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SFS Annual Meeting

Wednesday, June 5, 2024
13:30 - 15:00

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C36 Water Resource Management

13:30 - 13:45 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS TO FISH POPULATIONS IN IMPOUNDED AND UNIMPOUNDED STREAMS

6/05/2024  |   13:30 - 13:45   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS TO FISH POPULATIONS IN IMPOUNDED AND UNIMPOUNDED STREAMS Over half of the world’s rivers have seen changes in the magnitude and timing of flows due to water regulation and increased water usage, affecting the diversity and abundance of stream organisms. I related stream channel characteristics, discharge, substrate, and water quality to the structure of fish assemblages in impounded and unimpounded streams. Fish were sampled and physiochemical variables were measured at 6–10 sites in each of five streams (3 impounded, 2 unimpounded) during spring and fall 2015–2017. Fish species assemblages differed between  up-and downstream sites in the impounded but not unimpounded streams, and the differences were best explained by differences in habitat complexity (i.e., stream vegetation, woody debris), as well as temperature, discharge, and flow variations, which were all higher in unimpounded than impounded streams. With over 20,000 large impoundments in the southeastern USA, impoundments may fish species in thousands of stream kilometers, possibly altering stream systems by interfering with the numerous ecosystem services that fishes provide. 

Zanethia Barnett (Primary Presenter/Author), USDA Forest Service, zanethia.c.barnett@usda.gov;

Susan Adams (Co-Presenter/Co-Author), USDA Forest Service, Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research, Southern Research Station, Susan.adams@usda.gov;

13:45 - 14:00 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | RESEARCH THE UTILIZATION OF IRRIGATION SYSTEM INTO INTEGRATED FRAMING AT NAXAITHONG DISTRICT, VIENTIANE CAPITAL CITY

6/05/2024  |   13:45 - 14:00   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

Research the utilization of irrigation system into integrated framing at Naxaithong district, Vientiane Capital City Abstract The development of a fish farming system that uses modern techniques to increase fish production is still very much needed in Laos as well as in the countries downstream of the Mekong River to guarantee food from production to consumers; Water management in the irrigation supply area must use new techniques that are used in fish farming and reduce production costs. Therefore, this research study is not only a report to be published in the journal on the results of the efficient and effective use of water resources in the irrigated, also a summary of the progress of the research conducted in the strategy of reducing the effects of climate change, adaptation, and resilience in agricultural production in Vientiane Plain on sustainable use of water resources to study implementation of strategies and policies into the integrated fish farming system to increase productivity as well as guarantee. In terms of food and income generation for farmer families, empowering producers, reducing the cost of production at the farm level, to mediate and solve the effects of changes in the environment, and weather that affect the production of fish. This research has gathered technical and scientific data from many relevant fields both domestically and abroad, especially in the LMB countries. This research will be a supporting reference for stakeholder, researchers, farmers, strategy, and policy makers for the development of aquaculture, energy, processing industry, and socio-economic development safely and sustainably. Keywords: Aquaculture, livestock, integrated farm, environment, socio- economic, climate change, adaptation, and resilience.

kommaly onxaivieng (Primary Presenter/Author), Department of Livestock and Fisheries, kommaly_2016@yahoo.com;

14:00 - 14:15 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | POLITICAL ECONOMY AND LIVELIHOODS OF LOWER SESAN 2 DAM AS LESSON LEANT

6/05/2024  |   14:00 - 14:15   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

Political economy and livelihoods of Lower Sesan 2 dam as lesson leant Hydropower dam development has been an ongoing controversial issue ever since in a lot of countries, including Cambodia. With most of implemented and proposed plans are on the Mekong mainstream, the river is not likely to remain the same, not to mention a lot of dams have already been built upstream in China, Thailand and Laos. Recent government decision to postpone the dam development on the mainstream until 2030 has been applauded by NGOs, development partners, as well as research scientists showing how critical biodiversity is to the country. The delay is simply buying more time for natural resources, ecosystem of the river, and people living along the river to be safe for another 10 years or so; and researchers to produce more evident-based recommendations. Hydropower dam no doubt provides substantial immediate benefits to the country in terms of economic growth, electricity generation and employment. But in turn it has a wide range of negative impacts toward both natural resources in the river and people around. It is crucial to understand the how government weighting these two aspects for the nation’s prosperity. The paper will discuss political economy and livelihoods of the Lower Sesan 2 Dam to address knowledge gaps as lesson learnt from such enormous project.

samadee saray (Primary Presenter/Author), Wonders of the Mekong Project, saraysamadee@gmail.com;

14:15 - 14:30 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | WEAVING TOGETHER SOCIAL AND ECOLOGICAL NETWORKS FOR E-FLOWS MANAGEMENT

6/05/2024  |   14:15 - 14:30   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

Weaving together social and ecological networks for e-flows management As the scope and scale of freshwater management challenges increases, we are challenged to consider rivers as social-ecological systems. The Australian Commonwealth Flow-MER program is one component of monitoring and evaluation of a $16 billion investment in water reform for the 1 million km2 Murray-Darling Basin. The temporal scales involved in large scale ecosystem restoration and mitigating climate change impacts requires resilient and persistent policy settings at large scale. Resilient policy needs to engage effectively with all stakeholders, and this need is particularly acute with Indigenous groups who have traditionally been excluded. Based on 10 years of experience in Flow-MER and preceding programs, I will describe a social-ecological network which begins to represent the full scope of the engagement challenges for the Murray Darling Basin. Using data from several case studies that network will be decomposed into sub-networks which provide a tractable way to manage environmental water in highly complex social-ecological systems.

Ross M. Thompson (Primary Presenter/Author), Centre for Applied Water Science, University of Canberra, ross.thompson@canberra.edu.au;

14:30 - 14:45 | Freedom Ballroom H/G | HYDRAULIC IMPACT ON FISH MIGRATION IN A SARIAKANDHI FISH PASS OF BANGLADESH.

6/05/2024  |   14:30 - 14:45   |  Freedom Ballroom H/G

HYDRAULIC IMPACT ON FISH MIGRATION IN A SARIAKANDHI FISH PASS OF BANGLADESH. The importance of open water fish in our socio-economic regime has recently drawn the attention of the policy makers of the country. FCD/FCDI projects mainly serve the agricultural interests, but it interfere fish migration. This inevitably affects the open water fisheries sector as migratory routes. Nursing grounds of many species of fish are hampered and disturbed for these projects also. In order to permit fish migration in rivers, it is necessary to maintain conditions that help migrants reach their spawning grounds. To overcome obstacles, such as hydraulic structures, placed in the path of migrating fish, structures must be designed to assist the fish to pass them. The periodic and directed travel of fish mainly for feeding, breeding and over coming adverse climatic conditions is called migration. Fish passes are constructed to allow normal breeding migration and to ensure natural route of fish movement. Fish fry and hatching movement from Jamuna to Bangali river was the main objective of Sariakandi fish pass project. The study also found that there were seven major category migratory species in the project area and the fish pass is contributing positively for growth of fishery resources in then study area. During the monsoon carp fish is the dominating migratory species. Carpfish migrates in a higher velocity, whereas, catfish migrates in a lower velocity. Some problems were found in the operation and management of fish pass.

Bijoy Kumar Ghosh (Primary Presenter/Author), BUET, DHAKA Bangladesh, bkghoshbuet7@gmail.com;