVER LODGE NEAR THE PLATTE RIVER, NEBRASKA, UNVEILED THROUGH TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY

6/08/2017  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  302C

PHENOLOGY OF A BEAVER LODGE NEAR THE PLATTE RIVER, NEBRASKA, UNVEILED THROUGH TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY North American beavers modify ecosystems by felling trees, damming waterbodies, and building structures. Many studies have focused on these terrain modifications, specifically their influence on hydrology, habitat heterogeneity, and niche diversity in the surrounding environment; however, few studies have quantified commensal or opportunistic activities directly associated with their structures. We used time-lapse photography to monitor a beaver lodge on a human-excavated pond adjacent to the Platte River in central Nebraska, USA. We captured images every ten minutes over nine months with a modified security camera and recorded beaver activity, lodge maintenance, and other animal activities. We compared activity patterns to hydrologic, temporal, and weather conditions. Herein we describe the activity patterns of beaver, other animals, and the changing structure of the lodge, as well as observations of dozens of other species associated with the lodge during distinct seasons and time periods. We also illustrate how visual imagery can be combined with biological data to further the understanding of science and ecological interactions in presentations to both technical and nontechnical audiences.

Simon Tye (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Nebraska at Kearney, tyesp@lopers.unk.edu;


Michael Forsberg ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nebraska - Lincoln, forsberg.mike@gmail.com;


Emma Brinley Buckley ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Nebraska Educational Telecommunications, ebuckley@netad.unl.edu;


Keith Geluso ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nebraska at Kearney, gelusok1@unk.edu;


Jeff Dale ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), TRLcam, jeff.dale@trlcam.com;


Mary Harner ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nebraska at Kearney, harnermj@unk.edu;


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12:00 - 12:15: / 302C INVERTEBRATE RESISTANCE/RESILIENCE MECHANISMS IN AN INTERMITTENT STREAM AMONG YEARS WITH VARYING HYDROPERIODS

6/08/2017  |   12:00 - 12:15   |  302C

INVERTEBRATE RESISTANCE/RESILIENCE MECHANISMS IN AN INTERMITTENT STREAM AMONG YEARS WITH VARYING HYDROPERIODS In the southeastern US, more variable precipitation, warming, and human water demand are causing water deficits and a trend towards intermittency in streams. Following the end of a severe drought in the lower Flint River, Georgia, we examined mechanisms of invertebrate resistance/resilience in an intermittent stream during a year with multiple flow periods and a year with an average winter-spring flow. While richness and total abundance did not differ significantly, shifts were seen in the dominant taxa between years. Higher abundances of Simuliidae and a greater dominance of non-tanypodinae characterized the multi-flow year compared to a higher abundance of Isopoda and Baetidae in the average flow year. This suggest that the multiple flow periods favored rapid colonizers over those taxa that normally persist in refugia during average years. Variations in the hydroperiod will inherently favor taxa with certain traits over others and over time could alter assemblage composition of streams within the watershed. Awareness of biological responses will be increasingly important for regional water planning and conservation efforts to minimize the effects of changing climate and human demand.

Chelsea Smith (Primary Presenter/Author), J.W. Jones Ecological Research Center, csmith@jonesctr.org;


Nicholas Marzolf ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), J.W. Jones Ecological Research Center, nmarzolf@jonesctr.org;


Stephen Golladay ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Joseph W Jones Ecological Research Center, sgolla@jonesctr.org;


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12:15 - 12:30: / 302C LEGACY DISTURBANCE IN A LAKE LITTORAL ZONE: EFFECTS OF MINING RESIDUE ON THE COMPOSITION OF MACROPHYTE COMMUNITIES

6/08/2017  |   12:15 - 12:30   |  302C

LEGACY DISTURBANCE IN A LAKE LITTORAL ZONE: EFFECTS OF MINING RESIDUE ON THE COMPOSITION OF MACROPHYTE COMMUNITIES Large-scale disturbances can cause legacy effects on community composition in lakes that may persist for decades or longer. We quantified legacy effects of heavy-metal rich mining residues (hereafter stamp sands) deposited from 1868-1910 on littoral macrophyte community composition and presence of invasive macrophytes by comparing 15 sites with stamp sands to 15 sites with native sand and organic sediment in the Keweenaw Waterway of Michigan. Where macrophytes were present, total macrophyte biomass, diversity, and species richness did not differ between site type. Also, occurrence of non-native Myriophyllum spicatum and hybrid M. spicatum x sibiricum was not different by site type. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and multi-response permutation procedures revealed that significant differences in the composition of macrophyte communities between site types was explained by heavy metal concentrations and texture of sediments within sub-regions of the waterway with similar hydrodynamic conditions, but not the whole waterway. Our results suggest that this legacy disturbance may have lasting effects on littoral macrophyte communities that are evident at some spatial scales, although it does not appear to facilitate species invasion in this waterway.

Ryan Van Goethem (Primary Presenter/Author), Michigan Technological University, rrvangoe@mtu.edu;


Amy Marcarelli ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, ammarcar@mtu.edu;


Casey Huckins ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Technological University, cjhuckin@mtu.edu;


Kevyn Juneau ( Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Wisconsin - River Falls, kevyn.juneau@uwrf.edu;


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