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SFS Annual Meeting

Monday, May 20, 2019
09:00 - 10:30

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09:00 - 09:15: / 150 G DIVERSIFYING DISCUSSIONS: HOW DO WE FACILITATE TALKING ABOUT FRESHWATER SCIENCE IN OUR CLASSES?

5/20/2019  |   09:00 - 09:15   |  150 G

DIVERSIFYING DISCUSSIONS: HOW DO WE FACILITATE TALKING ABOUT FRESHWATER SCIENCE IN OUR CLASSES? Active learning strategies increase student-instructor and student-student interactions, creating opportunities for rich classroom discussions. Most observational protocols used in undergraduate STEM classrooms focus on classroom behaviors, but they are not designed to measure the ways in which instructors initiate classroom discussions [the teacher discourse moves (TDMs)]. Specifically, TDMs are conservational strategies used by instructors to improve student understanding of content. I will describe the development and validation of a new instrument, called the Classroom Discourse Observation Protocol (CDOP), which characterizes and quantifies TDMs from observational data in undergraduate STEM classrooms. The CDOP coding scheme has been used to reliably characterize the TDMs that occur in 2-min time intervals over the course of a class period. Preliminary results suggest that this protocol is able to distinguish differences in TDMs, even in classrooms with equivalent active engagement instruction. We will discuss how CDOP can facilitate diverse discussions with your students about freshwater science content, and as a result, enhance their freshwater science learning.

Petra Kranzfelder (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota Twin Cities, kranz081@umn.edu;


Jennifer L. Bankers-Fulbright (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Augsburg University, bankers@augsburg.edu ;


Marcos E. García-Ojeda (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California Merced, mgarcia-ojeda@ucmerced.edu;


Marin P. Melloy (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota Twin Cities, mello050@umn.edu;


Sagal Mohammed (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota Twin Cities, moham938@umn.edu;


Abdi-Rizak M. Warfa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Minnesota Twin Cities, awarfa@umn.edu;


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09:15 - 09:30: / 150 G ASSESSING AND ADDRESSING ACTIVE TEACHING STRATEGIES IN INTRODUCTORY STEM COURSES

5/20/2019  |   09:15 - 09:30   |  150 G

ASSESSING AND ADDRESSING ACTIVE TEACHING STRATEGIES IN INTRODUCTORY STEM COURSES Introductory STEM courses are pivotal in preparing undergraduate students to enter specialized fields like freshwater ecology. Despite a body of evidence that active learning (opportunities for students to construct knowledge during class) improves learning in introductory science classes, traditional lecture teaching dominates undergraduates’ experiences. In this study we assess teaching strategies practiced in introductory STEM class periods at a mid-size state university to determine at what level does active learning occur and ask what barriers exist for science faculty to implement active learning. We hypothesize that individual faculty use active learning, but that this occurs at low levels institutionally. To answer our questions, we conduct classroom observations, faculty self-assessments, and student surveys to assess teaching in introductory biology, geology, chemistry, and physics classrooms. Preliminary findings show a positive relationship between faculty pedagogical training and the use of evidence-based teaching. We also see an absence of small group discussions, group work, student presentations or student predications. Many freshwater sciences courses emphasize scientific communication and understanding through the scientific method; however, undergraduates miss opportunities to build these skills if the skills are not practiced, encouraged, and facilitated during pre-requisite introductory classes.

Kathleen Lohse (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, klohse@isu.edu;


Rosemary Smith (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, smitrose@isu.edu ;


Ruth MacNeille (Primary Presenter/Author), Idaho State University, macnruth@isu.edu;


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09:30 - 09:45: / 150 G A WORKSHOP MODEL FOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH: DESIGN OF STATISTICS CURRICULUM SUPPORTS

5/20/2019  |   09:30 - 09:45   |  150 G

A WORKSHOP MODEL FOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH: DESIGN OF STATISTICS CURRICULUM SUPPORTS Undergraduate research projects require students to apply skills learned from coursework to real data. However, despite experience from statistics courses, students still struggle to complete an analysis appropriate to a research question. Challenges for students include (1) identifying the appropriate statistical test based on the research question and data characteristics, (2) the steps involved with working through an analysis, and (3) understanding how to read output from the analysis. In research courses serving a broad spectrum of undergraduate research projects, re-teaching a statistics course is impractical. Instead, a “workshop model” that serves separate statistics modules for subsets of students is powerful in efficiently getting students up to speed to complete a research project while still proving a robust framework for students to develop durable knowledge. Discipline-Based Education Research was used to define “statistical literacy” appropriate to senior undergraduates. Workshop materials were designed to build flowcharts to externalize the analysis process and reduce cognitive load (and anxiety), and included toolkits of reference materials along with a R-commander workshop activity with real-data examples. This model, especially visual flowchart elements, can be used for teaching concepts in aquatic ecology.

Patina Mendez (Primary Presenter/Author), University of California, Berkeley, patina.mendez@berkeley.edu;


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09:45 - 10:00: / 150 G A SEMESTER OF IMMERSION COURSES IN FIELD BIOLOGY EMPHASIZES EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION IN AQUATIC SCIENCE

5/20/2019  |   09:45 - 10:00   |  150 G

A SEMESTER OF IMMERSION COURSES IN FIELD BIOLOGY EMPHASIZES EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION IN AQUATIC SCIENCE Institutions of higher education are now tasked with teaching undergraduate science as it is performed by professionals – through inquiry, autonomy, collaboration and discovery. Undergraduate research experiences can accomplish these goals, but are limited by time and funding. Thus, we sought to create an instructional model that would: 1) promote a deep understanding of content areas for all students, 2) link ecological theory to scientific practices and 3) incorporate course-based undergraduate research. In 2011, the “Field Semester” became a requirement for all undergraduate Environmental and Field Biology majors. The Field Semester consists of five core courses taught in three-week instructional modules, allowing for complete immersion in each subject. For most courses, two weeks are spent at off-campus facilities (e.g. ONU Metzger Nature Center or Florida State Coastal and Marine Laboratory). Research projects embedded within core courses investigate various anthropogenic effects on aquatic communities. The conclusion of the semester culminates in a symposium with student podium and poster presentations. We will discuss advantages, challenges and potential future directions. Our goal here is to promote dialogue around immersive, experiential education and to further enhance student engagement, and understanding, of ecology and environmental issues.

Leslie Riley (Primary Presenter/Author), Ohio Northern University, l-riley.1@onu.edu;


Robert Verb (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Ohio Northern University, r-verb@onu.edu;


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10:00 - 10:15: / 150 G INNOVATIVE WAYS TO INCREASE DIVERSITY IN RECRUITMENT OF FRESHWATER SCIENTISTS

5/20/2019  |   10:00 - 10:15   |  150 G

INNOVATIVE WAYS TO INCREASE DIVERSITY IN RECRUITMENT OF FRESHWATER SCIENTISTS The aquatic sciences provide tools to prepare future scientists for continued conservation and management of these ecosystems. However, these disciplines lack the workforce and professional diversity needed to tackle these difficult challenges. This presentation will focus on opportunities and efforts geared towards broadening participation in the aquatic sciences with the goal of bridging the gap between the training phase (i.e., students) and the professional phase (i.e., workforce). We will provide an overview of demographics in several disciplines within the aquatic sciences and highlight specific programs that offer opportunities for students to attend aquatic sciences conferences where they can present undergraduate research, attend professional development workshops, and gain access to a large network of students and professionals. The goal of these programs is to provide participants with a network of mentors and professionals working in the aquatic sciences, as well as access to mechanisms for pursuing careers in various aquatic science disciplines. In this presentation we will also outline the many successes of these programs by highlighting the various career and educational pathways of previous participants.

Checo Colon-Gaud (Primary Presenter/Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;


Daniel McGarvey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Commonwealth University, djmcgarvey@vcu.edu;


Patina Mendez (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Berkeley, patina.mendez@berkeley.edu;


PJ Torres (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Queens University, torresp@queens.edu;


Nicholas Macias (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of California, Santa Cruz, niamacia@ucsc.edu;


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10:15 - 10:30: / 150 G I-NATURE: PILOTING A CULTURALLY INCLUSIVE APPROACH TO STEM EDUCATION FOR UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITY UNDERGRADUATES.

5/20/2019  |   10:15 - 10:30   |  150 G

I-NATURE: PILOTING A CULTURALLY INCLUSIVE APPROACH TO STEM EDUCATION FOR UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITY UNDERGRADUATES. American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students have the lowest college enrollment and graduation rates of any underrepresented minority population at mainstream U.S. colleges and universities, and are the least represented minority in the STEM fields. i-NATURE seeks to understand and address this enrollment deficit and prepare students for the future. The primary goal of i-NATURE is to develop and pilot a new, culturally-responsive, place-based model for Fisheries and Aquatic Science curriculum that can provide a seamless transition from high school to the STEM workforce for AI/AN. i-NATURE seeks to create this model for STEM education by establishing a strong collaboration between Heritage University, the Yakama Nation, and partnerships with tribes, agencies, and universities around the Pacific Northwest. The program is tailored to meet the needs of AI/AN and other URM students in a culturally responsive manner while simultaneously helping students acquire the skills and knowledge most critical for success in the STEM workforce and graduate school. The model aims to increase retention and learning outcomes in STEM fields and provide a strong foundation in data analysis and computing to prepare students for graduate school and the 21st century workforce.

Alexander Alexiades (Primary Presenter/Author), Heritage University, alexiades_a@heritage.edu;


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