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SFS Annual Meeting

Monday, May 21, 2018
11:00 - 12:30

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11:00 - 11:15: / 410 A OPTIMAL METHODS FOR BIOMONITORING AND CONSERVATION EFFORTS: A CASE STUDY FROM THE OGEECHEE RIVER

5/21/2018  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  410 A

OPTIMAL METHODS FOR BIOMONITORING AND CONSERVATION EFFORTS: A CASE STUDY FROM THE OGEECHEE RIVER Macroinvertebrates are commonly sampled to monitor impairment in rivers. With their range in tolerance to environmental stressors, these organisms convey nuanced information about their habitat. However, questions remain about methodology, such as to which taxonomic level the specimens should be identified and whether taxonomic or functional trait classifications of macroinvertebrates are more informative. On the Ogeechee River (Georgia, USA), we have replicated a two-year procedure of sampling aquatic macroinvertebrates on submerged woody debris that occurred in the 1980s. We have two datasets of the community separated by three decades, over which time the river has been subjected to various anthropogenic impacts. By using different commonly implemented methods to compare the invertebrate communities from each period (e.g. comparing assessment scores using order-, family-, or genus-level identifications and comparing taxonomic versus trait diversity), we can determine whether these approaches yield varying results regarding potential change in the community of invertebrates. Initial analyses have indicated significant seasonal differences in community structure within a two-year period, so further comparisons may also suggest optimal timing and frequency of biomonitoring in order for conservation groups to obtain the most complete picture of the river community.

Joseph McHugh (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, mchugh@uga.edu;


Darold Batzer (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, dbatzer@uga.edu;


Kelly Murray (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, kmmurray14@gmail.com;


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11:15 - 11:30: / 410 A EVALUATING ANNUAL VARIATION IN A FISH COMMUNITY-BASED INDEX OF BIOTIC INTEGRITY FOR BOREAL PLAINS STREAMS

5/21/2018  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  410 A

EVALUATING ANNUAL VARIATION IN A FISH COMMUNITY-BASED INDEX OF BIOTIC INTEGRITY FOR BOREAL PLAINS STREAMS Freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to anthropogenic influences and multiple stressors, and proper management techniques are required to assess, conserve or restore aquatic health. Bioassessment is a valuable technique used to determine the ecological condition of water resources. We are developing a systematic approach for assessing stream health within Saskatchewan’s boreal region, by adapting, applying and evaluating a fish-based Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI). A potential limitation of fish-biomonitoring studies is the effect of seasonality and timing of sampling on the interpretation of results, especially in northern regions where temperature extremes likely influence fish reproduction and mobility. To evaluate potential annual variance in fish community metrics and IBI scores, we electrofished five streams in the summer of 2016 and 2017 and measured water quality and habitat variables. We found variations in species richness, composition, and abundance between years, which were reflected in IBI scores. This test of annual variance in fish communities and environmental variables will help critically evaluate the reliability of IBI-type approaches in this biogeographic region. Our results reinforce the importance of long-term monitoring to decipher trends in natural variation of fish communities from variation created by anthropological stressors.

Kate Prestie (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Saskatchewan, kate.prestie@usask.ca;


Iain Phillips (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Troutreach Saskatchewan/ Water Security Agency of Saskatchewan, iain.phillips@wsask.ca;


Dave Janz (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, david.janz@usask.ca;


Tim Jardine (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Saskatchewan, tim.jardine@usask.ca;


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11:30 - 11:45: / 410 A SEASONALITY OF TOTAL FATTY ACID PROFILES IN ACID MINE DRAINAGE IMPAIRED STREAMS

5/21/2018  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  410 A

SEASONALITY OF TOTAL FATTY ACID PROFILES IN ACID MINE DRAINAGE IMPAIRED STREAMS Pre-regulation coal mining and subsequent acid mine drainage (AMD) has drastically altered stream quality in the Appalachian region of the United States. Streams impaired by AMD often demonstrate lower pH, increased specific conductance, and high dissolved metal concentrations compared with streams not receiving AMD. The purpose of this study was two-fold, (1) to use fatty acid profiles to distinguish between biofilm communities in AMD impaired and unimpaired streams and (2) to determine the consistency of results throughout the summer sampling period. Fatty acid profiles easily and rapidly separated biofilm communities into their respective categories, either impaired by AMD or unimpaired, using multivariate statistical approaches. Fatty acid profiles were similar within stream type throughout the summer sampling season and the profiles were correlated with pH and specific conductance. The results of this study show that fatty acid profiles can rapidly and accurately categorize the biofilm community as a result of environmental impairment during the sampling season for biomonitoring.

Morgan Vis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio University, vis-chia@ohio.edu;


Sam Drerup (Primary Presenter/Author), Trine University , drerups@trine.edu;


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11:45 - 12:00: / 410 A THE MIGRATION OF A NEARLY-EXTINCT POPULATION OF MASU SALMON TO STREAMS IN THE PIRIKA DAM RESERVOIR IN NORTHERN JAPAN

5/21/2018  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  410 A

THE MIGRATION OF A NEARLY-EXTINCT POPULATION OF MASU SALMON TO STREAMS IN THE PIRIKA DAM RESERVOIR IN NORTHERN JAPAN After construction of the Pirika Dam in Hokkaido, northern Japan, the masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) population decreased in two of the three streams flowing into the reservoir. To restore their population, it is necessary to know whether masu salmon in the reservoir migrate to these streams. We examined the behavior of juvenile masu salmon in the reservoir using acoustic biotelemetry from August to October 2016 and May to August 2017. We released 20 individuals with acoustic transmitters in 2016 and 30 in 2017. Receivers were installed in the reservoir and at the three stream inlets. More than 40% of the released salmon were recorded at the Chushibetsu stream inlet in both years, while only one (2017) and three (2016) individuals were confirmed at the other stream inlets. Our results suggest that mature masu salmon from the fishway connecting the Chushibetsu stream and the main river below the Pirika dam were conserved and that releasing masu salmon in the other two streams might help the populations in the two streams to recover.

Masanori Nunokawa (Primary Presenter/Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold region, Public Works Reseaech Institute, nunokawa-m@ceri.go.jp;


Kazuhisa Kashiwaya (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Public Works Research Institute, kashiwaya-k22aa@ceri.go.jp;


Atsushi Tanise (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Public Works Research Institute, tanise-a22aa@ceri.go.jp;


Ryuichi Shinmme (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Public Works Research Institute, shimme-r22aa@ceri.go.jp;


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12:00 - 12:15: / 410 A VARIATION IN MACROINVERTEBRATE PASSIVE SAMPLING DEVICES FOR SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN RIVERS

5/21/2018  |   12:00 - 12:15   |  410 A

VARIATION IN MACROINVERTEBRATE PASSIVE SAMPLING DEVICES FOR SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN RIVERS Techniques for sampling macroinvertebrates in large rivers have not been standardized by many agencies. Variation within sampling devices can affect metric calculations used in bioassessments. This study quantifies variation in passive samplers deployed in the Savannah and Ogeechee Rivers within the Southeastern Coastal Plain. Leaf packs, snag bags, and Hester-Dendy samplers were deployed at three sites in each river for ~30d. We calculated 39 common bioassessment metrics to evaluate variation within each sampler. Average mean square error (MSE) of metric calculations was significantly different within samplers; snag bags exhibited 27% higher MSE than leaf packs (t38=2.6 P=0.01). MSE of methods adding variation within sites differed significantly between snag bags and Hesters (t38 =3.7, P=<0.01); snag bags exhibiting the highest MSE and Hesters the lowest, with 47% difference. Sampler variation increases when site variation is accounted for. However, variation scoring for samplers was not consistent after adding sites; leaf packs exhibited the least amount MSE within samplers, but Hesters exhibited the least amount of MSE after sites were added. Determining the precision of sampling devices will be an important step towards developing standard operating procedures for bioassessment of large rivers.

Kelsey Laymon (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, kelsey.laymon@icloud.com;


Damon Mullis (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, damon.mullis@phinizycenter.org;


Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


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12:15 - 12:30: / 410 A CHIRONOMIDAE (INSECTA: DIPTERA) OF SAN SALVADOR ISLAND, BAHAMAS: ENHANCING KNOWLEDGE OF NEOTROPICAL BIODIVERSITY

5/21/2018  |   12:15 - 12:30   |  410 A

CHIRONOMIDAE (INSECTA: DIPTERA) OF SAN SALVADOR ISLAND, BAHAMAS: ENHANCING KNOWLEDGE OF NEOTROPICAL BIODIVERSITY The Chironomidae (Diptera), commonly known as non-biting midges, are a species-rich family of holometabolous insects that live out their immature stages in aquatic habitats. Following emergence of the adult, the pupal exuviae (cast pupal skin) remains floating on the water’s surface. Pupal exuviae are species-specific, allowing identification to species, and thereby, providing a means to use them in biodiversity assessments. While this family is very diverse, with approximately 5,500 described species worldwide, knowledge of Neotropical species is lacking. Approximately 900 species are known to this ecoregion and only 16 species are known from the Bahamas. Our goal is to enhance the knowledge of Chironomidae of the Bahamas, specifically focusing on those from San Salvador Island. Chironomidae pupal exuviae were collected from various aquatic habitats, including rock pools and intermittent ponds, on San Salvador in June 2013 and were compared to a similar study from March 2012. Cumulatively, twenty-nine specimens were found, with representatives from 12 morphospecies and 9 genera.; Chironomus was the most common genus; this genus is tolerant of various environmental conditions, matching San Salvador’s relatively harsh environment. Ultimately, these results enhance knowledge of chironomid diversity in the Neotropics.

Alyssa Anderson (Primary Presenter/Author), Northern State University, alyssa.m.anderson@northern.edu;


Katherine M. Wollman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), South Dakota State University, katherine.wollman@jacks.sdstate.edu;


Petra Kranzfelder (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota, kranz081@umn.edu;


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