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SFS Annual Meeting

Wednesday, June 5, 2024
10:30 - 12:00

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C26 Invasive Species

10:30 - 10:45 | Freedom Ballroom E | RIPPLE EFFECT: WATER QUALITY AS A DRIVER OF INVASION SUCCESS

6/05/2024  |   10:30 - 10:45   |  Freedom Ballroom E

RIPPLE EFFECT: WATER QUALITY AS A DRIVER OF INVASION SUCCESS Invasive species management is plagued by difficulties surrounding intervention after establishment. As such, forecasting methods that predict invasion success are critical tools for invasion control. Key advances have come from understanding the characteristics of an organism likely to be a successful invader. However, less attention has been given to the environmental context in the invaded system. We suggest that a detailed understanding of the role of water quality in determining invasion success is a key knowledge gap limiting the efficacy of existing forecasting techniques in aquatic systems. With the goal of providing a synthesis of these relationships, we conducted a systematic search of primary literature using a set of search terms related to (1) invasive species, and (2) water quality. We produced a list of 8,644 papers of which approximately 40% were retained as relevant. Using a combination of Latent Dirichlet Allocation and manual topic evaluation, we summarized themes and identified water quality parameters that are known to impact invasion outcomes for particular species and the direction of those relationships. The majority of data was derived from lake systems with dreissenid mussels and fish being the most commonly studied taxa. Common parameters that increased vulnerability to invasion were increasing temperatures, nutrient concentrations, and salinity. We provide an up-to-date synthesis on the role of water quality in facilitation or hindrance of aquatic invasions and identify key systems and taxa that illustrate these relationships. Our work additionally highlights the potential applications of water quality data for guiding management and invasive species mitigation.

Corey Krabbenhoft (Primary Presenter/Author), University at Buffalo, ckrabben@buffalo.edu;

Grace Cavuoti (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, gracecav@buffalo.edu;

Sarah Chang (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, sluchang@buffalo.edu;

Catherine Clark (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, cbclark2@buffalo.edu;

Jonah Fronk (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, jonahfro@buffalo.edu;

Susanna Keilig (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, skeilig@buffalo.edu;

Matthew Scott (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, mjscott3@buffalo.edu;

Max Striedl (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University at Buffalo, maxstrie@buffalo.edu;

10:45 - 11:00 | Freedom Ballroom E | RAPID ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES IN WETLANDS OF LAO PDR

6/05/2024  |   10:45 - 11:00   |  Freedom Ballroom E

Rapid Assessment of Invasive Alien Species in Wetlands of Lao PDR Rapid Assessment of Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in Wetlands of Lao PDR, to assess status of four key invasive alien species: Giant mimosa (Mimosa pigra), Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), Golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata), Suckermouth catfish (Hypostomus plecostomus) at three wetland sites (provinces): BKN in Champasack, XCP in Savannakhet and NN in Borlikhamxay. Field surveys and interviews of key informants from communities. All invasive species are commonly found in wetlands, streams, riverbanks, ponds and rice fields. People explains floods brought and distributed IAS. Only Suckermounth catfish is not significant from study. Mimosa invasion is the most people concerned. It is fast growing and hard to control, no benefits and dangerous to human and animals. Water hyacinth is highest concerns in XCP, impacts on water flow, causing thicker sludges along wetland edges, riverbanks and oxbows. People are having difficulties in fishing and boat travelling where giant mimosa and water hyacinth are invading. After golden apple snail is present, farmer notice variety of aquatic resources is getting loss, it eats and destroy rice plants. However, many families earn income by collect apple snails for sell, especially poor family. No special management plan from local government nor development projects on IAS eradication. Some attempts done by communities to control IAS such as cutting, ploughing, and burning mimosa. Some collected water hyacinth by hand, dry on ground then burn. For apple snails, farmers collect from paddy fields smash and let them dry on the ground.

Somvilay Chanthalounnavong (Primary Presenter/Author), faculty of Forest science, National University of Laos, somvilay4@gmail.com;

11:00 - 11:15 | Freedom Ballroom E | INTERACTIONS BETWEEN INVASIVE SPECIES AND EXCESS SEDIMENT LOADING IN RIVERS REVEAL COMPLEX ROLES OF ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS UNDER GLOBAL CHANGE

6/05/2024  |   11:00 - 11:15   |  Freedom Ballroom E

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN INVASIVE SPECIES AND EXCESS SEDIMENT LOADING IN RIVERS REVEAL COMPLEX ROLES OF ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS UNDER GLOBAL CHANGE Freshwater ecosystems often face co-occurring threats. Yet, the combined role of multiple stressors such as invasive species and increased sediment loading is not well-understood. We investigated how invasive ecosystem engineers affect fluvial sediment transport and primary production in channels also impaired by heavy sand loading. We conducted a flume experiment with a pebble framework bed that was immobile under the imposed hydraulic conditions and had two treatments: crayfish presence (yes vs. no) and riverbed condition (no sand, open framework pores vs. sedimented, clogged framework pores). We documented pebble movement downstream, sand movement downstream and ingress into the bed, and biofilm growth. We found that pebbles moved exclusively in crayfish treatments compared to no-crayfish controls. Crayfish moved, on average, 280 pebbles or 320 g/day. The greatest downstream sand movement occurred if crayfish were present and the framework was clogged. Although we hypothesized that sand would move primarily in the downstream direction, crayfish readily enhanced ingress of sand into the bed, especially in open framework treatments. Tiles pre-colonized by stream biofilms and initially covered by sand were exposed to crayfish or no-crayfish treatments and then moved to tanks under grow lights for two weeks. We found that tiles from crayfish treatments supported more biofilm growth than those with no crayfish because they had uncovered the biofilms while foraging and mobilizing sand. These findings reveal the complexities of understanding ecosystem engineers in rivers disturbed by multiple stressors and highlight important interactions between invasive species and fine sediment pollution for regulating ecosystem function.

Lindsey Albertson (Primary Presenter/Author), Montana State University , lindsey.albertson@montana.edu;

Kate Mathers (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loughborough University, k.mathers@lboro.ac.uk;

Paul Wood (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Loughborough University, UK, p.j.wood@lboro.ac.uk;

Matthew Johnson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Nottingham, m.johnson@nottingham.ac.uk;

Catherine Sanders (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Lincoln, csanders@lincoln.ac.uk;

Stephen Rice (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Manchester Metropolitan University, s.rice@lboro.ac.uk;

11:15 - 11:30 | Freedom Ballroom E | HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW: THE EFFECTS OF AN INVADING HOST ON A COMMUNITY OF NATIVE SYMBIONTS

6/05/2024  |   11:15 - 11:30   |  Freedom Ballroom E

HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW: THE EFFECTS OF AN INVADING HOST ON A COMMUNITY OF NATIVE SYMBIONTS Biological invasions are a major threat to native species. Invaders can cause reductions in native species via interactions such as competition, predation, herbivory and spread of disease. However, invading host species may also affect the abundance and diversity of symbionts living on native hosts. Faxonius cristavarius, an invasive crayfish, is now established in the North and South Forks of the New River in northwestern, North Carolina and its range now overlaps with those of three native crayfish in the genus Cambarus. Cambarus crayfish in the New River may host up to seven species of annelid worm known as branchiobdellidans. Faxonius cristavarius is a noncompetent host of branchiobdellidans and removes them quickly when they colonize. We conducted a crayfish survey in the New River to determine the diversity and abundance of branchiobdellidans on Cambarus spp. across a gradient of F. cristavarius relative abundance. There were significant, negative relationships between the relative abundance of F. cristavarius and worm numbers and richness. Significant reductions were also observed in several worm taxa. In a lab experiment, we found that the presence of F. cristavarius in aquaria significantly reduced worm number on Cambarus robustus compared to a C. robustus occupying aquaria with a conspecific. The decline in worm abundance and diversity appears to be a hidden, effect of invasions and it is likely that many other native symbionts are also declining as a result of invasions.

Robert Creed (Primary Presenter/Author), Appalachian State Universtiy, creedrp@appstate.edu;

Mary Massie (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State University, massiemc@outlook.com;

Bryan Brown (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, stonefly@vt.edu;

11:30 - 11:45 | Freedom Ballroom E | NATIVE SYMBIONTS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH NATIVE AND INVASIVE HOSTS

6/05/2024  |   11:30 - 11:45   |  Freedom Ballroom E

Native symbionts and their relationships with native and invasive hosts Symbiosis is integral to the life history of most multicellular organisms. Symbiosis can affect growth rates, alter host mortality, and even affect immune-suppressant properties. However, the relationship between hosts and their symbionts is not clear cut. Multiple factors can disrupt the interactions between hosts and symbionts. The potentially disruptive effects of invasive species on native host-symbiont relationships is an emerging global change threat. Invasive species compete with natives for essential resources such as food and habitat. Another resource invaders may affect are native symbionts. This effect can be seen with the introduction of invasive crayfish to the Virginia Mountain Lake Region where invaders are disrupting the native hosts’ relationships with symbionts, and even forming relationships of their own. In our studies we examined the prolonged effects of native symbionts (branchiobdellidan worms) on invasive and native crayfish hosts. In aquarium experiments, we placed native symbionts on the carapaces of 2 invasive species, Faxonius cristavarius and Faxonius virilis, and one native species Cambarus appalachiensis. To limit the ability of invasive hosts to control symbiont abundance through grooming activity, ½ of each host species were subjected to dactyl ablation on the walking legs and compared to an unmanipulated control. Our results show Faxonius cristavarius’ growth rates decreased when having native symbionts and dactyl ablations, while native hosts’s growth rates increased under the same treatments. Our results suggest that optimal conditions for mutualistic relationships differ between species. Invasive hosts can alter native symbiont and host populations depending on their relationship with native symbionts.

Cameron Lockett (Primary Presenter/Author), Virginia Tech, clockett25@vt.edu;

Cameron Braswell (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, camman@vt.edu;

Robert Creed (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Appalachian State Universtiy, creedrp@appstate.edu;

Bryan Brown (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Virginia Tech, stonefly@vt.edu;

11:45 - 12:00 | Freedom Ballroom E | INVASION DYNAMICS OF CHERAX QUADRICARINATUS IN PUERTO RICAN RESERVOIRS: INSIGHTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL DNA AND TRAP SAMPLING

6/05/2024  |   11:45 - 12:00   |  Freedom Ballroom E

INVASION DYNAMICS OF CHERAX QUADRICARINATUS IN PUERTO RICAN RESERVOIRS: INSIGHTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL DNA AND TRAP SAMPLING Freshwater ecosystems in Puerto Rico face the ongoing invasion and spread of the Australian red-claw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus), with potential ramifications for native biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Building upon previous research, we investigated the detection patterns of C. quadricarinatus within reservoirs, particularly examining the role of biotic resistance exerted by native shrimp populations. Our eDNA dataset shows that C. quadricarinatus is detected primarily in reservoirs where native shrimp assemblages have been completely extirpated, suggesting exploitation of vacant ecological niches. Intensive eDNA and trap sampling across two adjacent reservoirs in Spring 2024, one with shrimp present and the other with shrimp absent, will test this hypothesis. Through the integration of community composition and environmental datasets, we aim to further understand the intricate connections among human-mediated introductions, biotic interactions, and habitat suitability. Our findings hold implications for invasive species management and highlight the urgency of comprehensive monitoring and mitigation strategies in Puerto Rican freshwater ecosystems.

PJ Torres (Primary Presenter/Author), College of the Holy Cross, ptorres@holycross.edu;

Courtney Larson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), US Environmental Protection Agency, Larson.Courtney@epa.gov;

Nicholas Macias (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), University of Georgia, nicholas.macias@uga.edu;

Julia Paxson (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), College of the Holy Cross, jpaxson@holycross.edu;

Checo Colon-Gaud (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), Georgia Southern University, jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu;