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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 24, 2018
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 420 A PHENOLOGICAL SHIFT OF CANADA DARNER (AESHNA CANADENSIS) EMERGENCE IN THE ST. CROIX RIVER VALLEY, MINNESOTA

5/24/2018  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  420 A

PHENOLOGICAL SHIFT OF CANADA DARNER (AESHNA CANADENSIS) EMERGENCE IN THE ST. CROIX RIVER VALLEY, MINNESOTA Dragonflies are good bioindicators of environmental change and are particularly useful as sentinels of climate change. We conducted a phenological study of Aeshna canadensis (Canada Darner) emergence in three fishless kettle ponds in the St. Croix River Valley, Minnesota. Ponds were sampled three times per week from mid-May through early October, 2017 using methods (emergence traps, rearing cages, emergence screens, and shoreline exuviae hunting) aimed at collecting emerging dragonflies. We documented emergence beginning May 24, peaking the first week of June, and ending July 15. We observed adults flying beginning the last week of August and continuing through the end of our sampling period. Emergence timing of our study population does not align with the observed flight period or with that suggested by published literature. We hypothesize that this species is shifting to an earlier emergence window in response to warming climate. Additionally, we may have detected a migratory population with early-emergers flying elsewhere to reproduce. We are exploring this using hydrogen isotope analysis to detect differences in natal origin of late-flying adults.

Holly Kundel (Primary Presenter/Author), Augsburg University, kundelh@augsburg.edu;


Emily Schilling (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg University, schillin@augsburg.edu;


Maia Crews-Erjavec (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg University, crewsem@augsburg.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 420 A AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH ELODEA CANADENSIS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN ITS NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE RANGES

5/24/2018  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  420 A

AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH ELODEA CANADENSIS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN ITS NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE RANGES The aquatic macrophyte, Elodea Canadensis (Canadian Waterweed), hereafter Elodea, is a successful invader around the world. Its presence in Alaska is a concern because of the threat it poses to ecosystem services provided by invaded habitats. One hypothesis proposed for the success of aquatic invasive plants in naïve systems is the absence of herbivory. The goal of this study was to compare aquatic invertebrate communities associated with Elodea in native (Illinois) and invasive (Copper River Delta (CRD), Alaska) areas. Aquatic invertebrates were sampled monthly (May – August) from Elodea beds in four Illinois ponds and four CRD ponds. Aquatic invertebrate abundance and species richness were higher in Elodea beds from native ponds than invaded ponds. Although Chironomidae (Diptera) were the numerically dominant insects in Elodea beds from both native and invaded ponds, Chironomidae abundance was significantly higher in Elodea beds from native ponds. Densities of taxa commonly associated with vascular hydrophytes also were significantly greater in native ponds and included genera known to feed on aquatic macrophytes. Lower abundance or absence of ecologically similar taxa in invaded ponds may contribute to Elodea’s success on the CRD.

Jennifer Piacente (Primary Presenter/Author), Loyola University Chicago , jpiacente@luc.edu;


Chantel Adelfio (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Copper River Watershed Project , chantel@copperriver.org;


Martin B. Berg (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loyola University Chicago, mberg@luc.edu;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 420 A IMPROVING THE KNOWLEDGE BASE ON THE PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF FINE SEDIMENT FOR MACROINVERTEBRATES

5/24/2018  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  420 A

IMPROVING THE KNOWLEDGE BASE ON THE PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF FINE SEDIMENT FOR MACROINVERTEBRATES Excessive fine sediment delivery can cause serious deleterious effects to riverine systems (e.g. increasing turbidity, clogging the river bed, smothering aquatic insects). There has been a drive to employ biomonitoring practices, instead of physical methods of measuring fine sediment, in these highly dynamic systems. A systematic literature review, which examined the response of macroinvertebrates to different gradients of fine sediment pollution, found that there was a wealth of evidence relating to organismal response to sediment associated contaminants, but indicated a distinct absence of studies which considered the direct and physical effects of fine sediment (e.g. clogging, abrasion) at the organism level. A recirculating flume experiment was set up to investigate physical damage on three different species of macroinvertebrate gills. Insect cadavers were exposed for eight hours to two concentrations of fine sediment (High/Low) and at two velocities (High/Low). Gills from cadavers of different species were damaged to varying extents and responded differently to treatments in a way that suggested gill morphology and behavioural responses (such as avoidance) as key factors.

Morwenna Mckenzie (Primary Presenter/Author), Coventry University, mckenz36@coventry.ac.uk;


Kate Mathers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loughborough University, k.mathers@lboro.ac.uk;


Paul Wood (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loughborough University, UK, p.j.wood@lboro.ac.uk;


Martin Wilkes (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Coventry University, ab9323@coventry.ac.uk;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 420 A DOES LABORATORY BEHAVIOR CORRELATE WITH DIET FOR THE INVASIVE RUSTY CRAYFISH FAXONIUS RUSTICUS?

5/24/2018  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  420 A

DOES LABORATORY BEHAVIOR CORRELATE WITH DIET FOR THE INVASIVE RUSTY CRAYFISH FAXONIUS RUSTICUS? Laboratory behavioral experiments are a common tool for understanding organisms, but whether these behaviors accurately reflect field behaviors or performance remains understudied. Directly connecting laboratory behaviors to field interactions would increase understanding of a variety of organisms. The relative abundances of stable isotopes within individuals can be used to understand their previous field function, such as calculating trophic position. This study examined linkages between laboratory dominance assays and trophic position of rusty crayfish (Faxonius rusticus) using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. We chose three tissues – muscle, hepatopancreas, and haemolymph – for stable isotope analysis based on their expected variation in isotopic turnover rates. We hypothesized more dominant crayfish would have higher trophic positions and tissue with faster turnover rates would exhibit a stronger relationship between laboratory behavior and trophic position as these tissues more closely reflect the feeding ecology at time of collection. We failed to find a relationship between dominance and trophic position, regardless of tissue used for stable isotope analysis. Future studies should investigate whether laboratory behavior and field function correlates between, rather than within, populations and consider other behavioral types.

Amaryllis Adey (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Illinois, akadey2@illinois.edu;


Eric Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Illinois, erlarson@illinois.edu;


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10:15 - 10:30: / 420 A MEIOFAUNA OF ONEONTA CREEK, OTSEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

5/24/2018  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  420 A

MEIOFAUNA OF ONEONTA CREEK, OTSEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK Meiofauna are tiny organisms that live between sediment grains in freshwater, the most prevalent of which are rotifers, gastrotrichs, and nematodes. Their distribution is affected by abiotic factors like groundwater flow, sediment type, and water chemistry. In order to learn more about the organisms found in Otsego County New York, a series of surveys were conducted in Oneonta Creek above and below Lower Reservoir. Twenty sites were sampled for organisms as well as for pH, salinity, conductivity, total dissolved solids, and temperature. The purpose of this talk is to provide more information about which meiofauna can be found in Oneonta Creek and discuss their pattern of distribution around the reservoir.

Jeffrey Heilveil (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), SUNY College at Oneonta, heilvejs@oneonta.edu;


Sarah Newtown (Primary Presenter/Author), SUNY College at Oneonta, newtsa08@oneonta.edu;


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