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SFS Annual Meeting

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EXPLORING DISPERSAL AND GENETIC CONNECTIVITY THROUGH A NEWLY DISCOVERED ARIZONA TREEFROG POPULATION

The survival of a population, even that of a species, can depend on certain population genetic components, especially diversity, connectivity, and structure. For that reason, population genetic studies can provide beneficial guidelines for conservation and management actions when attempting to manage species in the face of climate change. The Huachuca Mountains and Canelo Hills of Arizona are home to isolated populations of the Arizona Treefrog, Hyla Wrightorum, a species of conservation concern. These isolated populations are morphologically and genetically unique, and they face threats from invasive species, human water use, fires, and climate change. Understanding the population genetic attributes of these unique populations is crucial for guiding conservation efforts in this region. In 2018, DNA was collected from individuals from a previously unsampled population, discovered only in 2015; the new population is geographically isolated from other previously studied populations. This new population may provide insight into the dispersal dynamics of this species in this region. Individuals will be genotyped and analyzed to determine similarity and connectivity to other populations. This project will help us understand the basic and applied ecology of this potentially vulnerable group of frogs.

Meryl Mims (), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;


Jacob Helmann (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, hjacob@vt.edu;


Meryl Mims (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, mims@vt.edu;