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SFS Annual Meeting

Thursday, May 23, 2019
14:00 - 15:30

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14:00 - 14:15: / 150 G INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF FRESHWATER CONSERVATION PLANNING

5/23/2019  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  150 G

INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF FRESHWATER CONSERVATION PLANNING Systematic conservation planning is vital for allocating protected areas given the spatial distribution of conservation features, such as species. However, the challenge remains that the range-wide occurrence of a given species is often not known. Here, species distribution models (SDMs) are often used to predict species' habitat suitability across a study area. Using 85 fish species within the transboundary Danube catchment as target species, we first show that accounting for spatial autocorrelation in species data and SDMs can have drastic impacts on the delineation of protected areas, yielding a better model fit and more efficient conservation plans. Such results can then be further used for ecosystem-based management (EBM) that more efficiently and adaptively balances ecological and societal needs. We further illustrate a model-coupling that comprises the mapped fish distributions and ecosystem services in a multi-zone systematic conservation planning approach, emphasizing social equity given the gross domestic product (GDP) of a country to balance the share of specific management zones among countries. We show how such approaches can be useful to derive best-possible options for the spatial arrangement of protected areas and for EBM.

Sami Domisch (Primary Presenter/Author), Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, domisch@igb-berlin.de;


Martin Friedrichs (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, friedrichs@igb-berlin.de;


Thomas Hein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Institute of Hydrobiology and Aquatic Ecosystem Management (IHG), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Max Emanuel Strasse 17, 1180 Vienna, Austria, thomas.hein@boku.ac.at;


Florian Borgwardt (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, florian.borgwardt@boku.ac.at;


Annett Wetzig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, annett.wetzig@igb-berlin.de;


Karan Kakouei (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, kakouei@igb-berlin.de;


Javier Martinez-López (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Spanish National Research Council, CEBAS-CSIC, jmartinez@cebas.csic.es;


Kenneth Bagstad (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Geosciences & Environmental Change Science Center, kjbagstad@usgs.gov;


Ainhoa Magrach (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), BC3 — Basque Centre for Climate Change, ainhoa.magrach@bc3research.org;


Stefano Balbi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), BC3 — Basque Centre for Climate Change, stefano.balbi@bc3research.org;


Ferdinando Villa (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), BC3 — Basque Centre for Climate Change, ferdinando.villa@bc3research.org;


Andrea Funk (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, andrea.funk@boku.ac.at;


Virgilio Hermoso (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Centre Tecnologic Forestal de Catalunya, virgilio.hermoso@gmail.com;


Simone D. Langhans (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Otago and BC3 - Basque Centre for Climate Change, simone.langhans@otago.ac.nz;


Sonja C. Jähnig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, sonja.jaehnig@igb-berlin.de;


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14:15 - 14:30: / 150 G LONG-TERM ALGAE DYNAMICS THROUGH A LANDSAT LENS

5/23/2019  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  150 G

LONG-TERM ALGAE DYNAMICS THROUGH A LANDSAT LENS Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and nuisance algal blooms (NABs) are a worldwide phenomenon with implications for human health and safety. HABs occur when cyanobacteria grow in dense enough to produce toxins. Cyanobacterial biomass has increased worldwide in recent decades, raising concern about the future of fresh- and marine-water systems in a changing climate. Understanding the patterns of past algal blooms can provide useful insights for managing future blooms. Remote sensing can enhance our understanding of the spatiotemporal distribution of NABs. We used images from the USGS Landsat Collections available in the Google Earth Engine for cloud processing. We estimated chlorophyll-a using 299 images taken over 36 years and performed an emerging hot spot analysis in ArcGIS. Our analysis indicates that there has been an upward trend in chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentrations near the eastern shoreline of Utah Lake over the time span of this study, rendering it an enduring hot spot. The remainder of the lake is a cold spot, showing low mean chl-a concentrations over time. Further analysis will explore factors relating to the timing and intensity of blooms in individual growing seasons over the timespan of this study.

Mark Jackson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, mark_jackson@byu.edu;


Neil Hansen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, neil_hansen@gmail.com;


Carly Hansen (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Utah, carlyahansen@gmail.com;


Shanae Tate (Primary Presenter/Author), Brigham Young University, r.shanae.tate@gmail.com;


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14:30 - 14:45: / 150 G HUMAN DOMINATION OF THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE EXCLUDED FROM DEPICTIONS AND PERCEPTIONS

5/23/2019  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  150 G

HUMAN DOMINATION OF THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE EXCLUDED FROM DEPICTIONS AND PERCEPTIONS Human water use, climate change, and land conversion have created a water crisis for billions of individuals and many ecosystems worldwide. Global water stocks and fluxes are estimated empirically and with computer models, but this information is conveyed to policymakers and researchers by water cycle diagrams. Here, we compiled a new synthesis of the global water cycle, which we compared with 464 water cycle diagrams from around the world. Though human freshwater appropriation now equals half of global river discharge, only 15% of water cycle diagrams depicted human interaction with water. Only 2% of diagrams showed climate change or water pollution, two of the central causes of the global water crisis. 95% of diagrams depicted a single catchment, precluding representation of teleconnections such as ocean-land interactions and continental moisture recycling. These inaccuracies correspond with specific dimensions of water mismanagement, suggesting that flaws in water diagrams reflect and reinforce misunderstanding of global hydrology by policymakers, researchers, and the public. Correcting depictions of the water cycle will not solve the global water crisis, but reconceiving this symbol could support equitable water governance, sustainable development, and planetary thinking in the Anthropocene.

Benjamin Abbott (Primary Presenter/Author), Brigham Young University, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, benabbott@byu.edu;


Kevin Bishop (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Uppsala University, Kevin.Bishop@geo.uu.se;


Jay Zarnetske (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA, jpz@msu.edu;


Camille Minaudo (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), E.A. 6293 GeHCO, François Rabelais de Tours University, Tours, France, camille.minaudo@univ-tours.fr;


F. S. Chapin iii (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, fschapiniii@alaska.edu;


Stefan Krause (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, U.K. , S.Krause@bham.ac.uk;


David Hannah (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Birmingham, UK, D.M.HANNAH@bham.ac.uk;


Sarah Godsey (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Idaho State University, godsey@isu.edu;


Stephen Plont (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, plontste@vt.edu;


Rebecca Frei (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, beccafrei@gmail.com;


Tyler Hampton (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Waterloo, tylerbhampton@gmail.com;


Madeline Buhman (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, madeline.buhman@gmail.com;


Sayedeh Sayedi (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Brigham Young University, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, sarasayedi91@gmail.com ;


Gilles Pinay (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Irstea, France, gilles.pinay@irstea.fr;


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14:45 - 15:00: / 150 G MANAGING FOR RESILIENCE OF COLDWATER FISH HABITAT IN GLACIAL LAKES USING LAKE-SPECIFIC WATERSHED LAND USE THRESHOLDS

5/23/2019  |   14:45 - 15:00   |  150 G

MANAGING FOR RESILIENCE OF COLDWATER FISH HABITAT IN GLACIAL LAKES USING LAKE-SPECIFIC WATERSHED LAND USE THRESHOLDS Coldwater fish habitat in lakes is threatened by both climate change and eutrophication. We classified coldwater fish habitat as optimal (Tier 1), marginal (Tier 2), or unsuitable (Tier 3) for over 10,000 glacial lakes in an 4 state region, including 938 lakes in which coldwater cisco (Coregonus artedi) are present. We quantified lake-specific responses to changes in climate and land use to prioritize restoration and protection. Coldwater fish habitat depends on lake morphometry, summer air temperatures, and watershed land use. Under contemporary conditions, we identified 333 Tier 1 lakes. Of these, 8% were predicted to remain Tier 1 across all levels of watershed development and up to 15°C temperature increases; these lakes can serve as climate refugia. Managing watershed forest cover affected resilience of a number of lakes. For example, 65% of Tier 1 lakes are at risk of becoming Tier 2 under mid-century climate predictions, although 15% of those could remain Tier 1 if watershed forest cover was increased. By quantifying the resilience of cisco lakes and how it is influenced by local action across a multi-state region, we can prioritize conservation action to maintain coldwater fish habitat.

Gretchen Hansen (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Minnesota, ghansen@umn.edu;


Peter Jacobson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources - Fisheries, peter.jacobson@state.mn.us;


Kevin Wehrly (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Michigan Department of Natural Resources, wehrlyk@michigan.gov;


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15:00 - 15:15: / 150 G CHALLENGES IN FRESHWATER BIODIVERSITY: JOINING FORCES TO FACILITATE MONITORING, DATA COMPILATION AND PUBLISHING

5/23/2019  |   15:00 - 15:15   |  150 G

CHALLENGES IN FRESHWATER BIODIVERSITY: JOINING FORCES TO FACILITATE MONITORING, DATA COMPILATION AND PUBLISHING Species distribution data are crucial for understanding biodiversity dynamics and the underlying drivers. This is especially the case for freshwaters, which are among the most endangered ecosystems globally. However, a huge body of data gathered by scientists and water managers is currently difficult to access: systematic data publishing practices have not been fully adopted yet and data embedded in scientific papers and research project websites are often challenging to extract. At the same time, data and knowledge generated through publically-funded research or monitoring programmes are considered a common good. The Freshwater Information Platform (FIP) aims at pooling freshwater related research information from multiple projects and initiatives to make it easily accessible for scientists, water managers, conservationists and the interested public. FIP consists of several major components, three of which form its “data publication unit”. These are presented here as tool to streamline open access freshwater data publication, arguing it will improve the capacity to protect and manage freshwater biodiversity in the face of global change. We further present linkages to and cooperation with other key initiatives in the field, namely the Alliance for Freshwater Life as well as Freshwater BON.

Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber (Primary Presenter/Author), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, BOKU Vienna, Austria, ask@boku.ac.at;


Aaike De Wever (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), INBO Belgium, aaike.dewever@gmail.com;


Vanessa Bremerich (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany, bremerich@igb-berlin.de;


Joerg Strackbein (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), UDE Essen, Germany, joerg.strackbein@uni-due.de;


Daniel Hering (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Faculty of Biology Aquatic Ecology Universitätsstrasse 5 D-45141 Essen Germany, daniel.hering@uni-due.de;


Sonja Jähnig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany, sonja.jaehnig@igb-berlin.de;


Koen Martens (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), RBINS Brussels, Belgium, darwinula@gmail.com;


Klement Tockner (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany & Institute of Biology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany & Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Vienna, Austria, klement.tockner@fwf.ac.at;


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15:15 - 15:30: / 150 G LANDSCAPE-SCALE HYDROSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF FLOODPLAIN INUNDATION FOR ECOLOGICAL AND MANAGEMENT APPLICATIONS: A CASE STUDY OF THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER SYSTEM

5/23/2019  |   15:15 - 15:30   |  150 G

LANDSCAPE-SCALE HYDROSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF FLOODPLAIN INUNDATION FOR ECOLOGICAL AND MANAGEMENT APPLICATIONS: A CASE STUDY OF THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER SYSTEM Inundation is a dominant physical process that drives the form and function of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplains. Despite its importance, inundation patterns have not been systemically characterized in spatially-explicit ways that would advance understanding of ecological processes or inform management actions in the UMRS. We developed a geospatial model of floodplain inundation using topo-bathymetric terrains and 40 years of daily water surface elevations. We applied the model across 2.8 million acres of the UMRS and summarized long-term patterns of surface water dynamics in terrestrial areas including inundation frequency, duration, depth, and timing. We found that distributions of these flooding attributes varied within and among multiple levels of river organization, including navigational pools and geomorphic reaches. Non-linear relationships among inundation attributes and their geospatial distributions likely reflect complex interactions among topographic, hydrologic, and anthropogenic constraints on flooding dynamics. We discuss current and future applications of the inundation model to advance process-based knowledge of ecological phenomena and to inform management decisions in the UMRS floodplain.

Molly Van Appledorn (Primary Presenter/Author), U.S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, mvanappledorn@usgs.gov;


Nathan De Jager (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, 2630 Fanta Reed Road, La Crosse, WI 54603, ndejager@usgs.gov;


Jason Rohweder (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, jrohweder@usgs.gov;


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